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April 12, 2019

  HANSARD19-45

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/legislative-business/hansard-debates/



Second Session

FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2019

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE
 

SPEAKER'S RULING:
Alleging One Member Is Insinuating Another Member Is Lying
(Pt. of order by the Off. Opp. House Ldr
[Hansard p.2792, 3 April 2019]
3319
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS
Gov't (N.S.): Clear-cutting on Crown Land - Desist,
3320
TIR: Ripley Rd., Truemanville - Repave,
3320
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1151, Laffin, Mike: Retirement - Best Wishes,
The Premier
3321
Vote - Affirmative
3321
Res. 1152, N.S. Athletes: Special Olympics Worlds - Congrats,
The Premier
3322
Vote - Affirmative
3322
Res. 1153, Clair, Ozzy/Clair, Nico: Deaths of - Tribute,
3322
Vote - Affirmative
3323
Res. 1154, We'koqma'q Aquaculture: Certification & Expansion - Congrats.,
3324
Vote - Affirmative
3324
Res. 1155, Intl. Students: Grad. Entrepreneur Stream -Welcome,
3325
Vote - Affirmative
3326
Res. 1156, MacLennan, David: Male Masters Athl. of the Yr. - Congrats.,
3326
Vote - Affirmative
3326
Res. 1157, Congratulatory Motions - Approve,
3327
Vote - Affirmative
3327
Res. 1158, Ntl. Telecomms. Wk.: 911 Call Takers - Recog.,
3327
Vote - Affirmative
3328
Res. 1159, HRM: French Online Guide halifax.ca/fr - Congrats.,
3328
Vote - Affirmative
3329
Res. 1160, Megan, Cassidy - Founder: Purple Day - Recog.,
3329
Vote - Affirmative
3330
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 149, Time of Remembrance Act,
3330
No. 150, Workers' Compensation Act,
3331
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1161, Remembrance Day Observation - Extension Proposed,
3331
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS
EPABA: 2nd Ann. Bus. Expo. - Thanks,
3332
Matheson, Bailey: Death of - Tribute,
3332
Sharpe, Evan: Male Athl. of the Yr., Special Olympics - Congrats.,
3333
Publicover, Lloyd: Volun. of the Yr. - Congrats.,
3333
Coleman, Abby: The Science of Clean Water - Congrats.,
3334

»  
Moore, Dylan/Davies, Nate: Dartmouth North Clothing - Congrats.,
3334
Rockingstone Hts. Staff: Support in the Barho Tragedy - Thanks,
3335
Turple, Jeff: Volun. of the Yr. - Congrats.,
3335
Constituency Staff: Hardworking & Steadfast - Thanks,
3336
Waterbury, David: Lions 70-Yr. Pin - Congrats.,
3336
deCoste Ctr.: Marketing Award - Congrats.,
3336
North Dartmouth Echo: 15th Anniv. - Congrats.,
3337
Scholastic Chess Assoc.: Engaging Youth - Applaud,
3338
Bates, Elizabeth: Death of - Tribute,
3338
Barrelling Tide Distillery - Medallists: Cdn. Artisan Spirits - Congrats.,
Keith Irving
3339
Strait Pirates: Hockey Championship Finals - Best Wishes,
3339
Trethewey, Ethan: Children's Wish Fulfilled - Recog.,
3340
DesChamp, Ronald: Retirement - Congrats.,
3340
Beck, Robert: Death of - Tribute,
3341
Rhindress, Terry - Head Coach: Mt. Allison Mounties - Best Wishes,
3341
Arsenault, Caroline: École Mer et Monde - Thanks,
3342
Titans Bantam C: Wayne Waugh Mem. Hockey Tourn. Champs - Congrats.,
3342
Okafor, Toochukwu - Pastor: Youth Engagement,
St. Thos. More Catholic Church - Thanks, T. Halman »
3343
d'Entremont, Christopher - MLA: N.S. Polit. Career - Best Wishes,
3343
Battle of Vimy Ridge: 102nd Anniv. - Tribute,
3344
Sissiboo Landing: Festival of Trees Fundraiser - Congrats.,
3344
Wadden, Jean: Valued Constituency Assist. - Thanks,
3345

« »  
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS:
No. 643, H&W: Cobequid Com. Health Ctr. - Expansion Plans,
3345
No. 644, Gov't. (N.S.): Long-Term Care - New Construction,
3348
No. 645, Gov't. (N.S.): Nominee Prog. - Low Quota,
3350
No. 646, Bus. - Devco Workers: WCB Extension - Action,
3351
No. 647, Gov't. (N.S.) - MLA for Yar.: Allegations - Action,
3353
No. 648, H&W: Com. Health Ctr. Model - Min. Awareness,
3354
No. 649, Justice - Home Deaths: Coroner's Off. - Dept. Policy,
3355
No. 650, Com. Serv.: Child/Youth Advocate Off. - Funding,
3356
No. 651, TIR - Dominion St. Bypass: Traffic Lights - Confirm,
3357
No. 652, H&W - Incorrect Health Records: Tracking - Comment,
3358
No. 653, Com. Serv.: High C.B. Poverty Rates - Unacceptable,
3360
No. 654, H&W - Buchanan Hospital: Med. Lab Position - Status,
3361
No. 655, Immigr.: Retention of Immigrants - Strategies,
3362
No. 656, H&W - Dal Univ. Grads: Return of Serv. Agreement - Confirm,
3363
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CW ON SUPPLY AT 11:03 P.M
3365
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 3:12 P.M
3365
REPORT OF CW ON SUPPLY [Rule 62G(1)]:
Motion to Concur
Vote - Affirmative
3367
[INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:]
No. 151, Appropriations Act, 2019
3367
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 151, Appropriations Act, 2019
3367
Vote - Affirmative
3368
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 151, Appropriations Act, 2019
3368
Vote - Affirmative
3370
PRIVATE & LOCAL BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 122, An Act to incorporate the Pine Grove Cemetery Company,
Lower Stewiacke, Colchester County
3370
Vote - Affirmative
3370
[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:]
No. 133, Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act
The Premier
3371
3371
3372
3374
3375
3376
3378
3379
The Premier
3381
Vote - Affirmative
3384
No. 136, Financial Measures (2019) Act
3384
3384
3385
3387
3388
3394
3396
3399
Vote - Affirmative
3401
[GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:]
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
3401
3407
HOUSE RECESSED AT 7:12 P.M
3410
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 7:28 P.M
3410
ARRIVAL OF THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR
3410
BILLS GIVEN ROYAL ASSENT:
Nos. 84, 90, 91, 92, 95, 97, 99, 101, 103, 105, 106, 109, 112
3411
119, 121, 122, 133, 135
3411
136, 139, 140, 151
3412
ADJOURNMENT, « » HOUSE ROSE TO MEET AGAIN AT THE CALL OF THE SPEAKER » : « »
3415
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 1162, Cameron, Pearl: Terry Fox Top Fundraiser - Thanks,
3416
Res. 1163, Treen, Paige: Enjoying Com. Support - Recog.,
3416
Res. 1164, Doucet, Troy: Beneficiary of Life-saving Action - Recog.,
3417
Res. 1165, Shumilacke Food Bank: Donor Support - Recog.,
3417
Res. 1166, Slack, Stan: Snowmobiling Assoc. of N.S. - Thanks,
3418
Res. 1167, Delorey, Sarah: E. Hants Sport Award - Congrats.,
3418
Res. 1168, LilyPond Vintage: Com. & Bus. Venture - Congrats.,
3419
Res. 1169, Ashley, Brandon: Ultimate Garage Giveaway - Congrats.,
3419
Res. 1170, E. Hants Penguins PeeWee AAA Hockey: Com. Serv. - Thanks,
3420
Res. 1171, Penny, David: Dedication to Coaching - Recog.,
3420
Res. 1172, S. Shore Reg. Hosp. Aux.: Com. Fundraising - Thanks,
3421
Res. 1173, Fundy Geological Museum: 25th Anniv. - Congrats.,
3421
Res. 1174, Carter-Rose, Anita: Mental Health Advocate - Thanks,
3422
Res. 1175, Power, Brandon: Canada U-18 Rugby Team - Congrats.,
3422
Res. 1176, Hashimoto, Barb: Com. Serv. - Thanks,
3423
Res. 1177, Medallists: U16 Mixed Curling Champs - Congrats.,
3423
Res. 1178, Gilbert, Edith: 100th Birthday - Best Wishes,
3424
Res. 1179, Genge, Rollie - Physician: Dedication to Com. Health - Thanks,
3424
Res. 1180, Age of Sail Museum: 25th Anniv. - Congrats.,
3425
Res. 1181, Ripley, Tim: 25 Yrs. of Serv. to Amherst Arena - Thanks,
3425
Res. 1182, Prod., Something's in the Air: Everyone Has Dreams - Congrats.,
3426
Res. 1183, Rafuse, Cole: Titans, MasterCard Memorial Cup - Congrats.,
3426
Res. 1184, Meier, Django Valentino: Pan Am Games, Taekwondo - Best Wishes,
3427
Res. 1185, Martin, Karen: Survivors of Abuse Recovering - Congrats.,
3427
Res. 1186, Special Olympics Bowling Team: 2019 Winter Games - Congrats.,
3428
Res. 1187, LumberYard Axe Throwing: Best Entertainment Award - Congrats.,
3429
Res. 1188, Athls., Team N.S.: 2019 Can. Winter Games - Congrats.,
3429
Res. 1189, Wolverines - Hosts: NSSAF 2018-19 Div. 2 Hockey - Congrats.,
3430
Res. 1190, Stn. Six Fire Midget AAA Female Hockey: Esso Cup - Best Wishes,
3430
Res. 1191, Saulnier, Sandra: Book, Lost in Grey - Congrats.,
3431
Res. 1192, J&W Murphy Fdn. - Donor: QEII Fdn. - Commend,
3431
Res. 1193, Brooks, Eliza: 100th Birthday - Best Wishes,
3432
Res. 1194, Lake Echo Lioness Club: 40th Anniv. - Congrats.,
3432
Res. 1195, Smith, Micah: Oncology Massage Therapy - Congrats.,
3433
Res. 1196, Laffin, Michael: Retirement - Congrats.,
3433
Res. 1197, St. Luke's United Church - Host: Rainbows Canada - Congrats.,
3434
Res. 1198, Publicover, Lloyd: Volun. of the Yr. - Congrats.,
3434
Res. 1199, Village Emporium: Best Artisanal Retailer - Congrats.,
3435
Res. 1200, SMB Com. Enterprise Ctr.: Creating a Vibrant Com. - Congrats.,
3435
Res. 1201, Brown, Natalie: Sesquicentennial Award - Congrats.,
3436
Res. 1202, Whitfield, Kyly - Ph.D.: $1M Grant, Gates Fdn. - Congrats.,
3436
Res. 1203, Freshmart: Loblaws Awards - Best Wishes,
3437
Res. 1204, Bayit Prop. Grp.: Mill Cove Stn. Commem. Plaque - Congrats.,
3437
Res. 1205, van Gurp, Hendrika: Extraordinary Soc. Work - Congrats.,
3438
Res. 1206, New Ross Trails Soc.: Creating a Network - Congrats.,
3438
Res. 1207, SMB Food Bank/Thrift Store: Com. Serv. - Congrats.,
3439
Res. 1208, LeBlanc, Sue: Healthy Eating in Schools - Congrats.,
3439
Res. 1209, Transition Bay: Edible Landscaping - Congrats.,
3440

 

 

[Page 3319]

HALIFAX, FRIDAY, APRIL 12, 2019

Sixty-third General Assembly

Second Session

9:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Suzanne Lohnes-Croft, Brendan Maguire

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Before we begin the daily routine, I want to present the Speaker's Ruling from the point of order that was brought up last week.

SPEAKER'S RULING:

On April 3rd, following Question Period, the honourable Official Opposition House Leader rose on a point of order respecting a statement by the honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education that the honourable member for Northside-Westmount had insinuated he was lying.

An allegation that another member has lied is unparliamentary and is never acceptable in this House.

That night, I requested the advance extract from Hansard to review what was said in the exchange, and the member had laid out several different lines of reasoning that had been advanced with respect to occasions on which additional funding had been granted to universities and had asked for forgiveness as "he struggled to believe" the most recent one given by the minister, in his words, "this time." He did not say that the member had lied although he did imply that the minister was not being accurate.

There have been a number of occasions in this House recently in which members have jumped to conclusions and have made statements in this Chamber. I personally believe each of us has to own our own words when we misspeak.

[Page 3320]

There's a fundamental principle in the Westminster parliamentary system that members are not to say something indirectly that they are not permitted to say directly.

In his reply the honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education did utter the word "lie," and therefore I will ask him to withdraw the term.

The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I retract the word "lie" from my statement earlier. Thank you.

THE SPEAKER « » : Thank you very much; that brings the matter to a conclusion.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

HUGH MACKAY « » : Mr. Speaker, by your leave I table a petition presented to me by members of the public at large. The operative clause reads as follows:

". . . please ban clear cutting, favour selection management on Crown land and cancel WestFor's license."

Mr. Speaker, there are 284 signatures on this petition, and as per the Rules of the House, I have affixed my own signature and dated the petition. Thank you.

THE SPEAKER « » : The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Cumberland North.

ELIZABETH SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : I beg leave to table a petition, the operative clause being:

"Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure
We the residents of Ripley Road 3 in Truemanville, Cumberland county would like to have our road Repaved and Fixed from one end . . . to the other."

There are 21 signatures and I have affixed mine, as per the Rules of the House.

THE SPEAKER « » : The petition is tabled.

[Page 3321]

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 1151

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mike Laffin, the Manager of House of Assembly Operations, has been working in Province House for 38 years; and

Whereas Mike has served under every Nova Scotia Premier since John Buchanan and every Speaker since Arthur Donahoe; and

Whereas Mike and his team have kept Province House running smoothly, looking beautiful, and continuing to be a piece of Nova Scotia's history that we can all be proud of;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly thank Mike for his commitment to this Legislature, congratulate him on a successful career, and wish him a wonderful and relaxing retirement in May.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried. (Standing Ovation)

The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 1152

[Page 3322]

THE PREMIER » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in March, members of Team Canada's Special Olympics team travelled to Abu Dhabi in 2019's Special Olympics World Games; and

Whereas six Nova Scotia athletes proudly represented Canada at the Games, including Anthony James who won silver in the 4x100m relay, Stephane Piccinin who won bronze in the 1500m relay, Kristina Richard who won gold in the 4x400m relay and bronze in the 200m relay, Jessica Stewart who won gold in the 4x25m freestyle relay, Krista Stockman who won silver in the level four individual stroke play, and Benjamin Theriau who had a remarkable finishing time in his three running events; and

Whereas these athletes brought energy, passion, and dedication to their sport, motivating all of us to work harder while teaching us not to lose sight of the most important thing: having fun;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize Nova Scotia members of Team Canada and thank them for their amazing job representing our country and congratulate them on their accomplishments in the 2019 Special Olympics World Games in Abu Dhabi.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness on behalf of the honourable Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 1153

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I ask for a moment of silence after the resolution.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 3323]

Whereas each day, our fish harvesters face many risks and dangers as they pursue a living on the water to support their families and to help keep our coastal communities strong and vibrant; and

Whereas on Monday, April 8, 2019, cousins Ozzy Clair and Niko Clair, members of Paq'tnkek Mi'kmaw Nation had been in an oyster boat in rough waters near Bayfield when their boat capsized, throwing both men into the water; and

Whereas the men were pulled from the waters unresponsive and passed away later that evening in the hospital;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me as we pause for a moment of silence to honour Ozzy and Niko Clair, to extend our condolences to their families, friends, and community members as they deal with the loss of these two young men.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

I would ask all members and guests to please rise to observe a moment of silence in memory of Ozzy and Niko Clair.

[A moment of silence was observed.]

THE SPEAKER « » : Thank you.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

[9:15 a.m.]

[Page 3324]

RESOLUTION NO. 1154

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the aquaculture industry is a significant economic contributor to our rural and coastal communities, and in 2017 had farm gate value over $116 million; and

Whereas the We'koqma'q First Nation's trout farm is a true success story. When they officially took over the fish processing facility in 2015, it employed eight people. The facility now employs more than 50 We'koqma'q community members and includes a hatchery, grow-out site and processing plant; and

Whereas the Band is currently working on obtaining their Best Aquaculture Practices certification to help them identify improvements and implement processes and policies that adhere to the certification. This process can also assist them in marketing, growing operations and introducing new efficiencies, and ultimately increase revenue and job opportunities for the First Nation community;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the We'koqma'q First Nation on their hard work and dedication towards growing the aquaculture industry in Nova Scotia and helping to create a brighter future for our rural and coastal communities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Just for purposes of clarity of the record, the honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal was reading that on behalf of the honourable Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

The honourable Minister of Immigration.

HON. LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction.

[Page 3325]

THE SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : With us in the gallery this morning we have representatives from the International Graduate Entrepreneurs. These individuals have decided, after graduating from one of our Nova Scotia post-secondary institutions, to make Nova Scotia a place for them to stay and build their lives, families and careers and have been nominated under our stream.

I am going to ask them to please rise as I say their name. Stephanie Sun, UBielife is her company; Joyce Liu, Lumi Studios; Iven He, For You Newcomer Counselling Agency Inc. and Mr. He brought with him an employee, Lei Wang. Please rise and accept the warm welcome of the House.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Immigration.

RESOLUTION NO. 1155

HON. LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas thousands of talented international students attend post-secondary institutions in Nova Scotia every year; and

Whereas the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration offers a variety of pathways that recognize the significant economic contributions immigrants make to our province, including the International Graduate Entrepreneur Stream; and

Whereas this International Graduate Entrepreneur Stream offers recent graduates of a Nova Scotia university, or the Nova Scotia Community College, who have started or bought a Nova Scotia business and operated it for at least one year, and intend to settle here, the possibility to be nominated for permanent resident status;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in continuing to welcome international students to our province and encourage them to stay on as International Graduate Entrepreneurs here in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 3326]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

RESOLUTION NO. 1156

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Scotsburn resident and marathon runner, David MacLennan, has been named the Athletics Nova Scotia Master Male Athlete of the Year; and

Whereas David was the winner of the marathon event of the 2018 Scotiabank Bluenose Marathon, finishing in an impressive two hours and 50 minutes; and

Whereas he is also the newly minted Men's 55-59 Canadian Marathon Champion, having broken the Canadian record that stood since 1995;

Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize David, his hard work and dedication to running, congratulate him on being named Athletics Nova Scotia Master Male Athlete of the Year.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

RESOLUTION NO. 1157

[Page 3327]

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby request that the following motion be adopted without notice, pursuant to Rule 32(5) of the House of Assembly Rules and Forms of Procedure.

Be it resolved that all congratulatory motions deposited with the Clerk pursuant to Rule 32(3) of the Rules and Forms of Procedure of the House of Assembly from February 28, 2019, to the end of business today, that have not been otherwise considered by the House of Assembly be approved.

THE SPEAKER « » : Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Lands and Forestry.

RESOLUTION NO. 1158

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Municipal Affairs, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall moved the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas emergencies can occur at any time of the day or night that require police, fire, and emergency medical services to respond promptly to protect life or preserve property; and

Whereas 911 call takers work in conjunction with emergency dispatch partners to provide a critical link between Nova Scotians experiencing an emergency and the first responders and police, fire, or ambulance who are there to help; and

Whereas these committed Nova Scotians provide assistance to more than 220,000 callers annually and are an integral part of our 911 system, showing compassion, understanding, and professionalism during times of emergency;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Legislature thank 911 call takers and recognize April 14 to April 20, 2019, as National Telecommunications Week, which provides an opportunity to celebrate and honour the men and women whose diligence and professionalism keep Nova Scotians safe.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3328]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Acadian Affairs and Francophonie.

RESOLUTION NO. 1159

HON. LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : Monsieur le Président, à une date ultérieure je demanderai l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que le 11 avril, la Municipalité régionale d'Halifax a lancé Halifax.ca/fr, un guide en ligne en français sur Halifax; et

Attendu que ce guide en ligne vise à fournir à la communauté acadienne et francophone de la MRH un meilleur accès à l'information sur les principaux services offerts par la municipalité; et

Attendu que la province de la Nouvelle-Écosse, par l'intermédiaire de l'Office des Affaires acadiennes et de la Francophonie, a appuyé le développement de cette ressource dans l'intérêt de la dynamique communauté acadienne et francophone de MRH;

Par conséquent, qu'il soit résolu que les membres de l'Assemblée législative se joignent à moi pour féliciter la Municipalité régionale d'Halifax pour leurs efforts visant à améliorer les lignes de communication entre la communauté acadienne et francophone et le gouvernement municipal.

Monsieur le Président, je demande l'adoption de cette résolution sans préavis et sans débat.

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas, yesterday on April 11th, the Halifax Regional Municipality launched Halifax.ca/fr, a French language online guide to Halifax; and

Whereas this online guide is aimed at providing the Acadian and francophone community of HRM with improved access to information about key services offered by the municipality; and

Whereas the Province of Nova Scotia through the Office of Acadian Affairs and Francophonie has supported the development of this resource for the benefit of HRM's vibrant Acadian and francophone community;

[Page 3329]

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating the Halifax Regional Municipality for the efforts in improving lines of communication between the Acadian and francophone community and the municipal government.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, permission to make an introduction.

THE SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, in the East Gallery, if we could ask Cassidy Megan and her mother Angela to stand. Cassidy is the founder of Purple Day and she was not with us on March 26th because she was travelling in India and spreading the goodwill of Purple Day. I'd like to give her the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 1160

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker. I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cassidy Megan started Purple Day, which is celebrated on March 26th to raise awareness for people with epilepsy and to let them know that they are not alone; and

Whereas Purple Day is now celebrated in over 100 countries around the world, as well as Antarctica and the International Space Station; and

Whereas Cassidy this year celebrated and spread epilepsy awareness in India where she spoke in five different states and cities.

[Page 3330]

Therefore be it resolved that we all celebrate Cassidy and how much she has done for epilepsy awareness throughout the globe.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Business on an introduction.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to draw the members' attention to the East Gallery where we have two special guests. I know when they are from New Waterford, it's hard to say they're special guests, but they still are.

We have the CEO and co-founder of Health Outcomes Worldwide, Corrine McIsaac. Corrine has a very innovative technology for wound care, has done tremendous work here in Nova Scotia and other provinces, and is certainly looking to export internationally. She has done tremendous work, tremendous success and it is really changing the landscape of wound care for our province, first and foremost, as her homeland. We are happy to have her.

With Corrine, we have a hockey legend from home, Bruce Campbell. Bruce was a great player, but he lost a ton of fights in his day. I'd say he loses a daily fight in debate with Corrine.

I'd ask Bruce and Corrine to rise and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 149 - Entitled an Act to Establish a Time of Remembrance. (Alana Paon)

Bill No. 150 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 10 of the Acts of 1994-95. The Workers' Compensation Act. (Tammy Martin)

[Page 3331]

THE SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, it is a notice of motion. The chair held me down.

THE SPEAKER « » : With the consent of the House, we will revert to Notices of Motion.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[NOTICES OF MOTION]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

RESOLUTION NO. 1161

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I apologize for that.

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Be it resolved that Paragraph (3) of Rule 3 of the Rules and Forms of Procedures of the House of Assembly is amended as follows:

"Remembrance Day" is repealed and replaced by "November 4th to 11th (Remembrance Day) inclusive".

Mr. Speaker, basically that means that the House would not sit for the time frame mentioned in the resolution, so that members can spend time at home to do celebrations with their community.

THE SPEAKER « » : The notice of motion does not deal with the business of the House, therefore we require the unanimous consent of the House.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3332]

It is agreed.

The notice is tabled.

[9:30 a.m.]

[STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

EPABA: 2ND ANN. BUS. EXPO. - THANKS

BARBARA ADAMS « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to bring recognition to the Eastern Passage and Area Business Association and their new board of directors. After holding their second annual general meeting, the board of directors are as follows: Chair Misty Ramier, Vice-Chair Magali Grégoire, Treasurer Jody Wood Keizer, Secretary Karen Noble, Social Media and Membership Director Mel Zilkowsky, and Ethics Chair Nathalie Schofield.

The EPABA, along with myself, will be hosting the second annual Business Expo on April 25, 2019, at our local Lions Club. Last year, the event began with representatives from various agencies like Canada Business Network, Nova Scotia Works, and CBDC Blue Water, just to name a few. All aimed to offer information to local businesses and to end with public participation to meet our business association members.

I ask all members of the Nova Scotia Legislature to join me in thanking and acknowledging the EPABA for all of their hard work and dedication to our community.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

MATHESON, BAILEY: DEATH OF - TRIBUTE

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honour the amazing life of Bailey Matheson, who left this world far too soon on April 5th at the age of 35. Bailey was a resident and successful businessowner and entrepreneur in Lakeside and, two years ago, was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

Bailey faced her illness with a tremendous amount of courage and strength. She embraced the years she had left and lived them to the fullest, making sure to check off items on her bucket list. While I only briefly met and didn't have the chance to get to know Bailey, I do know that her caring, kind, and selfless nature touched the lives of many.

Bailey's self-penned obituary is an admirable example of a life well lived. We all have a lot to learn from Bailey and her powerful outlook on life and death. She faced her illness with a tremendous amount of courage, grace, and strength.

[Page 3333]

Mr. Speaker, I know all members will join me in extending our sincere condolences to Bailey's friends and family. Let us take Bailey's advice: "Don't take the small stuff so seriously and live a little."

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

SHARPE, EVAN: MALE ATHL. OF THE YR.,
SPECIAL OLYMPICS - CONGRATS.

TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, today I'm proud to acknowledge my friend Evan Sharpe, who was named Special Olympics Nova Scotia's Male Athlete of the Year for 2018.

Evan was honoured at the Special Olympics Nova Scotia Inspired Gala for his achievements on Team Nova Scotia at the 2018 Special Olympics Games in Antigonish, his first national games.

Evan is considered an all-round athlete, but his two main sports are swimming and curling. His curling team in Pictou County has won either silver or gold medals over the last five years, earning them the Team of the Year award.

I ask the members of this House to join me in congratulating Evan and his curling team on their accomplishments and wish him the best of luck moving forward.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

PUBLICOVER, LLOYD: VOLUN. OF THE YR. - CONGRATS.

HUGH MACKAY « » : Mr. Speaker, yesterday I rose in this House to congratulate Ms. Maria Kirby-Breen from Chester, who was recently awarded the 2019 Nova Scotia Youth Volunteer Award.

Today I rise to congratulate Mr. Lloyd Publicover of Blandford, who was recently presented with the Nova Scotia Volunteer Award representing the Municipality of Chester. Mr. Publicover has been a key volunteer for the Blandford and Area Fire Rescue team, the Blandford District No. 1 Community Centre, and Saint Barnabas Church.

Last evening I was pleased to provide certificates to both Ms. Kirby-Breen and Mr. Publicover during the Municipality of Chester's Annual Volunteer Awards. I invite the members of this House to join me in congratulating both Ms. Kirby-Breen and Mr. Publicover.

[Page 3334]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

COLEMAN, ABBY: THE SCIENCE OF CLEAN WATER - CONGRATS.

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, a New Glasgow student recently had the opportunity to speak at the Fourth Commemoration of the International Day of Women and Girls in Science at the UN.

A visit to examine the Town of New Glasgow's water-treatment facility created an interest in Abby Coleman and started a journey that took her to the United Nations in New York City.

At this time, the Grade 8 student at New Glasgow Academy learned about the process of where the town's water originates and how it is purified. She began a project of testing water in the area and used this in the local science fair. Her second-place finish in the regional science fair earned her a trip to nationals in Ottawa. Abby was very excited when she received an invitation to speak at the UN event in February.

During her speech, she shared her love and interest in science, as well as the importance of clean water and why she is so passionate about it. Abby is presently a Grade 9 student at North Nova Education Centre.

I would like to ask all members of this Legislature to join me in congratulating Abby Coleman for having such an earnest interest in science and the value of clean water in today's society.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

MOORE, DYLAN/DAVIES, NATE:
DARTMOUTH NORTH CLOTHING - CONGRATS.

SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge Dartmouth High students Dylan Moore and Nate Davies who have founded the company Dartmouth North Clothing as part of the Junior Achievement Nova Scotia program.

Dartmouth North Clothing made very cool, very hip, tie-dyed tee-shirts of many brilliant colours and styles, with the company's logo on each one. Dylan and Nate sold the shirts at various locations, including the busy Alderney Farmers' Market and they donated 20 per cent of their profits to the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre. The money they donated will support over 200 meals, served as part of the food centre's program.

Mr. Speaker, I am inspired by Dylan and Nate, two young people from the community who had an idea and followed through on it, but who also had an awareness of their community and the need within it. I want to congratulate them on their success with Dartmouth North Clothing, thank them for their generosity, and I look forward to what they do next.

[Page 3335]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

BRENDAN MAGUIRE « » : Mr. Speaker, before I start my member's statement if you would indulge me for a second, I would like to say something in French - Bonne chance, mon ami Monsieur d'Entremont.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

ROCKINGSTONE HTS. STAFF:
SUPPORT IN THE BARHO TRAGEDY - THANKS

BRENDAN MAGUIRE « » : When the Barho family tragedy struck in March it impacted out entire community, in particular it impacted our youth and our schools. A school that bore a lot of the impact was Rockingstone Heights School, where the staff are absolutely incredible.

There are many people to thank so I want to thank a few people: Leanne Marsh, Juli Gillard, Melissa Jones, Meaghan McGuire, Bethanie Smith, Sarah Swinamer, Crystal Malay, Mercedes Boutilier, Cindy Campbell, Amanda Bigg, Lauren Gillis, Malena Matthews, and all the staff at Rockingstone.

Thank you for the clothing swaps, thank you for the turkey dinners and, most important, thank you for the shoulder for those youth to lean on and for keeping our community together during the tragic Barho family event. Your love and support will never be forgotten.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

TURPLE, JEFF: VOLUN. OF THE YR. - CONGRATS.

LARRY HARRISON « » : I stand to recognize the outstanding contributions of a community volunteer. Jeff Turple led the charge in bringing baseball back to the Town of Stewiacke. For the past four summers Jeff has been leader for all softball and hardball programs in the town. Along with creating the Stewiacke Storm Minor Baseball Association, a hardball team for ages under 11, and under 13, and a co-ed program for adults, he established a program called the Stewiacke Attackers Free for All Ball that provides participation for 100 children to try a new sport at no cost.

Mr. Turple's hard work and dedication was recognized by his community and he was recently nominated by the Town of Stewiacke and awarded a Provincial Volunteer Award. I wish to extend congratulations to Jeff on this well-deserved honour. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

[Page 3336]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

CONSTITUENCY STAFF: HARDWORKING & STEADFAST - THANKS

TAMMY MARTIN « » : Today I'd like to recognize the amazing office staff that I have in my constituency office in New Waterford. Dillon, Anne and Donna shoulder a lot of responsibility, a lot of not-so-nice stuff and a lot of wonderful stuff. I would like to thank them for the hard work they do in my absence, for carrying all of the requests and all of the duties and making sure that the constituents are well looked after.

I have to say, Mr. Speaker, the staff that I have in my constituency office are beyond awesome, and they make my job a lot easier.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg.

WATERBURY, DAVID: LIONS 70-YR. PIN - CONGRATS.

SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate David Waterbury of Mahone Bay on receiving his 70-year pin from the Lions Club International. David is a World War II veteran and recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross, which is awarded to officers and warrant officers for acts of valour, courage, or devotion to duty performed while flying in active operations against the enemy.

David is a lifetime member of the Kentville Lions Club and has been with the Mahone Bay Lions Club for the past 20 years. David has held positions as officer, president, secretary and treasurer. He collects previously owned eyeglasses for Third World countries, collects donations to CNIB, he volunteers at pancake breakfasts, as well as dances and raffles held by the Lions Club.

Mr. Speaker, I ask that you and all members of this House of Assembly please join me in congratulating David Waterbury on receiving his 70-year pin from Lions Club International.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

DECOSTE CTR.: MARKETING AWARD - CONGRATS.

KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I wish to mention that the deCoste Performing Arts Centre received the Marketing Award on April 6, 2019, during the Destination Eastern and Northumberland Shores Sports Tourism Gala. The deCoste Centre has attracted high-profile acts to the DEANS region which, in turn, has provided a tremendous marketing impact to the area.

[Page 3337]

Each year the deCoste Centre's program is jam-packed with fantastic local performances, sold-out shows such as the popular Mamma Mia; as well as high profile artists like Bruce Guthro; Sharon, Bram & Friends; and many more.

I am very pleased that the deCoste has been recognized for its important footprint on our tourism sector and I wish them the very best while they continue to flourish.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

NORTH DARTMOUTH ECHO: 15TH ANNIV. - CONGRATS.

SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to offer congratulations to the dedicated team of volunteers behind Dartmouth North's good newspaper, the North Dartmouth Echo for marking 15 years of publishing in our community.

Led by Sylvia Anthony, the group founded the paper in Spring 2003 and the first issue was published in June 2004. Community members were deeply concerned about the mainstream media coverage of Dartmouth North at the time. They knew there were plenty of positive and exciting things happening in our community that were being over-shadowed by a steady stream of negative press.

Since its first edition, the Echo has been the place to go for stories from around the community, highlighting the accomplishments of youth and other community groups, and the place to go to find the best church suppers and flea markets in the area.

There is an old saying that no news is good news. For the last 15 years, the Echo has shown the people of Dartmouth North that there is plenty of good news out there that deserves to be shared and celebrated.

I ask the members of the House of Assembly to join me in congratulating and thanking all involved with the North Dartmouth Echo for their continued dedication to the paper and to our community.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clayton Park West.

RAFAH DICOSTANZO « » : I beg leave to make an introduction.

THE SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

RAFAH DICOSTANZO « » : We have with us in the East Gallery six board members of the Nova Scotia Scholastic Chess Association. I am so delighted that they could come today. Chess is a game that I grew up with and means a lot to me. They have been doing some amazing stuff that I will be reading in the member's statement.

[Page 3338]

First, I would like to introduce them. Please stand up, if you don't mind. We have Chris Felix, Frank King, Tammy Peters, Farhana Kanth, Preeti Kapadia and Laurie Parker. (Applause)

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clayton Park West.

SCHOLASTIC CHESS ASSOC.: ENGAGING YOUTH - APPLAUD

RAFAH DICOSTANZO « » : Mr. Speaker, I stand today to recognize the Nova Scotia Scholastic Chess Association for challenging the youth of Clayton Park West and beyond to reach their full potential in this fun and skilled game.

For over 20 years, the Nova Scotia Scholastic Chess Association has promoted and fostered the growth of youth chess and has organized multiple chess tournaments across our province. It also supports chess education, recreation centres, schools and libraries, and recently the Canada Games Centre. The skills obtained by the game are math and study skills, as well as major development in critical thinking.

I had the pleasure of attending the Nova Scotia Provincial Chess Challenge last year and this year at Mount Saint Vincent University. The ages of attendees range from 5 to 18 years old. The winners will be participating in the Canadian Chess Challenge in Vancouver this May. Also, this year, with the help of a small grant from the Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage, the association was able to buy new equipment and supplies.

Would this House of Assembly join me in applauding Nova Scotia Scholastic Chess Association for showing the youth that exercising the mind can be fun. We thank them for their dedication and hard work.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisburg.

BATES, ELIZABETH: DEATH OF - TRIBUTE

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the passing of Elizabeth "Lizzie" Bates, formerly of Louisburg. Lizzie, as we fondly knew her, passed away on April 4th at the age of 103 at the Cove Guest Home in Sydney.

Lizzie and her husband Tom owned and operated a Shell service station in Louisburg, and Lizzie ran a restaurant beside the garage for many years. The food that she served was very popular among the town and all the surrounding areas. She was an excellent cook and had a great love of people. Lizzie was a member of Stella Maris Parish and a charter member and past president of the CWL.

[Page 3339]

I stand here today to express our deepest sympathy to Lizzie Bates' family and know that their wonderful memories will help them through this very difficult time.

[9:45 p.m.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings South.

BARRELLING TIDE DISTILLERY - MEDALLISTS:
CDN. ARTISAN SPIRITS - CONGRATS.

KEITH IRVING » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize Wallbrook entrepreneurs Russ and Colleen Murphy of Barrelling Tide Distillery, for once again bringing home the golds. Barrelling Tide recently won 10 medals at the Canadian Artisan Spirit Competition, Canada's only national spirit competition reserved for micro-distilleries.

Winning seems to be second nature for this business as they won 10 medals at the same competition in 2018. Their 2019 recognition included Gold with Distinction and Best in Class for the distillery's 5 Fathom Dark Rum, and Gold with Distinction for their Tide Gin, Raspberry Liqueur, and Cherry Liqueur. This is quite an exceptional feat considering there were 69 competing distilleries.

Please join me in congratulating Russ and Colleen Murphy of Barrelling Tide Distillery on their continued success producing award-winning spirits here in the beautiful Annapolis Valley.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

STRAIT PIRATES: HOCKEY CHAMPIONSHIP FINALS - BEST WISHES

ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, the Port Hawkesbury Junior Pirates are an institution when it comes to junior hockey in this province. They have been in operation for 54 years, and on Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. at the Civic Centre will play Game 3 of the Nova Scotia Junior Hockey League Final against the Fred Fox Division Champion, the Sackville Blazers.

The Pirates will be seeking their first provincial championship since winning in back-to-back years in 2001-02 and 2002-03. Sackville and Port Hawkesbury played two regular season games during the season and are tied at 1-1 after Sackville won the opening game of the series 3-1 before Cody Smith of the Pirates recorded his fourth shutout of the 2018-19 playoffs as the Pirates won 3-0 in Sackville Monday night.

The winner of the Nova Scotia Championship will advance to the Don Johnson Memorial Cup Atlantic Championship tournament in Kensington, Prince Edward Island, beginning April 23rd. Smith, in recording his four shutouts, even had one shutout streak stretching over four games of almost 175 minutes of hockey.

[Page 3340]

I want to take this opportunity and wish the Pirates every success in their championship final and hopefully when the series is completed, they will be headed to Prince Edward Island for the Atlantic Championships on April 23rd to April 28th.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

TRETHEWEY, ETHAN: CHILDREN'S WISH FULFILLED - RECOG.

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, Ethan Trethewey, a 10-year-old from Bridgewater, has been fighting cystic fibrosis, a fatal genetic condition that affects his lungs and pancreas.

To keep his lungs healthy, Ethan has two daily intensive physiotherapy treatments. His pancreas doesn't work properly so he takes more than 40 pills a day to aid with digestion, alleviate belly pain, and allow him to eat, drink, and grow. Ethan's mom Kari says: "He is strong and resilient and faces every challenge that CF has given him with bravery and determination."

Ethan loves Star Wars and his heartfelt wish to attend a Jedi Training Academy was granted by the Children's Wish Foundation. Last October, Ethan and his family went to Florida for a week. "Ethan's favourite part was being with his family and making a lifetime of memories," says Kari. "He also loved the Wizarding World of Harry, and facing off against Darth Vader."

I ask all members of the Nova Scotia Legislature to join me in recognizing this inspirational young man and his family for all they do to support him.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

DESCHAMP, RONALD: RETIREMENT - CONGRATS.

KIM MASLAND « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Roland DesChamp, Sr. from Shelburne on his retirement after an amazing 70 years in boat building. From a very young age, Mr. DesChamp knew he wanted to become a boat builder, buying and studying books on the subject, learning how to build a boat by the time he was 15 years old.

Now at the age of 85, he estimates he has built more than 1,200 boats. He has run the family business for 55 years and was recognized by the Nova Scotia Boatbuilders Association with a lifetime achievement award in 2015.

Mr. Speaker, I would invite members of the Legislature to join me in congratulating Mr. DesChamp on his contribution to the boat-building industry in Nova Scotia, and wish him a long, healthy, and happy retirement.

[Page 3341]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Bedford.

BECK, ROBERT: DEATH OF - TRIBUTE

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, last month Nova Scotia lost a long-time volunteer and all-around great guy, Robert Lawson Beck.

I first met Rob back when we worked together at ATV. He always had a smile on his face and a positive attitude. He was an enthusiastic account manager during a 30-year career at ATV and CTV Atlantic Bell Media. After I left ATV, I would run into Rob at all kinds of events. He was a devoted volunteer for many causes and organizations, including Diabetes Canada, the Nova Scotia Leadership Prayer Breakfast, Habitat for Humanity, various boards of trade, Christmas Daddies Telethon, and the Armdale Yacht Club, to name a few.

Rob enjoyed life. He was a musician, playing several instruments, particularly enjoying the guitar. He also loved singing with the Nova Scotia Mass Choir.

Mr. Speaker, Rob Beck was an optimist. He celebrated life. His many friends and family will miss him, but none more so than his wife Deborah, stepdaughter Laurel MacInnis, his brothers and sister, and extended family.

Mr. Speaker, there's a lot to miss.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland North.

RHINDRESS, TERRY - HEAD COACH:
MT. ALLISON MOUNTIES - BEST WISHES

ELIZABETH SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : Mr. Speaker, today I would like to recognize Terry Rhindress who was recently named head coach of the Mount Allison Mounties women's hockey program.

Terry brings over 20 years of coaching, teaching and development to the program from a variety of levels. Terry has also been named a member of the Canadian University Sport hockey staff and will be attending a week-long hockey camp in Russia this coming summer.

The Mounties are in good hands with Terry and all the experience he brings to their program. I would like to wish Terry the best with his new role and would like to thank Terry for his commitment to his passion of hockey.

[Page 3342]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

ARSENAULT, CAROLINE: ÉCOLE MER ET MONDE - THANKS

LISA ROBERTS « » : Monsieur le Président, je veux reconnaître la contribution énorme d'une comitante, Caroline Arsenault. Elle a convoqué un groupe qui inclut les parents et les membres de la communauté acadienne pour demander une école du conseil Scolaire acadienne provincial sur la péninsule d'Halifax.

Ce but a été atteint en septembre 2018 avec l'ouverture de l'École Mer et Monde où Caroline Arsenault est maintenant présidente du comité d'école consultatif. Caroline se dédie au bien-être des enfants et des parents acadiens et francophones, et à la défense et la promotion de la langue française comme présidente de la Fédération des parents acadiens de la Nouvelle-Écosse.

Par conséquent, je souhaite que tous mes collègues de l'Assemblée provinciale se joignent à moi pour féliciter Caroline Arsenault et dire merci pour ses efforts.

I want to recognize the tremendous contribution of Halifax Needham constituent Caroline Arsenault. She organized a committee, including parents and other members of the Acadian community to advocate for a Conseil scolaire acadien provincial school on the Halifax Peninsula.

That goal was achieved in September 2018 with the opening of École Mer et Monde, where Caroline Arsenault is now chair of the school advisory committee. Caroline is also contributing to the well-being of Acadian and other francophone parents and children, and to the defence and promotion of the French language, as president of the Federation of Acadian Parents of Nova Scotia.

I would ask all my colleagues here in the Legislature to join me in congratulating Caroline Arsenault and appreciating her efforts.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester North.

TITANS BANTAM C: WAYNE WAUGH MEM.
HOCKEY TOURN. CHAMPS - CONGRATS.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : The Wayne Waugh Memorial Hockey Tournament was held in March 2019 at the North Shore Recreation Centre, in Tatamagouche, where the Tatamagouche Titans Bantam C squad represented the hometown. The team is made up of 19 players - 10 boys and nine girls - all of different skill levels, and this is the first season that four of them have even played hockey.

[Page 3343]

Game 1 of the tournament saw the Titans rout the Glace Bay Miners 10-4, but in Game 2, the Titans ran into penalty trouble and suffered a 5-4 loss to the Miners. This was followed by a 2-2 tie with Stellarton. In the final game, the Titans trailed 2-1 when Kaiden Johnson scored their lone goal. Fortunately, a late-game goal by Cody MacKay tied the score, and in overtime a pass from MacKay to Johnson scored the winning goal.

It was an exciting win for the host team who were able to capture the winning banner for the first time in 13 years. Congratulations to this group of young people for their hard work and for representing Colchester North so well.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

OKAFOR, TOOCHUKWU - PASTOR: YOUTH ENGAGEMENT

TIM HALMAN « » : I rise today to recognize Reverend Toochukwu Okafor, the pastor at St. Thomas More Parish. Father T, as he's affectionately called by his parishioners, is a wonderful priest who cares deeply about his parishioners. Whether it's engaging the parish youth to serve on the altar or participate in the children's choir, Father T has an amazing gift in inspiring others to live with faith, hope, and love.

Originally from Nigeria, Father T has travelled all over the world and spent time in Colombia as a pastor. His background and experiences have allowed the parish of St. Thomas More to learn about the African Mass, a beautiful and joyous celebration.

Mr. Speaker, I am honoured to call Father Toochukwu a friend, and I ask all members of the House to thank Father Toochukwu Okafor for all that he does for the Parish of St. Thomas More and thank him for engaging the youth of our community.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings West.

D'ENTREMONT, CHRISTOPHER - MLA:
N.S. POLIT. CAREER - BEST WISHES

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : There are three of us in the Legislature from the class of 2003: the members for Annapolis, Kings West, and Argyle-Barrington. But most likely today is the last session for the member for Argyle-Barrington as he has declared seeking the nomination for West Nova. I know he's had a long and distinguished career representing the people of Argyle-Barrington and a strong voice for the Acadian population.

We also shared those challenging roles of being Health Minister for the province, obviously a privilege to do so, but we were also each other's critic. Thus the point I'd like to make: through those challenging moments we remained friends, the greatest respect for each other. I wanted the House to recognize the character of the member for Argyle-Barrington. (Applause)

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THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton-Richmond.

BATTLE OF VIMY RIDGE: 102ND ANNIV. - TRIBUTE

ALANA PAON « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to those who put their lives in jeopardy for our rights and freedoms. Today is the 102nd anniversary of the end of the Battle of Vimy Ridge in France. The capture of Vimy was more than just an important battlefield victory; for the first time all four Canadian divisions came together for the battle, from all regions of Canada.

Mr. Speaker, although the battle was won, victory came at the cost of many Canadians, both killed and wounded. Today a white marble sculpture at Vimy is a stark reminder of the additional Canadian soldiers killed in France with no known graves.

Mr. Speaker, veterans and Legion members across Canada pay tribute to these and many other soldiers throughout the year, but also, they help to educate schoolchildren and the general public in the weeks prior to Remembrance Day, which annually marks the period where all soldiers who fought for Canadians are remembered and celebrated.

Mr. Speaker, I ask members of this House to join me in acknowledging today as the anniversary date of the end of the Battle of Vimy Ridge and wish to thank the Royal Canadian Legion for their continuous efforts to help Canadians remember the sacrifices made to protect our freedom.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clare-Digby.

SISSIBOO LANDING: FESTIVAL OF TREES FUNDRAISER - CONGRATS.

GORDON WILSON « » : For the 12th year Sissiboo Landing has hosted its Festival of Trees, its Christmas fundraiser and the unofficial start of the Christmas season in our area. The trees, which may be traditional or have unique themes, are decorated by organizations or groups of friends. Some have been decorating their festival tree for years.

Every year everyone loves to drop in to meet with some friends, to see some trees and the gingerbread houses, and to have a cookie and a cup of cider. Whether it's an outing with the grandchildren or just a break from the hustle and bustle of Christmas preparations, it's a wonderful way to spend an afternoon.

As in past years, the organizers held their gala and visitors could vote on their favourite tree and gingerbread house during the first week of the festival. This popular fundraiser is only possible because of the support of the community, from the organizers and the decorators to the people who drop in.

[Page 3345]

I would like to congratulate Sissiboo Landing on the success of this year's Festival of Trees, and thank the festival's many supporters.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

WADDEN, JEAN: VALUED CONSTITUENCY ASSIST. - THANKS

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, today I rise to acknowledge and thank Jean Wadden who has been my constituency assistant since 2006. Jean exemplifies what we all look for in a constituency assistant: she is hard-working, fun loving, and very knowledgeable.

Mr. Speaker, none of us in this House could be successful without the supports we get from our constituency assistants and I would say that Jean has been, by far, the best partner one could have in this type of situation, in this job.

Mr. Speaker, I know that on behalf of all members I would like to extend my thanks to Jean for the work she has done and the work that she will do as we move forward.

[10:00 a.m.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The time allotted for Statements by Members has expired.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

H&W: COBEQUID COM. HEALTH CTR. - EXPANSION PLANS

TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, health care is in crisis. In every corner of this province the system is under severe stress and that is obviously true, even in metro, as well.

As the Premier would know, the Cobequid Community Health Centre has been overcrowded for most of this session and for quite a period of time. The emergency room was built initially for 21,000 patients. Last year it saw upwards of 50,000 patients.

The Premier talks about a plan for a significant health care infrastructure; I think he says the biggest health care infrastructure investment in history. Time will tell if that's another grandiose statement by the Premier.

[Page 3346]

I would like to ask the Premier: Included in that $2 billion investment, is there any plan for an expansion of the Cobequid Community Health Centre?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As he would know, we announced the redevelopment of the QEII here in metro, and part of that was the expansion that has taken place at the Dartmouth General. The third and fourth floors are completed. Four additional operating theatres are being added to that facility. The fifth floor will be finalized and that will become a Centre of Excellence around orthopaedic surgery.

He would also know that we talked about moving the outpatient portion, as well as some of the day surgeries, that will go into the new facility out in Clayton Park, as well as dialysis and some other services, basically services that those who live outside of the downtown core would be receiving. It saves them from coming downtown and at the same time we will continue to enhance the HI site.

When those are developed, he is absolutely right; it is the largest health care infrastructure development in the history of this province. I want to assure the honourable member and all those in Sackville-Cobequid that the Cobequid Community Health Centre will be part of that continuing evolution of how we provide services, not only to those who live here in the central core, but those of us who live outside.

TIM HOUSTON « » : The continuing evolution was the only reference I heard to the Cobequid Community Health Centre.

There is an impressive array of clinics offered at the Cobequid Community Health Centre by an impressive group of health care professionals. The demand is there for more clinics, but the physical space is not there.

Now, the AG has highlighted the need for an actual health care plan in this province. I suspect if the province had an actual plan as to how health care would be delivered over the next 10 to 20 years, we would see an expansion of the Cobequid Community Health Centre, but we are not hearing that.

First off, I'd like to ask the Premier: Is the Auditor General correct when he says that there is no plan, there is no health care plan? And how can we proceed with a $2 billion investment if we don't have an actual plan?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, we clearly laid out a plan for the redevelopment of the QEII. I just clearly laid out for the honourable member the changes.

I certainly believe that the people of Dartmouth recognize this plan with the investments we've made there at the Dartmouth General. I believe the people in and around Clayton Park will recognize the plan when we relocate the outpatient clinic. Those who come in Highway No. 103, the 101, the 102 who provide services downtown will recognize that.

[Page 3347]

I want to assure the honourable member that the Cobequid Community Health Centre is a part of that ongoing journey as we continue to make sure we provide those services.

He is very right. There is a tremendous amount of work that has taken place. Right now, at the Cobequid Community Health Centre, I would dare say that many of our own families have received services out of that facility and we see it as an important part of the evolution of health care.

What the honourable member should know, though, is that the QEII redevelopment has been talked about for more than a decade. It is finally getting done.

TIM HOUSTON « » : Time will tell how it gets done and when it gets done. In fact, we've been asking for a risk assessment. Has the government looked at the risk of it not proceeding in the right time?

We haven't seen an actual plan for health care delivery in this province. Instead, what we hear are sound bites. I think that's the history of this government. They manage to the podium. Get to the podium, make a sound bite, and then we'll see what happens after that. But health care is more important than that and before the Premier starts writing $2 billion cheques, he should have an actual plan.

I would like to ask the Premier one more time: Does he see anything for the Cobequid Community Health Centre in the $2 billion cheque he is planning to write right now?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, we continue to make sure that we do provide a plan for the overall delivery of health care across our province and I want to assure the honourable member that the Cobequid Community Health Centre is part of that.

I will tell you health care providers across this province are excited about the investments we are making to the physical infrastructure and we are excited about the second OR we've opened in Windsor. They're excited about the work that's happening at the HI site right now on the fifth floor.

The honourable member would know that we're the first government in history to put a health committee together. Last week we talked about the redevelopment in Cape Breton. Finally, the honourable member now agrees that's a good idea as we continue down the road to make those investments.

[Page 3348]

I hope he will continue to change his mind and not look for a political reason to complain about everything when he then has to backtrack on his complaints because he knows they're a good thing for Nova Scotia.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

GOV'T. (N.S.): LONG-TERM CARE - NEW CONSTRUCTION

GARY BURRILL « » : Mr. Speaker, the government is spending more than $1,000 per day per person keeping hundreds of long-term care residents living in our hospitals when the cost would be just a fraction of that to have these people living in nursing homes. Instead of that, we've been keeping them in our hospitals, which is causing no end of problems from the point of view of patient flow.

In five and a half years, the government has not opened a single new nursing home facility. I want to ask the Premier: Wouldn't it be better to spend smart up front on a comprehensive program of new nursing home construction, than to continue spending stupid on totally unnecessary . . .

THE SPEAKER « » : Order please. I would like to remind the honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party that the word "stupid" is an unparliamentary term, and I'll ask him to retract that.

GARY BURRILL « » : I would be happy to retract it. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. May I ask, is the word "unsmart" parliamentary?

THE SPEAKER « » : What I mentioned earlier is, you should not say indirectly what you cannot say directly. We'll leave it at that.

The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I also want to thank him for continuing, this session, to raise the issues that I know he is passionate about, issues that are coming from him that have impacted individual families that not only he represents but all of us represent.

I want to tell him that the issue of long-term care is an important one. As he knows, part of the redevelopment in Cape Breton will be part of adding long-term care beds. We're adding additional ones in two redevelopment projects we're having in other parts of the province. We'll continue to monitor the situation.

I also want to tell him one of the things that I've heard loud and clear from my constituents and people across this province is that they want to stay home as long as possible. The investments we're making in home care, which we have every budget that we've introduced, is continuing to support that. We will continue to reassess where the long-term care beds are required as we continue to make capital investments.

[Page 3349]

GARY BURRILL « » : The government has failed to hire the number of nurses needed to provide adequate care to the patients of the province. Instead, they overran the nurses overtime budget by $15 million last year in an ad hoc non-system that is pushing nurses' hard in the direction of stress and burnout.

Why can't the Premier see that this too is a case of failing to spend smart up front, thereby necessitating spending deeply ill-advisedly down the road.

THE PREMIER « » : Again, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to tell him, very proudly, the investments we continue to make in health care. As you know - an earlier question I had from the Leader of the Opposition - physical infrastructure has been allowed to decay in this province through successive governments. Making substantial investments, we believe that will not only enable us to provide high-quality care that Nova Scotians are expecting but will also allow us to attract health care providers who want to work in new and modern facilities.

I want to assure the honourable member that a number of seats have been added to the nursing schools in our province. We'll continue to hire those students; almost all of them get jobs in Nova Scotia.

I also want to tell the honourable member that the nurse practitioner positions that we've added have continued to heighten the scope of nurses across our province. We're adding family practice nurses in our communities.

Those are all important steps. This is a government that recognizes the important role nurses play, and the diverse role that nurses play in delivering health care to our citizens.

GARY BURRILL « » : Similarly, 33 per cent of pediatric day surgeries at the IWK are related to tooth decay in kids. Children with tooth decay are more susceptible to oral health problems down the road, some of which can lead to increased risk of chronic illnesses, including diabetes and heart disease.

If we spent smart by guaranteeing that kids could get their teeth cleaned for free at school, we might not have to be spending so much - deeply ill-advisedly - later on caring for chronic illnesses that could completely be avoided.

Can the Premier explain what the point is of failing to invest up front in prevention at the cost of spending so millions in mop-up later?

[Page 3350]

THE PREMIER « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We continue to make investments providing quality health care to our citizens. The issue the honourable member brings to the floor around dental care for young Nova Scotians is an important one, one that we need to make sure that, as we invest in providing dental care, it's done in a way that those who require our support the most receive it. There are many kids in this province currently today who have dental plans, the parents have dental plans. We need to make sure that those who do not, those who are living in socioeconomic disadvantage and circumstances, are provided the support of our government early on and I look forward to continuing to work with the Dental Association to ensure that all children have access to that care.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

GOV'T. (N.S.): NOMINEE PROG. - LOW QUOTA

TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia has a population of 960,000. Last year, our provincial nominee program quota was 1,350. Manitoba has a population of 1.4 million, but their provincial nominee program quota was 5,700. So, their provincial population is higher but their quota is 320 per cent higher. I would like to ask the Premier: Why is our immigration quota so much lower than Manitoba's?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, when we came into government, the number the honourable member is quoting was 500. The former Progressive Conservative government increased it to 650. We continue see that number climb. I want to congratulate the Minister of Immigration for her tremendous work. We also know that working with the current national government, we've been able to pick up the nominee programs in our sister provinces in Atlantic Canada that aren't being used.

He would also know we have 2,000 nominees that are in a broader prospect for the economy of Atlantic Canada. We continue to use those and, because of the hard work of the Minister of Immigration and the importance this government places on a diverse province, we've seen a record number of new people coming to Nova Scotia but, equally as important, we're seeing a record number of those people choosing to stay, live, and work.

TIM HOUSTON « » : Immigration is critically important to growing our economy, Mr. Speaker. If we want to grow our economy, we need more people. That's a simple fact and the numbers are going up but the disparity between what our province is receiving and other provinces is pretty dramatic. We've had a two-term majority Liberal government here, majority Liberal government in Canada. Every single federal member in Atlantic Canada was Liberal. This was the time to actually make very, very significant strides and, yet, we know that in 2016, 13 of Nova Scotia's 18 consensus divisions experienced population loss. Halifax grew by 8 per cent over a 10-year period, but Guysborough shrank by 16 per cent, Shelburne 10 per cent, Inverness 10 per cent, Digby 9 per cent. The out-migration and population decline dwarves the trickle of immigrants, particularly to rural Nova Scotia. Can the Premier enlighten this House of the few immigrants who go to rural Nova Scotia how many actually stay there after five years?

[Page 3351]

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, the honourable member is completely incorrect. We continue to see people from around the world choosing to come and live and work in this province. He is completely incorrect when he talks about the fact that the number hasn't continued to increase. We've continued to hit every target. The Minister of Immigration has hit every target. Those that go into rural communities are choosing to live and work in those communities. Where the honourable member talks about, we reversed the trend of out-migration of young people, the third consecutive year we've seen more young people stay here in Nova Scotia.

Part of that is through the immigration strategy. I want to tell the honourable member the Minister of Immigration is going to continue to be passionate and work hard to ensure that not only do we continue to grow our capital city, but we continue to grow all across our province. He should take a lesson from the president of Cape Breton University who has welcomed so many international students to that university, changing the landscape of Cape Breton Island. We're going to continue to work with the people, have a positive image of immigration, and not a negative one.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

BUS. - DEVCO WORKERS: WCB EXTENSION - ACTION

TAMMY MARTIN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Business.

Yesterday in Question Period, the Minister of Business said there was nothing he could do to help former miners seeking an extension of their WCB benefits. But I think there is something he and his government can do - make an extraordinary exemption for former Devco miners only. It would allow their benefits to continue for the rest of their lives. This change would not cost the province any money as the benefits for the miners would be paid for by the federal government.

Mr. Speaker, will the Minister of Business admit that there is a way to help these former miners that doesn't cost the province millions of dollars?

[10:15 a.m.]

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : I do thank the member for the question. It is important that all the Cape Breton members who were intimately involved in the Devco situation be on the record on this, so I do appreciate it.

What the member is asking is not accurate. The Devco miners are federal employees. The only mechanism we have through the Workers' Compensation Act would be to change the number from 65 to perpetuity, and it wouldn't be zero, it would be $1 billion.

[Page 3352]

This is a conversation that has been very unfairly categorized. The federal government has suggested - some bureaucrats have suggested that this money is sitting somewhere when, in fact, what they said was if we change our legislation they will be forced to pay.

That is not a fair way to present this situation. We have met with them for a number of years, with the Devco miners, Mr. Speaker. We want to do whatever we can to help but we can't change our provincial legislation for federal employees. We've got to make sure that the federal government is doing what they are saying they are going to do.

TAMMY MARTIN « » : I find that ironic that the Premier, the Minister of Business and the member for Sydney-Whitney Pier signed letters in support of this issue.

The people who were injured in the mines deserve to have ongoing support as long as they need it. Since they were federal employees when they were injured, the federal government is responsible for paying for their extended benefits. All the province has to do - and I'll table the letter from Public Services and Procurement Canada to this effect - is to amend the WCB Act to provide earnings replacement benefits for this specific group of workers past the age of 65.

Mr. Speaker, with this information now, will the Minister of Business encourage his government to make the simple legislative change to allow the federal government to provide these disabled miners with continued means of survival?

GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : This is part of the issue and this is why people get so upset with politicians, we can't categorize this in a way that's that simple. We can't simply make an amendment to the Workers' Compensation Act for one group of employees who are federal employees. It's impossible to do.

If the federal government has that focus and they want to help the Devco miners, they should. The Premier, the member for Sydney-Whitney Pier, and myself, we did write support letters when we met with the Devco miners - all of us a number of times. We do support their position that they believe their benefits should be extended in perpetuity. If the federal government wants to do that, we can help them find a mechanism to do that. They are federal employees, it's a federal Act. If there's a way for the province to help ensure that that money gets to those Devco workers we can, but we can't do it by amending provincial legislation.

This has been explained very unfairly to the point where there's an anger and a focus on the province. This is a federal government responsibility. We'll play a role and support the Devco miners, but the federal government has to do their job here.

[Page 3353]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

GOV'T. (N.S.) - MLA FOR YAR.: ALLEGATIONS - ACTION

BARBARA ADAMS « » : So we just heard the last two government ministers and Premier saying that they don't like our anger and focus on the government and what they're doing but, frankly, we were not elected to be the government's cheerleaders, we were elected to hold this government accountable for how they are spending our money - or should I say the taxpayers' money. That's our job and we're going to do it, despite their discomfort with it.

My question is to the Premier - and it is never too late to do the right thing. The Premier said many times that he wasn't previously aware of allegations against the member for Yarmouth or he would have acted, yet now that he knows, the Premier has refused to do anything concrete. The question is: Why is that, Mr. Premier?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, again I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to tell her that the letter that was sent to you on Monday that was cc'd to myself and the other Leaders in this House, referred by two former members, allegations in those letters. Also, as part of that letter it was said that I was informed of this back in 2013.

I took this issue seriously. The next morning, I looked through my entire records in the Premier's Office, as well as those in my constituency office, Mr. Speaker. At no time did I have any correspondence from there.

Let me be very clear, Mr. Speaker, at no time - at no time - did anyone tell me that anyone on my team was in a physical altercation with anyone in this House.

BARBARA ADAMS « » : Mr. Speaker, if members of this House, including me, are to feel free to do their job free from intimidation, we need strong leadership of this government. Yet the Premier has repeated many times that the key effort he took was to undertake a thorough search of his correspondence to make sure that he isn't held accountable for what was happening with his own caucus years ago.

To paraphrase Bob Seger, he's quite happy to act like he doesn't know now the things he didn't know then. But he does know now, and Nova Scotians know that he knows now. Even Dr. A.J., in "NSHA bullying physicians," in the first paragraph says, "but the premier has refused a review of allegations by three MLAs of harassment by the minister of education." Nova Scotians want to know, even if he doesn't want to tell us.

My question for the Premier, one last time: Is the Premier prepared to take any additional steps to learn the facts about the accusations that have been levied against his minister by a current sitting member of the Legislature or all those previous members who experienced the same thing?

[Page 3354]

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, again, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to tell her that that letter came to you, Mr. Speaker. The honourable member should know by now that you're the person in charge of Province House, not the Premier.

Those two former members - the allegations that were brought forward - I saw no . . . (Interruption)

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage will retract that statement that I heard very clearly.

BARBARA ADAMS « » : I'll retract the statement.

THE SPEAKER « » : Thank you. The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Again, I want to thank the honourable member for her question. I can tell you that the information that was brought to my attention was looked into. I saw no evidence it was related to information that had come to me.

Those two former members are no longer members of this House. I too read the article that the honourable member quoted from. There were zero facts throughout the entire article, which referenced a number of issues, but I will continue to say that the issue of violence is one that this government takes seriously. It's why we continue to invest in the sexual violence strategy across the province.

At any time, if it's brought to my attention that there has been a physical altercation with any members of our team, with anyone in this House or outside, I will take action.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

H&W: COM. HEALTH CTR. MODEL - MIN. AWARENESS

KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health and Wellness. I recently met with members of the Nova Scotia Association of Community Health Centres. They represent a community health model that helps reach the most vulnerable - 30 per cent of the population - with timely preventive care. They also provide that critical local voice that often gets lost in health care after the consolidation of health authorities. We all know that we're losing their local voices.

I will ask the minister: Is he familiar with the community health centre model and its role in filling the many gaps in our health care system?

[Page 3355]

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I am familiar with the organization and the work that they do and their community-based health care delivery. Much of the work they do really is modelled on and is very similar to the collaborative practice teams that are being established across the province, bringing together a group of health care professionals to provide the care that's needed to Nova Scotians in communities from one end of the province to the other.

We continue to invest to ensure that Nova Scotians do get access and those primary care health needs are met.

KARLA MACFARLANE « » : I thank the minister for his answer, but the reason why I'm asking this question is because the Nova Scotia Association of Community Health Centres has been trying to get the minister's attention and have his ear. These health centres want a place at the table and recognition of the role they play in our communities. They have a focus on social influences on health, which are critical for managing health issues that can later end up in expensive emergency visits. It seems to me that the minister and the NSHA would want to meet this group.

My question is: Will the minister commit to sitting down with this association as soon as possible? They've been asking for a year.

RANDY DELOREY « » : Again, Mr. Speaker, the work that's ongoing within the department and the Health Authority to meet the primary care needs of Nova Scotians - we recognize that the primary concern is Nova Scotians getting attached to primary care providers.

That's why we continue to put a focus on our investments in collaborative care teams and our recruitment and retention initiatives, to modify the incentive programs. We expanded the training opportunities for nurse practitioners and the training opportunities for physicians to meet those needs. We continue to invest another $10 million this year to establish and expand those collaborative care teams in communities across the province.

So again, we continue to respond to the expectations of Nova Scotians to improve access to primary care from one end of the province to the other.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank.

JUSTICE - HOME DEATHS: CORONER'S OFF. - DEPT. POLICY

BRAD JOHNS « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the minister responsible for the coroner's office. A former constituent of mine recently passed away suddenly at home. He was pronounced deceased by a doctor over the phone, with EHS paramedics present. I do have the authorization from his family to talk about this although I will not say his name now.

[Page 3356]

Mr. Speaker, his family was surprised to learn that the body would remain in the kitchen where he passed until the coroner's office came to remove it. It took six hours, despite repeated calls to the coroner's office from the RCMP for somebody to show up and remove his body.

Will the minister please commit to explaining to the bereaved family how departmental policy would allow such a clearly traumatizing incident to occur?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : I appreciate the question from my colleague. I wasn't previously aware of these circumstances, Mr. Speaker. There is a body removal service contract in place for purposes and circumstances such as this. I would be more than willing to speak with my colleague and get the specific details of this matter and look into it further.

BRAD JOHNS « » : I thank the minister. I'm sure the minister will appreciate the stress and emotion that was involved in the situation. Let me repeat, the family was in the room with the body for over six hours while their loved one laid on the floor where he had fallen. Mr. Speaker, clearly these circumstances are unacceptable.

I'd like to know if the minister would please commit to reviewing the procedures surrounding the removal of bodies by the coroner's office to ensure that this does not happen again and that bodies are removed in a timely manner.

MARK FUREY « » : I acknowledge my colleague's points that these are very traumatic circumstances for a family to experience and the stress associated to those circumstances would be very difficult. I do want to say to my colleague that he doesn't have to wait to bring these types of questions to the floor of the Legislature, he can engage me at any time, as many of his colleagues have, to address these circumstances in a very timely and efficient manner. I commit to that.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

COM. SERV.: CHILD/YOUTH ADVOCATE OFF. - FUNDING

SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services. Earlier this week in Committee on Law Amendments, Alec Stratford, Executive Director/Registrar of the Nova Scotia College of Social Workers, spoke about the need for a child and youth advocate office in this province. Mr. Stratford called for the government to establish an advocate office with a broad mandate to look at systemic issues affecting young people.

Mr. Speaker, can the minister explain why we don't see funding for a child and youth advocate office in this budget?

[Page 3357]

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. Indeed, currently the Office of the Ombudsman takes on this particular role. They do visit all our facilities where young people are housed. When a young person comes into care, they are let know that if they feel if at any time their rights have been trampled, that they can contact the Ombudsman's Office.

I want to let the honourable member know that in fact we do know they make regular use of that ability. One of the other issues is that we have been waiting for the second report from the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children to come out to see if that gave us any direction on that particular issue.

SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia is the only province in Canada that does not have a child and youth advocate office in place. In documents we received in response to a freedom of information request, an email from September 19, 2018, says that DCS would like to spearhead the creation of a child and youth advocate office.

Mr. Speaker, can the minister explain what has changed between September and now?

KELLY REGAN « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. Again, I think I've answered that in my previous answer, that in fact we do have the Ombudsman's Office that is fulfilling this particular role at this time.

We know that young people do make use of the services that are available from the Ombudsman's Office. The Ombudsman does go out regularly to our child caring facilities to, in fact, engage with young people. I want to let her know that this is an issue that we are certainly examining, and we did want more information on the Home for Colored Children report.

[10:30 a.m.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

TIR - DOMINION ST. BYPASS: TRAFFIC LIGHTS - CONFIRM

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : My question today is for the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

Kameron Collieries is a private company that has made a huge investment in the economy of Cape Breton Island. Part of that investment is the building of a road to bypass the very busy community of Dominion Street.

The Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal is responsible for building the entrance and the exit on this new road. One of the exits is on the Glace Bay Highway, which is a very busy road - four lanes wide. My understanding is that there is no intention of putting a traffic light system there. I think that would be a serious mistake.

[Page 3358]

I am wondering if the minister would let us know if there will be traffic lights there because the quantity of coal trucks moving across two lanes of traffic to get into the traffic flow could be a very dangerous situation for the motoring public.

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : I thank the member for bringing the matter forward. Yes, we are engaged in making some changes there to alleviate the emergence of the significant truck traffic. There is significant investment on behalf of the company in the private portion of the road. We intend, of course, once we get the intersections up, to review those in terms of our traffic control processes with our experts and study the volumes. A decision will be made to make sure that intersection is safe.

ALFIE MACLEOD « » : I want to thank the minister for the answer to that question.

Mr. Speaker, this may very well be my very last question in the House of Assembly, so it goes to the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. I have to know, I have to know - what is his plan for the New Boston Road? (Standing Ovation)

LLOYD HINES « » : I thank the member for the question. I think it will be a sad day to see the last of him in the House.

However, the department is receiving significant constant input from the three residents of the New Boston Road, and there is a recommendation that the name of that road be changed to the Alfie MacLeod Road. (Applause). We are carefully studying that option.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

H&W - INCORRECT HEALTH RECORDS: TRACKING - COMMENT

BARBARA ADAMS « » : That is good news, Mr. Speaker.

My question is to the Minister of Health and Wellness. I had a constituent visit the ER at Christmas time, where the doctor immediately interviewed him about the surgery he recently had to treat his lung cancer. The problem is, he didn't have lung cancer and he hadn't had surgery.

This gentleman and his wife attempted for quite a while to get his records corrected but despite calling medical records, who contacted Nova Scotia Health Authority lawyers, they were told that they couldn't undo what was already in the record.

It took a call from my office to remind the medical records department of the Personal Health Information Act and that they could, in fact, correct the records. It shouldn't take a call to an MLA's office. I would like to ask the Minister of Health and Wellness: Is his department tracking how many times the wrong records end up on somebody's medical record chart? How many times has this happened in the past year?

[Page 3359]

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, the member clearly highlighted the importance of accurate health care information being available both to patients and health care providers. With that in mind, we are embarking upon an investment to provide new technology and systems that have auditing mechanisms in place and provide a single repository for health care records - the One Patient One Record initiative.

As far as the specific data that the member has requested, I don't have those types of details right here on hand.

BARBARA ADAMS « » : The minister indicated that he might have those answers. If so, I would appreciate having a copy of it. Everyone knows that health records are extremely private, but there are often times when they get labelled inappropriately and people end up with the wrong records.

I had an opportunity to speak with the minister about the fact that another constituent had gotten copies of a continuing care plan for a member of his family, but it belonged to someone else. Then the next week, he got a second continuing care plan from a private agency and that also belonged to someone else. Then he got a third continuing care plan that did, indeed, have his family member's name on it, but none of the information was correct.

Can the minister tell me if he's tracking how many times there are errors when it's a private agency that's hired by the Nova Scotia Health Authority?

RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, we do indeed have the Personal Health Information Act (PHIA), which does identify the responsibilities of custodians of personal health care information and their obligations to ensure the accuracy and the reporting of any issues or breaches that go beyond the purview or issues particularly with inappropriate access or breaches of that information.

They are clearly laid out through that legislation. All custodians, from physicians to throughout the health care system, that legislation would apply to personal health information.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton-Richmond.

COM. SERV.: HIGH C.B. POVERTY RATES - UNACCEPTABLE

[Page 3360]

ALANA PAON « » : Mr. Speaker, a child living in poverty is at a very high risk to become an adult living in poverty. A generation has passed since 1989 when all Parties in the House of Commons passed a resolution to end child poverty by the year 2000.

Since that time, the child poverty rate in Nova Scotia has soared instead to 19 per cent. In 2015, 35,890 children across this province were living in low-income families. In 2015, the Canadian Centre for Policy Research revealed statistics showing more than one in five children in Nova Scotia live in a low- income household, but the federal riding of Cape Breton-Canso is one in four. In the federal riding of Sydney-Victoria, it is one in three.

Does the Minister of Community Services find it acceptable that Cape Breton has among the highest poverty rates in the province?

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I think it's quite similar to one she asked me in Estimates yesterday. As I indicated, since that time when those statistics came out, there have been a number of investments - federally and provincially - and I walked her through the investments that have been made by the federal government, which included in 2017-18 nearly $600 million coming to the families of this province to assist.

In addition to that, we've been making our investments as well. We have been building income security for families here in Nova Scotia. One of the things that I spoke about, for example, is a project that's under way in Cape Breton to get workers to work because we found out that there were actually a thousand jobs that were going unfilled in Cape Breton because people actually couldn't get transportation. That's one of many things we're doing. and I will outline those in my second answer.

ALANA PAON « » : Mr. Speaker, yes, yesterday in Estimates, as the minister points out, I did ask her questions on this. She pointed out that child poverty on Cape Breton Island has always been an issue, referring to it as a "statistical outlier." I can tell you that sometimes we do feel that way.

The federal riding of Cape Breton-Canso has the second highest level of child poverty in all of Nova Scotia. My provincial constituency is within this federal riding, and it concerns me to hear those numbers. It especially concerns me to know that children on Cape Breton Island are living in such disadvantaged circumstances.

As the minister admits that she does not know why the rates for childhood poverty are so high on Cape Breton Island, is she prepared to ask the government to please commission a report to finally find answers for these children and their families who continue to go without - historically go without?

KELLY REGAN « » : As I indicated to the honourable member, the numbers that came out recently from Statistics Canada were from 2017, which is before we began making a number of investments across this province, including things like allowing people who are living on income assistance to keep more of the money they earn when they are able to earn. That was the first part of the standard household rate; later this year, we will roll out the second part of the standard household rate.

[Page 3361]

That's not all we're doing; we are taking a number of steps. What I would point out to the honourable member is that there have been things like doubling the Poverty Reduction Credit. There are all kinds of different things we're doing, and it's not just our department.

If we look at the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, for example, the free pre-Primary program is an anti-poverty program. We know that children who go through a program like this do better in school and are more likely not to have involvement with the health care system. We know that we have free breakfast programs in 93 per cent of our schools across this province.

I hope to see her back at Budget Estimates, and we'll talk about it more.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

H&W - BUCHANAN HOSPITAL: MED. LAB POSITION - STATUS

KEITH BAIN « » : My question is to the Minister of Health and Wellness. Recently it was announced by the Health Authority that the medical laboratory position at Buchanan Memorial Hospital will be reinstated and that the posting for the position will go out. This was very welcome news to all the communities north of Smokey and the staff at Buchanan.

My question to the minister: Could the minister please inform the House as to whether or not this position has been posted and the duration of the posting?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : It is my understanding that the posting should be up. I haven't looked at the job postings for the Health Authority myself to validate that, but all Nova Scotians - any lab technicians that have that expertise - could go to the website with the career postings and verify.

As far as how long the posting goes up, I'm not sure. I think there's usually a standard duration of maybe a few weeks or a month, but I don't know exactly how long it's open while they're seeking candidates.

I will advise the member that if a position goes unfulfilled, they do evaluate why they think it may have been unfulfilled and re-post the posting at a future date.

KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm sure the minister realizes the importance of having the continuance of this position at the hospital while the posting takes please. Very simply, I want to ask the minister: Can he guarantee that the position will continue to have a technologist in place until this position has been permanently filled?

[Page 3362]

RANDY DELOREY « » : I believe efforts are being made to ensure the continuity of the services being delivered there. That's part of the work that's going on, but again, it does rely on people with the appropriate skillsets being willing and able and available to fill that space. I can't give 100 per cent certainty, but the efforts are being made to ensure that they do have continuity of those services.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

IMMIGR.: RETENTION OF IMMIGRANTS - STRATEGIES

LISA ROBERTS « » : My question is for the Minister of Immigration. A 2017 Conference Board of Canada report on immigration to Atlantic Canada discussed strategies for strengthening retention of immigrants to the region.

One challenge identified is that the province has cast a wide net and has been selecting immigrants based on their ability to integrate economically rather than on developing a critical mass of immigrants from certain countries and placing weight on their family or social ties to the region. Private sponsorship of refugees is often used as a tool for family reunification.

Mr. Speaker, is the minister lobbying her federal counterparts to allow Nova Scotia to welcome more refugees?

HON. LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : Let me take the opportunity to once again thank all Nova Scotians for the support when they supported and sponsored so many refugees to this province.

Sitting at the FPT tables, I can tell you that Nova Scotia was loudly talked about because in this province at that time, when that hit in 2015-16, on a per capita basis we sponsored the most privately-sponsored refugees across the country as a percentage. That is something I'm very proud of.

I'm also proud to say that many, many, many of our families, groups of five, organizations have continued to work and to sponsor and to bring families of those who are already here.

LISA ROBERTS « » : Sponsoring groups provide refugees with lodging, settlement assistance, and support for their first year in Canada. In 2004, groups in Manitoba established a private refugee sponsorship assurance program to guarantee financial support to Sponsorship Agreement Holders and constituent groups that undertook family or community-linked refugee sponsorship in the unlikely event of a breakdown in sponsorship. It meant that church and community groups that sponsored the loved ones of a resettled refugee were covered if somebody integral to the sponsorship died or got sick and couldn't support the sponsoree during that first year.

[Page 3363]

[10:45 a.m.]

Mr. Speaker, given the heartfelt desire of many newcomers in Nova Scotia to be reunited with family members, will the minister commit to establishing a provincial assurance fund for Sponsorship Agreement Holders in Nova Scotia?

LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : It also gives me the opportunity to inform members and all Nova Scotians of something that I don't know if many had known at the time, but in 2015-16, this province, with the help of the Premier, my office staff, and others, brought together all Nova Scotia stakeholders - all SAPs; all agreement holders from the churches; from ISANS; EMOs; all settlement partners - brought them all together and we actually formed a committee in anticipation of what could possibly happen. It was as a result of that, that we have been able to retain and support all of the refugees that are here. It's because of that, that they have all virtually, probably 99 per cent, have stayed and have brought many more families to this province, and we continue to do that.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

H&W - DAL UNIV. GRADS: RETURN OF SERV. AGREEMENT - CONFIRM

EDDIE ORRELL « » : My question is to the Minister of Health and Wellness. In Estimates, the Minister of Health and Wellness stated that when an international medical grad lands a Dalhousie University residency seat in their first round of the matching system under the Canadian Resident Matching Service, they have to sign a Return of Service agreement. This agreement binds them to five years of medical practice in an underserved area of the province; this seems like exactly the sort of thing that can help our rural and underserved communities, like many in Cape Breton, to keep healthy and growing.

My question to the minister: Is it true that Dalhousie University students that are able to do a residency here do not have a Return of Service agreement as a term of their residency?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : The residency spaces themselves that are for national students are part of the national program that they, in and of themselves, do not have a Return of Service associated with them. That's part of the training program and initiatives but associated with tuition relief, debt forgiveness, and other incentive programs that we have, does help support residents that have training in Nova Scotia and may choose to stay here. We make those available so that they do have a Return of Service associated with those financial supports.

[Page 3364]

EDDIE ORRELL « » : I really believe that these agreements would help more Nova Scotians secure reliable, quality health care in our communities and, beyond that, it would help medical grads from here in Nova Scotia stay in their communities, grow their families, and help build the generational fabric that keeps these communities alive.

My question is to the minister is: Will the minister commit to sitting down with Dalhousie University and others, to chat about how we might better leverage Return of Service agreements for graduates seeking residencies here?

RANDY DELOREY « » : Conversations continue and are ongoing with our partners throughout the health care system, from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia looking at various licensing opportunities for different classifications of physician services that they can provide at the Dalhousie University, Faculty of Medicine; and work with the residency physicians themselves, who are needed to provide supervision preceptor for both residents and the Practice-Ready Assessment; and the Health Authorities as well.

We continue to engage in those conversations ongoing throughout the year to come up with strategies and initiatives and opportunities to change. It's one of the reasons we've expanded the number of residency seats - 10 family physicians, 15 specialists in Nova Scotia - the only province to do so.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, my last question will be this. Last session, the minister proposed to be a UFO buff, the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. Is that really true? I ask, because six months later no sign has appeared on Highway No. 103 to identify Shag Harbour and its significance. Apparently, he's waiting for the day the earth stood still until he agrees Shag Harbour is big enough, mysterious enough, and truly a final frontier that deserves a sign, at the very best.

Mr. Speaker, when are we going to get a sign for Shag Harbour?

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for Oral Questions Put by Members to Ministers has expired.

The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

CLAUDIA CHENDER « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction.

THE SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

CLAUDIA CHENDER « » : I'd like to draw the members' attention to the gallery opposite where my predecessor, the former MLA for Dartmouth South, Marian Mancini has joined us today. I'd like everyone to join me in giving her a warm welcome. (Applause)

[Page 3365]

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole on Supply unto Her Majesty.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

[11:03 a.m. The House resolved itself into a CW on Supply with Deputy Speaker Suzanne Lohnes-Croft in the Chair.]

[3:12 p.m. CW on Supply rose and the House reconvened. The Speaker, Hon. Kevin Murphy, resumed the Chair.]

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The Chair of the Committee of the Whole on Supply reports:

THE CLERK » : That the Committee of the Whole on Supply has met and has come to agreement on 50 Estimate resolutions, including votes on business plans and on capital. The Chair has been instructed to recommend these Estimates to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House concur in the report of the Committee of the Whole on Supply.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye.

There has been a request for a recorded vote. We will ring the bells until the Whips are satisfied.

[3:12 p.m.]

[Page 3366]

[The Division bells were rung.]

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Are the Whips satisfied?

The Whips are now satisfied.

I would ask that all members please remain completely silent while the Clerks conduct the vote. When your name is called, please stand tall and state a very clear "Yea" or "Nay."

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:13 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. ChurchillMr. Dunn
Mr. FureyMr. Bain
Ms. ReganMs. Masland
Mr. MacLellanMs. MacFarlane
Mr. McNeilMr. Houston
Ms. CaseyMr. MacMaster
Mr. GlavineMs. Chender
Mr. DeloreyMr. Burrill
Ms. MillerMs. Roberts
Mr. KousoulisMs. Leblanc
Mr. WilsonMs. Martin
Mr. PorterMs. Smith-McCrossin
Mr. HinesMr. Halman
Ms. Metlege DiabMr. d'Entremont
Mr. InceMr. Orrell
Mr. RankinMs. Adams
Mr. MombourquetteMr. Lohr
Ms. ArabMr. Johns
Mr. HorneMs. Paon
Mr. JessomeMr. Rushton
Mr. MacKayMr. MacLeod
Mr. MaguireMr. Harrison
Ms. Lohnes-Croft 
Ms. DiCostanzo 
Mr. Irving 

[3:15 p.m.]

[Page 3367]

THE CLERK « » : For, 25. Against, 22.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Introduction of Bills.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 151 - Entitled an Act to Provide for Defraying Certain Charges and Expenses of the Public Service of the Province. (Hon. K. Casey)

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 151, the Appropriations Act, 2019, be now read a second time.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 151.

There has been a call for a recorded vote. We will ring the bells until the Whips are satisfied.

We will ring the bells for 20 minutes.

[3:18 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

THE SPEAKER « » : Order please. Are the Whips satisfied?

The Whips are satisfied.

The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 151. The Clerks will now proceed with the recorded vote. I'll remind all members to stand up with a simple "yea" or "nay."

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:38 p.m.]

[Page 3368]

YEASNAYS
Mr. ChurchillMr. Dunn
Mr. FureyMr. Bain
Ms. ReganMs. Masland
Mr. MacLellanMs. MacFarlane
Mr. McNeilMr. Houston
Ms. CaseyMr. MacMaster
Mr. GlavineMs. Chender
Mr. DeloreyMr. Burrill
Ms. MillerMs. Roberts
Mr. KousoulisMs. Leblanc
Mr. WilsonMs. Martin
Mr. PorterMs. Smith-McCrossin
Mr. HinesMr. Halman
Ms. Metlege DiabMr. d'Entremont
Mr. InceMr. Orrell
Mr. RankinMs. Adams
Mr. MombourquetteMr. Lohr
Ms. ArabMr. Johns
Mr. HorneMs. Paon
Mr. JessomeMr. Rushton
Mr. MacKayMr. MacLeod
Mr. MaguireMr. Harrison
Ms. Lohnes-Croft 
Ms. DiCostanzo 
Mr. Irving 

THE CLERK « » : For, 25. Against, 22.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 151, the Appropriations Act (2019), be now read a third time and do pass.

THE SPEAKER « » : There has been a call for a recorded vote.

We'll ring the bells for one hour.

[3:41 p.m.]

[Page 3369]

[The Division bells were rung.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Are the Whips satisfied?

The Whips are satisfied.

The motion is for third reading on Bill No. 151. A reminder to please remain silent during the vote and please stand tall when your name is called, with a simple "Yea" or "Nay." The Clerks will now conduct the recorded vote.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[4:41 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. ChurchillMr. Dunn
Mr. FureyMr. Bain
Ms. ReganMs. Masland
Mr. MacLellanMs. MacFarlane
Mr. McNeilMr. Houston
Ms. CaseyMr. MacMaster
Mr. GlavineMs. Chender
Mr. DeloreyMr. Burrill
Ms. MillerMs. Roberts
Mr. KousoulisMs. Leblanc
Mr. WilsonMs. Martin
Mr. PorterMs. Smith-McCrossin
Mr. HinesMr. Halman
Ms. Metlege DiabMr. d'Entremont
Mr. InceMr. Orrell
Mr. RankinMs. Adams
Mr. MombourquetteMr. Lohr
Ms. ArabMr. Johns
Mr. HorneMs. Paon
Mr. JessomeMr. Rushton
Mr. MacKayMr. MacLeod
Mr. MaguireMr. Harrison
Ms. Lohnes-Croft  
Ms. DiCostanzo 
Mr. Irving 

[Page 3370]

THE CLERK « » : For, 25. Against, 22.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Third Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR THIRD READING

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 122.

Bill No. 122 - An Act to incorporate the Pine Grove Cemetery Company, Lower Stewiacke, Colchester County.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley. (Applause)

LARRY HARRISON « » : I was going to say, Mr. Speaker, I am going to try to get it right this time, and my colleagues are going to curb their enthusiasm.

I move that Bill No. 122 be now read a third time and do pass.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 122. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third Reading.

[4:45 p.m.]

[Page 3371]

PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you call Bill No. 133.

Bill No. 133 - Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 133, the Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act, be now read a third time and do pass.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, it is with great honour that I stand in my place to speak to Bill No. 133.

I'd like to extend my gratitude to the Minister of Health and Wellness for arranging a meeting between our caucus and Dr. Beed, who clarified a number of concerns with regard to a few clauses in this bill.

If there was ever a bill in the past couple of years that propelled us all to reflect deeply on our loved ones and as well on our own mortality, it is this one. Over the past week, I have had many intense and emotional conversations, but we all know it is through the spirit of conversation and respect that we give and receive valuable knowledge and wisdom. I also believe the more unexpected something is the more there is to learn from it.

There are a lot of citizens not in support of this bill for reasons we must all respect and accept. Many believe this bill is too intrusive. I want them to know that I understand, and I am sincerely mindful of their opinions.

Many believe this bill brings no evidence of any future change and what the process involves now. Perhaps they are correct, but my hope for this piece of legislation is to motivate all of us to start talking; to talk more about organ donations.

I believe the colossal task in making this bill successful will be ensuring there will be an effective and efficient educational and awareness campaign. I implore the Liberal government to invest much focus on this aspect of the bill, considering in 2017 they dissolved the Legacy of Life program throughout rural Nova Scotia. Nurses working for this program were only given a 30-day notice that the program would be centralized out of Halifax.

[Page 3372]

The Legacy of Life program was created in 2006, and the program is guided by the vision of ensuring all Nova Scotians know about organ and tissue donation. The program serves as a lifeline for recipients, donors, and families who have many worthy questions before, during, and sometimes more importantly, after the transplant.

My amendments yesterday would have been added support or one could consider them as a replacement of what this government eliminated in the Legacy of Life program. Mr. Speaker, I have stood in my place during second reading of this bill and expressed my sincere personal views.

I am a proponent of this bill. I've defended this bill because I deeply believe if one life is saved by the passing of this bill it will be worth it. Mr. Speaker, 300 people died in Canada last year waiting for an organ donor. This is heartbreaking, and we need to ensure that number reaches zero.

I shall leave you with this, Mr. Speaker, death befalls all of us. May we all embrace the value of self-sacrifice as a gift given and received.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to speak briefly to this bill and in support of it on behalf of the New Democratic Party caucus.

I am lucky to have a bit of a personal window into the importance of this issue in that my constituency assistant Reena Davis was a recipient of a kidney just over a year ago. I knew her in the years as her kidney function was failing, and yet she was still a very inspiring example of a Nova Scotian living to the very fullest of her capacities.

We first met when she was a volunteer yoga instructor at Veith House when I was executive director there. For quite a long time I didn't know she was facing this particular challenge as her kidney function was decreasing. Then I stumbled upon her blog where she wrote about her experience and I gained some insight into the anxiety, the sense of lack of control, and just that tremendous ache of being in need of something, and not knowing if it would come.

I know that is the experience of many people who are waiting for organs as a result of various conditions, and I think if this bill lives up to its potential, what we are at the moment of doing is really increasing the capacity of many Nova Scotians to spend a shorter time in that waiting period because we hope there will be greater ease in connecting willing donors, suitable donors, with Nova Scotians who are in need. So, I am certainly in support.

Organ and tissue donation are something that most of us have the privilege of not needing to think about on a regular basis. Most of us don't expect that we will ever need one or perhaps that we will ever be in a position to give one, but the need is significant.

[Page 3373]

There are currently 186 people in Atlantic Canada awaiting organ donations; 125 in Nova Scotia. Across the country and in our province, there is a critical shortage of donors and the reasons for that are somewhat complex. Only some individuals would qualify as donors, depending on how they die and what kind of health they are in at that moment, and then not every donor is the right match for a recipient. Perhaps most significantly, suitable donors are not always identified, and their wishes are not always acted on.

This change in legislation, which changes our current opt-in system to an opt-out system, should go some distance towards remedying that situation and it really should be a point of pride for us to be the first jurisdiction in Canada to be an opt-out system.

There is another part of this equation, though, that needs considering and certainly this is a conversation that has taken up a lot of our time in this House and, which will be of no surprise to any Nova Scotian, there are real concerns about the capacity of our health care system. Do we have the health professionals, the equipment, the training in sufficient supply to ensure an effective system for handling an increased number of transplants?

We know from experience that even the most positive of policy changes can create a burden on a system if they are not also matched with investment. We've talked about this in the context of the government's plan to improve ambulance response times because in isolation, while that seems like a good thing, there are concerns about how our already overwhelmed emergency rooms might handle an increased patient flow. There is no question that our health system at this moment is at its capacity and beyond its capacity.

It would be useful to know what, if any, planned investment will accompany this bill to accommodate an increase in organ donors.

Another question raised by this legislation: Who will be considered an eligible donor? Members of the LGBTQ community are expressing concern about discrimination in the organ and tissue donation process and whether gay men, in particular, will face restrictions under the new legislation.

After about 25 years of not being a blood donor, I became a blood donor again. I have travelled and that ruled me out for some time. Then I was a mum and just incredibly busy and incredibly tired and it took me a while to sign up again. After a period of time where a family member needed many, many pints, I made it a priority and I became a donor again while I was already an MLA.

It is an incredibly moving thing actually to go to sign up there and sit there with people waiting for blood to come out of your body, and I always feel a little bit hesitant, as much as I want to share that I am doing that and maybe promote some of the stories that I hear there, which are very moving - it is just a very humble and very genuine space where people are showing up to give what they can give out of the goodness of their heart. It's such a great thing about our health care system that that is done freely. But at the same time the fact that so many of our fellow citizens are not able to participate in that makes me actually quite hesitant to talk about it, and I think I have some similar hesitations about this bill.

[Page 3374]

We have some important questions but, on the whole, this is an encouraging step for our province to be taking. I hope it will inspire other jurisdictions to switch to an opt-out system, so we can reduce the national number of people dying while waiting for organ and tissue transplants to zero. That would certainly be a good thing for us all.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Environment.

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Today I rise to speak on Bill No. 133, the Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act. This bill is very special to me because 15 years ago our family had to make that decision. Our son Bruce had been declared brain dead after being hit by a drunk driver. Bruce was only 26, a Springhill police officer. Seeing him lying there was the biggest shock of our lives.

Nurses immediately asked us to think about organ donation. We were stunned, we were puzzled, and we were numb, but after painful consideration we believed that it was the right thing to do.

The thing is, Mr. Speaker, that Bruce had not signed his donor card and we wondered if he believed in donation. We had never had that conversation - did he or did he not? If we donated his organs, would it be what he wanted? We thought so, but what if we were wrong?

After consideration of Bruce's core values and his desire to help others, we decided to donate. Some time later we learned that a musician from Amherst received his liver, and we have met Mike Blakeney; Bruce's heart went to a 62-year-old man; one kidney went to a 31-year old Halifax man, who had been on dialysis for five years; and the other kidney went to a New Brunswick recipient - which actually answers one of the questions that came from the House: What happens if we have organs and a recipient is not available in Nova Scotia?

We later learned from Bruce's friend Becky Cameron, a paramedic, that Bruce believed that everything should be donated. I could finally draw a breath of relief knowing that we had unknowingly followed Bruce's wishes.

Mr. Speaker, most people agree with donations but don't specify on their licence - Bruce was one of those. Imagine the lives of four people who are alive today and their generations follow them who are alive because of Bruce's final gift. Ironically, just over a year ago my husband required a donation of corneal cells, the gift of life, the circle of life.

[Page 3375]

I want to thank the Premier for being a champion of this bill. He will never know the full impact it will make on people's lives. (Standing Ovation)

[5:00 p.m.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, I won't be long. I want to thank the Minister of Environment for those strong words and to know that Bruce not only lives in the minds and in your hearts but also lives in different people, in their minds and their families and their hearts. I think we all shared that with you and to understand that love that you have for your son - sorry for the "you," but in this particular case, it was a heartfelt thank you to your family for your sharing of Bruce. Thank you so, so much. (Applause)

There's the example of why this is an important bill. For those of us who have had friends and family who have been touched by organ donation, whether on the receiving end or on the donating end, we understand the importance of giving life. I've had a number of friends who have received kidneys. I have friends who have received hearts. I have a father-in-law who gave tissues. All of it sort of puts a lot of these things into our view and understanding of how important organ donation is.

The issue of opting in or opting out is a bit of a red herring. How many people have we talked to in the past, when you ask them if they are a donor and they say no because they forgot fill out the paper? They imply they want to be, yet the paperwork's not done. They might not have had the conversation with their families. I think this bill, and it's flipping things around a little bit, puts them first. They are donors until they opt out.

If I'm to say anything of how to improve these things it's three things: education, education, and education to make sure that Nova Scotians understand how to deal with this issue. The member for Pictou West spoke very eloquently about the issue of - what was the name of the program again, Legacy of Life? There has to be a way to have those conversations that I think the Minister of Environment's family had to face at that time. To have those people around to comfort them, but to also explain to them the urgency sometimes of having to get those donations up and running and get them working and get them to the recipients that have been waiting for them for so long.

I stand in this House quite often and I talk about dialysis in the southwest. Many of those people who are receiving dialysis today could so well be helped by receiving a kidney - my kidney, your kidney, somebody's kidney - and that can hopefully be helped with a bill like this one today. I hope again that the government works hard to educate Nova Scotians to make sure this is the best program we can possibly make. Thank you for the opportunity to speak.

[Page 3376]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Armdale.

HON. LENA METLEGE DIAB « » : It's a privilege and an honour to rise and make brief comments about Bill No. 133, the Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act.

I want to start by thanking the Premier for his leadership on this bill and for his clear passion on the important issue of organ and tissue donation. To be frank, I have learned a great deal on this topic from the introduction of the bill, to its readings here in the House, through the presentations given in Law Amendments Committee. I was fortunate to attend the bill briefing when the Premier introduced the bill. I heard directly from donors, recipients, doctors, media, and the general public.

The stories I heard, and the facts presented were moving. I think they underscore the need for this policy shift. I'm grateful I've had the chance to clear up a number of misconceptions and learn what the bill is and what it is not. I want to highlight a few of those misconceptions.

Government has been clear about the exceptions. Those under 19 and those without decision-making capacity will be exempt and will only be considered donors if a parent, guardian, or substitute decision maker opts them in.

I also want to stress this point: organs will only be taken from a potential donor if there is a medical suitability. The organ will not be harvested, and it will not be stored. There actually needs to be a match to a person waiting for the donation to be transplanted.

It's also clear in the bill that deemed consent does not include consent for scientific research or educational purposes, unless you so desire and opt in.

Though we in Nova Scotia will be trailblazers on this issue in the North American context, it's important to remind all Nova Scotians that other jurisdictions have seen success with an opt-out system. Indeed, we need only look to the Spanish example, where we see decades of evidence to support this policy shift. We have good reason to believe that this could bring about a 20 to 30 per cent increase in the donation rate, and that increase, coupled with the appropriate support, which our Premier has committed to providing, should lead to a better system for all Nova Scotians.

I want to return for a moment to the fundamental importance of organ donation. Every day and in every community, there are Nova Scotians waiting to receive an organ or tissue donation that they need. Indeed, I learned that Nova Scotians are six times more likely to need an organ than to donate one.

We don't like to think of parts of our physical bodies as gifts, but these donations really are gifts. They are blessings to those who receive them.

[Page 3377]

Organ donations save lives, but even when they don't directly save a life, they can still give new life to a recipient, changing the sphere of what's possible for them. I want to briefly comment on two individuals in my life who are affected by this matter.

Mr. Speaker, I think of one member of my extended family, who is my age and has three young children, and has been waiting for years for a kidney transplant. He receives dialysis treatment, and I think all of us here know, and have heard from constituents, that this is a demanding procedure. His direct family members were tested in hopes of making a living donation, but unfortunately, there has been no match found yet. He's waiting and praying for a match, and our family prays for him as well.

I think of my own constituency assistant, Conor, who in his early teens was diagnosed with keratoconus, a corneal condition that caused a relatively rapid and pronounced decline in his vision that could not be corrected with traditional methods. That condition may not be life-threatening, but think about the barriers something like that adds to one's educational advancement, social opportunities, and professional pursuits.

A corneal transplant made possible by a Nova Scotian donor changed everything for him. Before the transplant, he would never legally have been allowed to drive. He would have spent more years unable to recognize a friend or acquaintance at another end of a room.

I mention this because people who are waiting for organ transplants live very unique and demanding lives. They and their families face challenges that many do not, and there are steps we can and must take to make their lives easier. Bill No. 133 does that.

I appreciate that government has made it clear that it will take time to get the rollout of this policy change right. I acknowledge that this bill will attempt to close the gap between willingness to donate and the actual act of giving without compelling any Nova Scotian to donate if they do not wish to do so. I think the change from an opt-in to an opt-out system will be of significant benefit to Nova Scotians. I expect other jurisdictions will follow our example.

I had the privilege to chair the Law Amendments Committee when Bill No. 133 was taken up, and I want to thank Janet Gallant, Cynthia Isenor, and Dr. Stephen Beed of the Nova Scotia Health Authority for presenting and responding to questions and for sharing their expertise with us. I also want to thank everyone who has spoken up on this issue and shared their stories. I think the most important thing we can do, if we are able, is to give someone a chance at life.

What I will conclude with is to urge all members of this House and all Nova Scotians to have these conversations at home with your loved ones. These are difficult and personal choices, particularly in certain cultures where such conversations do not happen, but these conversations are necessary.

[Page 3378]

Mr. Speaker, I knew my son's wishes with regard to organ and tissue donation for a while. Indeed, he showed me when he signed his health card renewal and I took a picture of it because I had never even thought of it. I just found out today when I was preparing to say a few words and contacted my daughter. I learned today from her that not only is she a potential donor but so are my two grandkids, ages three and five.

She said the following to me: If you know you have the chance at that moment when you are no longer on this earth to give someone else another day, how could you not feel that an even deeper meaning was being given to your life legacy? Then she added, with respect to signing on behalf of her two little ones: If I can save another life out of a tragedy that struck me, that would be one good thing in my life.

Mr. Speaker, let's be brave, let's be generous, and let's have these conversations, even if they are hard. I support Bill No. 133.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : First, I would like to thank the Minister of Environment for sharing such a personal story. I know that wasn't easy and I appreciate hearing the details.

I just want to say that I personally firmly believe that this is a good bill and I am glad that it has been brought forward. I think it will do a lot of good for a lot of people. But there is a segment of the organ donation population we should always keep in mind, and that is the live donor, because the live donor meets all the criteria the Minister of Immigration talked about. It is done willingly, it is done knowingly, and it is done for someone who is usually a very important member of their family.

Mr. Speaker, we need to be sure, as a province, that those who are live donors have an opportunity to live up to that expectation as quickly as possible. We've seen cases of people who have waited long periods of time. It may be a lack of resources, it may be a number of things, but I think as we are moving forward with this bill, we should always look at what the potential is for the people who are live donors.

This bill is a credit to our province, in my opinion. I shared with you my own story about my brother. I guess I'll leave you with this: Behind every dark cloud there is a silver lining and we, as a group of people, should be looking to make sure we make that happen for as many as we can. Thank you.

[5:15 p.m.]

[Page 3379]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clayton Park West.

RAFAH DICOSTANZO « » : Mr. Speaker, it is a privilege for me to rise to speak to Bill No. 133, Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act. I will start by thanking the Premier and Minister Delorey for bringing this bill forward. I believe that I and many of my colleagues will be proud of this unprecedented bill for many years to come, long after our service has ended.

Mr. Speaker, I'm confident that Nova Scotia is setting the stage for other Canadian provinces and other jurisdictions worldwide to follow our leadership and embrace this progressive legislation. This bill makes eminent sense. The benefits have been recognized by all my colleagues in the three Parties. Receiving an organ is both life saving and life changing. I will illustrate this message by sharing a recent experience working at the IWK with the Ali family. This story demonstrates the dramatic and powerful impact of an organ gift.

In February 2016, I had the honour of my first four-to-five-hour interpreting assignment at the IWK kidney dialysis unit, for a beautiful Kurdish Syrian refugee family. The Ali family have four children, the eldest Viyana who was 13, second Zeyn who was 10. Over the course of the coming weeks and months I got to know this family, their story of struggle and bravery.

In 2013, while living in a country immersed in civil war, the Ali family - an educated middle-class family - learned that their two eldest daughters both had a genetic kidney defect causing their health to rapidly fail. Their safest option to receive medical help was to move to Turkey. In Turkey, they had no family, no support, they did not speak the language, and were faced with expensive medical costs beyond their means.

In search of a better life for their family and better health for their two daughters, the Ali family registered as refugees with the United Nations. In February 2016, the opportunity to come to Canada was presented and made possible by a generous sponsorship of a group of families from Timberlea Baptist Church. The member for Timberlea-Prospect was there at the airport, apparently - he informed me today.

When the girls arrived in Nova Scotia, they were very sick. Their growth was stunted. Their diet was limited. It took six months of dialysis and different medical treatments to stabilize them. Six months later, Viyana and Zeyn were added to the organ recipient donation list. When both girls were placed on that list, the parents received detailed instructions on the pre-op and post-op process. They were also told that once a matched organ became available they would have only a few hours to arrive at the hospital for the major transplant operation. This was an exciting but also a very daunting time.

I will never forget the joy and the hope expressed by the mother Narin when she told me of Viyana's successful transplant operation in the corridor of the IWK on December 12, 2016. That day, I was working with Zeyn who was very happy for her sister but also sad that she now faced ongoing dialysis alone without Viyana beside her.

[Page 3380]

It was literally a miracle that only four days later the Ali family received another call that a second kidney match had occurred. This time was for Zeyn.

The first two weeks after the surgery were an emotional roller coaster. At first, it appeared that Zeyn's new kidney was not functioning - I believed they called it sleeping - but fortunately, after a short period of time, the kidney woke up and Zeyn no longer required dialysis.

Imagine having two children in hospital recovering from a major surgery at the same time. For six weeks, Narin continuously moved from one isolation room to the other, gowning and changing gowns each time. The father, Besir, was at home caring for the two younger children. The Ali family went through this difficult time with the support and encouragement from their Nova Scotia sponsors who had become their extended family.

Mr. Speaker, I am delighted to share that just this month both Viyana and Zeyn completed their two-year biopsies and learned that both kidneys are functioning beautifully. (Applause)

Here are four ways their lives have been changed. First, the girls no longer suffer from difficult symptoms of failing health; second, they can enjoy unrestricted diets, which now includes chocolate, which was definitely prohibited; third, they no longer have to endure hours of weekly dialysis, and instead both their dreams came true because both had told me their dream was to go to school every day; and finally, the family can now fully settle in Nova Scotia, which means taking English-language courses and securing employment.

Mr. Speaker, I am grateful for the 18 months and the many hours I worked as an interpreter at the IWK dialysis unit. This experience heightened my appreciation for the organ-transplant process. The emotional and physical stress of waiting for and recovering from an organ donation is real, but the results are extraordinary. As a result of this experience, I wholeheartedly support Bill No. 153 and encourage all MLAs to join me.

Mr. Speaker, we are so fortunate to live in a province that is willing to stand apart as a health care leader and innovator. I thank the generosity and I applaud the humanity of all Nova Scotians who support this bill. Because of this bill, we will save more lives and change more lives.

In closing, I am pleased to introduce the two sweethearts and their siblings who have joined us in the gallery today. These are brave, intelligent young ladies with big, bright futures ahead. They are here to thank Nova Scotians for the gift they have received, and to thank the IWK and our health system for the amazing care they received. They too are very happy that we are bringing this bill forward so that many more lives will be saved and changed forever.

[Page 3381]

I would like now to introduce this lovely family who have become like mine. (Standing Ovation)

Viyana, who is 16, please stand up. She is at Halifax West, and she just told me today that she would like to be a journalist, so I told her she has to come and become a Page one day. Zeyn, who is 13, is in junior high. She is a sweetheart who loves math; I know that.

Noujen, who is 10, I believe. She is in Grade 5. Dlir, who is the sweetheart of all; mother Narin, who is an ex-lawyer from Syria; and father Besir, a surveyor. They are my wonderful Turkish/Syrian family. [Comments in Arabic.] Thank you. (Applause)

THE SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the Premier it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, it's not often I cry on this floor; I usually cry after I leave here. (Laughter) I do want to sincerely thank everyone who has participated in this conversation - I don't want to call it a debate. I want to call it a conversation about what is in the best interests of Nova Scotians.

I want to thank the member for Pictou West, who continued to raise some concerns that were brought to her attention. I can assure you those are ones that we have concerns with and it is why the rollout is so important. We want to thank Dr. Beed and his team for continuing to be with us as we go through this process. The conversation about that rollout has already started and it's my hope that it won't take another 12 to 18 months to be set aside, that we'll be able to do that.

I want to thank the member for Halifax Needham for her words not only today but the words she brought to us last week about her own experience with her children, the conversation, but also the experience she had with a colleague she is working with.

I thank the member for Argyle-Barrington for your words today. The Minister of Immigration, thank you; I do believe that the Minister of Immigration and the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg brought the idea of live donors. It's an important part of this conversation and it is my sincere hope that presumed consent will have us all thinking about that.

Because of this bill, I have been approached by people who have actually been live donors. We often think there are only live donors to their own children or their own family. There are people who are extraordinary Nova Scotians who have actually become live donors for friends, for children of friends and, in some cases, perfect strangers because they felt they could make a difference.

[Page 3382]

I want to say thank you to the member for Clayton Park West for her putting a beautiful face on what we're trying to do - the young family that is here, the Ali family, and these two beautiful young girls whose lives have been changed in a positive way - and I would encourage you to eat as much chocolate as you want. (Laughter)

I also want to acknowledge the Minister of Environment. I listened to the Minister of Environment one day on CBC radio on my drive home and she was talking about her book she had written called The Gift: A MADD Mother's Journey of Healing. She made me cry that day. Ten months later I was called by a friend of mine who said, I want to introduce you to Margaret Miller, you don't know her. I said, I sure do. They said, how do you know her? I said, I listened to her on the radio and I'd love to meet her.

The Minister of Environment and I met, and she had her book with her. She signed it and I took that book back to my office and I continued to read that book. It was an emotional experience, but it was one that provided me a light into Margaret and her family. Through that tragedy that befell their family, she found some way to provide a healing process by writing this book and telling the story of many families who suffered losing a child, losing a loved one through impaired driving.

Today she described her experience with Bruce - I don't think any of us want to be asked that question. But in essence I think her telling her story is why we are standing here today and why I believe this bill was so critically important. About 90 per cent of us say we want to be organ donors. Not all of us act on that and tell our wishes to your loved ones or sign our donor card, even though we want to do it.

What this bill is about is - this is a presumed consent. After this bill becomes law, we will all be organ donors. Then it is up to us to take the next step. The conversation that the Minister for Environment and her family had to have will be an easier conversation for our health care providers to have if tragedy strikes our families. They will know that we already have presumed consent and the question will not be "Does your loved one want to be an organ donor?" The question will be, "Your loved one is an organ donor - can we continue?"

We, as a family, still have the ability to say no, but I believe we will have that conversation and we will see an increase in organ donations in our province, which means we will be fulfilling the wishes of our citizens. At the same time, we know there is work to do outside of Halifax to ensure that we continue to provide a message to health care providers to provide them the supports. It's not the kind of things, as Dr. Beed will tell you - it's not huge infrastructure. It's an educational component for our families, for us. It's also an educational opportunity for health care workers who have to ask this question. We can only imagine what it would be like to ask the question to a grieving family, but we are asking people to do that, and we need to provide them the support that will be required to do that.

[Page 3383]

[5:30 p.m.]

I've said this many times this week. There are very few times that when tragedy strikes us, we get a chance to see good. This is one of those times. God forbid that if tragedy were to strike our families, out of that we could provide good.

I was struck when we were introducing the bill, when we started here last week, and we brought in the families. Kelly Patterson was talking about her son Steven, who she lost in his mid-20s. What really got to me and really what I think speaks to what we're trying to accomplish was she immediately turned to, this is what the Minister of Environment did, to the families who received the organs, she talked about a man who received one of his kidneys. She talked about the fact that since that gift of life, that gentleman got to become a grandparent twice. He got to experience the gift of continuing to live.

That donation didn't only impact him. It impacted his family. It impacted his children. Imagine a son or daughter who is having a new child come into life who got to experience that with their father, all because of that donation.

We just saw two young girls who were introduced in this House whose lives are bright, whose love will go beyond just the people sitting in the gallery. There are people, I'm sure, in Syria who are also still today praying for their good health. The impact of that out of a tragedy. That is in essence what this bill is about.

I want to thank all members of this House. I thought there would be much more opposition to this piece of legislation, not in here, but out in the public, and there have been some concerns raised. Not in the way of stopping it, but in the way of making sure when we do the education component, the procedures are in place to carry out the wishes of those.

For those who want to opt out, we've made sure we have a clear ability for them to do so, and we also made sure we have a clear path so that health care providers can ask that question. We have a clear path so that if tragedy strikes our families, we can provide hope to Nova Scotians.

When I talked to Dr. Beed for the very first time, I said, "I'm tired in this province of burying hope." That's what I believe we do too many times. We bury organs that could provide hope and opportunity for families.

Mr. Speaker, I close debate on Bill No. 133. I want to tell you, I've been asked many times why I do this job, by people who actually care about me, because they know what this job is like. This is why I do this job. (Standing Ovation)

[Page 3384]

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 133. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 136.

Bill No. 136 - Financial Measures (2019) Act.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 136, the Financial Measures Act, now be read a third time and do pass.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, how can I talk about the budget after all this? (Laughter)

I'd like to start out at least on a positive note. I want to thank the member for Glace Bay, the Government House Leader, for the goodwill that I think was shown during the Estimates debates.

I won't speak for everyone in the House, but if I may speak for my colleagues in the PC caucus, we appreciate the opportunity to ask questions of the ministers. We appreciate the ministers taking the time to answer them, in most cases.

In the House here, we have a role in the Opposition and sometimes it may not be as pretty a role as people would like but I do, in my heart, believe that we stand for people that may have a differing opinion. If we didn't have that in our society, we wouldn't have democracy.

I want to thank the member for Glace Bay for his co-operation during the Estimates because I think it went very well. I know we've talked about transparency and I have been a critic of decisions, certainly around the Public Accounts Committee. I think that transparency is a good thing; when questions can be asked, sometimes clarifications can be made, and people can get closer together on things.

[Page 3385]

I'll continue with the rest of my remarks and I won't be long.

We have not voted for this budget, and I want to highlight for people, I had ample time to speak on the budget, in reply to the budget.

We have a strong feeling that we know there's lot of money being spent in the province. There's $11 billion in this budget but there remains a lot of people out there, particularly in health care, who are experiencing difficulty getting health care services. People without a doctor is a big issue. People experiencing delays in getting health care services, especially with specialists.

I think about people working in the health care system. Health care is roughly 40 per cent of the budget; a big component of the budget. I think about nurses who will not have vacation this summer, so they've been told. I think that shows there is a problem.

I think that we don't see new beds this year for nursing homes. We can't forget the many Nova Scotians who are waiting to get into a nursing home. We can't forget about people who are arriving at some hospitals in this province in an ambulance, and waiting to get out of the ambulance and into the hospital, because there is a backup, because there are people in the acute beds upstairs that could be in a nursing home. The people waiting to get into the acute beds are in the emergency area, and the people waiting to get into the emergency area are in the ambulances.

We cannot forget about these things. I also think about doctors, I mentioned a moment ago, and I know that in this budget there is not more money for doctors. There's a small increase and, if we need more doctors in the province, this budget is not going to have the resources allocated to hire them.

It has been a long sitting in some ways. In other ways, it's been a very short sitting. It felt a bit disjointed with March Break in the middle of it.

I think I will just close by saying that we know there are a lot of resources being spent here in the province, but we question whether the management of those resources is delivering the results that people need and expect in our province.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

CLAUDIA CHENDER « » : I'll just take a few moments and speak to the Financial Measures (2019) Act, and more broadly, to this budget, and also start, as my colleague did, on a note of gratitude.

Which is to say, as I've said many times in this House, I think we're all here for the right reasons. I think we're all here on behalf of our constituents and we're doing the best we can, and obviously the discussion we just had around this bill was a great example of that.

[Page 3386]

I think another great example is this morning when we heard the former Minister of Health and Wellness - you know, fete the former - that we can be collegial in difficult circumstances, and we have spent a long time talking about this budget. Sometimes, it seems like forever. If you asked my children, that's what they would say.

I'd like to just spend a few moments reiterating the point that I raised at second reading, which is when we hear about this budget, notwithstanding pieces of legislation like the one we just discussed, there are always bright spots, but when the budget is discussed, what we often hear is this idea that we are innovating, that we are reducing, that we are streamlining, that we're cutting red tape, that we are creating a positive business environment, that we're not afraid of China, and that's fine. It's good that we're cutting red tape so that businesses in Nova Scotia can thrive and so they should but, Mr. Speaker, there is less emphasis to our ears on simplifying and making more accessible the government services that individual people rely on.

Health, housing, income assistance, justice, those are the areas, those are the things our constituents rely on to thrive. They as individuals thrive when those services are available to them and are available to them in simple, accessible, clear, compassionate ways. That's the red tape we are focused on and I would say that that is our core challenge with this budget.

Our unified Health Authority is a bureaucratic nightmare. Having been at the VG only this morning and for much of this week with a loved one myself, believe me, I'm glad we're getting a new hospital. It is long since time. I may not agree with the manner of the build but I'm happy that it's happening. In the meantime, there are policy changes, bureaucracy, red tape that mean that nurses are working short. We don't have enough nurses, we don't have enough nurses because they're not getting their overtime pay - they're not getting their overtime pay, bureaucracy, red tape.

In an effort to consolidate, we've created more bureaucratic paperwork and policy that prevents the people of Nova Scotia from getting the services they need. Seniors' and Family Pharmacare programs are expensive and hard to navigate. I've been doing that this week too. Too many people don't have access to primary care, which means getting the myriad forms required for anything, for income assistance, for housing, which are complicated and challenging to fill out even if you have basic literacy, even if you have two degrees. It's complicated. It's full of unnecessary hurdles, which make it difficult for people, and particularly people who don't have access to primary care and we know that's a challenge.

Public housing wait-lists are too long. Too many of us in this Chamber spend our time and our budgets helping people fill out forms and understand information when the process, itself, could be simplified. We could actually create a transformation of the way that we look at budgeting so that we're putting people and those services, those amazing services our government provides and works hard to provide, we could make them more accessible to people. We could reduce the barriers to those services. We could cut back red tape, and this goes doubly for the most vulnerable who need income assistance or disability support.

[Page 3387]

What about African Nova Scotians? They've been dealing with the worst kind of red tape, constant stopping and recording of data by police that's stored in databases in HRM and across the province. You know how we could cut red tape for racialized Nova Scotians? We could put an immediate moratorium on street checks. We could stop a discriminatory, heavy-handed, illegal, and incidentally, heavily bureaucratic process.

What does this have to do with the budget or the Financial Measures (2019) Bill to which I am ostensibly speaking? Well, by this government's own admission, a budget is the measure of this government's priorities, their plans, and their successes. Unfortunately, by continuing to place austerity and short-term thinking at its core, this budget falls short.

[5:45 p.m.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I could speak at great length right now about the state of health care in this province and the failures of health care in this province. The evidence is everywhere we look. I could speak about the economy and the failures of the economic plan, really, for this government.

I am thinking of the film industry. We used to invest $25 million and generate $130 million of economic activity - now we invest $25 million and generate $85 million. I was stopped on the street today by a young man pretty much in tears, telling me about a production that is set in Nova Scotia but being filmed in Newfoundland and Labrador. That will start as we speak, with millions and millions of dollars.

There's a lot we could talk about that happens in this Chamber, the behaviour of members, something we could talk about. We could talk about judicial independence. There are lots of things that happened in this session that will be worthy of discussion and advance discussion as we carry on. What will be the legacy of this government? That's the question that a lot of those things will speak to. But I'm not going to talk about that today, in terms of legacies.

I do want to acknowledge three members of our caucus who have been integral parts of discussing many budgets before this Chamber. That's obviously the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg, first elected in 1995, a former Speaker of the House. Thank you to my friend and colleague, and to Shirley and your family, for everything you've done for this province.

[Page 3388]

Of course the member for Argyle-Barrington, first elected in 2003, former Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries, Minister of Health, Minister of Community Services, Minister of Acadian Affairs, and Minister responsible for the Youth Secretariat. Thank you for your service. Thank you, Anne, for sharing him with this caucus.

And of course the member for Northside-Westmount, first elected in 2011, came in in a by-election when the other former member went federally at that time, so thank you to you and Jane.

Should they not be back, I want to make sure that the members of this Chamber know the gratitude that I have for your service and that your caucus colleagues have for your service and dedication. Thank you to you and your families for your public service and for all you've done for your communities. This Chamber has been honoured to have you here and it has been an honour to work alongside you for the last five years. I speak for the entire caucus when I say that I wish you all the best in your future endeavours, and we look forward to continuing to support you as you support us.

Mr. Speaker, there's lots that needs to be done in this province. There's lots of work to do, for sure, around our economy, around our immigration, improving health care, and improving the function of this Chamber. Those are the things that will motivate our caucus as we move forward.

I am hopeful that the government will pay attention at least sometimes and maybe make some positive changes when they make sense. With those few words, I'll take my seat. Thank you. (Applause)

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

GARY BURRILL « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of our caucus, I would certainly like to echo the words that have been spoken by my colleague, the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party in extending a sense of appreciation and respect for all the contributions of the members for Northside-Westmount, Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg, and Argyle-Barrington. I want to assure those members that this is not a view that is held only within their caucus. (Applause)

Now, turning to the matter of the Financial Measures (2019) Act, I would like to take the occasion of third reading of the bill as we bring this sitting of the House towards a close. I'd like to take the occasion to direct a few comments about what, in my judgment, is the less-than-adequate economic thinking that underlies the budget, which has really defined this current session.

I would like to organize these comments around something very striking I heard a few weeks ago. I was attending a fundraising breakfast that was held at Knox United Church in Lower Sackville, and the guest speaker was a person who was unfamiliar to me from an organization that was unfamiliar to me. Her name is Barbie Murray.

[Page 3389]

Barbie Murray is from an organization called Wounds Canada. She is an educator and clinician and a national board member with Wounds Canada, and she was talking about the work of Wounds Canada and about her own clinical practice in the area of wounds treatment.

A big part of what she spoke about in describing her own clinical practice of wounds treatment was the number of patients who come to her clinic with the particular problem of - and she spoke quite a bit about this - foot ulcers. This, of course, had the interest of the audience. This is in a place where we have as much diabetes as we have in Nova Scotia and related problems. There are not very many families who haven't had experiences dealing with foot ulcers. So, she had the whole room there at Knox United, had everybody's attention.

She explained, as a clinician, that the thing about foot ulcers that was troubling to her is that they can very often be successfully treated, and she said the successful treatment of foot ulcers involves particularly - and this was new to me - a piece of equipment that is called an air boot. She said, when you have the air boot, things often proceed in a good healing direction with the treatment of foot ulcers, but she said there is an air boot problem, which I want to talk about.

She said that air boots aren't covered under MSI and they cost about $100. The result is, in her practice in Nova Scotia, that it's not uncommon that people don't have private insurance or personal means to be able to afford to get the air boot. In that clinic they try to organize the treatment the best that they can and get along the best they can without the air boot. But they do that knowing that, without the air boot, the chances of a positive healing outcome aren't really quite as good.

She went on to explain - and I was startled to hear about it - that when you don't have a successful outcome to the treatment of foot ulcers, this treatment that is contributed to by having an air boot, often the consequence is an amputation, and often what follows from that is extensive, long periods of rehab.

After explaining all this clinically, Ms. Murray asked what is really a budget question, what is really a fiscal question, what is really an economics question: What would possibly be the thinking that would lead our government to pay out all the thousands we do in carrying out amputation surgeries and would lead our government to pay out all the resources we do in those extensive rehabs, when so much of this could be avoided just by paying $102 upfront for the air boots? Why as a society, when it comes to a matter such as this, are we so willing to invest once it's too late? Why are we so slow to invest when we could really make a difference by making an investment upfront?

[Page 3390]

I think Ms. Murray was making a profound economic point, which speaks directly to the questions that we have been raising throughout this session about our concern about the thinking which underlies the overall approach to Nova Scotia's public resources in the budget.

I want to suggest that she is really right in expressing this concern. Why would we spend so much once it's too late, and be so reluctant to spend upfront when it could make a difference?

I want to suggest that there's such a thing as, if I can invent the term, air-boot economics. What I mean by air-boot economics is the general failure of a certain type of economic thinking to spend smart upfront. The failure to spend smart upfront, at the cost of setting up the requirement of spending in ways that are really extremely unsmart later on.

In my view, the thinking behind the budget which we have had in front of us this session which, in its many different components, we in the New Democratic Party have been approaching and assessing and criticizing is a classic example of what I am calling air-boot economics.

It is utterly, for example, a case of air-boot economics; it is a case of exactly what Ms. Murray from Wounds Canada was expressing dismay about. To continue to spend, as we will continue to do on the basis of this budget, over $1,000 a day to keep hundreds of long-term care residents living in our hospitals, when the cost would be a fraction of that - $300, maybe $400 a day - if the government would just make the upfront investment that this budget fails to make, in a comprehensive program of nursing home construction, so that those people could live in the nursing home facilities for which they have been often waiting very long.

That's not even to speak of how much less satisfactory the experience is for those alternate level of care hospital/nursing home residents themselves who, in Nova Scotia today, we should never forget when this discussion is before us, spend on average six times longer waiting in hospitals for nursing home placements than do people in any other province in the country.

That's not to speak, either, of the much-described ill effects on the operation of our whole health care system - of having up to a fifth of our hospital beds, as they are, occupied by people who aren't hospital patients - with the result, as we have heard and read of so many times, that emergency rooms unable to admit to the hospital itself are often overcrowded; with the result that paramedics are often unable to discharge responsibility for their patients in a timely manner to those overcrowded ERs; with the result that ambulance coverage in significant areas of our province is not what it should be.

[Page 3391]

Wouldn't we be better off if we listened to what Ms. Murray spoke about with the air boot example and spend smart upfront on the air boot of a comprehensive program of new nursing home construction, rather than continue to spend so very unsmart now, and later, on the so-to-speak rehab of unnecessary hospitalizations for all these people?

It is, similarly, fair to say, a case of air-boot economics to fail to hire the number of nurses who are needed to provide adequate care to the patients of Nova Scotia, as my friend, the MLA for Cape Breton Centre has said here so many times in this session. Then to overrun the nurses' overtime budget by $15 million, as the government did last year in an ad hoc, figure-it-out-as-you-go, fill-the-shift-somehow-today non-system that is adding, in very significant ways, to the stress and burnout of nurses all across the province.

Isn't what's taking place there a classic case of failing to spend smart upfront on the air boot, thereby necessitating spending so very unsmart on all kinds of rehab later?

If there ever were a doubly-classic case of air-boot economics, surely that would be the meagre, shameful, and chisel-y half-efforts provided in this budget on poverty income inadequacy in Nova Scotia. We need to assess every day where we are in our province.

[6:00 p.m.]

We are the province with the lowest median income in the country, the only province in the country where child poverty is going backwards instead of forward. And what do we have in this budget? We have a proposal which I think it is not unfair to call anemic, an anemic proposal to increase the incomes of let's say, for example, single mums, disabled people, the proposal increases their incomes by a total of $11 a month. By the way, that's $11 a month that doesn't begin this next month or next month - it doesn't begin until January next year.

We have in this budget, this document that we have been debating here for these weeks, we have this accompanied by a proposal to increase the Poverty Reduction Credit and by a proposal to increase the Affordable Living Tax Credit and by a proposal to increase the Nova Scotia Child Benefit, all together by a grand aggregate of exactly zero. All of this is in the context of an increase in the minimum wage of 55 cents, the effect of which is going to be to raise Nova Scotia from having the lowest minimum wage in the country to now being no more than ninth out of thirteen Canadian jurisdictions.

When we look at it from the point of view of the economics of the thinking that the government has put before us with this budget that they have passed, we cannot evade, I am trying to say, the air-boot question. Wouldn't we be better to simply make the investments to see that everybody had enough income in our province so they could get enough to eat, rather than continue to do as we do now, to spend, often when it's too late, on all the negative education outcomes, all the negative criminal justice outcomes, all the negative health outcomes that every single credible author in the field of social determinants of health recognizes all of these would be radically, dramatically reduced in severity and extent if people simply had the financial means to live?

[Page 3392]

Of course, it would be better if we made the investments up front instead of engaging, as this budget does, in the economic fallacy of air-boot economics. So we naturally ask what holds our government back from making these investments? What is it that holds our government back from making investments for the frail elderly of the province? What is it that holds our government back from making the investments to hire the health care professionals we need so that we don't burn out and undermine the morale of the ones that we have? What is it that leads our government to fail to make the investments on the basis of which everybody could grow up in a home where there's at least enough income, so you could get your food in the store instead of having to get it on a charitable basis from a food bank?

What is it that holds our government back from making those investments that would make this possible, these investments that every expert in this field has demonstrated would put us in so much of a better position in the long run.

I believe that a big part of the answer to this question has to do not with mal-intent but rather simply with the government's mistaken ideological fixated-ness with bad, and now, discredited and outdated economic thinking. Anyone who would have followed the budget discussions here of the last few weeks would understand very clearly what the government's fiscal priorities are. They have been stated repeatedly without obfuscation, they are balanced budgets, they are export development, they are a positive rating of its performance, especially on these two fronts, by the American bond-rating agencies, particularly Moody's and Standard & Poor's, but there is a growing chorus of economic thought which is sounding a different note.

It is a chorus of economic thought which we, in the New Democratic Party, have been engaged by and by which we are persuaded. This is a chorus of economic thought which is arguing rather that it is entirely mistaken fiscal policy for a government in 2019 to focus so exclusively on these fiscal priorities that it misses opportunities to make the investments that will ensure education and health care systems that the public has confidence in, that will provide dynamic responses to the threat of climate change, that will really address, significantly, food insecurity, that will really address significantly inadequate housing, that will really address significantly the urgent situation in household incomes as a whole, such that by means of investments of this sort, purchasing power aggregate demand could be sustained in our province on a level consistent with economic growth.

Now, there are many commanding authorities who have been speaking just in recent months about this subject. One of the most interesting is Olivier Blanchard who was, until recently, the chief economist for the International Monetary Fund. He was selected to give the prestigious address, I'll table this, to the American Economics Association just a couple of months ago. In his address, it was wrapped around a single core thought, which I'll quote, "There is a strong argument for using fiscal policy to sustain demand."

[Page 3393]

Two prominent economists, thinkers on this very subject, both at Harvard, Jason Furman and Lawrence Summers, whose paper I've also just tabled, have also just in the last couple of months spoken out about what they call, these are their words, the deficit obsession. They've written that the greatest threat to the present economy is not the drawbacks of deficits but it's rather, these are the economists' words, the more pressing problems of languishing labour force participation rates, slow economic growth, and climate change. And they write, politicians should not let large deficits deter them from addressing these fundamental economic challenges.

Our own Conference Board of Canada has recently intimated in a similar direction when they brought out just a few weeks ago their 2019 growth projections where members of the government will remember that they set out Nova Scotia's 2019 anticipated growth projection as 0.9 per cent, which had us in the lowest position in the country and then bringing forward an analysis about why some provinces were as low as they are, particularly, Nova Scotia at the bottom of those projections. The Conference Board of Canada drew special attention to the role of consumer demand, that is, they drew special attention to the structural weaknesses that plague an economy like ours, where people chronically lack the income, lack the money, to buy the things that our businesses have to sell.

So, all of this chorus of economic voices is sounding a profoundly different note, a more contemporary note, a note that has more the nodding, the ascension of the economics vocation as a whole. They are saying in general that governments in 2019, in this new moment, need to aggressively pursue policies which have at their core investments in health care, investments in infrastructure, investments in climate change adaptation, investments in education, and in investments in poverty reduction. They are saying that this is the right moment, in other words, for a competent government that understands its economy to do whatever it needs to do fiscally in order to provide the economic air boot, that is, even if that should require the temporary foregoing of an annual budget surplus.

I want to say, Mr. Speaker, that the government's fiscal thinking as we have seen it revealed in the discussions around this budget in recent weeks is a little bit like a person who owns a car and the person owning the car is very mindful of their fiscal limitations at the moment. The person who owns the car determines, they think, the most financially prudent thing for them to do would be to save their resources by not investing anything and looking after the ongoing maintenance of that car; not spending anything on the oil changes, not spending anything on the maintenance because they're worried about their fiscal limitations.

[Page 3394]

Well, this person would be able to get along for a while, maybe even for a year. Perhaps the person's car would even function reasonably well for a second year. But once you got to years three and four, well, the person's balance sheet might continue to look good, but their car isn't going to be sounding good. It's going to be making all the kinds of sounds that systems make when they're crying out for investment. Then you're going to get to year five and then you're going to get to year six when you haven't spent the amount that's required and the situation with that vehicle is not going to be altogether pretty.

That is where we are in the economy today in Nova Scotia. We're in year six of an investment-phobic government and the transmission of our health care system is seized, the motor of our education is getting cooked, and on all kinds of social, environmental, and economic fronts, the wheels are falling off the car. This is precisely what happens with air-boot economics. You end up with the whole economy and province in various ways on a variety of levels, so to say, as Ms. Murray put it, in very expensive rehab.

We in the New Democratic Party are in favour of spending smart up front, instead of spending unsmart later, and we will be privileged to be voting against the Financial Measures (2019) Act.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, I will not speak long on the Financial Measures (2019) Act, but I'm very aware of my own silence in the last couple of weeks, having pledged to speak about climate change in this Legislature. I got tired and I kind of lost my hope a little bit as we got into Budget Debate and as I participated in Budget Estimates with the Minister of Environment and the Minister of Energy and Mines. So I stopped talking about climate change in this House, but it's our last day of this session, so I'm going to do it again, just a little bit.

I'm going to share a story from my personal household, which I have been thinking about in relation to this Chamber. I've probably been predisposed to be concerned about the environment for a very long time. When I was maybe in Grade 8 or 9, my father gave me his book The Limits to Growth, and I wrote some essay based on it. Then I did a science essay for which I won a prize in Grade 10, right around the time that the ozone layer crisis was upon us.

It's pretty core to who I am and how I think about the world. It's not something I share with my partner, with whom I share many wonderful things, including two children. So it's a source of tension in our household, I would say, because I am taking the bus every day, and I am occasionally riding my bicycle, and very occasionally driving our car, and more often the odd time using CarShare Atlantic when I need to.

He really likes to go to the gym, and the gym is not that close to where he works, so he drives the car most days. He often has a good excuse: he has to pick up our kids somewhere or get them to something, but even when he doesn't have that excuse, he still drives the car so he can go to the gym. So sometimes I get to feeling like anything I do and everything I do is already futile before it even leaves my household. It's all cancelled out.

[Page 3395]

That's how I feel, oftentimes, being a part of this Chamber and in this government, participating in some fashion as a member of the Opposition in the government of Nova Scotia. While I aspire to ride my bike and take the bus, the Premier is off to China with the Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs and I don't know how many other government officials, because that's our future and that's the economic model that we certainly hear about from this government almost ad nauseum.

It's all about export, and it's not even about export of talent through animation or film. It's not about export of wisdom through the sorts of things that can be shared via webcams and the Internet. It's actually about putting stuff on planes and therefore we have to be expanding cargo capacity at the airport. Of course, that is absolutely heading in a very different direction from where we know, biologically and scientifically, we have to be heading.

While it might be a path for the next five years, maybe, in my view it's irresponsible to be pointing us off in that direction at precisely the moment that we know that we actually have to be aiming for a circular economy, for a low-carbon economy. There is no future technology coming that is going to make it possible to continue down the path that this government has placed us on where it is sustainable.

It's funny, as I shared the other day, my daughter is getting older and becoming more aware. A couple of weeks ago she wrote an essay about pollution and reducing pollution, and she entered a speaking contest and she won. So, I am going with her next week to see her speak about reducing pollution. She is talking about greenhouse gas emissions and she is talking about plastic.

I got home from the Chamber one night and she performed this, practised it for me the day before she was going to be speaking about it at school, and I almost lost it because I feel like for most of my lifetime I've been feeling like I'm a little bit out on margins of the political discourse of my time. Sort of like, maybe I'm wrong, maybe actually the way things are going is fine. Maybe everything I'm worried about is not actually cause for worry. I think that is actually the story that particularly Liberal governments like to tell us. That actually the way it is, is good, we're good, we got this.

Increasingly we're seeing that that is not true. There is actually not a way forward that does not require bravery, change, and the sort of impulsive generosity, which frankly was really evident in the debate about the last bill.

We need to be generous because part of moving forward into the era of really confronting climate change is really grappling actually with what we need and what everybody deserves. What everybody deserves is a sense of connection, a place to call home, an ability to take care of their families. That's what people need. People need that here and people need it in Mozambique. As we move forward, we have to be thinking as leaders and as governments about how we work to achieving that for everyone.

[Page 3396]

That's what I don't see in this budget when we're still spending a couple of million dollars trying to convince oil and gas companies to explore on our beautiful ocean. We're still building infrastructure for the economy that we know is unsustainably carbon-intensive and also when we're not taking care of ensuring Nova Scotians here today are able to meet their most basic needs. I don't think we've made the adjustment we need to make. That is the reason I will be voting against this budget.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

SUSAN LEBLANC « » : I've gone back and forth tonight on whether or not I was going to speak. For many moments in this House tonight I have been overcome with emotion, and if I open my mouth, I am going to become a blubbering mess, which may, in fact, happen as I talk now.

First, I want to say that I feel very privileged to stand up in this House tonight after the conversation, as the Premier put it, around the organ donation bill. I feel like I was really part of something special and important and progressive and exciting and sad and happy, and all those things. It does really bring home why I wanted to be here. I am grateful to the Premier and I am grateful to be here standing.

Now I am going to talk a little bit about what I think about the budget. In my first sitting when I was first elected, I began taking notes in a little journal called the Dramaturgy of the Legislature. I don't know if I've talked about this in public before but the member for Dartmouth South certainly knows about my note taking. I was analyzing my experiences from a dramatic point of view, the way a dramaturge would kind of build a performance or a play or analyze a piece of play text from a director point of view or to analyze a dramaturgy. That's what I was doing.

A lot of things came up for me and there are so many ways. People make the joke that politics is like theatre but, in fact, there are many ways that you could look at what we do from that point of view. One of them is, for instance, objective. In the play, objectives are the things that the characters want to achieve and so they do all these things to achieve what they want. Oedipus, oh, I'm not even going to use an actual example from a play, but the way they approach their objectives is through tactics.

We all want things for our constituents and for our province and for our children and for our aging parents. Then we have tactics through which we go toward achieving those objectives.

[Page 3397]

Another thing that is in a good play, in a good piece of theatre or a good story, is tension. Tension is what happens when two people's objectives or two ideas clash. In this sitting, I feel like we've had a lot of tension. We've had tension between individuals in the House across the floor. We've had tension with the reaction around the Wortley Report. We've had tension from the outside coming in and among us over on this side and you over on that side and you over on that side.

We've also had tension - and this is a big one for me - on a larger scale. That is the tension that I feel in my body, in my heart, around such bills like the organ and tissue donation bill and how proud I can feel to be a part of a group of people, as I mentioned, that is passing this progressive piece of legislation that really does put Nova Scotia on the map in North America in terms of being able to save lives. It's really special. Then that feeling is juxtaposed against another feeling that results in observations I've made, in particular, over the last 10 days during Budget Estimates, and that is the feeling that I've been getting.

I honestly don't mean any disrespect, but it is an honest observation I've been feeling that many of the people I've posed questions to in Estimates have answered with a sense of almost defeat. Almost a feeling that, well, you're kind of right about that, but this is why we've done this, or this is the reasoning, and, you know, there's not that much money, and our budgets are limited, and we will never be as good as Ontario.

That is a direct quote from my session with the Minister of Business when we talked about the film industry in Nova Scotia: we will never be as good as Ontario. In that session, I proudly put forward my feeling that, in fact, we can be as good as Ontario, and we were, but we can talk about that later.

So this tension where I feel excited and inspired by a progressive piece of legislation and then it is juxtaposed against this feeling of, this observation of defeat or deflation is one that I struggle with and one that I find very interesting.

The thing about theatre is when these tensions happen, there's a struggle. There's a struggle and ultimately then somebody comes out on top until the next scene where there is another bit of tension. Then someone else comes out on top and ultimately it rises. All this rising action happens, and I guess, if you're going to extrapolate that analogy and say the climax of the thing would be an election, and we'll see what happens then.

In any case, I just wanted to talk about that feeling for a minute. All of what we are doing here makes for really good theatre, but if only it was a play. In fact, what we are talking about actually is real life. We can go to the theatre and experience all this tension and these emotions, but then we get to go home. We can go home sad or we can go home happy and jubilant, but this is real life and I am left with the feeling that this is a tragedy right now and that I am witnessing this almost giving up.

[Page 3398]

I don't even know if this is the exact reason, but we hear that there is just no money to invest in long-term care beds, or we can't invest in very many of them. We can only invest in a couple, even though there are way more people waiting for long-term beds. Even though long-term care beds are one of the main solutions that we know medical professionals are saying would help our health care system and the backlog and what's going on in our hospitals.

We know that nurses and child welfare social workers are completely burnt out in their jobs, but yet somehow we can't do anything to help them. We know that the most vulnerable people in our population - many of whom are the ones that we see, and we've all been talking about this this week - these are the people that we see in our constituency offices, who need our help the most. These people are facing hunger and homelessness because their income assistance rates are not keeping up with their actual costs of living.

So we feel deflated. I feel deflated by this news. The good news is, like many good stories, there's Part Two or there are Second Acts and I will also say there can be surprise endings and I feel hope for those things.

I will also just say this - that in my career as a theatre person, in my career with Zuppa Theatre, one of our main rules when we made theatre was that we were not allowed to oppose our director or say no, I don't like that idea. We weren't allowed to do that in our rehearsals. Instead, if we didn't like something, we had to propose something else or we had to prove our director wrong with action. To me, that is a very invigorating idea. We can't just stand here and say that's a bad idea, that's not going to work, that feels a little depressing, our film industry is wrecked. That's not good enough.

What I want to say is that I want to propose some things. I want to prove the government wrong with ideas. I have a long list of ideas which I won't burden you with this evening, but I would say that there is hope and there are ideas and there are things that we can do that will make significant changes with only insignificant amounts of investment. More than we're seeing, but not that much more.

For instance, we could implement rent control, which actually won't cost us anything. Rent control would save many people from homelessness because it would cap what the landlords are doing to people when their income assistance rates are not keeping up.

We could build more long-term care beds. I might be speaking out of turn here, but I suppose we could probably figure out all the small options homes we need for people with disabilities and empty out some institutions which could be used as long-term care facilities. I don't know, I haven't really thought this through but it's an idea.

[Page 3399]

We could have solar farms everywhere. There's an idea. We could build those great big batteries that we talked about in Energy Estimates and invest in those. We could actually invest in green jobs and transform our economy into a green, just economy where there are great jobs that pay well for all kinds of people in Nova Scotia who don't have work right now and, hopefully, guarantee that we might be here more than 100 years.

We can be creative, we can be bold, we can be brave, and we can be progressive in our thinking. I don't really know, after saying all of that, how this all fits with my initial theatre analogy except that there are ways out of tragedy, Mr. Speaker. There's going to be a sequel, there's going to be a Part Two, there are ways out of tragedy.

[6:30 p.m.]

I look forward to working with the government - and I mean that - over the next year to make some of these proposals so that next year, when we listen to the Budget Speech and next year, when we debate the budget and we go through those god-awful 10 days of Estimates, that we can have a different conversation and that maybe Act II is a different story.

With those words, I will take my seat. Thank you.

THE SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : I believe I have more composure now, so maybe I can say what I wanted to say.

We are speaking about Bill No. 136, the Financial Measures (2019) Act, and the Financial Measures (2019) Act provides the legislative authority to implement measures in Budget 2019-20 and other legislative measures which have financial implications.

Budget 2019-20 is our fourth consecutive balanced budget. It builds on a strong fiscal foundation which we built, and it allows us to live within our means and to use the revenue that we have to continue to provide programs and services for Nova Scotians, who need it and deserve it. That will be the legacy of this government.

Mr. Speaker, with those few remarks, I move that Bill No. 136, the Financial Measures (2019) Act, do pass.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 136.

There has been a request for a recorded vote.

[Page 3400]

We will ring the bells until the Whips are satisfied.

[6:32 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

THE SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Are the Whips satisfied?

The Whips are satisfied.

The Clerks will now proceed with the recorded vote on Bill No. 136.

I'll just remind all members to remain completely silent while the Clerks record your vote. I'll remind all members to stand tall and state a simple "Yea" or "Nay."

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[6:33 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. ChurchillMr. Dunn
Mr. FureyMr. Bain
Ms. ReganMs. Masland
Mr. MacLellanMs. MacFarlane
Mr. McNeilMr. Houston
Ms. CaseyMr. MacMaster
Mr. GlavineMs. Chender
Mr. DeloreyMr. Burrill
Ms. MillerMs. Roberts
Mr. KousoulisMs. Leblanc
Mr. WilsonMs. Martin
Mr. PorterMs. Smith-McCrossin
Mr. HinesMr. Halman
Ms. Metlege DiabMr. d'Entremont
Mr. InceMr. Orrell
Mr. RankinMs. Adams
Mr. MombourquetteMr. Lohr
Ms. ArabMr. Johns
Mr. HorneMs. Paon
Mr. JessomeMr. Rushton
Mr. MacKayMr. MacLeod
Mr. MaguireMr. Harrison
Ms. Lohnes-Croft 
Ms. DiCostanzo 
Mr. Irving 

[Page 3401]

THE CLERK « » : For, 25. Against, 22.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be resumed.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : All right, let's see if we can do this without becoming a blubbering idiot as well. (Interruption) Yes, why would I change?

I just want to say this might be my last opportunity in the House - might, because I could actually underestimate my opponents and not win the nomination and I'll be back here in the Fall. If I am back here in the Fall, look out.

I thought, where do I start a final speech in the House, and I thought maybe look back to the first time that I got to speak in this House, and some of you weren't very old. I'm just looking around at some of our newer members. Look at the 59th Assembly, September 30, 2003, I think there was a bunch of new members sitting around that Legislature. Of course, the Premier was there, the member for Kings West was there, and a whole bunch of other newbies at that time who were able to represent their communities in there.

My first speech in the House, or at least the first time I got to stand at the microphone was a question about Hurricane Juan. I was Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries and it came from the Honourable John MacDonell, who asked me a question about what kind of programs would be available for farmers. Never mind the question, never mind my answer; I stuck to the script, by the look of it. What I really enjoyed is how John responded to my answer. It was: "Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his first answer in Question Period, he is certainly following the direction of previous ministers, I want to say, with no answer."

As much as we stand on this side of the House asking questions of that side of the House, it is a long-time tradition not to answer a darn question. But that was the first thing I got to say in the House of Assembly all those years ago. Actually, on that day I saw a resolution and a statement actually from the previous member for Sackville-Cobequid. Dave Wilson actually got to respond to the death of one of his co-workers, John Rossiter, at the time. It was a pretty emotional day that day as we talked about Hurricane Juan and its repercussions in our community.

[Page 3402]

I think I also saw a resolution from the Premier, there might have even been a resolution from the member for Kings West as well, so it was a busy day for all of us - fifteen years and seven months ago that we entered into this Legislature, just a few days prior to that.

Trying to put a bunch of thoughts together, we have a lot of people to thank to be here. I'll save the best for last, who happens to be in the gallery today, who, of course, is my wife but I'll say thank you to her in a moment. But it's the people of Argyle-Barrington - Argyle first, Barrington second - who returned me to this place. Actually, the member for Northside-Westmount will be kicking me in the leg every time I blubber here. But to the constituents for electing me each time, for my EDA, the people who worked really hard, my volunteers who made sure that we were doing the right things, saying the right things, and really working hard to make sure that we were going to be the victors.

I can tell you, back in 2003, it probably wasn't apparent that I was going to win at that time. John Hamm had just come across a majority government. It wasn't basically said that he was going to win that second majority. It was going down to minority, from what all the pundits were saying at the time. I was running against Aldric d'Entremont at the time, so can you imagine? Two d'Entremonts on the same ballot makes it confusing. So I'm hoping that some people actually made the mistake and voted for me instead of Aldric. Those 400 votes made all the difference in the world to make sure that I came to this place.

Again, my EDA, my constituency assistant Theresa, my current constituency assistants JoEllen and Hazel, who are always there for me to make sure that the stuff is being done in our constituency because, ladies and gentlemen, colleagues, we only get here if the things are dealt with in our communities. We're only here if we respond to the request of our constituents, and they will return us hopefully in the next election. Without that work and support that we receive, of course we would not be able to come back here. So treat your constituencies well, if I'm to pass on anything here tonight.

I want to thank the PC Party of Nova Scotia for its support of me during the past 20 years. Quite honestly, I first went through the front doors of this place back in 1999 when I had the opportunity to be the executive assistant to the Minister of Finance at the time, Neil LeBlanc - and of course, I thank Neil LeBlanc for trusting me to be his assistant and allowing me to take his spot afterwards when he decided he was going to be retiring as well.

The PC Party of Nova Scotia is always here behind us. Of course, my Premiers - John Hamm, and my second Premier, Rodney MacDonald. My Leaders, of course - Jamie Baillie, and now my current Leader, Tim Houston. Thank you so much for your continued support for the constituents of Argyle-Barrington and for me. I just want to thank you for all that hard work. There is really only one of them sitting here right now, but I know the other ones are either listening online - I'm hoping - watching it. (Laughter) It's hard to tell.

[Page 3403]

I also want to thank my two interim Leaders. We had two interim Leaders during my time. The member for Colchester North was a force to be reckoned with, as she is now as the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board, and the member for Pictou West, for her sage advice during her time as Leader as well.

There were so many people who ended up sitting with us who I miss, quite honestly. I do miss Michael Baker and a number of people - the John Chataways and the other people who didn't make it past a certain time, or are not here with us now, but had the opportunity to represent their constituents on the floor of this Legislature.

While I was here, I was very proud of a number of things that we brought forward. The French-language Services Act is one that I will always think we all did together as well, that we were able to bring French services to this province that we hadn't had before. We were just off of a high, I think, and an acceptance of the Acadian and French community in this country and in this province.

La loi sur les services en français c'est quelque chose qu'est très important pour moi. C'est quelque chose qu'on a travaillé ensemble avec les trois partis qui étions ici au temps et de faire sûr que les services sont disponibles dans chaque région de notre province.

That is something that lasts today. We still have a Minister of Acadian Affairs. We still have services available to our constituents, and that dates back to 2003. That is something that will continue to go forward, hopefully evergreen, and adapt as things go on.

We have a vibrant French community that is continually under attack when it comes to language assimilation. Through the education system, through the Department of Acadian Affairs, hopefully we can work hard to make sure that those communities are as vibrant tomorrow as they are today.

Family Pharmacare is the other one that I like to talk about. We are still a long way from a national Pharmacare program and I think during my time as Health Minister that is the one issue that I think brought forward. It wasn't the greatest of programs, I have to tell you. It wasn't the richest of programs, but I can see the thousands of families that have been helped by that, that it was a stopgap of either having the drugs they needed to survive or going bankrupt, or having the drugs they needed to survive. (Applause)

I thank at the time, of course, my Premier at the time, Rodney MacDonald, for supporting that and moving it forward. And again, to the government, it is always that I think we can continue to work on, especially as we go forward with a national Pharmacare program that we continue that support and make sure that it is available not only to Nova Scotians but, of course, all Canadians as that program wraps up and gets into a full program.

[Page 3404]

The House of Assembly has been an interesting place to come. I have to say this morning I got pretty nostalgic when I walked in here, knowing it is probably one of the last times that I get to stand right here, right here in my spot. (Applause)

It is an honour to be here and each and every one of us here have to understand that it is our honour to be here. We're here on behalf of our constituents. So, every time you walk in there, know that you have the heart of your community, you are representing the heart of that community, regardless of what craziness can happen here. Absolute insanity can ensure sometimes. Yelling can happen here - I don't know if you've noticed it. But you are here to represent your constituents and I hope I have done that for Argyle-Barrington.

The second you go through those doors you are just a regular person and you should all get along and you should all work hard to bring the issues to work with your constituents and bring them back here for debate when debate ensues.

I have to say I've had some great friends in this House of Assembly. Some of them have been on other sides of the aisles. Dave Wilson, I have to say probably my best friend here - my best friend not here at this point. He left me before I got to go.

Quite honestly, when you come into this place - I was 34 years old when I came in here. I had a one-year old and a five-year old. Well, I have to say my wife had them. I left her behind to take care of the children. We were young families and Dave had a young family as well, so we had a lot of things in common. We might not have agreed upon policy but again, when we walked out that door, we were the same, and we're all the same when we walk back there. We should all remember that.

This is my family when I am in Halifax. I look at all these great people who have a lot to offer, who I am hoping will be the next government of Nova Scotia, I just want to say that. No offence to you guys, but I see the passion they have for Nova Scotia, which I know is the same passion that is in the NDP caucus and in the Liberal caucus. I think working together, working to make things happen, I think all good things will be rewarded in the end.

My best is to those who are staying behind - I see two others who are thinking about jumping; I'm calling them copycats at this point, that they wanted to follow along. This is a hardworking group and all I can do is wish them the best. Of course, to our Leader, the member for Pictou East, I hope that, of course, we work hard to make sure that happens. He will always have my support to make sure that that happens as well.

Of course, to you, Mr. Speaker, and, of course, the other distinguished people that had the opportunity to sit in that spot, I want to thank the Legislature and the Officers of the Legislature because they make our lives a lot easier in a lot of cases. They are the instruments, I believe, of our democracy to make sure that we play fair, that we at least play as just as we possibly can. Sitting as House Leader for a number of years, people like Neil and Annette and Nicole are amazing, the amount of information that they have on them. (Applause)

[Page 3405]

I have to say, the Speakers who have sat with you in that dais have been phenomenal individuals as well. I want to thank you for your hard work and your support of me. You only kicked me out once. So that that wasn't so bad. There's still some time, I suppose. What's ironic about that is that I got kicked out because of a ferry question. I didn't feel that they had things done in time. I was questioning them about it, and I got kicked out.

Mr. Speaker, the whole staff here are phenomenal, and friends of mine and the folks up at Leg TV work long hours with us, and the Commissionaires that are here. A number of different individuals - our Sergeant-at-Arms, David, it has been a great time to have you here knowing that we're safe. Since I came in here 15 years and seven months ago, security has changed dramatically for a whole bunch of bad reasons. When I'm in here, I feel safe because of the work that your folks do and that you do. I just want to make sure I thank you on behalf of all of us for the work and the security here.

When we first came in here, there wasn't even a metal detector downstairs. Quite honestly, the incident that precipitated that, I didn't see it because I was sitting where the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal was. A gentleman came into the gallery with a knife like this and got caught by one of the Commissionaires and was hauled out pretty quickly, but we didn't even know. We were sitting over there. The folks over here - I think the NDP were over here, and the Liberals were over there - saw the scuffle that was going on, but we had no clue. It was at that time that Murray Scott had to take on the issue and make sure that we were safer in this House of Assembly.

I put notes on here, but it keeps changing on me. Where am I going? Well I would like to go home and mow the lawn. That's what I would like to do next week. Snow and other things are impeding me from that. Apparently, next week, I'll be in on Monday in my role as Acadian Affairs Critic to see the boundaries report that will be coming down on Monday, so I don't plan on leaving the job too soon.

I do plan on seeking the nomination in West Nova. I think West Nova is a pretty diverse and exciting constituency. (Interruption) It's hard to sell memberships here, but I'm going to say it anyway.

There are a number of challenges in West Nova, as in many places in our province. The fishery needs to be tended to, not only on policy and legal issues but also the infrastructure that supports it. Our fishery has changed dramatically over the last 20 years. The vessels have gotten larger, and our ports are just not capable of taking that size of vessel to safely treat our fishers to make sure that they come home and are safe when they're there. They are the business parks of our constituencies for those who have fisheries in our areas. They are the business parks. They are the economic energy for those areas. We need to support them more, and we can really only do that sitting in the federal government. They're the ones that hold the keys to that economy.

[Page 3406]

On the issue of farming, I was Minister of Agriculture when we dealt with a number of issues when it came to BSE. The Premier was my critic for a little bit there too. We were talking about finding ways to help our cattlemen who were really having a hard time, and that worked really well. We were expanding our grape industry at the time. We were switching over from low-yield apple crops to higher-yield apple crops. Those are things that have been going on for quite some time that have really changed the industry, the farming industry in Nova Scotia. Those are things that I want to help work on, on a national level as well.

Taxation is also really important to make sure that small businesses in our areas are treated fairly; to make sure that we, as a federal government, have an opportunity to help the province; and when it comes to attracting doctors and making sure that they have all of the taxation opportunities so that they can compete with other parts of the world. Some of those taxation issues that were taken away by Mr. Morneau are actually there to help and keep doctors and other specialists and other professionals in our area. That is why they were there.

There's one issue that I have to say is extremely important to me and that is the completion of our highway system, the completion of Highway No. 103 and that means not only paving it down through - hold on, I will get to the 101 in a second - but making sure that the overpasses are available to the motoring public. That can only be done with a partnership with the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal and the federal government. There are probably tens of millions of dollars of construction that needs to be done - and I've talked about Exit 32 a whole bunch of times in this House of Assembly. It is an unsafe intersection. It needs the attention of both levels of government and is something that I hope to be able to help the Minster of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal on, as well.

The completion of Highway No. 101 is extremely important, too. The first section is done, and I thank the member for Clare-Digby for his work and the minister for his work on it, and of course the Premier, but there's another section that needs to be completed through there and I hope to be able to help along on that one, as well.

The final thing that I do want to make sure that I help out, and we talk a lot about it here, is the issue of the ferry. And I know it's been an interesting discussion here over the last number of weeks. It's one that I remember in my constituency and the neighbouring constituency of Yarmouth, what it was like without a ferry in that area and it was devastating. There were a couple things else going on at the same time, it wasn't just the lack of ferry or the opportunity for the tourist industry or tourist operators. The fishery was taking a bit of a kicking at the same time, so it was a pretty dark time in South West.

[Page 3407]

I have to say that the province shouldn't be going on this alone. They're spending a lot of money, a lot of taxation dollars that could be spent in other places, but right now they're the only level of government that's really supporting it in a larger way. There is some money coming down for the renovation of the ferry terminal in Yarmouth and I thank the federal government for that, but there should be some ongoing support for it and that's something that I'm going to bring forward to Ottawa if I have the opportunity to go there. (Applause)

Without making this too blubbery, to my wife up above right there, she's been with me the whole time. We've been together for over 30 years now, we've been married for almost 24. I don't know how she puts up with it, and she's allowing me to go federal, so thank you so much to her; to André who is in university in Moncton right now; to Alec who is probably swimming right now at the YMCA in Yarmouth in a 20-yard pool - so another project that needs to be brought forward for Yarmouth, which is an expansion of the pool - my mum and dad; her mum; my brothers and sisters-in-law - there's a whole gang there that works as a cohesive team. I think all of us have those teams that are important to us, and without them we couldn't do the work that we do here. To my wife whom I conned so long ago to be my wife - merci beaucoup. Je t'aime beaucoup. We're still at it. (Applause)

With those few words, I just want again to remind everyone why we're here. We're here for our constituents and sometimes, regardless of our political affiliations, we need to stand up for our constituents and we need to represent them here on the floor of this Legislature. We just need to think of, and look to Joe Howe and remember what he said when we're looking at issues that come forward - we need to look at what is right, what is just, and what's for the public good. Merci beaucoup tout le monde. (Standing Ovation)

[7:00 p.m.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That concludes the government's business for this session (Interruption) We'll retract.

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, like my colleague from Argyle-Barrington, this may be my last day sitting in this House, but not sitting in a house.

I want to start out by first saying the most important thing that all of us can remember, and should remember, is that there is nothing more important than family. And in a very strange way, I look at you all as my family.

[Page 3408]

You know, earlier today when I made that last question to the Minister of TIR about the New Boston Road, a number of colleagues from across the way came over and wished me well, and I had some phone calls to wish me well, and a few media people, and I finally, finally figured it out, Mr. Speaker. I now know what it's like to attend your own wake, because people are saying all the things that sometimes don't happen in here.

To my friend, the Minister of Health and Wellness, I want to extend to you a thank you for understanding that Question Period is not personal.

My colleague from Argyle-Barrington did the thank you so well, and he is right. There are many people who have made this possible for me. The people of Cape Breton West have given me the honour to be here on a number of occasions and then Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg. I will never, never be able to say thank you enough.

I am one of the luckiest people in Nova Scotia to have the opportunity to have sat in this House. I've sat over there, I've sat over here, I've sat up there, and I want to tell you, it doesn't matter where your chair is. What matters is that you are here and have the opportunity to represent your family, your friends, and your constituents. Although, Mr. Speaker, I have to say that the view is much better from up there. I know that we function because of how you operate this House. I know that when I had the opportunity and the honour to be the Speaker, it was only here in Halifax. At home, my wife was still the speaker. She got the final say.

My family has been supportive for a long time. When I first got elected in 1995, my son was five years old. The night of the election, I was carrying him in my arms. Today he has three sons of his own that he's carrying around and, I have to tell you, that makes me very proud. (Applause)

Part of my life with my family here has seen me engage with my three children as they got married, as they grew their families, and now I have six grandchildren. All of that took place while I was here with you, and you, and some of the people who aren't here.

I go back, and I think about people like Terry Donahoe who I had great respect for, who served as the Interim Leader of our Party for a period of time; people like Michael Baker who loved this place so much that he kept on coming back and coming back. You know some people wonder, why would Mike do that? It was for his love of this place and the love of this province.

When I first got involved in politics somebody said, why did you ever get involved with politics? I had three reasons at that time: my daughter Sandra, my daughter Jessica and my son Daniel. So now the question is, why would you think about moving on if you can? Well I have six reasons for that, my six grandchildren: Logan, Keigan, Nolan, Hannah, Rylee and Lauchie, and I think I even had them in order.

[Page 3409]

My thank you to the family can never be enough, but there are other people who make this possible. Again, my colleague had mentioned some of them, but my constituency assistant Jean Wadden, who has been with me since 2006 - a wonderful woman who actually can make sense of me sometimes. My assistant who works with me on a part-time basis, Leanne, again giving their all to the constituents.

The riding, the constituency association, that got me elected, because we all know we didn't do this trip alone. If it wasn't for our constituency associations and our people, we wouldn't be here. You know I have some people who have been with me through the very first election, since 1995, and they keep on coming back. I owe a great deal of gratitude and thanks for that.

The caucus staff, I've seen a lot come and go, as they have as well. But as we all know, they make our job as members of this House a much easier and better way to move forward.

During my time in this House there have been some dark days. I had a little health challenge of my own and when I landed in the hospital, do you know what? There were people from all sides of the House who called, sent best wishes, were wondering how I was doing. And that family, this family, gave me the opportunity to get better quicker; that whole experience gave me an advantage that I will never forget. It's an advantage I have over each and every one of you; that advantage is that I can put only one foot in my mouth.

Again, it goes back to the support. The very, very special person in my life has been Shirley. This summer we will be married 42 years, together for 45. I've been with her almost as long as I've been involved with the Tory Party. I just celebrated my 45th anniversary with the Tory Party earlier this month and it has been a great ride. Being with people here has been a rewarding experience.

I know we don't always agree on everything, but I also know that everybody here is here for the same reason, to do what they think is best for the people who gave them the honour to be in this House. I want to say thank you to all of you for allowing me to be part of this beautiful building, part of this Legislature, part of the history of our province and our country.

Before I sit down, there's another group of people in this building I want to say thank you to, and that is the Commissionaires who work in this building. (Applause) They make it safe for us to be here. They make it safe for us to go out into our vehicles or go out in the yard, Premier, when there's a few extra visitors. They do an incredible job, and sometimes are the last ones we remember to thank.

Our Pages, the staff of the Legislative Assembly - regardless of if we're talking about the Legislative Library or Hansard or Legislative TV, all those people do remarkable work. If they can make a group like this look good, they are amazing people.

[Page 3410]

Folks, I'm looking forward to a new challenge, but if that doesn't happen, I'll have a question about health next week. (Standing Ovation)

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : That concludes government business for the sitting, Mr. Speaker. I ask that we take a recess and await the arrival of the Lieutenant Governor to close this sitting.

THE SPEAKER « » : The House will now recess while we await the arrival of His Honour.

[7:12 p.m. The House recessed.]

[7:28 p.m. The House reconvened.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: His Honour the Lieutenant Governor is without.

THE SPEAKER « » : Let His Honour the Lieutenant Governor be admitted.

[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: His Honour the Lieutenant Governor.

[The Lieutenant Governor, the Honourable Arthur J. LeBlanc, preceded by his Private Secretary and by Mr. David Fraser, Sergeant-at-Arms, bearing the Mace, entered the House of Assembly Chamber. The Lieutenant Governor then took his seat on the Throne.

The Sergeant-at-Arms then departed and re-entered the Chamber, followed by the Speaker, the Honourable Kevin Murphy; the Chief Clerk of the House, Neil Ferguson; and the Assistant Clerks, Annette Boucher and Nicole Arsenault.

The Speaker, with the Clerk and Assistant Clerk on his left and the Sergeant-at-Arms and Assistant Clerk on his right, took up his position at the foot of the Table of the House.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: It is the wish of His Honour the Lieutenant Governor that the ladies and gentlemen be seated.

THE SPEAKER « » : May it please Your Honour, the General Assembly of the Province has, in its present session, passed certain bills to which, in the name and on behalf of the General Assembly, I respectfully request Your Honour's Assent.

[Page 3411]

THE ASSISTANT CLERK « » :

Bill No. 84 - Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Appreciation Act.

Bill No. 90 - Boxing Authority Act.

Bill No. 91 - Nova Scotia Museum Act.

Bill No. 92 - Municipal Government Act and Halifax Regional Municipality Charter.

Bill No. 95 - Emergency "911" Act.

Bill No. 97 - Credit Union Act.

Bill No. 99 - Assessment Act.

Bill No. 101 - Tourist Accommodations Registration Act.

Bill No. 103 - Justices of the Peace Act.

Bill No. 105 - Judicature Act.

Bill No. 106 - Coastal Protection Act.

Bill No. 109 - Pension Benefits Act.

Bill No. 112 - Education Act.

Bill No. 119 - Builders' Lien Act.

Bill No. 121 - Nursing Act.

Bill No. 122 - An Act to incorporate the Pine Grove Cemetery Company, Lower Stewiacke, Colchester County.

Bill No. 133 - Human Organ and Tissue Donation Act.

Bill No. 135 - Nova Scotia Power Privatization Act and Nova Scotia Power Reorganization (1998) Act.

Bill No. 136 - Financial Measures (2019) Act.

[Page 3412]

Bill No. 139 - Income Tax Act.

Bill No. 140 - House of Assembly Tartan Act.

THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR:

In Her Majesty's name, I Assent to these bills.

THE SPEAKER « » : Your Honour, having been graciously pleased to give your Assent to the Bills passed during the present Session, it becomes my agreeable duty on behalf of Her Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, her faithful Commons of Nova Scotia, to present to Your Honour a Bill for the Appropriation of Supply granted in the present Session for the support of the Public Service and to request Your Honour's Assent thereto.

THE CLERK « » :

Bill No. 151 - Appropriations Act, 2019.

THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR:

In Her Majesty's name, I thank Her loyal subjects, I accept their benevolence, and I Assent to this Bill.

[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: Please rise.

[The Lieutenant Governor left the Chamber.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: His Honour, the Speaker.

[The Speaker took the Chair.]

THE SPEAKER « » : I would ask the members to please rise and join me in the singing of our national anthem.

[The national anthem was sung by the members.]

THE SPEAKER « » : The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I think we're going to have a seat.

THE SPEAKER « » : Please be seated.

[Page 3413]

THE PREMIER « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I want to first of all express my thanks to all members today. I especially want to recognize the three members who have other plans into the future.

I know the member for Argyle-Barrington who spoke, we were elected the same year. I said he had the good fortune of going into government, baptism by fire, and I was a minister and I happened to be his critic early on. You're very right, we worked together dealing with the issue of mad cow disease, as they referred to it in those days. I worked with you as part of the Ministry of Health, and I appreciated your openness to continue to co-operate. I believe we're leaving here as we came in here: as friends. I look forward to seeing your path, considering I also live in West Nova, but I haven't been here long enough, so I'm looking forward to staying.

I also want to recognize the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg. I want to say to the member, as much as I respect the work he was doing in this House and as the Speaker, it is not that that I remember him most for. I remember, first of all, seeing you and the gentleness and kindness and love that you demonstrated to your wife when you moved around this building and in and out, and the supportive partner you have been through her journey.

On a personal note, not all of you will know, but my daughter was a Page in this House when the honourable member was Speaker, and the respect that you've shown our daughter and all the Pages at that moment in time is what has endeared you to our family. It is why I'm often asked how you're doing by Colleen, Andrea, and Jeffrey, because you demonstrated to us the kind of person you are. So, I want to wish you well as you move into the next phase of your life. (Applause)

One who didn't speak, the member for Northside-Westmount, hasn't been here as long as the other two. I was asked today about that. I said I didn't know the member as well as I knew the other two, but I knew very early on, when I would go to campaign against him in a by-election, I met him. I knew he was the kind of guy I'd like to have a beer with. What I didn't tell him was, it wasn't until you got here, I knew I'd be paying. (Laughter)

I do want to wish you well in your next phase, whether it's back here or in the next part of your journey. I appreciate the passion you've demonstrated for your constituents and I look forward to working with you. I hope that the three of you, if you are successful, remember that I do ask for money, and I won't be shy about asking for it. I wanted to wish you well as you guys embark on whatever the next part of your journey is, wherever it's going to take you.

I do want to acknowledge the Pages that are here. Thank you for your support and all the work that you do throughout the entire year. Legislative TV, thank you. To the Clerks, as has been demonstrated by all members who stood today and talked about the importance of the work that the Clerks are doing on behalf of all of us in a non-partisan way, which is what is required in this House at times, we want to thank you; the Hansard team; the Legislative Library. The House operational staff, Mike is no longer going to be with us - Peter will still be here, though, and provide us a good stewardship - so we wish him well as he goes forward. The Committees Office, we want to thank them for how quickly they were able to put the historic Health Committee together and do all that good work, and all our committee teams. The Sergeant-at-Arms was mentioned earlier today. I knew him before he came into this place, but I really appreciate the professionalism to which you always demonstrated while doing your job here and before.

[Page 3414]

I want to recognize the Commissionaires who were talked about before. Buzz and his team do a tremendous job of looking after us, making sure as we come in and out of the building. Quite frankly, I enjoy the great conversation just of, how are things going? It's a genuine ask, not as politicians but as an individual, and we appreciate all that you do as Commissionaires here in our building. (Applause)

The Halifax Regional Police and the RCMP continue to provide us support while we are here in this building. It's been mentioned by a number of my colleagues when they stood today, as well, that the staff who work in our caucus offices and, in our case, some of our departments, but there is no place like this. There is no job like this and it does get into your blood, but it would be impossible to do without the people who come to work on behalf of our respective Parties in our caucus offices. They believe in the vision that our Parties present and they believe sometimes in the vision of the people who happen to hold the office at that time, and they come to work every day on behalf of all of us. I want to thank them for the work that they do.

To the Public Service, which has demonstrated time in and time out that they have the best interests of this province at heart, regardless of who has the privilege of sitting on this side of the House. I feel fortunate to have been able to work with many of them and I appreciate their frankness and their desire to carry out whatever the public policy is of the government of the day.

As mentioned about our constituency assistants, I'll be heading back to my riding tonight. I haven't been there now for a number of weeks, but my office has been open and running. That's not unique to me; it's the same for all of you. They are the front lines. Oftentimes, quite frankly, they get the blast before we do and sometimes, because of them, the blast isn't quite as bad as we arrive. They work extremely hard on behalf of our constituents and on behalf of each of us. I want to thank them and their families.

Finally, I want to just thank all our own families who carry on while we come here. I remember the member from Argyle-Barrington, when he stood, he talked about having a five-year-old and a one-year-old and your wife became both parents. You don't live an hour away, you live three hours away, and that is true for many of us.

[Page 3415]

This place at times, the hours are late and long and frustrating and it is the person at home who is caring for our children or, quite frankly, if we are fortunate enough to have them grow up and go out and find their own living, it's the person who is waiting for us to come home to diffuse some of what we've experienced in this part or, quite frankly, allow some of the frustrations that can happen from this job to be mitigated.

I want to say on behalf of all of us, our thanks to our families. I want to wish all of you a great summer. I'll see some of you on the road and I'll see some of you in your constituencies. I would encourage all of you, regardless of whether you have the privilege of being the leader of a political Party, take your critic responsibilities and go visit some of these ridings. There are some pretty amazing things in other parts of the province and I am looking forward to coming to Richmond County to say hello to my family for a reunion, but there are many parts of this province you should embrace.

There are lots of very unique and distinct places. Fishermen's Cove is a hidden gem. I've said this many times that we all should take the time to drive across the bridge or drive and go over and visit. (Applause) There are not very many places where you have a working wharf and one that is also where it seems perfect, so I do want to say thank you to all of you for that.

With that, Mr. Speaker and members of the House of Assembly, I move that the General Assembly be adjourned, to meet again at the call of the Speaker.

THE SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House now adjourn to meet again at the call of the Speaker.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House now stands adjourned.

[The House rose at 7:49 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

[Page 3416]

RESOLUTION NO. 1162

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the first Terry Fox Run was held on September 18, 1981, with more than 300,000 people participating and raising $3.5 million; and

Whereas Pearl Cameron of Urbania has completed the Terry Fox Run every year for the last 36 years; and

Whereas Jessie Alder, Terry Fox's niece, presented Pearl with a certificate of recognition from the Terry Fox Foundation for being one of the province's top fundraisers for many years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Pearl on being recognized for her many dedicated years of raising money for cancer research.

RESOLUTION NO. 1163

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Paige Treen is the ten-year-old daughter of Gail Obrien and Peter Treen of Lantz, N.S., who at the age of eleven months was diagnosed with Zellweger Syndrome, a rare genetic disorder; and

Whereas Samantha and Elliott Seitl, children of family friends, were eager to help Paige and her family, so they set up outside Sobeys in Elmsdale and sold popsicles and lemonade, raising $672.65 for the Treens; and

Whereas after hearing the reason behind this fundraiser, Tim Reynolds, owner of TR Construction, gave the Treen family $750 and donated his time, knowledge, and materials to build Paige a wheelchair-accessible ramp;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking the Seitl family for organizing this fundraiser, Tim, and all members of this wonderful community who donated to the Treen family.

[Page 3417]

RESOLUTION NO. 1164

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on the morning of Saturday, November 18, 2018, Ronnie Densmore of Upper Rawdon was working in his yard when he heard the spinning of tires, and looking towards the road, saw that a car was off the road and on fire; and

Whereas Ronnie jumped on his ATV and went to help Rawdon & District volunteer firefighter Richard Dorey-Robinson, Richard's brother James, and passing motorist Vincent Prosper, who were already at the scene of the accident; and

Whereas while the car was filling with smoke, these four brave men used the muffler that had broken off the car to break some of the windows and pulled Troy Doucet to safety;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Ronnie, Richard, James, and Vincent for putting their own lives at risk in order to save the life of Troy Doucet, who suffered serious injuries and was transported by the EHS Life Flight to the QEII hospital.

RESOLUTION NO. 1165

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in 1996, Tim Hortons' Smile Cookie campaign was started to help raise funds for the Hamilton Children's Hospital in Ontario, and in the 22 years since this first campaign, the program has grown to become an annual week-long cross-Canada fundraising event and provides much-needed support to over 500 Canadian charities, hospitals, and community programs; and

Whereas on November 23, 2018, Milford Tim Hortons manager Jayme Newcombe and Mount Uniacke Tim Hortons manager Mohammad Asify presented to the Shumilacke Food Bank in Shubenacadie a cheque for $9,151 from monies raised during the 2018 Smile Cookie campaign; and

[Page 3418]

Whereas Shumilacke volunteers Faye Curry and Betty Fraser were very thankful for receiving such a large donation, from which they were able to purchase three months of supplies and stock up on protein, fresh vegetables, and fruit;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking the owners and staff of the Milford and Mount Uniacke Tim Hortons and the Hants East community for their generosity.

RESOLUTION NO. 1166

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in 2012, Mr. Stan Slack of Elmsdale received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal, in 2014 received the N.S. Trails White Hills Summit Award for his contributions, and in September 2018 was inducted into the International Snowmobile Federation Hall of Fame in Eagle River, W.I., just the 13th Canadian to receive this recognition; and

Whereas this "Gentleman of Snowmobiling," as he is known in Nova Scotia, has been involved in snowmobiling for 40 years and has created or chaired many successful programs; and

Whereas his initiative and guidance in trail development, youth programs, trail signage, and grooming and charity events has seen the Snowmobiling Association of Nova Scotia grow from 300 members to 2,400;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me recognizing and congratulating Stan Slack for his outstanding dedication to the development of the Snowmobiling Association of Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 1167

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sarah Delorey from Elmsdale captured several Player of the Game Awards and Team MVP during various tournaments in the 2017 season; and

[Page 3419]

Whereas her impressive play on the court garnered her an invitation to train with the Triple Threat Next Level Basketball program as an underage player; and

Whereas she was a starting player for the Under-15 Provincial Girls team, impressing basketball audiences in New Hampshire, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Saskatchewan for the Canadian Nationals;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in offering our congratulations to Sarah Delorey for her athletic accomplishments, including winning the 14 and Under Female 2018 East Hants Sport Award.

RESOLUTION NO. 1168

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Shirley Whiteway-Matheson's hobby of restoring and painting furniture became a small home-based business in 2015, when she officially launched LilyPond Vintage; and

Whereas in July 2017, Shirley opened LilyPond Vintage Furniture & Home Decor in Elmsdale, where she offers workshops and sells vintage pieces that she has restored, other unique home décor, and the necessary supplies needed to restore furniture and create stencilled decor pieces; and

Whereas Shirley is a tremendous supporter of her community, donating to local events, sports teams, and other local causes;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Shirley on making LilyPond a place that attracts artists and shoppers from all over this province and beyond.

RESOLUTION NO. 1169

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NAPA Auto Parts Ultimate Garage Giveaway contest ran from September 1st to December 14th and was open to all walk-in NAPA retail customers in Atlantic Canada who purchased a minimum of $50; and

[Page 3420]

Whereas Brandon Ashley of Lantz, who filled out a ballot at NAPA Elmsdale, thought that he was being pranked when he received a call telling him he was the winner of the contest; and

Whereas on January 3, 2019, NAPA officials and Elmsdale NAPA owners Keith and Vicki Sullivan presented Brandon with his $25,000 worth of garage products;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Brandon on his Ultimate Garage win.

RESOLUTION NO. 1170

By: Hon. Margaret Miller (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Hants Penguins PeeWee AAA hockey team eagerly accepted the opportunity to give back to their community by earning their own money and spending it on gifts for other deserving local children; and

Whereas the boys pooled their earned money together and went shopping at Toys R Us, where they purchased gifts to help Elmsdale Vision fill Santa's Sleigh; and

Whereas the gifts were sure to have made Christmas merrier for some less-privileged Hants County boys and girls;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking the East Hants Penguins PeeWee AAA Hockey Team for their incredible act of selflessness and their parents for raising such kind and considerate boys.

RESOLUTION NO. 1171

By: Hon. Mark Furey (Lunenburg West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas David Penny of Conquerall Bank is passionate about coaching and has been doing it for almost 40 years, with infinite patience and kindness and a good sense of humour; and

[Page 3421]

Whereas David, who has taught karate, kickboxing, and other sports, is best known for bringing amateur boxing to the South Shore and has students who have competed at the provincial, national and international level; and

Whereas David also takes an avid interest in developing coaches and currently mentors seven coaches, six of whom are female, at his club, Dave's Multisports;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in recognizing David Penny for his dedication to coaching.

RESOLUTION NO. 1172

By: Hon. Mark Furey (Lunenburg West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the South Shore Regional Hospital Auxiliary has three fundraising arms: the Daisy (that sells used clothing and housewares), the Gift Shop, and the Shoreline Gallery, which are run by over 130 mostly retired volunteers; and

Whereas in 2018, the auxiliary raised in excess of $375,000 that went towards purchasing an ultrasound and renovating Bridgewater's Food Bank; and

Whereas over the last decade $2 million raised by the auxiliary helped purchase hospital equipment, and more recently $40,000 in bursaries was given to hospital volunteers and $18,000 was donated to Bridgewater Senior Wheels;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia Legislature join me in thanking the South Shore Regional Hospital Auxiliary volunteers for supporting our community's health.

RESOLUTION NO. 1173

By: Tory Rushton (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Fundy Geological Museum in Parrsboro held an event in November 2018 to celebrate its 25th anniversary, with former and current directors reminiscing of the past of both the Nova Scotia Museum and the Fundy Geo Museum; and

[Page 3422]

Whereas the Fundy Geological Museum is the world centre for experiencing geological history interpreted from the unique features of Nova Scotia's Fundy region; and

Whereas, established in December 1993, the Fundy Geological Museum attracts over 22,000 visitors year-round and the museum includes an exhibition gallery, lab space, a multi-purpose room, a gift shop, and administration offices;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Fundy Geo Museum on its 25th anniversary and wish them many more years of success.

RESOLUTION NO. 1174

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Anita Carter-Rose of Musquodoboit Harbour is a devoted wife, mother, and grandmother, who is also committed to helping the people of the Eastern Shore; and

Whereas Anita is one of the co-founders of the Eastern Shore Mental Health group, which offers resources, support, and a safe place for anyone living with mental health challenges to share their experiences; and

Whereas Anita Carter-Rose has been a strong advocate for mental health services for the Eastern Shore and is currently working on a new pilot program for the Eastern Shore called the Mental Wellness Outreach Project, which will provide the government with a better understanding of the services needed on the Eastern Shore;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly thank Anita Carter-Rose for her continued commitment to improving the mental health of residents of the Eastern Shore.

RESOLUTION NO. 1175

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brandon Power of Musquodoboit Harbour was selected as the only player from Nova Scotia to be on the national U18 rugby team, which travelled to San Diego on Boxing Day for a training camp with Canadian and U.S. players; and

[Page 3423]

Whereas Brandon's Canada Red team played the U.S. Blue team on December 31, 2018, which resulted in a tie game; and

Whereas Brandon is looking forward to starting college next year, where he will be pursuing his athletic endeavours but also his academic goal of studying human kinetics;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Brandon Power on being the only Nova Scotian to make the Canada U18 Rugby team and wish him all the best in his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 1176

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Barb Hashimoto is a long-time resident of Owls Head, located on the beautiful Eastern Shore of Nova Scotia, where she worked as a realtor and helped many families find their perfect home; and

Whereas upon retirement from the real estate sector, Barb has kept busy by helping people on the Eastern Shore file their yearly tax returns; and

Whereas Barb has also been an active member of her local Liberal Electoral District Association, where she has held the position of treasurer for several years, but will be retiring from this position in Spring 2019;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly thank Barb for her community involvement and her dedication to her local electoral district.

RESOLUTION NO. 1177

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Keith Langlois of Lawrencetown, Abbey Penny of Halifax, Matthew Rushton of Cole Harbour, and Marin Callaghan of Halifax proudly participated in the 2019 Nova Scotia U16 Mixed Curling Championship, capturing the gold medal; and

[Page 3424]

Whereas participation in amateur athletics offers youth an opportunity to gain physical skills, participate in the community, and build character; and

Whereas curling is an internationally recognized sport, presenting unlimited opportunity for athletic and personal development for our Nova Scotia participants;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Keith Langlois, Abbey Penny, Matthew Rushton, and Marin Callaghan on winning the 2019 Nova Scotia U16 Mixed Curling Championship and wish them all the best for their future in the sport of curling.

RESOLUTION NO. 1178

By: Hon. Iain Rankin (Timberlea-Prospect)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Edith (Edie) Gilbert, a resident of Timberlea, celebrated her 100th birthday on November 18, 2018, with over 100 family and friends at St. Andrew's Church; and

Whereas Edie devoted her whole life to her family, community, and church and is the proud mother of four children, three boys and one girl; and

Whereas Edie's birthday celebration included certificates and awards of recognition from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Premier Stephen McNeil, Nova Scotia Lieutenant Governor Arthur J. LeBlanc, Fred Hiltz, Archbishop of the Anglican church, as well as my constituency office;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Edie Gilbert on keeping active, contributing to her community, and celebrating this special milestone in her life.

RESOLUTION NO. 1179

By: Keith Bain (Victoria-The Lakes)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dr. Rollie Genge has been providing family doctor services to residents of Baddeck and surrounding areas for 45 years, and continues to do so; and

[Page 3425]

Whereas Rollie is well respected both within his own community and the medical community as a whole; and

Whereas as a way of recognizing Dr. Genge's commitment and dedication to his community and their overall health, a fun evening will take place on May 10th at the Inverary Inn in Baddeck, where there will be a friendly roast of Rollie and his career;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Dr. Rollie Genge for his many years of continued and continuing service, and wish him all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 1180

By: Tory Rushton (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Age of Sail Museum in the community of Port Greville, Cumberland County, pays tribute to the heritage of the communities along the Minas Channel; and

Whereas the missions of the museum is to collect, conserve, and preserve the Parrsborough Shore lumbering and shipbuilding history for the purpose of education and display so that this important part of Nova Scotian history is not lost; and

Whereas this year will mark the 25th anniversary since the opening of the Age of Sail Museum, which has made such an impact on this community as well as the province of Nova Scotia and is constantly evolving;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Age of Sail Museum and all of their hard-working volunteers on 25 years of preserving the heritage of this great community.

RESOLUTION NO. 1181

By: Tory Rushton (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a hard-working 50-year-old individual keeps Cumberland County Minor Hockey games going and on schedule; and

[Page 3426]

Whereas Tim Ripley has been a timekeeper at the Amherst Arena for 25 years, allowing many Cumberland County Hockey players to learn, play, and enjoy this great sport; and

Whereas he not only keeps time but also announces games in both English and French for all levels from novice to Jr. A, and his services do not go unnoticed;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly thank Tim Ripley for all of his hard work and dedication to hockey players of all ages.

RESOLUTION NO. 1182

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 13th and 14th, Bonny Lea Farm Drama Group and the Chester Playhouse presented Something's in the Air and sold out both nights; and

Whereas Something's in the Air was a wonderful production wherein all participants met with the director to tell their personal stories so their stories, personalities, and interests could be reflected in the parts they were playing onstage; and

Whereas through a medley of comedic, moving, and unforgettable scenes and notably inspirational music, this play showcased the many abilities of people living with disabilities, and importantly, the underlying message that "everyone has dreams";

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Bonny Lea Farm, Chester Playhouse, and the cast and crew of Something's in the Air for their work supporting inclusion and for the success of their sold-out production.

RESOLUTION NO. 1183

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cole Rafuse achieved the dream of every major junior hockey player's life by being a member of the Acadie-Bathurst Titans, who won the MasterCard Memorial Cup on May 27, 2018, with a 3 to 0 victory over the Regina Pats at Regina's Brandt Arena; and

[Page 3427]

Whereas it will always be a cherished memory for Cole and his family, as well as for the Titans, as it was their first time in franchise history, in the 100th year of the Memorial Cup; and

Whereas Cole Rafuse played minor hockey in the Annapolis Valley system and regards those development years and the support of his parents, Jack and Cathy, as central to his success;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Cole Rafuse and wish him the very best in his hockey journey.

RESOLUTION NO. 1184

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Django Valentino Meier of Kingston won gold in the under-59kg weight class at the Taekwondo National Championships in Quebec this past January; and

Whereas because of this great success, Django has become a team member of the Canadian Junior National Team and will represent Canada as he competes at the 2019 Pan American Taekwondo Championship in Peru later this year; and

Whereas Django was recently recognized as Sport Nova Scotia's Athlete of the Month in February;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Django Valentino Meier on his incredible taekwondo accomplishments and wish him further success in his competitive taekwondo endeavors.

RESOLUTION NO. 1185

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Survivors of Abuse Recovering (SOAR) has been in existence since 1993 and provides peer counselling and support services to adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse, and Karen Martin has been an integral part of this organization; and

[Page 3428]

Whereas Karen Martin has held many roles with SOAR from the very beginning, including serving as Chair for several years, having received a Meaningful Involvement Consumers Award in 2012 for her work with SOAR; and

Whereas the impact that Karen has made on SOAR is everlasting, proving that she has left a legacy;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Karen Martin on the incredible and impactful work she has done with Survivors of Abuse Recovering for over 20 years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1186

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Special Olympics Nova Scotia Winter Games were held February 22nd-24th, including the five-pin bowling competition held at the Greenwood Bowling Centre at 14 Wing Greenwood; and

Whereas athletes Genna Coleman, Corynne Adamson, Amy Patey, John Guy, Rory Nixon, Josh Vandenberg, and coaches Samantha Blinn and Pat Nixon represented the Kings Special Olympics team with pride and grace; and

Whereas all bowlers did an exceptional job, posting personal best scores and winning a bronze medal in the Division 1 regional cup, and Genna Coleman took home a gold medal in her division;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Genna, Corynne, Amy, John, Rory, Josh, Samantha, and Pat on their tremendous success as they represented the Kings Special Olympics Team at the 2019 Special Olympics Nova Scotia Winter Games.

RESOLUTION NO. 1187

[Page 3429]

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Althea and Michael Gillespie founded the LumberYard Axe Throwing, which opened its doors in Greenwood on October 9, 2018; and

Whereas axe throwing at the LumberYard quickly became a popular recreational activity for the community and visitors alike due to the diligence of Althea and Michael in creating a thematic, friendly, safe, and enjoyable experience for all; and

Whereas the LumberYard Axe Throwing received the honour of being selected as the recipient of the Annapolis Valley Chamber of Commerce's Best Entertainment award;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Althea and Michael Gillespie on their entrepreneurial endeavour in founding the LumberYard Axe Throwing.

RESOLUTION NO. 1188

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas athletes Kyle Woodworth of Berwick, Samuel Gallant of Kingston, Hailey Peddle of Kingston, and coach Charles Grant of Berwick all represented Team Nova Scotia at the 2019 Canada Winter Games; and

Whereas Kyle, Samuel, and Hailey made Nova Scotia proud as they displayed dedication to their respective sports of snowboarding, squash, and judo, and as a goaltender coach, Charles continued to instill passion and integrity in his hockey players; and

Whereas their hard work and training were demonstrated as they competed against the best athletes in Canada as their communities, friends, and families cheered them on;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kyle, Samuel, Hailey, and Charles on doing a phenomenal job of representing Nova Scotia at the 2019 Canada Winter Games.

RESOLUTION NO. 1189

[Page 3430]

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the West Kings Wolverines male hockey team hosted the Nova Scotia School Athletic Federation 2018-2019 Division 2 hockey championships this past March; and

Whereas the Wolverines won silver in the presence of a packed crowd on March 10th after a phenomenal weekend of hockey and playing a hard-fought championship game against the Cole Harbour Cavaliers; and

Whereas players described it as an honour to have played host to this prestigious championship tournament and the community embraced the opportunity to showcase the local area and displayed the utmost level of sportsmanship, making the community proud;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the West Kings Wolverines male hockey team on winning silver and being phenomenal hosts of the NSSAF 2018-2019 Division 2 hockey championships.

RESOLUTION NO. 1190

By: Hon. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Station Six Fire Midget AAA female hockey team competed at the Female Midget AAA Atlantic Championship tournament in Bathurst, New Brunswick, this past weekend and were truly a force to be reckoned with; and

Whereas this team includes four young women from the Annapolis Valley, including Courtney Boone of Kingston, who has played with the Western Valley Hockey Association, and Caelyn Parker of Berwick, Brooke MacNeill of Kentville, and Ellen Laurence of Kentville, who have all played with the Valley Wild; and

Whereas their team remained undefeated going into the championship game and battled against the Northern Lightning, winning 5 to 2 in a game that had everyone on the edge of their seats, and will now travel to Sudbury, Ontario, for a chance to hoist the Esso Cup, beginning on April 21, 2019;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Courtney, Caelyn, Brooke, Ellen, and all players of the Station Six Fire Midget AAA female hockey team on winning Atlantics and wish them the best of luck as they compete for the Esso Cup.

[Page 3431]

RESOLUTION NO. 1191

By: Kim Masland (Queens-Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sandra Saulnier from Liverpool turned a lifelong dream into a reality and recently published her first book, Lost in Grey; and

Whereas, highlighting mental health issues through her novel, Sandra draws on some of her own experiences to write about a fictional woman who develops postpartum depression;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sandra for writing such a poignant first book that tells a story that will resonate for so many.

RESOLUTION NO. 1192

By: Kim Masland (Queens-Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the J. & W. Murphy Foundation generously donated $4 million to the QEII Foundation; and

Whereas $3 million of this will help create an Endowed Chair in Palliative Care at the QEII Health Sciences Centre, with the other $1 million providing funding for the new hospice in Halifax; and

Whereas the announcement was made by the daughters and daughter-in-law of the late Janet and Bill Murphy, the family behind the successful fishery company Mersey Seafoods in Liverpool;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly applaud the foundation for their foresight and generosity, which will benefit all Nova Scotians in years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 1193

[Page 3432]

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston-Dartmouth)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ms. Eliza Brooks of East Preston, who will turn 100 years old on May 15, 2019, is one of the oldest surviving members of the Preston communities; and

Whereas she raised four children as a single mother and was employed as a domestic worker at the Victoria General Hospital; and

Whereas she is a Lifetime member of the Ladies Auxiliary Ministry and a talented choir member of the East Preston United Baptist Church;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize and congratulate Ms. Eliza Brooks on her amazing life and contribution to her church and community.

RESOLUTION NO. 1194

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston-Dartmouth)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lake Echo Lioness club was chartered in 1979 by a group of women dedicated to serving others in the community; and

Whereas the Lake Echo Lioness Club is a volunteer service organization that supports charities such as the local food bank, Terry Fox, and individuals in need; and

Whereas the Lake Echo Lioness club is celebrating the occasion of the 40th charter on May 4, 2019;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize and congratulate the Lake Echo Lioness Club for their dedication and ongoing efforts to make our community a better place for all residents.

RESOLUTION NO. 1195

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By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston-Dartmouth)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ms. Micah Smith of North Preston, a musical talent who is occasionally a back-up singer for Reeny Smith, is also a highly-trained massage therapist; and

Whereas Micah always wanted to help people, so she actively pursued a career in massage therapy, graduating in 2014, and began work as an independent contractor for Massage Addict; and

Whereas she continued her studies, focusing on oncology massage therapy, at a prestigious institution in Boston to acquire the skills to help relieve cancer patients' pain;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize and congratulate Micah Smith for achieving this high level of professionalism and wish her every success in opening an at-home practice.

RESOLUTION NO. 1196

By: Hon. Lena Metlege Diab (Halifax Armdale)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas I want to share my appreciation for the years of dedicated work of House of Assembly Manager of Operations Michael Laffin; and

Whereas Mike has served the Nova Scotia House of Assembly for over 35 years, and all members appreciate his years of dedicated work to keep the House of Assembly moving; and

Whereas I, of all members of the Legislative Assembly, can say that I have known Mike the longest, as I had the pleasure of working with him when I was a Page here in the Assembly in 1985-86;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in saluting Michael Laffin for his long career of service to the people's House and wish him a relaxing retirement.

RESOLUTION NO. 1197

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By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas St. Luke's United Church in Tantallon recognizes that approximately half

of all children and youth living in Canada will experience loss from death, separation by marriage breakup, armed forces deployment, or incarceration, and they chose to host "Rainbows Canada," a program designed to help children successfully navigate the grieving process; and

Whereas the Rev. Anika Sangster of St. Luke's feels the program can help a child

process his or her grief in a healthy way; and

Whereas Rainbows Canada provides peer-support groups for children ages 3 to 18

Years old free of charge to help them deal with stress, anger, depression, and anxiety;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate St. Luke's United Church in Tantallon for facilitating the implementation of this important mental health program for children and youth in our community.

RESOLUTION NO. 1198

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lloyd Publicover has been a key volunteer for the Blandford & Area Fire

Rescue Team for over 50 years, trains all new volunteers for the fire department, and manages the department's Pumpers Lounge; and

Whereas Lloyd Publicover is an important volunteer for his fundraising efforts on

behalf of the fire department and Saint Barnabas Church; and

Whereas Lloyd recently received the 2019 Nova Scotia Volunteer Award representing the Municipality of Chester;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Lloyd on his many contributions over the years to his community and wish him well in all his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 1199

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By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Village Emporium, a small business located in the Village of Chester,

was named the 2018 Best Artisanal Retailer by the Municipality of Chester; and

Whereas owners Angela Kitching and Pat McNamee provide a wide variety of

locally handcrafted products as well as a selection of items from away from a total

of over 20 vendors; and

Whereas the Emporium offers a collection of freshwater pearl jewellery designed

and made by Angela and Pat, as well as an eclectic offering of goods ranging from

jewellery, soaps, sewn and knit goods, greeting cards, books, décor, and more;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Village Emporium on their Best Artisanal Retailer Award and wish them well in their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 1200

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas local volunteers worked hard over many years to develop the St. Margaret's Bay Community Enterprise Centre to provide meeting rooms, offices, training and board room, hot desk areas, work tables, and on-site printing and photocopying; and

Whereas the centre is run by a team of dedicated volunteers who provide the supportive community where small businesses and organizations can thrive; and

Whereas the centre is a perfect resource for everyone to connect, engage, share experience and expertise, and most of all bring people together to create a stronger and more vibrant community;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the volunteers who successfully created and operate the St. Margaret's Bay Community Enterprise Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 1201

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By: Hon. Patricia Arab (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Natalie Brown is the Executive Director of the Fairview Family Resource Centre; and

Whereas the Fairview Family Resource Centre helps youth and adults develop skills that will help them in the workforce; and

Whereas due to Natalie's commitment to the community, she was a recipient of the Halifax West Sesquicentennial Award;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Natalie Brown on this significant award.

RESOLUTION NO. 1202

By: Hon. Patricia Arab (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dr. Kyly Whitfield was chosen as the recipient of a $1-million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; and

Whereas Dr. Whitfield is an associate professor of Applied Human Nutrition at Mount Saint Vincent University, where she focuses her research in nutritional deficiencies; and

Whereas her passion for children is evident through her work and it is because of people like her that we can innovate new technologies to help the global problem of hunger;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Dr. Whitfield on this incredible award.

RESOLUTION NO. 1203

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By: Allan MacMaster (Inverness)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Wayne and Karen Beaton of Mabou have received a social responsibility award and an award for market penetration from Loblaws for their Freshmart store in Mabou; and

Whereas they and their staff of 12 have worked hard over the years to give the people of Mabou and area a supermarket that would rival any found in an urban setting; and

Whereas they have been generous to their community: the food bank, the Inverness Hospital, the national champion Midget AAA Cape Breton West Islanders, and other local sports teams;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly wish their success in Mabou to continue for the next generation of Beatons.

RESOLUTION NO. 1204

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Forces Station Mill Cove was an important part of the Hubbards community from 1967 until the armed forces residential community was closed by the Department of National Defence in 1992; and

Whereas when the Mill Cove Station was closed as a government facility the property became a rental community managed first by the Aspotogan Heritage Trust and lately by the Bayit Property Group which now calls the area Mill Cove Park; and

Whereas to honour the naval legacy of Mill Cove, the new owners have created a large commemorative plaque which replicates the CFS Mill Cove badge as the centrepiece of a legacy feature at the corner of Hwy No. 329 and Parkwood Drive;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Bayit Property Group for preserving this important part of the Hubbard's and Aspotogan Peninsula history.

RESOLUTION NO. 1205

[Page 3438]

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hendrika van Gurp, a resident of Big Tancook Island, is a celebrated teacher, principal, author, a representative on the Lunenburg County Provincial Advisory Council on Education, and distinguished promoter of the culture of peace and safety in schools; and

Whereas Hetty founded Peaceful Schools International, a charitable organization dedicated to supporting schools that have a declared commitment to creating a safe and welcoming environment for all students; and

Whereas among Hetty's many accolades, she was given the Baha'is Commendation for promoting racial harmony, the YMCA Peace Medal, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission Award, and received the Order of Nova Scotia in 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulates Hetty van Gurp for her extraordinary work as an educator and a promoter of safe schools for students here at home and around the world.

RESOLUTION NO. 1206

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the New Ross Trails Society has developed a plan to integrate the village with a series of trails easily accessible to all citizens from school children to senior citizens; and

Whereas Phase 1 of the trail project will start this spring due to the generous offer of the Murphy Family to integrate a recreational trail within their working Christmas tree farm in memory of their little daughter Ruby; and

Whereas the trail will feature an expansive view over the village of New Ross and the rolling hills beyond from Porcupine Hill, marked as a place of peace and quiet contemplation dedicated to all the children of New Ross;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the New Ross Trails Society in their excellent work to create a network of trails in their community, and to wish them well in their future endeavours.

[Page 3439]

RESOLUTION NO. 1207

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the St. Margaret's Bay Food Bank and Thrift Store presently serves over 400 local families in need in the Bay area; and

Whereas they operate full time out of the Shambala Centre in Upper Tantallon with a contingent of both paid staff and a heavy contingent of volunteers to empty bins, sort clothing, organize donated foodstuffs, run the thrift shop and prepare contributions; and

Whereas the Board of Directors works closely with local businesses, churches and other organizations to collect food and cash donations and conduct fund-raising events;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the St. Margaret's Bay Food Bank and Thrift Store on the many successful years of service to their community, and to wish them well in their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 1208

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sue LeBlanc was the creative force behind the Chester Area Middle School's pilot project to feed all their students a free, nutritious lunch during the month of February; and

Whereas Sue realized shortly after starting her job at the school that many students could not afford the $5 each day needed for a cafeteria lunch, she raised the $6,000 needed for the pilot project from the Municipality of Chester, the Community Health Board and private donors; and

Whereas Sue volunteered her own time and solicited over 20 volunteers from the community to prepare, serve and clean-up for 200 or so students and staff;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sue LeBlanc on her commitment to prove that healthy, home-made food can be provided to school children at a reasonable cost, and to wish her well in all her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 1209

By: Hugh MacKay (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Crossroads Educational Vegetable Garden in Tantallon was created in 2012 by the volunteer organization Transition Bay St. Margarets, and donated 423 pounds of fresh vegetables to the St. Margaret's Bay Food Bank last fall; and

Whereas Transition Bay hopes to inspire everyone about the ease and productivity of growing your own food, including the idea of "edible landscaping" rather than lawns; and

Whereas another initiative of Transition Bay is the Tantallon Village Farmers Market on Sonny's Road in Tantallon to feature fresh, locally grown produce, sustainable raised animal products, prepared food and beverages, and locally hand-made arts and crafts;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Transition Bay for their fine work to encourage re-localization of services and resources, and to wish them well in their future endeavours.

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