The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD17-05

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



First Session

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
Res. 3, Estimates: CW on Supply - Referred,
245
258
Adjourned debate
267
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 236, N.S. Gov't.: Long Serv. Award Recipients - Congrats.,
267
Vote - Affirmative
268
Res. 237, Premier's Award of Excellence: Recipients - Congrats.,
268
Vote - Affirmative
269
Res. 238, Valley Harvest Marathon - Anniv. (25th),
269
Vote - Affirmative
270
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 4, Dignity for Victims of Sexual Violence Act,
271
No. 5, Provincial Court Act,
271
No. 6, Sexual Violence Action Plan Act,
271
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS:
Spicer, Peter & Pat - Prov. Woodlot Owners of Yr.,
271
Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent - Report
Tabling, Ms. L. Roberts »
271
MacDonald, Jaxon et al - Hosp. Visit,
272
Mir, Jawad: "Only 78" Documentary - Congrats.,
272
No. 12 Colliery (New Waterford) - Anniv. (100th),
273
Lumière Arts at Night Fest. (7th Anl.): Organizers - Recognize,
273
Mi'kmaq Sports Hall of Fame: Inductees - Congrats.,
273
Hardy, Cheyenne: Prince's Youth Serv. Award - Congrats.,
274
McLean, Isabel: Thompson River Track & Field Team - Selection,
274
Sheffield, Julie: Physician Shortage - Concerns,
275
Otter Pond Demonstration Forest - Thank,
275
Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank Campaign - Constituents Thank,
276
Hood, Allison: Newbridge Acad. - Studies/Hockey Career,
276
Barron, Justin/Huntley, Hannah - NSSAF Athletes of Yr.,
277
MacDonald, Lisa - Molson Brewing Co. Award,
277
Bond, Dr. Jason - Premier's Award of Excellence,
278
Dart. Learning Network - Office Opening,
278
Hammonds Plains-Lucasville Campaign - Supporters Thank,
278
Mckenny, Ceilidh/Sampson, December - Roadside Stand/U-Pick,
279
Lunenburg MLA Campaign - Constituents Thank,
279
Beaver Bank Kinsac - Time Capsule,
280
Hadad, Dr. Sura: Dental Patients - Dedication,
280
Can. 150th/Battle of Vimy Ridge (100th): Northside Salute - Congrats.,
280
Sampson, Jacob: Chasing Champions - Congrats.,
281
Cruickshank, Jill - Retirement Congrats.,
281
McCarron, Deanne: Yar. Vol. - Recognize,
281
Greene, Gary: N.S. Country Music Hall of Fame - Induction,
282
Snyder, Nicholas - Perfect Sch. Attendance,
282
Rochon, Lisa: Constituency Assistant - Thank,
283
Peacher, Joyce: Vol. Serv. - Thank,
283
Dayles Grand Market - Recognize,
284
Corbett, Neil - Antigonish Mun. Co. Dist. 9 By-election,
284
Hartling, Megan - Fundraising,
285
Booker, Kienja - Bus. Development,
285
MacKenzie, John Archie: Death of - Tribute,
285
Julian, Michael J.: Sidney Crosby Hockey School - Selection,
286
Helm, Const. Colin - Crime Prevention Award,
286
Guysborough-East. Shore-Tracadie MLA Campaign - Supporters Thank,
287
Lilley, John: Football Can. U-16 East Challenge - Congrats.,
287
Toarnett, Tony: European Battle Sites - Remembrances,
288
Hart, Lyndsay: Ridgecliff Middle Sch. Grad. Dance - Organizer,
288
Hubley, Evelyn - Birthday (100th),
288
Chester Vol. FD: Members - Recognize,
289
Himmelman, Bret: Can. Summer Games (2017) - Success Congrats.,
289
Bluenose II: Successful Sailing Season - Captains/Crew Congrats.,
290
Clayton Park West MLA Campaign: Supporters - Thank,
290
Cdn. Fed. of Univ. Women: Wolfville Chap. - Recognize,
291
Glass Slipper - Prom Dress Sales,
291
Cape George Lighthouse: N. Shore Dev. Assoc. - Acquisition,
292
Curry, David: Digby Crown Atty. - Appt.,
292
Smith, Beverley: Commun. Dedication - Thank,
293
Doors Open Halifax: Chester-St. Margaret's MLA - Founding Thank,
293
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS:
No. 18, Prem.: Physician Shortage - Response,
294
No. 19, Prem.: Physician Shortage - Budget Response,
Mr.. G. Burrill
295
No. 20, Prem.: CBU Funding - Explain,
297
No. 21, Prem. - Budget: Nursing Homes - Funding,
Mr. G. Burrill
298
No. 22, Prem. - Cap and Trade - Effects
299
No. 23, Fin. & Treasury Bd.: Drug Recognition Training - Funding,
300
No. 24, EECD - C.B.-Victoria Reg. Sch. Bd.: Mental Health Supports
- Details, Mr. E. Orrell « »
301
No. 25, Prem. - N.S. Child Poverty: Budget Adequacy - Confirm,
Mr. G. Burrill
302
No. 26, Waterville Youth Detention Ctr.: Safety Recommendations
- Status, Mr. J. Lohr « »
303
No. 27, Health & Wellness: Barrington Passage Dialysis Unit
- Budget Omission, Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
304
No. 28, Northern Pulp: Environmental Assessment Level - Details,
305
No. 29, Prem.: N.S. Tuition Fees - Lowering,
Mr. G. Burrill
306
No. 30, EECD: Mental Health Care - Access Provide,
307
No. 31, Energy: Rail Co. Access - Charges,
308
No. 32, Health & Wellness - Long-Term Care: Food Budgets
- Restore, Ms. K. Masland « »
310
No. 33, Fin. & Treasury Bd.: Pension Valuation Adjustment
- Accuracy, Hon. David Wilson »
311
No. 34, EMO: False 911 Calls - Review,
311
No. 35, Agric.: N.B./ON Bees - Border Close,
312
No. 36, Justice: Waterville Young Offender - Case Appeal,
313
[GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:]
[GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:]
Res. 1, Deputy Speakers/Chairmen on Committees: Hants West MLA/
Lunenburg MLA - Appt., Hon. G. MacLellan »
Hon. J. Baillie « » on amendment
314
Mr. G. Burrill
315
Moves sub-amendment
316
316
318
Vote on sub-amendment - Negative
320
Vote on Res. 1 - Carried
321
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
321
325
Adjourned debate
333
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Wed., Sept. 27th at 1:00 p.m
333
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Tabled 09/25/17:
Res. 160, Proposed Federal Tax Changes - Condemn,
334
Res. 161, E. Dalhousie - Anniv. (200th),
334
Res. 162, Timberlea Baptist Church - Tidal Impact Team:
Commun. Outreach - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
335
Res. 163, MacDonald, Aliana: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
335
Res. 164, Doucette, Alisha: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
336
Res. 165, Tasco, Brianna: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
336
Res. 166, Moore, Bridgette: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
337
Res. 167, Chapdeline, Connor: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
337
Res. 168, Richardson, David: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
338
Res. 169, DeLong, Emily: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
339
Res. 170, Jackman, Erin: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
339
Res. 171, Richardson, Grace: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
340
Res. 172, McNamara, Hunter: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
340
Res. 173, Smith, Josh: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
341
Res. 174, LeBlanc, Lacey: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
341
Res. 175, Swan, Logan: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
342
Res. 176, Knowles, Pastor Louise: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
342
Res. 177, Wilton, Mathew: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
343
Res. 178, Churney, Megan: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
344
Res. 179, Larade, Michaela: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
344
Res. 180, MacDonald, Mikayla: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
345
Res. 181, Khoury, Nicholas: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
345
Res. 182, Richardson, Noah: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
346
Res. 183, Khoury, Peter: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
346
Res. 184, Moore, Peter: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
347
Res. 185, Bell, Skyler: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
347
Res. 186, Schwarz, Sydney: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
348
Res. 187, Estey, Tim: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
349
Res. 188, Logan, Zach: Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal
Impact Youth Group - Thank, Hon. I. Rankin « »
349
Res. 189, Doane, Alexandra Meredith: Can. Summer Games
(2017) - Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
350
Res. 190, Laurette, Billy: Can. Summer Games (2017)
- Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
350
Res. 191, O'Siadhail, Cian: Can. Summer Games (2017)
- Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
351
Res. 192, Kardas, Haley Autumn: Can. Summer Games (2017)
- Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
351
Res. 193, Stevens, Jane Anne: Can. Summer Games (2017)
- Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
352
Res. 194, Hansford-Smith, Jason: Can. Summer Games (2017)
- Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
352
Res. 195, Munro, Ryan: Can. Summer Games (2017)
- Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
353
Res. 196, Wiseman, Tammy: Can. Summer Games
(2017) - Congrats., Hon. I. Rankin « »
353
Res. 197, ROC/Munro, Marian - Prospect Communities
Farmers Market, Hon. I. Rankin « »
354
Res. 198, Prospect Communities Vol. Awards - Recipients Thank,
354
Res. 199, Butcher, Darrin & Anne: Make-A-Wish Fdn
- Support Thank, Hon. K. Murphy »
355
Res. 200, Anjoul, Anna & Sam/Anna's Café & Grill:
Customer Serv. - Thank, Hon. K. Murphy « »
355
Res. 201, Towns, Benjamin: Sta. 23 Vol. FD - Serv. Thank,
356
Res. 202, Beckett, Craig: Sta. 19/20 - Serv. Thank,
356
Res. 203, Higginbotham, Chief Andrew: Sta. 24/25 - Serv. Thank,
357
Res. 204, Dooks, Sylvanus, Jr.: Sta. 26 - Serv. Thank,
357
Res. 205, Young, Cory: Sta. 23 - Serv. Thank,
357

[Page 243]

HALIFAX, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2017

Sixty-third General Assembly

First Session

1:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Mr. Chuck Porter

MR. SPEAKER » : Order, please.

The honourable Official Opposition House Leader.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, I believe when we left it last night under debate on Motion 1, if I consult Hansard, your comments were "I am advised by the Chief Clerk that we have run out of time. The clock has expired before the vote occurred so the motion to adjourn was put but not voted on, so we'll deal with that tomorrow, or at our first opportunity."

I would suggest to you that we were seized with that question. If I interpret O'Brien correctly, once a motion has been purposed to the House by the Chair, the House is formally seized of it. Mr. Speaker, I would suggest that we have to return to the debate on Resolution No. 1, to dispense with that vote before we can proceed with the motion that you are about to put forward, which would be to dispense with business in order to take on the budget, so I look for your ruling on that.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Thank you to the honourable House Leader for raising that. I was going to deal with that later, after the Budget Speech, at the beginning of the daily routine, but I'll deal with it now since you raised it. I would like to provide a procedural clarification.

[Page 244]

Certainly, last night at the end of proceedings, the Leader of the Official Opposition moved to adjourn debate on the amendment to Resolution No. 1 in the seconds before 10:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. was the appointed time for the end of the day's business.

I, as Speaker, put the question to the House to adjourn debate on the amendment to Resolution No. 1 and the vote was defeated. I did not announce the result of the vote. I did state that "The clock has expired before the vote occurred so the motion to adjourn was put but not voted on, so we'll deal with that tomorrow, or at our first opportunity."

This was not exactly what I meant to say as the vote had indeed taken place and the adjournment vote on the amendment was defeated. However, at that point, further debate was foreclosed because the hour for the end of the day's proceedings had been reached. The result of all this is that the debate on the amendment to Resolution No. 1 was adjourned, and in accordance with Rule 4.2, that the item of business appear on the order paper under its normal order of business which is Government Business, Government Motions. When that item of business is next called by the Government House Leader, the Leader of the Official Opposition will be first to continue the debate on this amendment for his remaining 42 minutes.

Does that provide clarity? Thank you for raising that.

Now, as with the tradition on Budget Day in this House, with the consent of the House we will commence with the motion for Resolution No. 3 respecting the estimates under Orders of the Day. This means that the daily routine will be delayed until after the response from the Budget Speech is adjourned, and Question Period will begin one hour after the start of the daily routine.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[ORDERS OF THE DAY]

[GOVERNMENT BUSINESS]

[GOVERNMENT MOTIONS]

[Res. No. 3, re Estimates - CW on Supply: Referred - notice given Sept. 22/17 - (Hon. Karen Casey)]

With that consent, I will now recognize the honourable minister.

[Page 245]

The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, pursuant to the notice of motion given by me on September 22, 2017 and the Rules and Forms of Procedure of the House of Assembly, I have the honour, by command, to present a message from His Honour the Lieutenant Governor of the Province of Nova Scotia, relating to the Estimates of Sums required for the service of the Province for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018, which is:

"I hereby transmit Estimates of Sums required for the Public Service of the Province for the year ending March 31, 2018 and in accordance with the Constitution Act, 1867 recommend them, together with the Budget Address by my Minister of Finance and Treasury Board, and any resolutions or bills necessary or advisable to approve the estimates implement the Budget measures to the House of Assembly.

Signed,

Arthur J. LeBlanc

Lieutenant Governor, September 25, 2017"

Mr. Speaker, at this time I wish to:

(1) table the message from His Honour, the Lieutenant Governor of the Province transmitting the Estimates for the consideration of this House;

(2) table the Estimate Books;

(3) table the government business plan;

(4) table the Crown Corporation business plans;

(5) table the Estimate and Crown Corporation Business Plans resolutions;

(6) deliver my Budget Speech; and

(7) move that the Estimates of Sums required for the service of the province for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018, being Supply to be granted to Her Majesty and the Crown Corporation Business Plans be referred to the Committee of the Whole on Supply.

Mr. Speaker, with your permission I would like to do an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MS. CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of the members to the Speaker's Gallery where I have some family here with me today; my husband, my brother – my only brother, my only sister, my only husband, one of my sons, and my EA, Joy. I would like you to give them a round of applause. (Applause)

[Page 246]

There are also two other guests in the Speaker's Gallery. I will be referencing them and speaking about them in my Speech but I would like to welcome them; Frank Davies and Tareq Al-Qaraghuli who will have joined us here and you will be hearing more about them in the Speech. So, welcome to the House. (Applause)

I would also like to say that I do believe that in a much higher gallery than this my parents are looking down.

[1:15 p.m.]

Investing in a Stronger Nova Scotia

Mr. Speaker, this is the first budget of our government's second mandate. We stand here today with the first back-to-back majorities in nearly 30 years. We are here, as government, because Nova Scotians want to continue to work with us to build a stronger province. Not just for families today, but for future generations. It starts with our own fiscal health. We have laid out a clear, reasonable, and sustainable fiscal plan. We have stuck to that plan, and we are making progress.

Today, I am honoured to table this government's second balanced budget, which is projecting a surplus of $131.6 million, with a positive net position of $21.3 million. This comes only two months after I presented to Nova Scotians our financial results for last year, 2016-17. These annual Public Accounts showed the year ended with a surplus of $149.6 million.

That means back-to-back balanced budgets for the first time in nearly a decade. We have been able to achieve this by controlling expenses and focusing on the priorities of Nova Scotians. We have made key investments in communities across the province, but we have also made some difficult, but necessary, decisions to live within our means.

The results are clear. Last year's surplus allowed us to make a payment on our debt. Nova Scotia has not been in a position to reduce the debt since 2011. It was fiscally responsible, and it eases the burden on future generations.

Our net debt-to-GDP (Gross Domestic Product) was reduced to 36.3 per cent. This budget estimates a further reduction to 35.5 per cent. We are trending in the right direction to meet the One Nova Scotia goal of reducing net debt-to-GDP to 30 per cent by 2024.

Today, we are in a stronger position to continue to invest in and to expand new opportunities for economic growth, to support existing businesses, and to provide services in health care and education and for those who need them most. That is what Nova Scotians expect, and it is what they deserve.

[Page 247]

As Minister of Finance and Treasury Board, I am committed to working with my colleagues to continue on this road to restore the fiscal health of our province. We know this will allow us to make investments so that all Nova Scotians can benefit.

In the Spring, we presented a budget that included new investments in infrastructure, in youth and young families, in new ideas for a better economy, and in heathier and stronger communities. We are committed to these investments, and we are building on them. My colleagues and I have had the privilege of talking with many people in our communities, hearing their priorities and their ideas to move this province forward.

We listened. The budget I am presenting today reflects what we tabled in April, and it also reflects what we have heard since that time. This budget includes an additional $19 million in investments, specifically in health care, education, and economic development.

Healthy People & Communities

Mr. Speaker, health care continues to be our largest priority and our largest area of investment. We estimate spending $4.2 billion on health care this year.

In addition to the initiatives we announced in the Spring, we are adding more resources to improve services and programs that matter most to Nova Scotia families.

Nova Scotians want a health care system that will work for them, to be available when and where they need it most. They want more timely access to primary care, to family doctors. They want shorter wait times for surgeries. And, they want better access to mental health services. This budget invests in each of these areas.

Patient-Focused Health care

Patient-focused health care starts with care at the community level: primary health care. This budget invests $9.6 million more than last year to ensure more people across the province have better access to primary health care through collaborative teams.

Work is well underway to recruit additional health providers for new teams and to strengthen existing primary care teams around the province. With those expanded teams in place, Nova Scotians will have more timely access to a family doctor, a nurse practitioner, or another collaborative health care team member, such as a family practice nurse, mental health clinician, social worker, or dietician.

Each year since our first budget in 2014, we have increased funding so that more people on a wait-list could have orthopedic surgery. This continued effort has resulted in 2,000 more surgeries. Even with this progress, people continue to wait.

[Page 248]

In the Spring, we announced a budget increase of $3.7 million to perform even more surgeries and to provide access to new pre-habilitation services. This budget takes an even greater step, adding $2.7 million to that plan. This gives us a total annual increase of $6.4 million this year, the Health Authority will hire more surgeons, more anesthetists and more health care professionals at the province's four orthopaedic assessment centres.

This will allow more patients to get their surgeries faster and will help us move closer to the national wait time benchmark here in Nova Scotia. We will increase funding in future years to continue to support this effort.

Mr. Speaker, doctors are central to the delivery of primary care and to specialized services in our communities and hospitals. Every jurisdiction needs them and is aggressively recruiting them. Part of our recruitment plan includes our partnership with the Dalhousie Medical School and the many doctors and health care teams who supervise residents and doctors-in-training.

In the Spring, we committed to adding 10 new seats in the Dalhousie Family Medicine Residency Program, an increase of 28 per cent, bringing the total number of seats to 46 in this program. We will also fund 10 spaces for a new practice-ready assessment program for doctors who were trained internationally and who want to practise in Nova Scotia. Our partners - Dalhousie Medical School and the Nova Scotia Health Authority - are making progress on both of these initiatives.

Nova Scotians asked us to do even more. This year we will work with the Dalhousie Faculty of Medicine to develop a new clerkship program for third-year medical students for communities in Cape Breton. This will allow the school to be ready to accept and place four medical students in Cape Breton in September 2018. These students will provide community-based care under the supervision of local doctors for a total of 48 weeks. What a great way to provide on-the-job training and to assist local doctors in meeting their patients' needs. These are among the important steps we are taking to support healthy people and healthy communities for generations to come.

Our commitment to improving health care services and infrastructure spans the entire province. The QEII redevelopment project is a good example. Work to plan, design, and construct new facilities to support hundreds of health services has already started.

Construction recently began to expand surgical services at the Dartmouth General Hospital. Renovations have started at Hants Community Hospital in Windsor to create a second operating room. A site has been chosen for a new community outpatient centre in Bayers Lake. It will serve the patients who live outside of metro Halifax and who must now travel to the city's downtown. This new facility will not replace services provided on the peninsula.

[Page 249]

Mr. Speaker, sadly, nearly every Nova Scotia family has been touched by cancer. There continues to be advances in treatments, yet the financial burden can be overwhelming for some. Government is committing more than $2 million per year over the next three years that will provide financial relief and peace of mind to Nova Scotians requiring take-home cancer therapies. We will work with Cancer Care Nova Scotia to fully develop the program to ensure no one pays more than 4 per cent of their net income for cancer medications taken at home. At the same time, we will continue to work with our colleagues in the other Atlantic Provinces for a long-term solution.

Better Access to Mental Health Care

Mr. Speaker, one in five Nova Scotians lives with mental illness. The impact on our families, in our communities, and in our work places is very real. Knowing where to turn for help should not be complicated. This year, we will support the creation of a new provincial central intake system that will make it easier for people to access mental health supports.

Through community mental health grants, we are supporting organizations like the Strongest Families Institute, a not-for-profit organization that helps families dealing with everything from behavioural issues of their young children to teenage anxiety.

For those who need more than community supports, perhaps in need of urgent care, we have also committed to expand and enhance crisis services and the services many people access through their local emergency departments. The next step is to ensure patients get the follow-up they need, whether it be from mental health specialists, primary health care providers or other community supports.

Mr. Speaker, during the last campaign, Nova Scotians spoke clearly that mental health was a priority for them. We will hire more clinicians, put more support in underserviced areas, and cut wait times for mental health care.

Experts tell us just how important it is to start treatment for mental illness early. We will invest $12.9 million more over the next four years in youth mental health and addictions services - $1.8 million this year, followed by an increase to $3.7 million in each of the next three years.

This funding will mean more mental health professionals in our communities, particularly in rural and underserved areas. It will allow us to better support the unique needs of at-risk youth, young people in Cape Breton, and those in our First Nations communities. This commitment also includes more funding for Kids Help Phone for more services that are growing in demand and in use.

Mr. Speaker, opioid use and misuse is a growing concern across Canada. We know there are many Nova Scotians using opioids and looking for treatment options. We hear it from the front lines and from the families. Because of what we have heard, we have more than doubled the funding that will be made available to fight opioid addiction.

[Page 250]

This budget will provide $1.36 million to support the Opioid Use and Overdose Framework launched earlier this year. In part, this funding will eliminate the current wait-list for opioid use disorder treatment. This will include opening 250 new spaces for treatment.

[1:30 p.m.]

Education for a Stronger Nova Scotia

An investment in education is an investment in future generations of Nova Scotians. Mr. Speaker, this year we estimate spending $1.3 billion in education and early childhood development.

This Fall begins the first year of a four-year roll out of our pre-Primary program, providing free, full-day programming for four-year-olds. We are only the third province in Canada to offer this important, life-changing program. We know that only 25 per cent of preschool-aged children now benefit from a regulated child care experience. Our pre-Primary program provides parents with another option.

The early years of a child's life are critical for their development. Research tells us that four-year-olds who have access to such a program perform better in school and lead happier and healthier lives. Primary class teachers in our schools tell us the same. That is the strong start our children deserve.

Early education expert Margaret McCain has said our Nova Scotia plan will be an important foundation for a lifetime of learning. She has said early education is tied to other important goals including improving educational outcomes, reducing illiteracy and poverty, and making the province a place where young families want to come and stay.

Other experts from around our country are praising this model of early childhood education. José da Costa, an education professor at the University of Alberta, has said the Nova Scotia model is providing a strong foundation on which to build more advanced learning and skills throughout elementary, junior high school, and senior high school.

Jessica Wolstenholme from Sydney Mines, Cape Breton, is a mother of four with three children in the early learning centres program. She has said the program will help her children grow socially. She has also said how wonderful it is for children to be introduced to the school setting in a play-based way that is not as structured as school.

When Minister Delorey tabled a budget this past Spring, we promised an investment of $3.7 million in pre-primary. Now, our investment this year has grown to $4.45 million so we could launch more classes in more communities than we originally planned - at least 52 classes in 45 sites throughout the province. For the first time, more families will have access to this program. It will help their children while saving them thousands of dollars annually in child care costs. We will not stop until every four-year-old in the province has access to this program.

[Page 251]

Mr. Speaker, no child should start their school day hungry. Statistics tell us that learning takes place at a greater rate when children start their day with a nutritious breakfast. An additional $1.1 million for the school breakfast program this year will help Nourish Nova Scotia expand and enhance the existing program to provide a healthy breakfast for every student in the province.

We are investing $1.1 million to expand the Reading Recovery Program to 73 more schools; $1 million to double the investment to teach coding in our classrooms; and $1.4 million to hire more school psychologists and speech language pathologists. The Commission on Inclusive Education is examining the model of inclusion and has released an interim report. Together we are seeking to achieve transformative change for the benefit of our students.

We heard from Nova Scotians that our students need better access to mental health care services and we are listening. Our budget contains $1.8 million to connect more children and youth with community and mental health supports, for a total investment in SchoolsPlus of $8.2 million. Expanding this program means more mental health clinicians will be hired, and other investments will bring more guidance counsellors into the system and cut wait lists for psychological assessments. This is one more step in our plan to make SchoolsPlus available in every school across the province by 2019.

Mr. Speaker, these investments are in addition to the $10 million we have available to respond to the recommendations of the Council to Improve Classroom Conditions. From their work, we have already expanded provincewide class caps to Grade 12.

New Ideas for a Better Economy

Nova Scotians expect us to pursue new ideas and to grow our economy so that more people can benefit from success. Our economic plan leverages our ocean advantage, builds on our proximity to international markets, recognizes our leadership in post-secondary education, and supports new ideas for traditional and emerging sectors. Our plan starts with our greatest asset, our people.

Youth & Jobs

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Our young people and new citizens are our best competitive advantage. They bring energy and new ideas to our economy. We want more of them to land their first jobs here in Nova Scotia, and start new businesses here in Nova Scotia.

This budget will increase our investment in the Graduate to Opportunity program. This program has helped 200 Nova Scotian employers hire more than 350 new graduates since it was introduced in 2015. This year we will add $1.7 million, bringing our total annual investment to $4.9 million. Introducing this program to more Nova Scotia employers has the potential to support up to 1,200 new jobs over the next four years.

With another $1.7 million, we will create a new program called Innovate to Opportunity. Similar to G-T-O, this new program will provide a wage subsidy to employers. However, this program will encourage employers to hire recent graduates from masters and PhD programs for research and innovation-focused jobs.

Many Nova Scotia businesses need more people with specialized skills and technical trades. Starting this Fall, government began covering the cost of tuition for apprentices returning to the classroom for their technical training. With up to 2,200 apprentices taking their training each year, this $1.3 million annual investment provides them with important financial relief as they continue their education and training.

In addition, this budget will provide $2 million to expand the Apprenticeship START Program. It will support 700 positions across the province. This program supports small and medium-sized businesses in hiring apprentices from underrepresented groups or in rural areas.

Keeping Young People Here

Mr. Speaker, we want to create more reasons for our young people to stay. Nova Scotia has one of the best student assistance programs in the country. This year, we will build on that by extending loan forgiveness eligibility to five years, up from four years. This can fully eliminate a young person's entire provincial student loan, worth up to $40,000.

This budget also introduces a new First-time Homebuyers Assistance Program to encourage those with modest incomes to lay down roots here. Getting that first home is a milestone for many young families, and we can help make that happen.

We also want to continue pressing ahead to attract new citizens to our province. More immigrants can help bring important skills and opportunities to our communities and to our economy. We will continue to partner with the federal government to increase provincial immigrant programs, including the Atlantic Immigration Pilot. When the right conditions are in place, newcomers are better able to settle into their new communities and workplaces, and start their lives here. Government is a willing and able partner.

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Recently, I learned about the two people who are in the Speaker's Gallery today. Tareq is a recent immigrant from Iraq who had over 25 years of trades experience, and he is here with his employer Frank Davies. Tareq was among a group of new immigrants who came to the province with varying degrees of experience in the trades. Working with the Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency and Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia, this group was assessed for their language skills and provided with occupational and safety training. They were matched with employers for a 12-week on-the-job skills assessment, for which the employers received a wage subsidy.

Now, 11 of the 15 who started the program have become registered apprentices and are working toward their Red Seal certification. Tareq is a registered apprentice with Davies Plumbing and Heating Ltd. in Lantz, Nova Scotia. He has said he is happy to be able to work as a plumber again, a trade that has been in his family for generations. Frank Davies, president of Davies Plumbing and Heating, has said he considers Tareq to be among the best on his team, and that other apprentices are learning from him. (Standing Ovation)

As part of his apprenticeship journey, Tareq is enrolled in his Level 1 technical training at the Nova Scotia Community College, which is now tuition free because of our budget investment this year. He and the other new Nova Scotian apprentices are working, contributing to their communities, to this province, and to the diverse culture that makes Nova Scotia a vibrant place to live. (Applause)

This is a great example of the success that can come when community and government come together. They are proud and appreciative. Another new group of 25 newcomers will go through the same program this year.

New Ideas for Economic Growth

Success in the private sector will mean more jobs for our young people and greater benefits for Nova Scotians. That is why we will make strategic investments to support economic growth in this province.

Nova Scotia's fish and seafood sector provides quality jobs and economic opportunities for our people and for our coastal communities. The value of our seafood exports is growing, having reached $1.8 billion last year. We will work tirelessly to ensure our fishery remains strong, prosperous, and sustainable for generations.

Our investment in this budget goes beyond what we promised for the industry in the Spring. Nova Scotia will support the Atlantic Fisheries Fund announced in March by the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans. This fund will focus on growing opportunities and increasing market value for high-quality fish and seafood products from Atlantic Canada.

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As a cost-sharing program, Nova Scotia's contribution this year will be $2.5 million. With federal and provincial contributions from New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador, the total value of the fund will exceed $400 million over seven years. This is an historic investment in innovation, infrastructure, and science in this very important sector.

[1:45 p.m.]

The Centre for Ocean Ventures and Entrepreneurship, known as COVE, will house ocean business start-ups and small and medium enterprises. It is a site for ocean technology innovation and commercialization. It is on schedule to open in Spring 2018, and this budget will provide $10.7 million for its capital and operational funding this year.

Mr. Speaker, 2017 is becoming, and has become, another banner year for tourism. So far this year, Nova Scotia has seen an increase of 95,000 visitors compared to 2016, for a total of 1.25 million visitors to our province. With this increase, the preliminary estimate of tourism revenues through July 2017 is $1.4 billion, up from $1.3 billion last year.

We have our sights set even higher for more growth, as we work toward $4 billion in tourism revenues by 2024. We can only achieve this goal by attracting more first-time visitors and enhancing what we offer them when they are here. This year, we will create a $2 million fund that will be used to help revitalize the province's iconic tourism sites. We will increase Nova Scotia's tourism marketing in China and explore opportunities to expand air access to bring more people to Nova Scotia.

If we want a strong and thriving ocean sector, tourism industry and economy together, we need to protect the environment that they depend on. Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia is recognized as a national leader in fighting climate change. We have introduced renewable energy sources to the grid, such as wind and hydro, and we have made significant investments in energy efficiency programming. We are supporting further innovation in other renewable projects and technologies. Over the next year, we will develop a cap and trade program that will achieve even further greenhouse gas reductions, while protecting the pocketbooks of Nova Scotians.

Further, our budget will build on the important work we have already started to support business growth. This includes expanding rural Internet access, continuing with our ambitious highway plan, introducing business navigators, reducing red tape, and reducing taxes for small business.

Small business owners are looking for ways to grow and to give back to their communities. To help them, we will reduce their taxes by $14.1 million. We will do this by increasing the small business tax threshold to $500,000 from $350,000. This means small businesses can earn $150,000 more income and still be taxed at the lower tax rate of 3 per cent.

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In the past two years, government has cut red tape to help restaurants, local wineries, farmers, apprentices, and many businesses in other sectors. We have set a target to further reduce red tape by $25 million, and have been meeting with business owners to get their ideas. This input will be added to the work already under way to achieve that target, which will help support business with their start-up and their growth.

We will also help our businesses pursue more opportunities in new and strategic markets. A new investment of $1.3 million will help increase export and trade opportunities for businesses, including a new Export Accelerator Program as part of the Atlantic Growth Strategy. We will double the Small Business Development Program and we will continue to fund sector development programs for our agricultural, forestry, aquaculture, and seafood industries.

Through our province's first comprehensive Culture Action Plan we are also investing $2.5 million to support our artists, musicians, publishers, and other creative workers to drive exports and create our own economy.

More Opportunity for All Nova Scotians

Our positive fiscal position creates more opportunities for all Nova Scotians. We are investing more in youth, in families, and in communities.

In 2014, we said we would start reforming our tax system once we could afford it. Now that we are at that point, we are cutting income taxes by increasing the tax-free basic personal amount by up to $3,000 for those with taxable incomes under $75,000.

Mr. Speaker, this tax measure will be in place on January 1, 2018. What's most important is that more than 60,000 people will no longer pay any provincial tax at all. That is a 28 per cent increase and it means 283,000 people will not have to pay provincial tax. This is more money staying in the pockets of recent graduates, of low-income and retired Nova Scotians, of single parents, of working families, and of small business owners.

This would not have been possible without the work of all Nova Scotians as we move this province towards restoring our financial health. The hard work of Nova Scotians is producing real benefits for them and for their families.

This budget will also help the more than 600 Nova Scotia foster families meet more of the day-to-day needs of the children in their care. They will receive higher babysitting rates and higher per diems, and their reimbursement for travel expenses will move to an automatic payment system.

This government has made home care a priority. By increasing funding and taking a new approach, people will have ready access to home support services. This budget will continue investing in home care and it will expand the caregiver benefit program, allowing it to reach 1,600 more people. This will mean more than 3,000 Nova Scotia families can receive this benefit.

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Today, we can fund more resources and supports for families with children with autism. We will build on the success of the Early Intensive Behavioural Intervention Program by investing an additional $800,000 to help Autism Nova Scotia in its work with families. The funding will be used to implement the Social ABCs Program, which will provide supports to children who have not yet entered the EIBI program. This funding will also support families through the regional autism resource centres around the province.

Mr. Speaker, we continue to look for ways to help the individuals and families across our province who live in poverty. A $2 million investment this year will kick-start a four-year, $20 million plan that will identify and implement new approaches to help address this very important issue.

Housing is another priority area for Nova Scotians, and we will invest in more affordable housing options and programming, in partnership with the federal government. This year, $38 million will help create new affordable housing units, including new small options homes, offer more in rent supplements, and fund home repair and adaptation programs to assist low-income homeowners. We will also fund projects that will make more buildings accessible to people with disabilities.

This budget will support SHIFT, our action plan for an aging population. New initiatives stemming from this action plan will support older adults so they can stay involved and connected in their own communities.

As well, the budget for the Seniors' Pharmacare Program will increase by $7.9 million. This will help meet the growing demands on the program. Government has made no changes to the co-payments or to the premiums this year, and we are also committing that there will be no increases next year either.

This Fall, more people will be able to receive help with the cost of heating their homes. Government is increasing the income thresholds for the Heating Assistance Rebate Program for individuals and families. These changes will allow an additional 5,000 households across the province to be eligible for that support.

Mr. Speaker, this budget will support a range of programs that help women at risk. This government made important strides with the development of our province's first Sexual Violence Prevention Strategy. We will continue to work with community leaders and agencies to address the problems of sexual violence; our ongoing commitment will be $1.1 million.

In addition, we are increasing resources to Nova Scotia Legal Aid, hiring two sexual assault prosecutors, and investing more to strengthen enforcement of court-ordered spousal and child support payments owed to our families.

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With support from the federal government, this year we are building new second-stage housing units in Cumberland County to support women and children fleeing domestic violence. Additionally, a four-unit second-stage housing option will be built in the Halifax region, specifically to support Indigenous women and their children.

We will also expand the domestic violence court to the Halifax region and make permanent the domestic violence court first piloted in Sydney.

In helping to address indigenous issues within the justice system, government is moving forward with a new Aboriginal Justice Strategy, which will include a culturally-sensitive wellness court in Wagmatcook.

As the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls gets under way, government will ensure support is available to assist individuals who become involved in the process. Three community outreach specialists who have experience in dealing with trauma will be hired to provide cultural support to those families and community members who may need it.

Conclusion

Mr. Speaker, today I present a budget that reflects what we have heard from Nova Scotians, their values and their priorities. It invests in our businesses, and in creating the conditions for economic growth and success.

The fiscal health of our province has improved. We are on a path to achieving ongoing financial sustainability. This has allowed us to continue to support economic growth, preserve financial capacity, make strategic investments, and provide the services and supports Nova Scotians expect and deserve. I am proud to be part of a government that has demonstrated that it cares.

Mr. Speaker, we want all Nova Scotians to see themselves as part of the success of this great province.

Before I take my seat, Mr. Speaker, I do want to say that part of the tradition has been that the Finance Minister purchases new shoes; I don't need any new shoes. But what I did do, I went to a needy family - two children in elementary school. They need sneakers, rubber boots - whatever - for their feet. I've set it up for the mother to take those two little kids to a shoe store - there's a credit there for them - and they can buy their own shoes. (Applause)

[2:00 p.m.]

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East. (Applause)

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, may I make an introduction?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Seated in the gallery we have a couple of young people who are here today interested in politics. In the corner we have Tyler Baker, who is here with his father, Bud. Over here we have Alison McIvor. She's here with her equally young aunt Theresa Reid. Maybe we can get Tyler and Alison to stand and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

I would be remiss, Mr. Speaker, if I didn't acknowledge the regulars up there in the corner, the young people and also the young at heart: Mike Salterio and John A. MacDonald. Thank you all for being here today. (Applause)

Lots of work goes into the preparation of a budget, Mr. Speaker. There are volumes, and pages and pages of work prepared, so we certainly appreciate the work that the staff does on this.

As I was reflecting on this budget and some of the items in the budget, which we'll get to to speak about today, I can't help but think about the voter turnout. It struck me when I heard the minister saying right off the top, in the opening comments, "We are here, as government, because Nova Scotians want to continue to work with us . . ." I think that statement might have been a little bit more accurate if they had said we're here as a government because 38 per cent of Nova Scotians want to work with us - because that's the reality of the voter turnout in this province. News flash for the government members - if any of those 38 per cent are small business owners or doctors, guess what? The number is going down, folks.

The member for Cumberland South and I were looking at this budget this morning and he made an observation. He said, of course the budget is balanced on paper; of course, you can balance a budget when you don't have any doctors. That's kind of what's happening in this province right now. There's lots of time over the next few days to talk about tax yields and tax rates and where the money is going, and we'll certainly spend a great deal of time talking about that.

As I approach this budget, it occurs to me that there's a lot of money - an $11 billion budget is a big enterprise - flowing in and a lot of money flowing out. All of that money comes from people, and it touches people. We need to be conscious of what types of programs are being supported and what types of programs are being cut. We'll look at that over the next few days.

Last night, my colleague, the member for Dartmouth East made a statement that kind of stuck with me. It's an old quote, he tells me. He said, ". . . challenge is nature's way of strengthening you." When you think about the people of this province, we have certainly had our fair share of challenges. We are a strong people in Nova Scotia; we're people of dignity. Nova Scotians don't want to live in poverty, but Nova Scotians want to do their part. They want to be respected.

[Page 259]

The environment of the province right now is such that people don't feel respected. Ask yourself, do doctors feel respected? Do teachers feel respected? Do social workers feel respected? The member for Dartmouth North, I think, had an article about the burnout amongst social workers. These are all things that we have to ask ourselves. Do any of the people who were marching around this Legislature just a few short days ago feel respected? I think the answer is no, Mr. Speaker. At some point, you have to ask yourself, why is that, why the great divide between classes of people and government and people?

We need to think about those people today as we review this budget. Those are the people we should be thinking about. They're working hard. They're often overworked. They can't get to every student, they can't get to every patient, they can't get to every file, and it puts a ton of stress on them. One thing that governments can provide is respect - it's free to respect people. On the other side of the coin is trust. Respect is free to be given, but trust must be earned. As we stand here today, the trust is broken in many relationships because the government hasn't respected the people. And I hope this government is ready to try to earn that trust.

I look at this budget and I wonder if that is the case or not, because if you think about some of the recent actions of the government, there is no dignity in not negotiating with people. There is no dignity in just legislating contracts on everyone who is in your employ. There is certainly no respect in what happened to the film industry in this province. So, we understand why the trust is broken. We hope that the government will work to earn that trust back.

Today's budget is a very interesting budget because a lot of this has already happened. We are halfway through the year. Much of this has already happened. Much of this money has already come in. Much of this money has already gone out. Now, we did ask this morning, how much has already gone out and how would it compare when you look at the budget, because the budget is just a dream, it is the government's view of what may happen. It is their wishes, it's their dream for what will happen. We know that in this case, this year, at this moment in time, much of it has already happened. It is a fair question to ask how you are tracking against what your expectation were versus your actual. We don't have the answer to that.

Somebody has the answer, but it wasn't one that was certainly shared with us. We do know that the way this province operates, when you are operating without a budget, you can spend up to half of the prior year's budget amount. If you had a $100 budget last year, you can spend up to $50. You can just do that.

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If you are going to go over, you need special permission from the Legislature or from special warrants. We know that we are halfway through the year, interestingly almost exactly halfway through the year. We do know that there were $1.2 million in special warrants. It's hard to understand and to make sense of all that, but we know that much of this has already happened. But the thing I find interesting about the fact that much of this has already happened is on the revenue side, the money coming in, because we know that the government - we heard lots of applause from themselves today and the feel-good nature of back-to-back balanced budgets. Certainly, it is a nice headline. It would certainly imply that things are just going great.

And yet when you look at the revenue projections, the changes in revenues from the April budget that was tabled on the eve of an election to today, there was a change in revenue. That is a short period of time, but there was yet a pretty dramatic change in revenues, and guess which way it went in the case of personal income tax estimates? It went down, it went down, so we do know that in that short period of time it's not all roses and sunshine for the people of this province.

Mr. Speaker, I will take my seat for a second; a member wants to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development.

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the member for Pictou East for allowing me to make a quick, timely introduction here. I do have a constituent in the audience and a good friend. I would like to bring this House's attention to the east gallery where I have my good buddy Lionel Landry here today from Yarmouth. He is a long-standing Party member, someone who has always been there as a source of support and assistance for me during campaigns and all the time in between. So, I would like to take a moment to thank him for his friendship, support, and for being here with us today. I would ask the House to give Lionel a warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East has the floor.

MR. HOUSTON « » : It would be a miracle if the minister's sincere gratitude towards me extends to the end of this speech, but we'll see.

We do know that the revenues have changed dramatically. That is cause for concern for me. When we look at what is in the budget, it is interesting to think about what is not in the budget that maybe should be in the budget. We have a very skinny surplus. A surplus is good in many ways, it is assumed to be good, but a very skinny surplus of $21 million, and in getting to that surplus we don't know what is booked in the accounts for the great number of lawsuits that the province is facing as a result of the actions of this government in their most recent term - lawsuits launched by the Teachers Union, lawsuits launched by the NSGEU, and a whole host of others which could have very dramatic impacts on the finances of this province. They could evaporate that skinny surplus instantaneously, Mr. Speaker, so we need to think about that.

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We also need to think about the situation that has come out recently with respect to the HST on gaming revenues. We do know that the province has been levied $53 million in HST that they've paid but are appealing, so they paid it while they appealed it. It's not booked through the income statement, it's just sitting in a prepaid asset account, if you can believe that. If that appeal is not successful, the whole $53 million comes back, and guess what? Your $21 million surplus is now a $30 million deficit. These are very real things.

The thing that is interesting to me is that there's nothing in this budget to deal with marijuana legalization, Mr. Speaker. We know that the federal government will legalize marijuana in July - it's not that far away - and yet there's nothing in this budget today to prepare for that inevitability. If you think about some of the things like the training of law enforcement officers - and a constituent was mentioning to me just this morning about the drug recognition experts that will be required across this province. There will be quite a few of them that will be required. The training for those drug recognition experts is $17,000 to $20,000 a pop. So, it's a lot of money and yet nothing in this budget.

It just makes me, as we look forward - if that's not being done this Fall and it's not in this budget which goes to the end of March, and the legalization is on July 1st, Canada Day, there's not a big window of time and it makes we wonder if this government is prepared for that. It's reflective of much of the planning we've seen from this government on many issues - in other words, non-existent, Mr. Speaker. The marijuana issue is too big an issue to bumble in the way that some of the other recent things have been bumbled by this government. It's an interesting observation.

There are some things in there that we wish weren't in there, Mr. Speaker. I'm thinking about $1.6 million in there for consultations and preparation, I guess, for the carbon tax. They have $1.6 million set aside to get ready for the carbon tax.

I found it interesting, Mr. Speaker, when I looked through the nice little handout that proclaims all the wonderful things of the government. There's things all the way down here to $50,000 for this and $30,000 for this, but no mention of the $1.6 million for the carbon tax. Interesting that it didn't make it into their highlights. Because they know what we know, the carbon tax is not good for this province but here we go with money for that.

The other thing that really strikes me is there are a couple of references to the Internet, and coming from a rural area I know the challenges that the people who live in rural areas face with respect to Internet service. It would amaze most people from the city as to how many people don't have access to - and I won't even say "adequate" Internet, Mr. Speaker, I will just say that they don't have access to the Internet and cellphone coverage.

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In this budget, I did see $14.5 million for rural Internet. It raises the question for me - what's the real plan? What's the real, long-term plan? Is this government organized enough to have a plan to tap into some of the federal funds that are available? I don't know and, again, I worry about the planning that we see on a lot of these issues.

I mention the personal income taxes, the sharp decline in personal income taxes. That sharp decline was due to - and this was the way it was explained to me, Mr. Speaker - lower than expected growth in household income. We know what that means - people aren't making more money. They're working harder but they're not making more money and that is a frustrating thing for people; that trend is down.

So, when you think about it, this government has announced what they call the largest tax cut in recent history, is the way it was described. Tax cuts are generally a good thing. We like tax cuts. We like people retaining the money they earn. To refer to the tax cut as the largest tax cut in recent history, there's no real answer as to how recent and it made me think this is the best glass of water I had in recent times. It's an indefensible statement, but those are the type of statements that we see from this government, the largest tax cut in recent history. (Interruption) Yeah, my colleague from Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg says the recent history is perhaps since their May budget, and that's the type of stuff.

[2:15 p.m.]

So, we do know the federal government has some tax changes proposed that have caused a lot of anxiety; they have caused a lot of anxiety in me, Mr. Speaker. When we ask the question will this government benefit from those federal income tax changes, of course the answer is yes they will, but when you ask that question, the Premier says we don't talk about that. We don't want to talk about that today. So, it's disingenuous at least, at a time when this government should be standing up for Nova Scotians, fighting for our economy, fighting for our health care system, because these changes will hurt both of those. They will hurt our economy and they will hurt our health care system and these are changes that should be opposed because we have a disproportionate risk to other provinces.

Now, last week in Question Period, the Premier was asked repeatedly would he stand up against those changes and he really didn't have any answer. He wasn't acknowledging anything there but he left this Chamber, he went on the radio, honestly thought better of it, and said that's an indefensible position, I'd better change up my notes here a little bit I guess; and he went on the radio and I was glad to hear the Premier say that, not so much that he was concerned, but that he was passing along the concerns that he was hearing. It's not quite there, but it was certainly a change from what we heard on the floor of this Legislature. He was passing along the concerns of others. I guess the next step would be for him to generate his own concerns and share those and that would be fine, but the whole concept of the federal changes, it gives me pause for thought.

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I find it very, very funny to hear the federal Liberals talking about being worried about families using business as an advantage and, you know, that may be a little easier to believe if it wasn't being touted by a minister and a Primer Minister whose, really, one of their main claims to fame is their family fortunes. So, it would be a little easier to take for the rest of us if they weren't taking that type of position; but this budget today, this budget is the first budget of this new government. It's a glimpse into maybe what we'll expect from this term because we did have an election. We did have an election and I know the New Democratic Party was maybe hoping for a bit of divine intervention in that election but the Premier was returned. We know the Premier was returned.

My grandmother had an expression about her china and she always said that the more often you use your china the stronger it gets and that's an expression that my grandmother always had. She would say that it says it right in the care instructions and I've often been thinking of her saying that as I think of the Premier and all of his trips to China. I think the Premier might be confused with the care instructions for the province and an actual strategy for growing the province because I am confused by how often he goes to China. But he did come back with something great this time. He did succeed in getting membership into a club. Unfortunately, it's a club you have to pay to join and he could have done it from Google while sitting in his office here. He didn't have to go to China. He didn't have to go to China. He could have done that on the Internet.

AN HON. MEMBER: If he had Internet.

MR. HOUSTON « » : If he had Internet, he could have done it from home.

We talk about the revenues, we talk about the expenses and of course we have to talk about the Department of Health and Wellness which is the largest expenditure of the province, $4.2 billion. Of course, in that amount of budget there's some stuff that we can all support and get behind and there certainly are some good things in the budget around the opioids and the oral cancer. I'm pleased to see that the government is finally acting on that stuff.

I am a believer in people taking some responsibility for their own health. I've been watching with great interest as the Minister of Health and Wellness has been on a social media campaign - I believe he called it his Back to Fit campaign - day 5 of his Back to Fit or day 10 of his Back to Fit. He's on day 71 now. I did notice, Mr. Speaker, that a lot of what the minister is doing is biking. I saw a lot of biking in the summer and that's good and it wasn't lost on me, on how appropriate that was, because the minister is the master of spin.

We heard the Premier saying that during the election campaign he heard Nova Scotians and their concerns about primary health care. He says he heard them and he said that he got the message and today we would see a government that reflected his receipt of the message from the people. But, Mr. Speaker, it's not just what you say, it's what you do. There is nothing in this budget devoted to improving the situation around primary health care in this province - remarkably nothing - and that is the real shame. I would say the message was not received and there is so much that could be done and much of it doesn't even cost money. It doesn't cost money to listen to the concerns of the doctors and have a system in place where they know how to raise those concerns and who to raise them to. That doesn't cost money, it just takes planning and organization.

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We see in the budget money for this surgery, more money for ortho, more money for this, but let's stand back and say, who is going to do those surgeries, Mr. Speaker, and where will they be done? That's the part that's not well thought out.

Health care demands are at an all-time high in this province and yet the value placed on health care providers is at an all-time low. The demands are at an all-time high and the value placed on health care providers, especially around primary care, is at an all-time low. I was shocked, Mr. Speaker, to read in the pamphlet here that last year's health care budget was underspent. They didn't even spend the money they had allocated for health care. Imagine my surprise, because it's an indication of the priorities of this government.

You can't go around and say we hear the people of the province, we hear their concerns around health care and we've got the message and we're going to deal with it, and then not spend the budget that is allocated to it. With the concerns around health care and the doctor shortage - over 100,000 people in this province don't have a doctor, don't have access to primary health care - and yet here we have a government that didn't even spend the money allocated to health care in the province. It's an absolute shame. I hear that it's only getting worse and I do hear the Premier. I heard the Premier say that the federal tax changes won't hurt us because they're national and we're all in the same boat, is what he was suggesting.

We already have amongst the lowest-paid doctors and the highest taxes. We will get disproportionately hurt. The Premier should know that the master agreement he signed with doctors, just in 2015, already reduced their incomes.

There are very serious issues in health care. There are things that can be done. Imagine having a billing code on the books that would allow doctors to do non-face-to-face visits so they could call and get through to people. Imagine, that billing code exists but it is not used because it's too complicated to use. It's easier for the doctors to call the people in for the visit.

These are the types of things that should be fixed. The Premier doesn't want to acknowledge the crisis in health care, but it exists. It would be okay if he didn't acknowledge it but he tried to fix it, but looking at the budget today, I don't see how they're trying to fix it.

[Page 265]

Before I wrap up, Mr. Speaker, I do want to talk about education, another very serious issue and a big budget item. Unfortunately, the Education Minister, like the Health Minister, is spinning his wheels. I'm going to do something that I don't do often or don't do often enough. I do want to congratulate the minister on something that he did do or he was responsible for. A young family told me that their child was getting ready to start pre-Primary, and they were very nervous. They didn't know what was going to happen or what to expect. The child found some relief in knowing that the minister and this government also don't know what's going to happen with pre-Primary or what to expect. He felt a little comforted knowing he wasn't on his own.

Again, if you look at the actuals versus the budget from last year, the education budget was underspent. Think of all the concerns in education. I think that was probably one of the biggest rallies in history last year when the teachers marched around here to make their points, which were well received by people on this side of the House. We understand what they're getting at. But they were maybe not so well received on the other side when you see that they have underspent.

That's health care and education. Transportation - I did catch one mention of roads in here. We have a 13-page document on all the wonderful things this government is doing. In 13 pages, there are six words devoted to roads. The sentence is on Page 10, "This includes expanding rural internet access, continuing with our ambitious highway plan" and blah blah blah. That's the only reference to roads in this whole thing.

I know the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal has sailed into his new role here, and I hope that he is on the job more often than the CAT is. We all know that the Yarmouth ferry has not been running near as much as people would have hoped. In fact, if we think about the amount of money that's spent on that Yarmouth ferry every year, it's hard on our roads budget. At this point in time, the government's plan - the deal the government signed, believed in, and touted - would have anticipated roughly 120,000 passengers over the last two seasons. Mr. Speaker, you know as well as I do that it's nowhere close to that, maybe 80,000. Yet there's another $10,000 on the lease this year.

Maybe it's just as well. Maybe we'll see more ferries because our roads are so bad and deteriorating so badly. Maybe we will have to revert to water transportation for everything (Interruption) Or with magic wands - thank you to the member for Inverness for that.

Mr. Speaker, there's a ton of risk in this budget. We have the HST around the VLTs. That could easily turn this to a deficit. We have a number of lawsuits facing the province. That could easily turn this into a deficit.

I will say this about Nova Scotians: they will do their part if they think everyone is doing their part. But we have an environment in this province where people feel that not everyone is doing their part because it seems that some people get raises, get jobs, or get money because they're part of the club. Of course, we need to think about the situation at Acadia University. It turns out that even though the government said there was no more money, there was some money for some. There was some money for some but not for others. Think about where we started - respecting people. Think about where we started - trusting the government. Some say that this government has the courage of its contradictions.

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[2:30 p.m.]

I will make no judgment on the Acadia decision, but I will certainly make judgment on the way it came about. I will certainly make judgment on the process that wasn't followed. This is not about Acadia getting money and others not getting money. It's just about others not knowing that they could get money if they could get into an inner circle, which is certainly what it seems like to us standing out here. CBU saw the injustice of it. They saw the injustice and spoke out against it, and wasn't it interesting when the minister said, we have money for you too. It's not the way that things are supposed to work.

If you think about a person of honour like David Wheeler who thought that there was no more money and tried to do everything he could, and probably ultimately made the cuts he had to make because he really didn't know that there weren't any rules - he tried to do what was right. The cuts that he made, doing what he thought everyone else had to do, maybe cost him his job there. That's a very sad outcome for a government to have forced on an institution and on a people. There's a funding formula for universities and everyone sticks to it - except those that don't, Mr. Speaker.

The whole club concept is something that has angered Nova Scotians. I remember when NSBI was hiring and they explicitly said at the start of their process - they want somebody from Nova Scotia, and they want somebody with deep commercial experience. That was the criteria. They got neither. Was it the club mentality? I will let that linger on this House.

People are angry. People feel like that they're not being treated fairly by this government. People feel like they're not respected. I have an expression for that, I say that it is a "do as I say, not as I do" government. This is why we see the turnout that we do. People are frustrated by how decisions are made and they want to know how ordinary Nova Scotians get access to these same opportunities, because they should have access to these same opportunities but they don't.

We have a lot of numbers to go through here, but we have a bigger issue to deal with in this province - that's the culture of this province that this government has created. We need to change that culture and we on this side of the House will make every effort to do that. Is the budget balanced? It's hard to say. Time will tell on that one. Do people need to be treated better? They most definitely do.

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What I would say for now is: to be continued. With those few words, I would adjourn debate on the budget for today.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is to adjourn debate. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : I beg leave to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MS. MILLER « » : I would like to draw the House's attention to the east gallery where we are joined by a first-time visitor to our House. I would ask Lois Bignell to please stand and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : We will now move on to the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of the Public Service Commission.

RESOLUTION NO. 236

HON. TONY INCE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today, September 26th, more than 300 Nova Scotia Government employees received Long Service Awards for 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and even 50 years of service to the province, an incredible achievement; and

Whereas there are more than 10,000 across the province committed to serving the citizens of Nova Scotia over many years; and

[Page 268]

Whereas across the province government employees are providing families, businesses, and communities with the programs and services they rely on day in and day out;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate the Long Service employees and all civil servants across the province who work tirelessly to serve the citizens of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 237

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today, September 26th, 27 Nova Scotia Government employees, one individual and three groups, received the Premier's Award of Excellence which is the most prestigious government award; and

Whereas this award recognizes the exceptional efforts of public servants who deliver high-quality programs and services to Nova Scotia families, communities, and businesses; and

Whereas these employees reflect government's commitment to Public Service excellence and continuous improvement, while demonstrating the courage to step into new territory and achieve their goals;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate these 27 employees and all civil servants across the province who work tirelessly to serve the citizens of Nova Scotia.

[Page 269]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

RESOLUTION NO. 238

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas every autumn the Valley Harvest Marathon in Wolfville attracts thousands of participants of every age and ability; and

Whereas last year the Valley Harvest Marathon had more than 2,500 runners, including over 1,000 children, participate in runs throughout the weekend; and

Whereas this year, 2017, will mark the 25th Anniversary of the Valley Harvest Marathon;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join in congratulating the organizers, volunteers, and participants who continue to make the Valley Harvest Marathon a successful event year after year, and offer our best wishes as the Valley Harvest Marathon marks its 25th Anniversary.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate. (Interruption)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The subject matter is sport and recreation for the province and he is the Minister of Sport and Recreation under his portfolio of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 270]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, with the unanimous consent of the House, I ask that we revert to the order of business, Presenting and Reading Petitions.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of the residents of Eagle Ridge Green Lot Owners Association. The operative clause reads: We are against the proposed clear-cut to the Crown lands to the west and north of our development in Annapolis County in Nova Scotia. We are currently using these lands for recreational purposes by our development.

There are 59 names attached to it and I have attached mine.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Unfortunately, I have to reject the petition as there is no ask of government; there is a statement of dislike of government operations.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

MS. SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MS. LOHNES-CROFT « » : I would like to have members acknowledge the east gallery where my constituency assistant - I'm so excited, Mr. Speaker, that she is here to hear the budget, but she likes Question Period even more than the budget or my speeches - Ruth Wawin is my constituency assistant and I'd like to welcome her to the House. (Applause)

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

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Bill No. 4 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 14 of the Acts of 1989. The Victims' Rights and Services Act. (Ms. Karla MacFarlane)

Bill No. 5 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 238 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Provincial Court Act, Respecting Sexual Assault Law Education for Judges. (Ms. Karla MacFarlane)

Bill No. 6 - Entitled an Act to Address Sexual Violence at Colleges and Universities. (Mr. Eddie Orrell)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland South.

SPICER, PETER & PAT - PROV. WOODLOT OWNERS OF YR.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am delighted to congratulate Peter and Pat Spicer of Spencer's Island on being chosen as the provincial Woodlot Owners of the Year for 2017. The Spicers were chosen because of their careful stewardship and creative management of their 1,600-acre woodlot. This woodlot has been in the Spencer family for seven generations and once provided wood for shipbuilding. The woodlot includes a range of forest ecosystems and is harvested for timber and non-timber forest products. It provides social and economic benefits to the community, such as, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, and other forms of recreation. I congratulate Peter and Pat Spicer on this outstanding achievement and wish them well in all their future endeavours. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

WORKING GROUP OF EXPERTS ON PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT

- REPORT TABLING

HON. LISA ROBERTS: Mr. Speaker, I wish to draw the attention of my fellow members to the tabling of a very important report yesterday, the Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, a working group of the Human Rights Council of the UN, tabled its report. Many local African Nova Scotian leaders met with the working group when they travelled to Nova Scotia last October.

The report finds, no surprise, disproportionately high unemployment rates among African Nova Scotians. It also details many other intersecting and multiple forms of discrimination that impact health and education outcomes. This issue of disproportionately high unemployment and lack of workforce participation amongst the African Nova Scotian population was an issue that was identified in the Ivany report. In fact, it is Goal 8 of the One Nova Scotia Commission, but I see on the One Nova Scotia Commission's website that not only is there no progress on this goal, the metric is under development and it's also missing from this Budget Speech today. Thank you very much.

[Page 272]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

MACDONALD, JAXON ET AL - HOSP. VISIT

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to recognize the kindness of Jaxon MacDonald, Ainslee Caisson, Kaitlyn Sedge, Haielee Gammon, Brennan Travis, and Matthew Oake. These six young people did not want their friend, Jessica Gionet, to miss out on the celebrations surrounding the Grade 9 graduation dance at Ridgecliff Middle School. The group arrived in their finery at the IWK Hospital where Jessica was staying so that she could be a part of the glamour and excitement of the night. They brought along their makeup artist and a corsage for Jessica.

I would like the members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly to join me in congratulating each of the above-named individuals for their thoughtfulness and generosity of spirit and wish them well into their high school education.

[2:45 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

MIR, JAWAD: "ONLY 78" DOCUMENTARY - CONGRATS.

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to draw attention to a new documentary entitled "Only 78", which was recently screened at the Atlantic Film Festival in Halifax.

After eight years of meetings, media interviews, and even a complaint filed with the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner's Office, Gabarus eventually won repairs for its seawall in early 2014 through a $700,000 shared funding agreement with three levels of government. Filmmaker Jawad Mir was struck by the resilience of the people of Gabarus. The community has shown it doesn't matter how small you are, you fight. You just have to go for it.

It is a pleasure to congratulate Jawad for bringing this play to the small community of Gabarus to the forefront and the people of Gabarus for not taking "no" for an answer.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

[Page 273]

NO. 12 COLLIERY (NEW WATERFORD) - ANNIV. (100th)

MS. TAMMY MARTIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise in remembrance and respect of the 100th Anniversary of the explosion of No.12 Colliery in New Waterford. Time may heal some wounds, but in New Waterford, the tragedy of July 25, 1917 is still a painful memory - 65 miners lost, many wounded and permanently injured. Families left to struggle without their loved ones and providers. Surviving miners left without work.

In the years following the 1917 explosion, coal and steel workers would fight the industrial powers for better wages, safer conditions and an improved standard of life. Collective bargaining rights in Nova Scotia did not just happen to workers. They were fought for and they were especially fought for in Cape Breton. From the strikes led by J.B. McLachlan to the death of William Davis in 1925, miners sacrificed their safety and their jobs, even their lives, for the greater collective good.

Anyone who comes from a mining family knows the courage it took to go down to those mines every day and the hardship that was faced by mining families, especially in the early days when miners and their partners and children were literally forced into starvation by low wages. Mining is part of our history of Cape Breton.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney-Whitney Pier.

LUMIÈRE ARTS AT NIGHT FEST. (7th ANL.):

ORGANIZERS - RECOGNIZE


HON. DEREK MOMBOURQUETTE « » : Mr. Speaker, this past weekend marked the 7th annual Lumière Arts at Night Festival, which over 10,000 residents attend the Sydney waterfront to support 40 artists from across Cape Breton and around Canada.

Always an amazing event, there's a tremendous amount of work that goes into Lumière. I want to recognize Alyce MacLean, the Board Chair, and all the Board of Directors of Lumière. Sarah Roth who was the event coordinator, and all the volunteers that were responsible for making the 7th edition of Lumière another great success for Sydney and making it a premier art event in the province of Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

MI'KMAQ SPORTS HALL OF FAME: INDUCTEES - CONGRATS.

MR. KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, since 2010 the Mi'kmaq Summer Games have been revitalized and held annually in Unama'ki communities throughout Cape Breton. The 2017 event was held in Wagmatcook First Nations in August. On Wednesday, August 23rd, at the Wagmatcook Cultural Centre, three new inductees were entered into the Mi'kmaq Sports Hall of Fame to ensure recognition of outstanding support, accomplishment and achievements.

[Page 274]

I rise today to recognize and congratulate this year's inductees into the Mi'kmaq Sports Hall of Fame: Noel Paul, athlete; Charlie Peter Googoo, builder; and Alex Denny, athlete. I would like all members of this Legislature to join me in congratulating these three individuals on their achievement.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

HARDY, CHEYENNE: PRINCE'S YOUTH SERV. AWARD - CONGRATS.

MS. SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, one of the first people I met after my election to this house was Cheyenne Hardy, a Grade 11 student from Dartmouth North. She is a warm and intelligent young person who is a fierce advocate for our community.

Today, Cheyenne is in Toronto, about to receive the Prince's Youth Service Award at the WE Day celebrations. She is one of four young Canadians receiving this award and she's being honoured for her work in reducing the stigma of living in Dartmouth North and for her fundraising efforts to help a young girl from Africa, named Precious, receive a life-saving surgery.

Mr. Speaker, I ask this Assembly to join me today in congratulating Cheyenne Hardy for this award and thanking her for her service to our community.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Fairview-Clayton Park.

MCLEAN, ISABEL: THOMPSON RIVER TRACK & FIELD TEAM

- SELECTION

HON. PATRICIA ARAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize Isabel McLean, a young member of our Fairview community, who was recently selected to be on the Thompson River University track and field team in Kamloops, British Columbia.

Isabel began competing in track and field events at the young age of 10. She has trained and competed diligently, specifically in hurdles and sprints and was successful in both regional and provincial meets. Isabel continued her athletic career in high school, maintaining success in both academics and sports, including track, badminton and rugby. As a member of the Halifax West's track and field team, Isabel made provincials for the 4x100 race, and in June 2017 was recognized on the principal's list for having maintained an average above 90 per cent throughout her high school career.

Isabel has learned determination and mental discipline through athletics which will help her throughout her life.

[Page 275]

Mr. Speaker, I ask the members of this House of Assembly to join me in recognizing Isabel McLean and in wishing her every success in the future.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

SHEFFIELD, JULIE: PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE - CONCERNS

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Julie Sheffield received a letter from her family doctor, Dr. Michael Keough, last week informing her that he is closing his practice September 30th due to relocation. Unfortunately, he was unable to find a replacement, and this leaves Julia in the position of having no family doctor, again, for the second time in two and a half years. Her original family doctor retired in 2015 and she was so pleased to get in with Dr. Keough last November. He is a relatively young person, so she hoped to be under his care for a long time.

Julie is sad that professionals in our province no longer want to work in Nova Scotia. She knows they are not leaving for any other reason than the working conditions in our province.

Mr. Speaker, I call upon this government to address the conditions which lead to established doctors like Dr. Keough, from leaving this province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

OTTER POND DEMONSTRATION FOREST - THANK

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, as has already been mentioned in the House, this is Forest Week. During the election campaign, many of us heard concerns from voters about the state of Nova Scotia's forest. People across the province are working to show that there is a different way to care for and make a living from our forests.

The Otter Pond Demonstration Forest has brought together many of them. It was created as a division of the Nova Scotia Woodlot Owners and Operators Association in the wake of a clear-cut on Crown land.

Local woodlot owners, harvesters, environmentalists and community leaders came together to push for an alternative, a site where people together can learn how to manage a forest for many values. That's what they do now on 500 hectares. They do cut when it makes sense ecologically and economically with a view to the very long term. They offer education, recently on identifying lichens, including the boreal felt lichen endangered in Nova Scotia and insufficiently protected by the current buffer zone of 100 metres and, coming up in October, managing hardwoods for value.

[Page 276]

I thank them for demonstrating what we can do together.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

WAVERLEY-FALL RIVER-BEAVER BANK CAMPAIGN

- CONSTITUENTS THANK

MR. BILL HORNE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to take this opportunity to thank my constituents who supported me in the May provincial election and thank all the residents who voted. Our riding had one of the highest voter turnouts at 57 per cent. I am grateful to those who supported me through donations, and to the hard-working team of volunteers who contributed their time and efforts to my campaign. Also thanks to the fellow candidates Dan McNaughton, Trevor Sanipass, and Anthony Edmonds for the exciting and very competitive election.

Being re-elected as MLA for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank is an honour, and I appreciate the support and the many kind words of congratulations received. I had the privilege of meeting many of my constituents while campaigning and I am recommitting that I will continue to work hard on their behalf.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

HOOD, ALLISON: NEWBRIDGE ACAD. - STUDIES/HOCKEY CAREER

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to focus the members' attention on a young student athlete from Stellarton. Allison Hood recently played with the Pictou County Subway Selects and will continue her studies and hockey career at Newbridge Academy, a private school in Sackville, Nova Scotia.

The talented athlete is well known in Pictou County hockey circles where she has exhibited great puck possession skills, mobility, and is a valuable two-way player. Allison's offensive and defensive instincts allow coaches to use her in numerous situations. She is a three-time provincial champion and a two-time silver medallist during her young hockey career.

Hopefully her experience at Newbridge Academy will propel her career to a whole new dimension.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Fairview-Clayton Park.

BARRON, JUSTIN/HUNTLEY, HANNAH - NSSAF ATHLETES OF YR.

[Page 277]

HON. PATRICIA ARAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize Justin Barron and Hannah Huntley, two students at Fairview Junior High who were recognized by the Nova Scotia School Athletic Federation as Male and Female Athletes of the Year.

Throughout the province's school system, over 40,000 students participate in school sport programs. Each year, 19 different sports are offered under the advising of coaches, parents, and staff members. These sports promote healthy lifestyles and ensure that time management and leadership skills are perfected.

Each year, the federation distributes awards to a male and a female recipient who demonstrate exceptional athletic ability and sportsmanship. These awards are given out at an annual luncheon and celebration of school sport.

Hannah is an avid volleyball player, playing for the Bedford Blizzard Volleyball Club as well as being a key player on her school's own team. Not only was Justin heavily involved in interscholastic athletics but he was recently the Halifax Mooseheads' 13th overall pick in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League draft.

It is already evident that these two students have bright futures ahead of them through both sports and academics. I ask that the members of this House of Assembly join me in recognizing Hannah and Justin and wish them continued success in the future.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

MACDONALD, LISA - MOLSON BREWING CO. AWARD

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize and pay homage to Lisa MacDonald for being honoured by the Molson Canadian brewing company as a leader in her community. Molson recognized 1,500 individuals across Canada with commemorative crates, and only 150 people with an extra-special recognition. Ms. MacDonald received both.

Lisa has a history of being involved in a multitude of community organizations and boards, such as the Aberdeen Health Foundation, Summer Street Industries Society, the Pictou County Food Bank, and New Glasgow Farmers Market, just to name a few. She dedicates her spare time to helping others and lending a hand wherever needed.

I congratulate my dear friend Lisa for her recognition and thank her for many years of dedication and service to our community.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

BOND, DR. JASON - PREMIER'S AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

[Page 278]

MR. HUGH MACKAY « » : I rise today to recognize Dr. Jason Bond, a recipient today of the Premier's Award of Excellence. The Award of Excellence recognizes public servants who go above and beyond in delivering high-quality programs and services to Nova Scotian families, communities, and businesses. It is the most prestigious government award that can be bestowed in recognition of public service excellence.

Dr. Bond, working in the Department of Internal Services, modernized the Coordinate Referencing System for all location-based information across Nova Scotia. This significant technical achievement allows for instantaneous high-accuracy positioning anywhere in the province. To put this in perspective, the accurate positioning of property lines is foundational to our provincial land title system, the basis for property taxation. Dr. Bond's advances in the adaptation of the satellite-based global positioning system, or GPS, allow land surveyors to collect and analyze property data.

I ask the members of the Legislature to join me in congratulating Dr. Bond.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

DART. LEARNING NETWORK - OFFICE OPENING

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : I wish to congratulate the Dartmouth Learning Network on the opening of their new office. Established in 1985, the Dartmouth Learning Network offers free classes and tutoring for adults looking to gain new skills, their adult high school diploma, or their GED. This organization, with its staff and dedicated team of over 40 volunteer tutors, is a fantastic addition to our Dartmouth East community.

I'd like to welcome them to the Tacoma Drive neighbourhood and congratulate them on the opening of their new office.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Lucasville.

HAMMONDS PLAINS-LUCASVILLE CAMPAIGN

- SUPPORTERS THANK

MR. BEN JESSOME « » : Mr. Speaker, it's important to offer thanks to the people who support you throughout your campaigning. I know many other members in this Assembly have gone ahead and done so. I would like to take the opportunity to thank everybody in my community who voted to support me to come back to this House. I'm looking forward to representing them in this House, and I'm also looking forward to supporting the Minister responsible for Youth with my new responsibilities as ministerial assistant responsible for Youth.

In particular, I would like to acknowledge my campaign team, the ones who got me through to this point: Bill Woodburn, Paul D'eon, Cathy Baker, Liz Shaw, Mitch Griffiths, Trevor Floyd, and - frankly, there are too many to acknowledge, but I want to say thank you to them and say that I'm excited to be back.

[Page 279]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

MCKENNY, CEILIDH/SAMPSON, DECEMBER

- ROADSIDE STAND/U-PICK

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : I rise today to bring attention to two young entrepreneurs who established a health-oriented garden last year in the Shortts Lake area. They delivered organic vegetables to 30 local customers. This year, Ceilidh Mckenny and December Sampson, who both have doctors for parents, are giving their clients the added advantage of fresh air and exercise through a roadside-stand and operation of a you-pick. They also have free-range chicken and beef available and are selling apples from a you-pick orchard this fall.

With provincial occurrences of obesity, respiratory problems, and high blood pressure above the national average, the healthy alternatives offered by these young people who plan to study medicine this Fall, are hugely important.

[3:00 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg.

LUNENBURG MLA CAMPAIGN - CONSTITUENTS THANK

MS. SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : I am honoured to have been re-elected to serve the Lunenburg constituency in the Nova Scotia House of Assembly. It was encouraging to meet so many new people and long-time residents on doorsteps and at events during my recent campaign travels. I appreciate the time they took to share with me their ideas, concerns, and aspirations.

Again, they have entrusted me with speaking on their behalf, and since the May 30, 2017, election, they have continued to provide me with ideas and feedback through their willingness to discuss what matters to them. I will continue to work on their behalf to help address challenges and make improvements here in the Lunenburg constituency.

I ask that all members of the Legislature join me in thanking the constituents of the Lunenburg constituency for putting their trust in me once again.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank.

BEAVER BANK KINSAC - TIME CAPSULE

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MR. BRAD JOHNS « » : I rise today to inform the House that on July 1, 2017, the residents of Beaver Bank Kinsac unearthed a time capsule that had been buried in the community cenotaph since 1992, in recognition of Canada's 150th birthday. Inside were numerous artifacts, including a list of members of service groups, hockey cards, newspaper clippings, and class projects from local elementary schools, all predicting what they thought Beaver Bank would be like in 2017. Submissions were again taken, and the capsule was re-buried to be opened for the 175th Canadian birthday celebrations.

I would like to take a chance to thank the residents of Beaver Bank Kinsac and recognize those individuals who provided a glimpse of history.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clayton Park West.

HADAD, DR. SURA: DENTAL PATIENTS - DEDICATION

MS. RAFAH DICONSTANZO: I rise today to recognize Dr. Sura Hadad of Clayton Park Dental for her remarkable dedication to her patients. In August, Dr. Hadad hosted a customer appreciation day for her patients. This event was to celebrate five years of offering dentistry in Clayton Park and to give back to the people who make it possible for her to do so.

Dr. Hadad is highly regarded by many as a dentist who can cater to any patient she meets. Not only is she wonderful with children, but she is also fluent in both English and Arabic, which is essential in such a diverse community. Last year, Dr. Hadad provided newcomers and refugees with free dental care upon their arrival in the city. It is acts such as these that further prove the compassion and dedication that Dr. Hadad possesses.

I would ask members of this House of Assembly to join me in recognizing the outstanding acts put forward by Dr. Sura Hadad and her team at Clayton Park. We appreciate your dedication to our community.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

CAN. 150th/BATTLE OF VIMY RIDGE (100th):

NORTHSIDE SALUTE - CONGRATS.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : I rise today to congratulate the organizers of the Northside salute to the 150th Anniversary of Canada and the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge. It took the combined efforts of three local Legions under the leadership of retired regimental sergeant, Major John McNeil, who has worked with large-scale tattoos across Canada and Europe. A host of local talent entertained a sold-out crowd for over two hours. Everyone hopes this event will become an annual event.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the volunteers and organizers who spent countless hours creating this quality community event.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings South.

SAMPSON, JACOB: CHASING CHAMPIONS - CONGRATS.

MR. KEITH IRVING « » : I rise today to congratulate Coldbrook native and Acadia University theatre graduate Jacob Sampson on the phenomenal success of his play, Chasing Champions the Sam Langford Story. This play tells the story of the early 20th Century boxing legend Sam Langford, an African Canadian from Weymouth Falls, Nova Scotia. Sam is considered one of the greatest boxers of all time but was never able to win a world title, due to racism and the fact that other champions were scared to fight him. Chasing Champions won six merit awards for excellence in Nova Scotia theatre, including outstanding actor and outstanding new Nova Scotia play for Jacob.

On behalf of the Legislative Assembly of Nova Scotia, I would like to commend Jacob on this impressive achievement and thank him for his tremendous contributions to the performing arts in our province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

CRUIKSHANK, JILL - RETIREMENT CONGRATS.

MS. KIM MASLAND « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the retirement of Jill Cruikshank, Director of Economic Development for the region of Queens Municipality. Jill has worked for the municipality for 19 years and her peers have praised her work.

She is credited with helping to create Port Medway Lighthouse Park and for working with community organizations to develop lease agreements at the Visitor Information Centre, Fort Point Lighthouse, South Shore Regional Airport and the former courthouse. Former Mayor Christopher Clark credits Jill with playing a vital role in helping the region pull its economy back together, following the closure of Bowater mill and the former Mayor John Leefe noted that she will be greatly missed.

I am very pleased to congratulate Jill on her retirement and thank her for her years of service to the region of Queens.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Yarmouth.

MCCARRON, DEANNA: YAR. VOL. - RECOGNIZE

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to recognize one of Yarmouth's most dedicated community members. Deanna McCarron devotes 70 hours per week to run the dance organization Kids Act. She has retired from her career as a respiratory therapist to devote herself to full-time volunteering to this wonderful organization.

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Deanna was recently chosen as one of L'Oréal Paris's 10 Canadian Women of Worth, an award that honours extraordinary women who selflessly volunteer their time to serve their communities. This award includes $10,000 for her organization, Kids Act.

Mr. Speaker, I ask that members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Deanna McCarron for the time and energy she has devoted to the youth in our community. I know she has made a positive difference in the lives of many and we are very fortunate to have her in Yarmouth.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

GREENE, GARY: N.S. COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME - INDUCTION

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, Gary Greene from Lower Argyle was honoured to be inducted into the Nova Scotia Country Music Hall of Fame. The ceremony took place in Truro on the 16th of September. In 1994, he became a Maritime Old Time Fiddling Champion.

Gary played in rock bands with his brother Duke, from the time he was a teenager until he was about the age of 30. Then he began playing the fiddle again and played various venues and events. Gary played in Ottawa at the Grand Masters Fiddling Event. He also plays a number of instruments, including piano, base guitar and mandolin as well. He has released four CDs, playing all the recordings and all the instruments himself.

Please join me in congratulating Gary Greene on receiving this honour and wish him continued good health and happiness in all his endeavours.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

SNYDER, NICHOLAS - PERFECT SCH. ATTENDANCE

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, all parents try to impress upon their children the importance of good attendance, but Nicholas Snyder of Bridgewater Junior-Senior High School took this to a whole new level. Nicholas graduated this past June and did so without missing a day, ever. Having won a perfect attendance award in Grade 6, Nicholas made it his mission to complete his education career without missing a single day.

I would ask members of this House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Nicholas on reaching this impressive accomplishment and wishing him the best of luck as he pursues his post-secondary education.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

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ROCHON, LISA: CONSTITUENCY ASSISTANT - THANK

MS. BARBARA ADAMS « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to express significant congratulations and appreciation to my constituency assistant Lisa Rochon who, along with a dedicated group of volunteers, this summer and continuing on now, pulled together to help the Kiwanis Club of Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage area to keep the park open.

This is a park privately-owned by the Kiwanis Club. Without their help the community would not have had the full-time use of this beautiful park and beach. The small members group of the Kiwanis are aging and they found the task of opening and closing the gate too much so they spontaneously shut down the park. Once the Kiwanis members decided it was too much, they allowed us to come in and offer our support.

After attending this meeting, Lisa and a group of volunteers volunteered to open and close the gate every morning and every night. Thanks to their efforts, the park users have full use of the park and, without them, this would not have been a successful summer. I want to ask the House to congratulate all those volunteers for their participation this summer.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Bedford.

PEACHER, JOYCE: VOL. SERV. - THANK

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : I would like to tell you about a super volunteer in my constituency. Joyce Pitcher has been a member and volunteer with the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 95 for 13 years, but that really doesn't give you an idea about Joyce's dedication to veterans in Bedford. I actually don't think that there is a position at the Legion that she hasn't filled at some point. No matter the event, Joyce is there and usually organizing it. She is a welcoming presence for all who come to the Bedford Legion. So it is no surprise that Joyce has won many awards, most recently she was given a lifetime membership in the Royal Canadian Legion.

Joyce worked with the meteorological service at Environment Canada for many years. She also found time to volunteer with the HRM Emergency Measures Organization. For over a quarter century, she was a member of the Canadian Figure Skating Association and served as a national level test and competitive judge.

Mr. Speaker, I ask the members of this House of Assembly to please join me in thanking Joyce Pitcher for her volunteer service, particularly her dedication to improving the lives of Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland North.

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DAYLES GRAND MARKET - RECOGNIZE

MS. ELIZABETH SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : I would like to recognize Dayle's Grand Market in Amherst for their efforts and successes as local business owners. Dayle's Grand Market is located in a large retail structure which has been a pillar in our community since 1906. Vendors including Maritime Mosaic, the Copper Tree, the Crystal Café, HD Coins and Collections, and others offer a multitude of products which support our local artisans.

Dayle's Grand Market is a growing concern. The potential for success is exponential. It is an honour to thank everyone at Dayle's Grand Market for the art, culture and investment in the growth of our community. I invite everyone to visit downtown Amherst Dayle's Grand Market.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Antigonish.

CORBETT, NEIL - ANTIGONISH MUN. CO. DIST. 9 BY-ELECTION

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : On August 19th, the Municipality of the County of Antigonish held a by-election to fill the District 9 seat left vacant by the passing of Warden Russell Boucher. While this was a difficult time for many in the community, I was proud to see two residents step up to take on Russell's long held role of representing the community at the council table.

Neil Corbett has been a contractor for most of his life and is a native of District 9. Though he has spent time working out West, he always kept home in his mind. He entered the race, hoping to give back to the community and to advocate for resources for the local community centre and seniors in this area. Danny MacEachern is a long-time volunteer firefighter, a member of his local parish council and a familiar face to the students of the NSCC Strait Area campus where he works. He came into the race hoping to bring the same dedication he has for volunteer work and his family to the municipal building.

The results were announced shortly after voting closed that Neil Corbett was elected by the district, with both candidates showing respectful results. I know Russell would be proud to see two of his long-time friends making sure that the community will not go unserved.

Mr. Speaker, I ask colleagues in the House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Neil Corbett as the new councillor for District 9 of the Municipality of the County of Antigonish and Danny MacEachern for a well-run campaign.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

HARTLING, MEGAN - FUNDRAISING

[Page 285]

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Today, I want to share how a random comment affected Megan Hartling and a fundraiser was born. Hearing about a family struggling with back-to-school fees and how heartbreaking it was to see kids showing up without supplies, that was all it took for Megan. Facing her own limitations, she reached out to Facebook and now four years later this resident spends her summers collecting school supplies for struggling families.

Once collected, everything is sorted for either elementary or high school, and delivered on opening day. Two schools are chosen each year on a rotating basis. This year, A.G. Baillie and North Nova Education Centre were the recipients. Meghan hopes to be able to expand to include the NSCC.

I thank Meghan for her dedication and generosity and wish her the best moving forward.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Preston-Dartmouth.

BOOKER, KIENJA - BUS. DEVELOPMENT

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize Kienja Booker of North Preston for her initiative on developing a technology-based business through Instagram. Kienja used Instagram to post pictures of herself, highlighting different hair styles and advertising hair style products. Kienja works with Up North Naturals, a Toronto-based natural hair products company. Her relationship with the company is so successful that she has partnered with them to develop a new product.

Kienja's goal is to increase her followership to 100,000 from the present 60,000. She is very pleased that her two daughters are also following her Instagram. I would like to ask members of this House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Kienja on the development of a thriving business through the use of social media.

[3:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

MACKENZIE, JOHN ARCHIE: DEATH OF - TRIBUTE

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Let us remember John Archie Mackenzie, MLA for Inverness and Inverness North from 1970-1984. He passed away in July of this year. John Archie's compassion for people did not end after his political career. Many a night he spent with someone who was alone and close to death, sharing his support at their hospital bedside. A teacher and an active volunteer, John Archie took a real personal interest in people. You could feel that whenever you met him. We will miss his warm welcoming approach and how hard he worked for our communities.

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From our Legislature, let us extend consolation to his wife, Dorothy, and to his family.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hants East.

JULIAN, MICHAEL J.:

SIDNEY CROSBY HOCKEY SCHOOL - SELECTION

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize East Hants First Nations youth, Michael J. Julian, for being chosen to attend the annual Sidney Crosby Hockey School. Michael was one of the participants selected from applicants across Canada and the world to attend the camp run by the Pittsburgh Penguins' superstar at Cole Harbour Place in mid-July. Michael enjoyed the camp, participated in on-ice and off-ice development and met other keen hockey players his age from across the world, and he treasures this wonderful experience.

I would like the members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Michael on taking advantage of this learning opportunity and wishing him success in his future endeavours.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clare-Digby.

HELM, CONST. COLIN - CRIME PREVENTION AWARD

MR. GORDON WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I would ask the members of this House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Constable Colin Helm, recipient of the Leadership in Crime Prevention Award presented by the Department of Justice.

Constable Helm received the award in the category Restorative Approach/Restorative Justice Award for his work to promote strong relationships with Aboriginal and African Nova Scotia communities. On his arrival at the Digby detachment he realized building bridges between these communities should be an important part of his job. His leadership and new approaches in engaging these communities, as well as the greater community, have been key in preventing and reducing crime.

In addition to this focus, Constable Helm has initiated Operation Think of Me to promote greater driver care in school zones. He is also involved with projects to reduce youth crime, increase awareness in seniors of fraud and cybercrime, and emphasize the importance to use seatbelts. In his free time, Constable Helm is still present in our community, coaching basketball.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore- Tracadie.

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GUYSBOROUGH-EAST. SHORE-TRACADIE MLA CAMPAIGN

- SUPPORTERS THANK

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to extend my sincere appreciation to the constituents of Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie for their welcoming attitude as I visited their homes, businesses, and community centres during the election campaign. On May 30th, I was honoured to receive their support and return for a second term as their MLA. In a riding such as Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie, the largest in the province, it is difficult to get to every door and we covered a lot of kilometres on the campaign trail in trying to do so.

I will continue to work hard for all our communities and the great people of Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie. Because of their support, I will be able to continue to advance the interests of our communities across this great constituency.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Armdale.

LILLEY, JOHN: FOOTBALL CAN. U-16 EAST CHALLENGE

- CONGRATS.

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate a remarkable young person from Halifax Armdale.

John Lilley, a fourteen-year-old student at St. Agnes Junior High, is an avid football fan and a promising wide receiver for the Halifax Argos. In August, Football Canada announced their 2017 Under-16 East Challenge All-Star Roster. This group of 40 talented players from across the country represents the top performance from Football Canada's Under-16 East Challenge who competed in Wolfville in July. This particular tournament is recognized as the start of a young football player's journey towards the national team and, as such, the competition is intense. I'm proud to say that John's exceptional performance was recognized and he was named to the all-star roster. This is not only a great accomplishment but also an invitation to represent Team Canada in the 2018 International Bowl.

Please join me in congratulating John on his achievement and assure him that all Nova Scotians will be cheering for him in the Under-16 Canada East team next year.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Portland Valley.

TOARNETT, TONY: EUROPEAN BATTLE SITES - REMEMBRANCES

[Page 288]

HON. TONY INCE « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to recognize Terry Toarnett, a senior member of our community. He and his group recently went on a cruise to Europe. They visited several historic battle sites, from Amsterdam to Basel, Switzerland by way of the Danube River, and they thoughtfully visited the graves of some fallen Nova Scotian soldiers. One of the cemeteries they visited was at the Abbey. There, they were able to leave Nova Scotia pins and a flag in honour of the soldiers' courageous sacrifice. They were humbled to see the names on the headstones - two of the soldiers were from Sydney, Nova Scotia.

I ask that members of this House of Assembly please join me in thanking Terry and his colleagues for leaving behind a small token representing all of our reflections on soldiers' sacrifice, and Nova Scotia's sincere gratitude. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

HART, LYNDSAY: RIDGECLIFF MIDDLE SCH. GRAD. DANCE

- ORGANIZER

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize Lyndsay Hart of Timberlea.

Lyndsay decided to step in to organize the much-anticipated Grade 9 graduation dance at Ridgecliffe Middle School at the end of the school year. Rather than have students miss out, Lyndsay and a small group of parents worked hard to plan, decorate, and chaperone the Grade 9 dance.

I'd like the members of the House to join me in congratulating Lyndsay and the other volunteers whose thoughtfulness and generosity of spirit ensured the students had a memorable evening together before moving on with their education in high school. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

HUBLEY, EVELYN - BIRTHDAY (100th)

MR. BILL HORNE « » : Mr. Speaker, I had the honour of attending the 100th birthday celebrations for Waverley's Evelyn Hubley on September 17, 2017. Many friends and family were in attendance, with visitors from the U.S. and many parts of Canada.

I presented Evelyn with certificates from all levels of government and she was especially excited to receive her greetings from the Queen. There was lots of food, laughs, and Evelyn was very talkative and had many stories to tell.

I would ask the members of the House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Evelyn and wishing her the best on many healthy and rewarding years in the future. Thank you.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

CHESTER VOL. FD: MEMBERS - RECOGNIZE

MR. HUGH MACKAY « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise to recognize the accomplishments of the Chester Volunteer Fire Department and their program, Take a Walk in our Boots.

I was recently invited, along with my colleague Bernadette Jordan, MP for South Shore-St. Margaret's, to spend a very memorable evening with the Chester Volunteer Fire Department. It was an invitation to "take a walk in our boots" and I learned very quickly that those boots are some big boots to fill.

Between August 19th and 28th the firefighters of the Chester Volunteer Fire Department conducted their annual live fire drill in the Mobile Burn Unit of the Nova Scotia Firefighters School. MP Jordan and I were trained on the proper donning and doffing of personal protective equipment and entered the flaming Mobile Burn Unit to get some hands-on firefighting experience.

Mr. Speaker, I ask the members of the Legislature to recognize the brave men and women and what they go through to protect us from fire. Thank you to the Chester Volunteer Fire Department for giving me this opportunity to take a walk in their very big, courageous boots.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Lucasville.

HIMMELMAN, BRET: CAN. SUMMER GAMES (2017)

- SUCCESS CONGRATS.

MR. BEN JESSOME « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to recognize Bret Himmelman. Bret is a 19-year-old who began canoeing at 15 after his grandfather dropped him off at the Maskwa Aquatic Club, as a non-member, to stay in shape for hockey. He quickly fell in love with the sport and decided to train for it full time.

Bret's hard work and dedication paid off when he was chosen to represent Nova Scotia at the 2017 Canada Games in Winnipeg. Bret was rewarded for his hard work. He won two gold medals, won a bronze medal, and also had a fourth place. He has certainly made us proud in Hammonds Plains and in this province.

I would like to ask all members of the House to please join me in congratulating Bret Himmelman on his success at the 2017 Canada Summer Games. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg.

BLUENOSE II: SUCCESSFUL SAILING SEASON

- CAPTAINS/CREW CONGRATS.

MS. SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to congratulate the captains and crew of Bluenose II on their successful sailing season. On September 13th Captain Phil Watson welcomed the 100,000th visitor to grace the decks of their vessel during their 2017 sailing season, which only began June 10th.

The 100,000th visitor, Guylaine, and her husband, Maurice, were visiting from New Brunswick. These guests were greeted with Bluenose merchandise from the Bluenose II Company Store and invited to sail with the captain and crew the following morning.

Bluenose II also participated in Rendez-Vous Tall Ships Regatta 2017 in Lunenburg, which took place along the Lunenburg waterfront. The event was met with success as spectators were welcomed to tour the docks, hear about the crew's travels, and access their mobile show trailer.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask all members of this House of Assembly to join me in thanking Sea Captain Phil Watson, Land Captain Alan Creaser, the crew and all visitors who contributed to the successful 2017 sailing season for Bluenose II.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clayton Park West.

CLAYTON PARK WEST MLA CAMPAIGN: SUPPORTERS - THANK

MS. RAFAH DICONSTANZO: I rise today to recognize the support of the Clayton Park West community in my recent election. During the campaign, I had the pleasure to meet many people, and it confirmed my belief that the members of Clayton Park West are outstanding Nova Scotians. I thought that coming into the community as a new candidate would be challenging, especially with a long name like mine, an Italian and Arabic name. But the people I encountered were so supportive of me, which led to my election.

In the past few months since being elected, I have had the joy of getting to know the constituents on a more personal level through various community events. I have learned that they are hard-working and dedicated to making this community a wonderful place to live and work. Without these people, Clayton Park West would not be the thriving community that it is today. It is all because of the wonderful citizens who live there.

Mr. Speaker, I ask that members of this House of Assembly rise and recognize the excellence of the constituents of Clayton Park West.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings South.

CDN. FED. OF UNIV. WOMEN: WOLFVILLE CHAP. - RECOGNIZE

MR. KEITH IRVING « » : I rise today to recognize the Wolfville chapter of the Canadian Federation of University Women, which recently held their 50th annual book sale. Each year since 1968, this group has sold donated books to raise funds to support a variety of worthwhile organizations and initiatives.

Since 2003 alone, more than $206,000 has been provided to local and international groups. Members work diligently throughout the year to bring this fantastic event to fruition, and I commend each of them for their efforts. I especially acknowledge the contributions of Eleanor Palmer, who has been involved in every book sale since the beginning 50 years ago. What a tremendous commitment.

On behalf of the Legislative Assembly of Nova Scotia, I congratulate the Wolfville CFUW chapter on reaching this significant milestone and thank them for all that they do to improve the lives of their fellow citizens.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Bedford.

GLASS SLIPPER - PROM DRESS SALES

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to tell you about a couple of groups that recently helped graduating high school students outfit themselves for prom without breaking the bank.

Last year some grads from Charles P. Allen High School - Lynda Ofume, Ampai Thammachack, Stephanie Manuel, Anna Negulic, and Julia Thorne - created an organization called Glass Slipper which provided gently used prom dresses for grads. This year, Glass Slipper gave away a couple of hundred prom dresses once again. Kudos to Don Schelew Dry Cleaners for stepping up to provide dry cleaning. Also this year, Shades of Bedford in Sunnyside Mall held its prom dress event, selling experienced prom dresses for $25 each. The money raised went to MADD Canada, and grads were able to buy the prom dress of their dreams for a fraction of the normal price.

I would like to ask the members of this House of Assembly to please join me in congratulating Glass Slipper, Don Schelew Dry Cleaners, and Shades of Bedford for their efforts to help all grads experience prom.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Antigonish.

CAPE GEORGE LIGHTHOUSE:

[Page 292]

N. SHORE DEV. ASSOC. - ACQUISITION

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, this past summer included an historic day for the community of Cape George in Antigonish County. On July 8th, the North Shore Development Association officially took ownership of the Cape George lighthouse on behalf of the community.

The site is of historical importance to the area, having been a home lighthouse since 1861. The current lighthouse was constructed in 1968 to replace a wooden structure and acts as a superb example of the traditional Canadian lighthouse design favoured in the 20th Century. This lighthouse and the two that preceded it on this site were instrumental to the safe navigation of the Northumberland Strait at Cape George Point.

For more than 20 years, the association - comprised of hard-working residents - has ensured that the site was maintained for both residents and summer visitors. This has included maintaining roads, keeping the grass cut, providing picnic tables, installing commemorative plaques, and even paying for the lighthouse's most recent coat of paint. Without their contribution, the lighthouse would surely have been a shadow of the magnificent cultural attraction it is today.

I ask colleagues to join me in congratulating the North Shore Development Association and the residents of Cape George on their successful acquisition of the Cape George lighthouse and in thanking them for their commitment to this iconic site over the decades.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clare-Digby.

[3:30 p.m.]

CURRY, DAVID: DIGBY CROWN ATTY. - APPT.

MR. GORDON WILSON « » : I would ask the members of this House of Assembly to join me in congratulating David Curry, who was recently appointed Crown Attorney for Digby. While in law school at Dalhousie, he was awarded the Judge Corrine Sparks Award, an award to celebrate students who are committed to using their legal education to challenge and change their community. After graduating, he worked for a short time at Legal Aid Ontario before returning home to work for the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Commission in Yarmouth.

He has continued to have an impact on his community, including chairing the Nova Scotia Legal Aid Equality and Racial Diversity Committee. Mr. Curry is a member of both the African Nova Scotian community of Nakile and the Bear River First Nation Reserve. Mr. Curry will continue to have a positive impact on our communities in his new position.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore- Tracadie.

[Page 293]

SMITH, BEVERLEY: COMMUN. DEDICATION - THANK

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : I rise today to recognize a lifelong resident of Sheet Harbour, Beverley Smith. Beverley has always been a dedicated volunteer in her community, starting with being an inaugural member of the Sheet Harbour Lionesses, which is now an essential part of the Sheet Harbour Lions Club. Through the Lions Club, she continually organizes the annual Seaside Festival potluck dinner, which is just one of the fundraisers the Seaside Festival committee holds every August. Since the 1960s, Beverley has been a lay reader at St. Peter's Catholic Church and now runs their religious education program. She is also president of the CWL. She organizes the World Day of Prayer and is chairperson for the annual St. Peter's Christmas Bazaar. But that's not all. Beverley has worked tirelessly every year since their beginnings in Sheet Harbour to ensure the annual Terry Fox Run and the fundraiser campaign for the Canadian Cancer Society in the area are a roaring success.

I ask members of this House of Assembly to please join me in thanking Beverley for her unrelenting dedication to her community and for continuing to make a difference every day.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Armdale.

DOORS OPEN HALIFAX: CHESTER-ST. MARGARET'S MLA

- FOUNDING THANK

HON. LENA DIAB « » : I rise today to note the success of Doors Open Halifax, a novel event that brought our community together to learn about Halifax's rich history and to explore the contemporary face of our city. In providing free and public access to structures of historical, contemporary, or architectural significance, the Doors Open Halifax Heritage Society is giving people a chance to explore the history and culture that has shaped our region.

Doors Open Halifax worked in conjunction with over 30 venues for this year's event and afforded a unique glimpse to the many who participated. This year was even more exciting, as Doors Open Halifax added three historic venues in Halifax Armdale - St. George's Greek Orthodox Church, the Dingle Memorial Tower, and the Armdale Yacht Club.

Join me in thanking the member for Chester-St. Margaret's for his work as founder and member of the board of directors of Doors Open Halifax and all the organizing team and volunteers who have worked to make Doors Open Halifax and show us the fascinating history in this region.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for members' statements has expired.

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ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE - RESPONSE

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : My question is for the Premier. Many Nova Scotians were wondering today if the Premier got the message that there is a family doctor crisis in Nova Scotia. Now they know the answer is no, he did not. There is not one red cent in new money in primary health care in the budget today - not one red cent. Mr. Speaker, 100,000 Nova Scotians are without a family doctor, and the Premier is telling them to keep on waiting. I would like to ask the Premier, why is he turning his back on Nova Scotians who need a family doctor?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As he would know, in the budget, there is an additional 10 medical seats at Dalhousie University for the residency program for Canadian-trained doctors. There's an additional 10 for foreign-trained doctors to earn their Canadian competency here in our province. That will take our complement up to 56 who will be trained each and every year. We're going to continue to work with those communities to ensure that they have access to family physicians.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Those 10 seats at the Dalhousie Medical School are six years away for those 10 doctors if they stay in the province after they graduate. Ten international doctors could come quicker, but 100,000 people don't have a family doctor, and the Premier says someday within the next six years, we might have 10 more if they stay. That is not acceptable. There is a crisis. There are 100,000 people without a doctor, and the Premier has nothing to say to them today. How can he claim that he got the message from the Nova Scotians who are screaming out for help with their family doctors when he has done so little in the budget today to get them the doctor that they need?

THE PREMIER « » : I'm very proud of the work that we have done with our partners in health care. We will continue to make sure that we have access to family physicians. We'll continue to recruit from across the country. I'm pleased with the investment the honourable member made today in adolescent mental health. We'll continue to make those investments to hire more clinicians.

The issue around orthopaedic surgery, we'll continue to make sure that those Nova Scotians who are on a wait-list for too long, Mr. Speaker, hear that the province has heard them. We'll continue to make sure we make those improvements. At the same time on the campaign trail I heard from Nova Scotians who want us to continue down the road in making sure we live within our means and making strategic investments in the economy of our province. I am so proud that we'll continue to enhance the stuff we've been doing around fish and aquaculture. We'll continue to make sure they bring back much-needed revenue and invest in the services that Nova Scotians require.

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MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, today was a budget. It was just a budget, it was not an action, it was a budget. Nova Scotians have learned from this government that they can't count on even the budget. The health budget last year was shortchanged by $28 million. In the same year where Nova Scotians are crying out for more doctors, the Premier shortchanged the health budget by $28 million and Nova Scotians have gone without a doctor, too many have, as a result.

Mr. Speaker, my question to the Premier is, how can they trust him to care about their primary care needs, their family medicine needs, when he shortchanges the health budget, when he says he got the message and then he comes here and has so little to show for all that effort?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member. This budget has an additional $82 million in it, directly into the health care budget - the very things the honourable member campaigned for: mental health. He led a great campaign, along with his caucus, ensuring that we continue to focus on mental health issues in the province. We invested in that in this particular budget.

We all heard from Nova Scotians who wanted us to continue to grow the economy, at the same time invest in education - well we've been doing so - and to live within our means and this budget is a reflection of what Nova Scotians voted for, Mr. Speaker, and it's a reflection of the values of Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM.: PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE - BUDGET RESPONSE

MR. GARY BURRILL: Mr. Speaker, more than 100,000 people of whom the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party has spoken, have looked to this day and the tabling of this budget, in hopes for an answer to their predicaments. The physician resource plan says we need to hire 107 new doctors a year in order to seriously address the physician shortage and yet officials from the Department of Health and Wellness this morning were able to confirm only that as a consequence of this budget, eight new doctors will be hired this year.

I wish to ask the Premier, does he not feel that when it comes to the doctor shortage, this budget has let down an awful lot of people?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for his question. As you know, this budget is an investment in collaborative care practice across the province. It would also provide a collaborative care team that would assist physicians across the province, nurse practitioners, mental health clinicians, family practice nurses, nurse practitioners, all of whom are part of delivering primary care to the citizens of our province.

[Page 296]

I can tell the honourable member that there are 10 medical seats at Dalhousie University which will be increased. There are 10 residency seats that will be increased for foreign-trained doctors' competency. We also heard from those Nova Scotians, Mr. Speaker, who are on a wait-list for orthopaedic surgery. This is part of the investment we've made in this particular budget and we will continue to make those strong investments in our economy, so we can continue to enhance those programs that Nova Scotians want and expect.

MR. BURRILL » : Mr. Speaker, this morning the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board spoke about the government having listened to and heard the people of the province since this Spring. But if there is one thing that members of this House all heard going door-to-door in the course of the election, surely it was, do something about getting us some doctors.

Since this Spring, the number of people without a doctor has continued to grow and Doctors Nova Scotia speaks now of the situation as having reached the tipping point.

I ask the Premier if he has indeed listened to the people of the province, why has he presented a budget that falls so far short of what would actually be required in order to seriously address the doctor shortage?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As he would know, Mr. Speaker, from his time on the government side of the House, the short-term fixes haven't worked in this province. They didn't work when he was in power. We're going to continue to make strategic, long-term investments so that we can continue to enhance the primary care that Nova Scotians expect in their communities and we will continue to work with Doctors Nova Scotia, all of our sister organizations to ensure that Nova Scotians get access to primary health care.

MR. BURRILL « » : Mr. Speaker, amongst those who have looked to this budget with a sense of hope, have been many of the people of industrial Cape Breton, as they continue to experience repeated closures of the emergency rooms, especially in New Waterford, Glace Bay, and at the Northside General. However, they are disappointed to learn today that not a single Collaborative Emergency Centre will open anywhere in the province as a result of this budget.

I ask the Premier, how can he face the people of industrial Cape Breton, who he is disappointing so bitterly with this budget?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As he would know, we continue to ensure that this budget and every budget in the foreseeable future has investments in collaborative care practices. We'll continue to make those investments and ensure that we keep the commitment to the people of New Waterford, as we have to other communities across this province.

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Where the honourable member ignored what was going on in Shelburne, our government, when we were in power, actually completed and opened a Collaborative Care Centre in Shelburne. There are many of those across the province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: CBU FUNDING - EXPLAIN

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Today we learned the Premier's price to buy silence from our universities. Acadia gets another $3.5 million outside the funding formula that all universities agreed to, and Cape Breton University gets a million to stop complaining about it.

Can the Premier explain to this House why Cape Breton University is getting another million dollars after being told for two years that there was no more money?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank the university presidents and the university communities across the province, who've worked since 2013 to ensure they could continue to offer the top-quality education that they're known for.

At the same time, working with them toward economic opportunity through those institutions, through the start-up community and the innovation hubs that we've created - the honourable member would know that when the former government was in, it gave Acadia University a $3.5 million increase outside the funding formula. We said, when we came into power, that we would continue that process until we got to a point where we could fiscally adapt it. We knew and were very clear in 2008 that both CBU and Acadia were impacted by the formula in a negative way. We've adjusted that today.

We look forward to the universities coming together to find a new funding formula.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, if that's the case, why are all the other universities, their board chairs, and their presidents shocked and surprised that some universities get extra money and others don't? The government had a funding formula that all the universities agreed to, but out of the blue Acadia gets more money from this government outside of that formula, and only when Cape Breton University had the courage to publicly complain about it did they suddenly get $1 million to stop complaining.

That is no way to run this province. I would like to ask the Premier, how can he justify randomly giving money to some universities at the expense of others?

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THE PREMIER « » : The honourable member's statement is inaccurate. As I go back to 2012, Acadia University was receiving funding over and above the formula that was granted by the previous government. We said we would keep that commitment, which we did at that date. When that became a permanent investment we also told CBU that there would be money coming in in our budget, and the minister announced it today.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM. - BUDGET: NURSING HOMES - FUNDING

MR. GARY BURRILL: Mr. Speaker, this budget, like its predecessor this Spring, returns just $3.2 million of the $8 million that has been cut from nursing homes in Nova Scotia over the past two years, thereby acknowledging that that $8 million cut had a harmful effect on dietary and programming spending in long-term care facilities.

I ask the Premier, what possible justification can he offer for failing to return all of the money that his government has cut from nursing homes in the last two years?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank those who work across our province in our nursing homes. The honourable member would attest that we've made investments in this current budget, targeted toward food and recreation. That funding is directly targeted to the services that our seniors require in those nursing homes. We expect that money to go directly to our seniors, and we'll continue, if required, to make targeted investments in our nursing homes across the province.

MR. BURRILL « » : The percentage of the surplus declared today that would have been required to return every single cent that has been taken from nursing homes in the province in the last two years is a mere 3.6 per cent. Surely others besides me would have heard during the election that the last place we in Nova Scotia should be turning to generate a surplus is the budgets that support the diets and the programming and the staffing of the residents of nursing homes.

I do want to ask the Premier, will he acknowledge that this failure to restore all the money that had been previously cut from nursing homes has been an error of judgment?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, again I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I'm very proud of the fact that we've invested in food budgets in nursing homes across the province. We invested in recreational services. We're targeted that funding, that money to go directly to the use of seniors. At the same time the honourable member would know that we continue to invest in home care because one of the things I heard loud and clear from seniors across this province is they want to remain home as long as possible and we're ensuring that that happens.

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[3:45 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: CAP AND TRADE - EFFECTS

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, the government is trying to put a happy face on today's budget but Nova Scotians are not buying it. This budget contains the unhappy news that family paycheques have flatlined. That's why income tax revenues are going down. Paying the bills is getting harder for Nova Scotia families and yet this budget contains $1.6 million to set up a cap and trade scheme which will increase the living costs for all Nova Scotians.

I'd like to ask the Premier, why is he making it harder for Nova Scotians to get by?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for his question. He knows full well that the cap and trade system that Nova Scotia has negotiated will not increase the costs to Nova Scotians. We believe and we've said all along that Nova Scotians have paid enough when it comes to power and the investments of this province and that's why the federal government has recognized the hard work of all Nova Scotians.

I would also remind the honourable member that this budget being introduced today is the largest single tax cut in the history of this province and it is directed towards those who need it the most.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, that is the "have your cake and eat it too" answer that Nova Scotians are not buying. You cannot say the cap and trade won't increase Nova Scotians' living costs and then say it will do something good for the environment at the same time. Obviously if it is going to help the environment, it is going to increase the living costs of Nova Scotians and the Premier has chosen to focus in on gasoline prices and home heating fuel costs. That is the problem.

This is a budget that claims to be cutting taxes but stays silent on the extra taxes that are coming when cap and trade comes in, Mr. Speaker. He is only telling half the story.

I'd like to ask the Premier, has the government done a study on the impact of cap and trade on the Nova Scotia economy? If so, will he table it so all Nova Scotians can judge for themselves?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I look forward to debate when it comes to the cap and trade system that will be in this province, but I do want to tell you this, the negativity that the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party continues to talk in this House he tried in the election campaign and not only did Nova Scotians not believe him, they believed us.

[Page 300]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

FIN. & TREASURY BD.: DRUG RECOGNITION TRAINING - FUNDING

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board. Marijuana will be legalized July 1st. Today we saw a budget that takes us up to March 31st, not a whole bunch of time between the end of this budget and the legalization of marijuana. Yet as law enforcement people across the country raise concerns, including our own here in the province, about how it will be enforced and stuff, they are looking to know when some drug recognition expert training might be made available to them.

There was nothing in the budget today for dollars for drug recognition expert training. This budget takes us to March 31st. I wonder if the minister can comment on a plan for training law enforcement, easing their concerns.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Thank you to the member. As the member would know, we are looking at the federal legislation. We've had meetings with our federal counterparts. There are a lot of details that have yet to be worked out.

We know that we're not looking at tax dollars, we're looking at the safety of the young people in our province, so we want to make sure that is our focus, that when we do a consultation that we are focusing more on how we can protect and ensure the safety of all Nova Scotians.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, that's precisely the point I'm trying to make is there are a lot of unanswered questions. There are a lot of concerns and many of those concerns are coming from law enforcement about the protection of all citizens, particularly young. What they are saying is that people, they need training. They need training and they need to know that they'll have access to drug recognition experts on staff, presumably hundreds of them across the province. It can cost $17,000 to $20,000 to provide that training.

It's real money, Mr. Speaker. It's money that should be allocated in this budget if this government is ready and has a plan for July 1st and I don't know that they have it. My question today for the minister is, time is ticking, when is the plan going to be developed and shared with Nova Scotians?

MS. CASEY « » : We want to be ready for July 2018. We know that is the target for the federal government. We also know that the whole notion of enforcement is something that has to be addressed.

The consultation we will be doing in the province, I believe, will be an opportunity for Nova Scotians to tell us when and how and what they would like to see with respect to our implementation of whatever comes from the federal government.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

EECD - C.B.-VICTORIA REG. SCH. BD.:

MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORTS - DETAILS

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : My question is for the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. In August, the province committed $192,000 to boost mental health supports at the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board. The cost would cover two guidance counsellors and one social worker. The school board had asked for more help in the wake of the tragic loss of three young lives. What the province has failed to mention was that these three positions have previously been slated to be cut by the school board - and I'll table that document, Mr. Speaker.

My question to the minister is, will the minister explain why he didn't tell the whole story when the announcement was made?

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : I can't say I fully understand that question. There were allocation decisions that were made by the school boards. They do have very difficult decisions to make when it comes to operational allocations. There were no cuts from the province in terms of their overall budget, but they did have to make the decisions that were made as a result of the choices that were in front of them. We did provide them with additional funding to have those needed supports, particularly in the wake of some devastating situations that happened in Cape Breton.

I'm also pleased that we're moving forward with our SchoolsPlus programs, which is providing supports for our children who need mental health supports from one end of the province to the other, along with other items that were in today's budget.

MR. ORRELL « » : The school boards have difficult decisions to make, Mr. Speaker. With no increase in their budget, they had to cut those positions. That announcement was to put those positions back. So, basically, they didn't give them any money to allow for those positions to stay for mental health. Today all I've seen the minister do is re-announce his commitments.

Tragedy has struck our island; three families lost their children after a long struggle with mental illness. Mental health services in this province are in a crisis. We have heard too many stories from families who are struggling to get the care they need. Dr. Kutcher released seven recommendations, and the minister said they would immediately implement some of the recommendations. We weren't told which ones or given a timeline.

So my question to the minister is, will the minister provide an update to the House and let us know when the students and families of Cape Breton can expect the mental health supports they deserve, and not simply reverse the cuts they made?

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MR. CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I have to be very clear on this - there have never been any cuts to the education system since our government has taken office, which is very different than the previous two governments that we had under the Progressive Conservatives and the NDP, who actually cut funding because enrolment was down. We're the first government that has recognized that just because enrolment is going down in our education system doesn't mean that the needs are going down.

So I'm proud to stand behind our record of investment. That said, these are very difficult situations, and as that member can understand, those individual circumstances are complex. It's not just the education system that needs to be there to respond to them. We are working closely with our partners in Health and Wellness and Community Services to make sure that there is a host of proper supports available for people when they need it. I do want Nova Scotians to know that there are increased investments for mental health supports in today's budget.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM. - N.S. CHILD POVERTY: BUDGET ADEQUACY - CONFIRM

MR. GARY BURRILL: Mr. Speaker, let us recognize together that we face an emergency situation in Nova Scotia. Our poverty rate is not near the middle of the pack in the country; in fact, we face the highest child poverty in Canada anywhere at all. Our rate of food bank usage increasing is not anywhere near the average in Canada - we face the single highest rate of food bank use anywhere in the whole country. Our median household income is the lowest in Canada. We have recently faced spikes in personal insolvencies.

So, Mr. Speaker, I wish to ask the Premier, does he really feel that he can say to the people of Nova Scotia, living in poverty, that the very little he offers in this budget is sufficient or adequate or enough?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I'm sure if he read the budget and listened to all of the debate that's going on around and the media outlets, he would know we have invested in a Poverty Reduction Strategy of $20 million, which has been announced over the life of this government. He would also know that today had the largest single tax cut in the history of this province which was clearly directed towards those Nova Scotians who need it the most.

We continue to make investments in affordable housing to ensure that those Nova Scotians who are spending too much, quite frankly, on shelter can find affordable housing across this province. We know there's more work to do, and we continue to work with our sister organizations to ensure that we respond to the needs of all Nova Scotians.

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MR. BURRILL « » : With every due respect, the number that the budget talks about for this year's allocation relative to poverty reduction is not the $20 million the Premier has spoken of but $2 million - $2 million. I think about testimony that was given here to a standing committee of this House by the Deputy Minister of Community Services not so long ago, in which it was spoken about how $143 million is the amount that would be needed to actually move everyone in Nova Scotia up to the low-income cut off and, by contrast, when we look at this budget we see that the increase in income assistance there, is zero.

Mr. Speaker, does the Premier think it's acceptable for his government with this budget to continue, in fact, condemning thousands of the people of our province to living below the poverty line?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. Again, I want to tell him that over the life of this government there's a $20 million investment today announced, that will be towards a poverty reduction strategy. I again want to remind him that the single largest tax cut in the history of this province is directed towards those Nova Scotians who require it the most, but also know those changes mean 60,000 more seniors will not be paying any kind of income tax in the Province of Nova Scotia.

If he followed this budget today, he would also recognize we increased from four to five years' tuition forgiveness on the Nova Scotia portion of the loan, which means more young Nova Scotians will be leaving university without any debt to the Province of Nova Scotia. If he followed the budget today, he would also recognize we invested more money directly to employers to create more job opportunities for young Nova Scotians who are working in our province. He left us quite a hole but we're digging out of it.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

WATERVILLE YOUTH DETENTION CTR.:

SAFETY RECOMMENDATIONS - STATUS

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice. Given the fact that the staff at the Waterville youth detention centre are reported to be terrified at the prospect of getting the young offender who murdered Daniel Pellerin back in that facility - and I'll table that - and given the fact that a number of safety recommendations made after the 2016 riot at Waterville which was instigated by this offender have not been completed - recommendations intended to protect both staff and other offenders - will the minister tell us if those safety recommendations will be completed before that offender is transferred to Waterville?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : I thank my colleague for the question. I think it's important that my colleague has the facts around the recommendations. The assessment that followed the events at Waterville in September 2016, resulted in 42 categories, 103 recommendations, and to date 84 per cent of those recommendations are complete. We recognize the work that's being done is in the best interest and safety of the employees and those who occupy the Waterville facility. We will continue to work with Correction Services to ensure that the safety of all who find themselves in that environment are of the utmost priority.

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MR. LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, the citizens of the Valley are alarmed and nearly everybody knows someone who works there. If the minister can't get those recommendations 100 per cent done, will the province appeal the ruling to have the offender sent to Waterville?

MR. FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, let's be very clear. The Department of Justice and the province acknowledge and accept the decision of the court. There is a distinct difference in the custody of young offenders and the custody of adults. My colleague should know that. We will work in all the decisions that we make to ensure the best interests and the public safety and the personal safety of individuals who find themselves in that environment as those who occupy space or those who work in that environment, to protect their personal safety.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HEALTH & WELLNESS: BARRINGTON PASSAGE DIALYSIS UNIT

- BUDGET OMISSION

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, let me start off by saying, Holy Moses, it's hot in here!

This seems to be the session where I get to re-ask my questions of a new Minister of Health and Wellness when it comes to the priorities of southwestern Nova Scotia. I was happy to see in the budget bulletin where it talks about advanced planning, design, and construction of satellite dialysis units at hospitals in Bridgewater, Kentville, Digby, and Glace Bay and expand dialysis services in Halifax and Dartmouth. Unfortunately, what is missing in this one is that the community of Barrington Passage in Barrington has been asking for a dialysis unit for many years as well and yet I don't find them in this list again. So can the minister explain to me why they were left out once again?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for the question. Clearly, Nova Scotians who require the services of dialysis - it's a very extensive process. It takes a lot of time. The areas that he cited there that we've announced in this budget, the work that's ongoing is to improve the access for Nova Scotians to these services and to reduce the travel time for those Nova Scotians. We are working our way through. There are many communities around the province that would like to have this service. This is the list we have available right now. We are continuing to improve the services.

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[4:00 p.m.]

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : Well, I hope, Mr. Speaker, I can engage the minister to maybe sit down and chat about this one, where I had the opportunity to speak to your predecessor on it and where we did not get a sufficient answer to it.

The people of Barrington Passage, Cape Island, Shelburne County have to travel over 100 kilometres to Yarmouth, maybe to Bridgewater to receive those services, four times a week in all kind of weather.

There should be an opportunity for them to receive that kind of service in a satellite way in a community like Barrington Passage. So I hope that the minister can see his way to sit down and talk to the community and talk to me and maybe come up with a solution for those individuals needing this kind of service.

MR. DELOREY « » : Certainly, if the member opposite wants to sit down and have a further conversation on behalf of his constituents, I am happy to do that. In the meantime, I would like to highlight many of those communities, particularly on the list identified there. There are people travelling even further than 100 kilometres that these investments at the front end are designed to tackle first and foremost. Again, it's a situation we recognize, we want to improve services for people across the province receiving dialysis, to reduce the amount of travel times they have to receive this important service, and that is the work we are beginning.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

NORTHERN PULP:

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT LEVEL - DETAILS

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, Northern Pulp has qualified for a faster environmental assessment for the new water treatment facility that needs to be built by 2020, when Boat Harbour closes. The Liberal Government's Department of Environment is giving Northern Pulp a class-one environmental assessment. This gives the public only 30 days to comment once the project is formally registered.

The other option would have been a class two which would have been more appropriate considering the magnitude of this project. The minister was quoted saying that it was automatic to provide a level-one assessment, that it was a staff-level decision. Actually the regulations clearly stipulate that where there is modification to an existing undertaking it would be a class one - and I will table that.

Can the minister please explain what the modifications are to warrant a class one, or perhaps he will agree that is truly a new development and a myth that it definitely needs a class-two environmental assessment?

[Page 306]

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member opposite for the question. I am on record saying that it's a modification to an existing undertaking, it was a staff-level decision. Whenever an existing industrial site makes a modification to its effluent treatment facility, that is clearly within the regulations and the Environment Act to be a modification. Therefore, it is a class-one environmental assessment.

MS. MACFARLANE « » : So just to be clear, this environmental assessment is happening eight miles away from where the original treatment facility is. It's a new development, let us just face the facts here. Our fishing industry is extremely important to sustainable and economic growth. We cannot underestimate its value in providing good jobs and, more importantly, food security. We even heard the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board speak about it in her Budget Speech, and potentially the effluent pipe that will be installed by Northern Pulp when the new treatment facility is built will run out into the Northumberland Strait, invading our rich fishing grounds.

I would like to know what the minister has done with his federal components as well as his local colleague with Fisheries and Aquaculture to ensure that measures are taken to not jeopardize our fishing industry.

MR. RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, through this process, there will be a rigorous and thorough environmental assessment, a class one and, as I said, that has been a staff-level decision for that. (Interruption)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable Minister of Environment has the floor

MR. RANKIN « » : There is a 30-day period where there will be public submissions that we will take very seriously that will help to shape the terms and conditions. We will get feedback from the Department of Fisheries, both provincially and federally, as well as the Department of Environment and Climate Change Canada, and we will make sure our decision is based on science and evidence.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM.: N.S. TUITION FEES - LOWERING

HON. GARY BURILL: Mr. Speaker, everybody recognizes that education beyond Grade 12 is the key for people to improve their financial future. And yet this important door is not, at the moment, adequately open to our people, particularly our young people because at the moment in Nova Scotia students are facing the single fastest-rising tuition anywhere in the country. In the midst of this crisis of opportunity, I want to ask, does the Premier not feel it unwise to be bringing forward a budget at this time that fails to invest in lowering tuition fees for the students of our province?

[Page 307]

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, not only are they lower, but for a Nova Scotia student who attains their degree in five years, we've actually eliminated the Nova Scotia portion.

MR. BURRILL « » : Mr. Speaker, what ought to be eliminated is a government that thinks it is conscionable or consistent with the interests of our province to have average university tuition, as students go back to school this Fall, exceeding $7,500 and to have a situation as we have it at the moment where average student indebtedness on undergraduate graduation is now in excess of $39,000.

This budget does expand the terms for potential forgiveness of student debt after the fact but what it does to remove the roadblock of skyrocketing tuition is exactly nothing. I wish to ask the Premier, does he not see that the impact of this approach is precisely to pass on increasing amounts of debt to future generations?

THE PREMIER « » : Again, Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As he would know, I'm sure he has read the document, that he would know if you complete your degree in five years we eliminate the Nova Scotia portion of your student debt.

I want to say it again for the honourable member, we eliminate it completely, Mr. Speaker. I also want to remind the honourable member that there are investments in there to eliminate the fees associated for apprentices who are going back to receive their Red Seal - very positive news here across the province where oftentimes young Nova Scotians in their 20s are in that stage of continuing to invest in their career.

As you would know, the investments we made in terms of jobs, keeping people here, Mr. Speaker, it's always a balance. I'm very pleased to say that Nova Scotians and students responded well during the election campaign and returned us here.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

EECD: MENTAL HEALTH CARE - ACCESS PROVIDE

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : Mr. Speaker, yesterday I indicated in the House that improving access to mental health services must be a priority. The Youth Health Centre at Prince Andrew High School in Dartmouth East has been closed since the beginning of the school year when the health worker accepted a position at another school.

Mr. Speaker, this has left the students at PA, as well as the students at all the schools that feed into Prince Andrew, without a youth health care worker. The staff at the schools told me that they don't expect the health centre to open for at least another month.

[Page 308]

My question to the minister is, following the recent tragedies involving teen suicides, why is this government continuing to allow students to go to school with no access to mental health care?

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I do appreciate the question and I do appreciate the member's passion. This is an area of interest for all of us in this House. In fact, we are increasing mental health from one end of the province to the other, through our SchoolsPlus Program. We're also recognizing that mental health isn't just an issue that our teachers and support staff in the schools should be solely dealing with. Mental health is an issue that's broader than that so we are working more closely with our Department of Health and Wellness colleagues to make sure that all the appropriate services are there.

In this particular issue, there's obviously a staffing issue that has been created because of the movement that the member mentioned. I know that all folks at the board are working very diligently to fill that position.

MR. HALMAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hope the minister and I can have a chat about that situation, it would certainly be appreciated.

Mr. Speaker, this government has said that all schools in the province would be SchoolsPlus by the 2019 school year. My question is, why is this government not moving faster to implement a program that we all know has the ability to help our youth that may be experiencing a mental health crisis?

MR. CHURCHILL « » : This is, in fact, a priority for us as I know it's a priority for the members opposite. We are moving forward with a plan of expansion for mental health supports in our schools, which is important, but also more important is recognizing that this just isn't an issue that can be dealt with in our schools. We need to have the proper supports outside and the appropriate medical areas to come in and provide all the services that these children need, particularly in times of crisis.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

ENERGY: RAIL CO. ACCESS - CHARGES

MR. KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Energy. Last year my colleague, the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg asked the then Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal about the enormous and unreasonable fees the rail company is trying to charge residents for permission to access their land and their utility line.

The minister agreed that the fees were completely unreasonable and mentioned that they were upward of $20,000. The minister, who has met with these residents on numerous occasions and promised them he would solve this problem, told members of the House he would be reaching out to the rail company, Tennessee Wyoming. The minister assured members that he would report back. My question to the Minister of Energy is, will he stand up for residents seeking electricity and give a time-bound commitment to follow through on this promise?

[Page 309]

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : I do thank the member for the question. Look, this has been something that many of the MLAs from Cape Breton have had very detailed involvement with. There are two types of fees - there's the annual crossing fee, and then there's the developmental fee - which are certainly exorbitant. They are in that range of $20,000 and we could never figure out where exactly they came from. The railway says it's not them, it's the power utility. The power utility says that it's the railway.

So there's a lot of complexities involved with this. As the member would know, we commissioned an independent study by Neil MacNeil to figure out exactly who was charging these fees and what they were charging them for. That report is completed. It is with the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal now. I know this has been frustrating for residents, and I truly hope that we will get to the end of this.

MR. BAIN « » : Last year, we gave the minister a copy of the letter written from the URB that confirmed that residents are right on the issue. A 2011 Order in Council that changes the regulations confirms that the URB is correct on the law. The residents of Cape Breton deserve answers from this government. Resident Ken Jardine told reporters last week, and I quote, "We cannot get electricity: there's no economic development allowed. Politicians came to our meetings and said it was easy to fix, then did nothing."

My question is, when will the minister finally deliver on the promises he and his Premier have made and fix this problem for the hundreds of impacted property owners and lease holders?

MR. MACLELLAN « » : We didn't make any promises that we could fix this, and certainly I would never suggest that it was an easy one. Again, the astronomical numbers that are being charged, that's what's unfair and unreasonable for us. It's a very complex situation involving the Act, the URB, and of course, private sector operators. To the members, I know it has been a frustrating journey. I do believe that there will be a significant level of development for those landowners there, but we do have to sort this out.

Again, I think that the Neil MacNeil report will go a long way in clarifying who exactly is charging these fees. If there's a way to bundle these fees and make the overall cost lower, I think that's the best bet for all of us. We want to see development in Cape Breton. We know the landowners have been through a lot. Again, it truly is my hope that we can continue down this road of diplomatic conversations, looking at this study and finding out exactly, once and for all, how we solve this problem.

[Page 310]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

HEALTH & WELLNESS - LONG-TERM CARE:

FOOD BUDGETS - RESTORE

MS. KIM MASLAND « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is for the Minister of Health and Wellness. During the election, this government promised to target funding for food budgets at long-term care facilities. Of course, it was this same government that stripped food budgets in the first place, leaving seniors with inadequate service. Nevertheless, I am happy that they may have seen the error of their ways. My question is, will the minister commit to immediately restoring all the food budgets in long-term care facilities?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : I thank the member for the question. The budget that was brought in today reflects the path that we charted a while ago. We built upon the budget that was brought in in the Spring prior to the election. It fulfills our campaign commitments to move forward in these areas. That includes an increased investment of over $1 million towards long-term care facilities for dedicated food and recreation budgets for our seniors in those facilities.

MS. MASLAND « » : Our parents and grandparents deserve respect as they age. That includes providing enjoyable meals when they live in nursing homes. My question is, does the minister believe seniors in long-term care facilities should simply accept what is put in front of them, or will he make changes to improve their quality of life?

[4:15 p.m.]

MR. DELOREY « » : I thank the member again for the follow-up question. This decision that we've made, when we went through and you saw long-term care facilities make changes to their budgets as part of their operations - we recognize there's a need and an opportunity to ensure that we target our investments to ensure that they are provided - to ensure that the residents in these facilities receive those supports to which the funding is allocated. So in this case, the increase we've allocated for is an increase toward their dietary requirements as well as recreation, improving the quality of life for those residents.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

FIN. & TREASURY BD.:

[Page 311]

PENSION VALUATION ADJUSTMENT - ACCURACY

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board. In last year's budget, the Pension Valuation Adjustment was estimated to cost the government about $66 million for the fiscal year. However, today we learned that that cost was only $17 million, saving the government close to $49 million.

I'll ask the minister, why was the Pension Valuation Adjustment so far off in last year's budget?

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Thank you for the question. We know that the pension valuation amount was adjusted. It was reflected in the Public Accounts that were presented and approved by the Auditor General in June or July. With the cost of the benefits going down, that meant that the cost of government went down, so we were able to reallocate those dollars to Nova Scotians.

MR. DAVID WILSON « » : When the Liberal Government came to office, they took a one-time Pension Valuation Adjustment hit that ballooned the deficit at the time by some $319 million, setting the stage for their austerity agenda and how they approached negotiations. Somehow, prior to the election, this same adjustment supposedly saved the government some $49 million.

I'd like to ask the minister, if this is just a matter of accounting, how can the government be so lucky?

MS. CASEY « » : You mean with the minister?

Thank you for the question. No, as the member would know, we have external opinions about the pension valuation amount. Those opinions were given to us. We have to respond and react to those, and those opinions did tell us that the amount that the government would have to pay to support the benefits had decreased. Those adjustments were made. They were all included in the Public Accounts for last year and, again, approved by the Auditor General.

We know that that's some money that we no longer have to keep in that account, and we'll put it to good use for Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

EMO: FALSE 911 CALLS - REVIEW

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the minister responsible for the EMO.

Last night around 2:00 a.m., a constituent of mine got a visit from the RCMP. Apparently the salty line, or whatever was wrong with it, decided to call 911. We know what happens when 911 gets called and there's nobody actually on the line: the RCMP have to reply.

[Page 312]

I'm wondering if maybe the minister responsible for the EMO could look into the issue of how many false calls 911 is getting that are being blamed on bad infrastructure from Bell Aliant?

HON. DEREK MOMBOURQUETTE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to thank the honourable member for the question. I'd be more than happy to discuss that particular situation further.

EMO is constantly monitoring the support we provide to communities across the province, and I'd be more than happy to discuss that specific issue.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : When the Bell Aliant technician did show up at some point today, there was some issue of a bad line and infrastructure problems, that it was going to be escalated. But I can also say to the minister that that happened to my constituency office about six months ago, where on two different occasions, while we were sitting there talking to constituents, the RCMP showed up wondering what was going on.

There is an infrastructure problem going on (Interruptions) I know, it's way too easy.

The point is, the RCMP are being called out when they don't need to be, when I'm sure they have more pressing issues to be dealing with than broken lines or Bell Aliant issues.

Can the minister maybe look into this issue and we'll chat about it a little more?

MR. MOMBOURQUETTE « » : To the member, EMO has very strong relationships with both private and public entities, Bell being one of them. I'm more than happy to discuss this issue further.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

AGRIC.: N.B./ON BEES - BORDER CLOSE

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture. As the minister knows, this Spring he shut the border to bees from southern Ontario. However, New Brunswick did not, and now has small hive beetles in four locations in New Brunswick, including Aulac.

My question for the minister is, will the minister close the border to both New Brunswick and southern Ontario bees this year?

[Page 313]

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : We're very concerned about the small hive beetle. We put in the most rigid inspection process in the country around small hive beetles. We're monitoring our orders at the present time and we have a plan in place in case we find them in Nova Scotia.

MR. LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, as the minister may well know, the small hive beetle is capable of flying apparently 10 or 15 kilometres. It is a very prolific beetle. We know it is in Aulac. We are very concerned about Amherst. I know the minister has just said he has a very extensive monitoring plan. Does he have an eradication plan? When will we find out exactly what the monitoring and eradication plan is?

MR. COLWELL « » : We are presently working on a long-term plan for eradication of the small hive beetle in Nova Scotia. We're doing extensive monitoring at the border and in areas around where the small hive beetle could potentially fly into Nova Scotia.

It's very unfortunate that New Brunswick didn't take the precautions we did for the inspection process even after I wrote to the minister and asked him to do that and because of that we go to New Brunswick now.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

JUSTICE: WATERVILLE YOUNG OFFENDER - CASE APPEAL

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice. Earlier my colleague, the member for Kings North referred to an offender from the youth facility in Waterville. My question to the minister is, after reading all the details around this offender, we know we don't have what we would consider an offender who is in the same realm as most offenders. The IWK actually breached their confidentiality on his file because of how dangerous he is and how premeditated his plans were to kill a youth caseworker.

I would like to know if the minister will take a stand and appeal the judge's decision so that we will ensure the security of the employees there, as well as the other offenders in that facility.

HON. MARK FUREY « » : I thank my colleague for the question. As I indicated earlier, Mr. Speaker, one of the priorities for the Department of Justice in the province is to ensure the safety . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for Oral Questions Put by Members to Ministers has expired.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

[Page 314]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Notices of Motion.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Resolution No. 1.

Res. 1, Deputy Speakers/Chairmen on Committees: Hants West MLA/Lunenburg MLA - Appt. - notice given June 16, 2017 - (Hon. G. MacLellan)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition on the amendment.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I can't tell you how happy I am to get back up and continue my remarks on government Resolution No. 1. I thought at the end of business yesterday that I had concluded and offered to adjourn debate but as you know, the government members voted against adjournment. They wanted me to continue on with my examination of government Resolution No. 1. I want to thank them for the compliments that they had not yet heard enough of our views on government Resolution No. 1 so I'll return. I just want to make sure I know how much time I have left in my one hour, if I could do a quick time check. I believe it was another 42 minutes. I hope I can get my remarks in in time because there is a lot to say about government Resolution No. 1.

Mr. Speaker, the main points I made yesterday were that government Resolution No. 1 offends the conventions of this House. It lines up that all of the Deputy Speakers will come from only one Party, and that is the Liberal Party. Not only does that offend the conventions of the House but it's just not fair on principle. It's not fair on equity and Nova Scotians will see it for what it is, which is a play to have all of the referees of this House come from one team. No one would think that's fair. That's why we brought forward our amendment, the PC Opposition amendment to add a PC member to the ranks of Deputy Speakers, so that there is balance.

The member we propose is the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg, whose qualifications are evident, I think, to all members of the House. That includes that he is a former Speaker himself, that he has a reputation for presiding over this House in fairness to all sides, and that he knows the Rules of the House enough to preside in a very competent manner. I really encourage the government members to vote in favour of the amendment when that time comes.

[Page 315]

Mr. Speaker, I also indicated last night that, in the interest of fairness, if the NDP caucus wishes to bring forward an amendment or sub-amendment of their own to name a member of the NDP to also be a Deputy Speaker, we would be supportive of that. Then all three Parties would be represented among the ranks of Deputy Speakers, which is a convention of this House, which is only fair. Nova Scotians will see it for what it is - a chance to ensure that the presiding officers of this House are reflective of both sides of the House and indeed all Parties.

That's the point I made last night. This is a very important matter of principle. It is a matter that will affect not just the resolution before us but every bill that comes before this House during the mandate of this government. So I strongly urge members on all sides to fix the problem by supporting our amendment. With that, Mr. Speaker, I am happy to take my place and give the NDP caucus an opportunity to put their case, and then we will go on with the debate from there.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

MR. GARY BURRILL: I'm happy to speak for a few moments to this measure and to reflect a little on this proposal of the government to have the Deputy Speaker position entirely represented by the government side, contrary to the practice that had been taken by the NDP when we were in power and by the Progressive Conservative Party prior to that.

The reflections I would like to offer about this I would like to put forward by means of thinking just a little bit about what an important thing a gesture is. A gesture can take us beyond the small and the petty. It can take us in a particular situation beyond that, often outside of the roles we may find ourselves set in to a place of larger-spiritedness. This is why a gesture is often something that can move people, can move a crowd, particularly. The significance of gestures is something that is all around us.

I think about the football game of the Detroit Lions the day before yesterday. The context is all the debate at the moment about members of the NFL taking the knee, as the expression is, prior to games. In that context, the anthem singer sang the entire anthem without moving a muscle, standing erect as he sang it, until he came to the last word of the last line, "the home of the brave." On the word "brave," he went down on one knee, fist in the air - the power that was communicated in that one second by that gesture.

Gestures are particularly important when we are dealing in society with bodies that have differences of opinion. I can't help but refer to the Hebrew scriptures, to the venerable old story of the two archenemies there, Jacob and Esau, the brothers who spent their lives in terrible enmity. Later in their lives, their whole encampments were coming towards one another. There was much question as to what was going to happen after all these years of hardness and of difference. Jacob sent some gifts towards the other encampment. This was altogether important as a gesture in the direction of reconciliation. This was a gesture out of pettiness, moving the situation towards a greater largeness.

[Page 316]

[4:30 p.m.]

I do remember clearly when I was very first elected in 2009. I remember the day when the appointment was made by the then-new NDP Government of three Deputy Speakers, one from each of the three Parties represented in the House. I was struck when this appointment was made because I had had the understanding that this was something that only belonged in minority Legislatures, and we were in a majority situation. I remember registering the thought that I was grateful to be part of a government that had the character to reach across Party lines and at that important tone-setting moment, at the beginning of that mandate, to make such an important gesture.

So, I want to say that with the measure that the government is putting forward, the government is defining itself and setting in these early days of its second mandate a very important matter of tone. It's characterizing itself, in my judgment, as a government whose outlook is infected by smallness and a government whose outlook is limited by the petty, a government for whom the large or the magnanimous or the gracious is beyond its grasp. So, I would like to move a sub-amendment to the motion moved last night by the member for Cumberland South as follows:

I move that the amendment to Resolution No. 1 be amended by, (1) adding the words "honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River" in paragraph one immediately after Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg; and, (2) striking the word "three" in paragraph two and substituting for it the word "four." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

MS. BARBARA ADAMS « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to introduce a member of the viewing gallery up there. Melanie Russell is one of our candidates in the last election and she has also returned back to the classroom as one our beloved teachers and I would just ask for the House's indulgence in welcoming her to the Chamber. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount on the sub-amendment.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and the sub-amendment to the amendment really doesn't make that much difference because the sub-amendment to the amendment is trying to amend a resolution to allow . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please.

[Page 317]

The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

MR. ORRELL « » : . . . because both amendments are trying to add to the fairness that I was introduced to when I came to this Legislature as a green MLA back in 2011. I had the same question at the time. Why is the government allowing two Opposition MLAs to be Deputy Speakers? I was told at the time it was because of fairness to the proceedings of the House and fairness to the proceedings that we have here, to allow debate to proceed in a smooth manner so that not one person gets to control a debate through their Party or his or her Party.

We heard here in the Chamber last night the member for Halifax Atlantic talked about we all have to lay down our swords and get along and work for the better of the province, and that same evening we get a resolution that comes in that looks for two of the same government MLAs to be the Deputy Speaker. Now, they'll get out of that Chair and they'll go back and sit in their chair and they have to answer to their people so I'm not saying they wouldn't be fair, but it gets a lot harder to be fair when you have a vested interest in it.

We heard the analogy of refereeing and umpiring. I did a lot of refereeing when I was younger. It was always when you had a game that meant something, they used to take the referee from another town in our area. So, if Glace Bay and Sydney were playing, they took a referee from North Sydney. If Sydney and North Sydney were playing, they brought in a referee from Glace Bay. It just made it fair so that there was no vested interest in the referee to see the outcome of that game. When you've got people who volunteer to do that stuff, it just makes it fairer.

Now, I know there are other things involved in this and there's compensation and there's trying to make people happy and we've elected this many people so we've got so many jobs. I understand that part of it but if we're going to come in here and have fair and open debate, we know that whoever's in that Chair is going to do that job. The member for Halifax Atlantic or for Hants West or Louisbourg, I'm sure will be excellent candidates. Both sides of the House have recommended one of their own to add to your ability to govern this House, Mr. Speaker, and there's not all days that you can sit there. It's a long day - today it's hot. You're sitting there and you're not even getting the breeze we're getting from this window so I know you need a break and in fairness of the debate and in fairness of the Rules of the House I would think having somebody that has been in that Chair before, like the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg has been a Deputy Speaker and Speaker before. I know that when I came to this House, he was a great source of knowledge for me on what were the proceedings, what was going on at the time.

I remember when I first came here I sat through about three Question Periods. I hadn't heard one answer. So I turned to the member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg who was on my left and asked him, you've been here before, how come they're not answering questions? His answer was, it's Question Period - if they were going to give you an answer, they would call it answer period.

[Page 318]

Those are the things that happen looking for information from someone who is experienced, and I think people from both sides in your Chair would allow a fairer debate, would allow the debate to continue on. They wouldn't be seen as playing favourites to either Party because we could be out of line and our own member from our caucus could be in that Chair and have to put us back straight. Whereas if it was a member from the other, some people see that as they wouldn't have done that if it was their own. So you never know - you kind of keep the decorum in the Legislature the way it should be.

So I am in favour of having one, our amendment brought forward and two, the amendments from the NDP brought forward just so that we can see that the debate is fair. Make sure that the debate continues smoothly. I am not saying that any people from the other side, from over there would not do a good job, but when I came here it was the fact that this was the way it was. It was tradition, there was nothing written in rules to see that. And I was really shocked when this government came in and didn't do the same tradition as done in the past number of years.

So I wanted to speak in favour of that tradition and with those words I will take my seat.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : I would like to say a few words on the sub-amendment. I think the sub-amendment is in fact an improvement to the amendment. If in this Parliament we look to the House of Commons, we look to the British House of Lords in the U.K. and in both of those institutions the Second Party and in our case in the House of Commons the Third Party also have a Deputy Speaker, so we see that we are in an institution that is bounded by tradition.

I guess that is one of the surprises for me coming out right off the farm into the House of Assembly. The first time I was in this building was when I walked in as an MLA. One of the surprises for me was the extent to which tradition is used to guide everything from the orders of the day to sometimes the trivial. We focus on that tradition and I come to understand that goes back some 800-plus years to England where parliamentary law was encoded in a book called Beauchesne's, as I understand it. Everything that we do has some sort of precedence or tradition and we look back to that place in the U.K. and we see that the Speaker of the House of Commons is from the governing Party and Deputy Speaker works the Committee of the Whole - in fact, our Deputy Speaker also does that, works the Committee of the Whole.

I fail to grasp how we take such an important part of tradition of parliamentary democracy and just walk away from it for convenience's sake when other little pieces of it we keep and we don't know why we keep them. I think of the moment in this Assembly a few days ago when the Lieutenant Governor finished reading the Speech from the Throne, the Clerk started reading it again, and the Premier interrupted the Clerk. That is a tiny piece of tradition - what that signifies, I have no idea.

[Page 319]

Another tradition about the Speaker is that the Speaker will resist becoming a Speaker and will struggle to not want to be the Speaker. Like several other members mentioned, that goes back 700 years ago when the Speaker was operating in the House on the behest of the King and if the King wasn't happy, the Speaker could have his head chopped off. From what I read, seven Speakers did have their heads chopped off over a 200-year period before that tradition was eliminated. It was a very real fear at one time.

There are other parts of our tradition like the meaning of the Mace, walking between the Speaker and the person who is speaking - all sort of little pieces of tradition. I would say I believe that even though some of them maybe don't make sense to me, I think that every little piece of that tradition has value and there was a brilliance that the creators of parliamentary democracy created 200, 300, 400 years ago in setting up this system and nothing that happens here is trivial, in my opinion. Everything has deep significance.

What is happening is that we are learning parliamentary democracy, so I think that looking at the House of Commons, looking in the U.K., looking at our own House of Commons, we should follow that model. With those few words, Mr. Speaker, I'll take my seat.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Barring more speakers, the vote will be on the sub-amendment.

There has been a call for a recorded vote. We will ring the bells until the Whips are satisfied.

[4:41 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Are the Whips satisfied?

We will now proceed with the recorded vote. I'll reiterate the instructions in case you have forgotten and for those who are new to the Chamber, welcome to our first recorded vote. I'll ask that all members please remain absolutely silent and when your name is called, please stand and state Yea or Nay very clearly. Please remain silent until the vote is concluded and the Clerk will then announce the results.

Again, just to reiterate, this is on the sub amendment as put forth by the New Democratic Party.

[Page 320]

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[4:47 p.m.]

YEANAY
Mr. MacMaster Mr. Churchill  
Mr. MacLeod Mr. Furey  
Mr. Dunn Ms. Regan  
Ms. MacFarlane Mr. MacLellan  
Mr. Baillie Mr. McNeil  
Mr. d'Entremont Ms. Casey 
Mr. David Wilson Mr. Glavine 
Mr. Burrill Mr. Delorey   
Ms. Zann Mr. Colwell  
Ms. Roberts Ms. Miller  
Ms. Leblanc Mr. Kousoulis  
Ms. Martin Mr. Porter  
Ms. Chender Mr. Gordon  Wilson 
Ms. Smith-McCrossin Mr. Hines  
Mr. Houston Ms. Diab  
Mr. Orrell Mr. Ince  
Mr. Bain Mr. Rankin  
Mr. Lohr Mr. Mombourquette  
Mr. Johns Ms. Arab  
Ms. Adams Mr. Horne  
Ms. Masland Mr. Maguire  
Mr. Halman Mr. MacKay  
Mr. Harrison Mr. Jessome  
 Ms. Lohnes-Croft 
 Ms. DiCostanzo 
 Mr. Irving 

THE CLERK » : For, 23. Against, 26.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is defeated.

We'll now move on to the amendment to Resolution No. 1. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is defeated.

We'll now move on to the vote on Resolution No. 1. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

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The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Just before we get to the honourable member for Dartmouth North, the honourable member for Dartmouth East put forth the motion to adjourn debate on Address in Reply, and he has 25 minutes left. (Interruption) He is done.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North. (Applause)

MS. SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Congratulations to you on your re-election as Speaker of this House, and congratulations to all of us here on your election to this House.

I'd like to acknowledge that we're gathered on the traditional and un-ceded land of the Mi'kmaq people. I'm grateful to be a guest here in K'jipuktuk in Mi'kma'ki.

I'm honoured to stand in this House as a representative for Dartmouth North. It is truly a great place to live and raise a family, and I am humbled that my neighbours and community have chosen me to occupy the seat belonging to the people of Dartmouth North.

As this is my first speech in this House, I'd like to take a moment to thank some important people from my campaign. Before I do that, I should echo the member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage and welcome Melanie Russell, who ran against me in Dartmouth North. (Applause)

First, I'd like to thank the Leader of our Party for his vision of and commitment to a Nova Scotia where everyone has a fair shake at getting ahead, and where no one is left behind. Congratulations to him, the newly-elected member for Halifax Chebucto. I'm very excited to work alongside him and am proud to be part of this historic caucus for the people of Nova Scotia.

I'd like to thank my incredible campaign team, expertly led by Garett Spelliscy, Charlie Mancini, and Joanne Lamey, our official agent, who has tirelessly worked for our Party in this province for almost 50 years. Thanks also go to Anthony Scoggins and the members of our Dartmouth North NDP EDA, who volunteered many hours to ensure our campaign could be a winning one.

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I want to acknowledge the support of my parents Barbara and André Leblanc from Prospect Bay, and my brothers and sisters and their families, who have believed in me in whatever I have done in my life.

Most especially, I want to thank my partner Sebastien Labelle, and our children Françoise and Aimé, who did their share of promoting their maman during the campaign. They also eased the strain of all the nights of missing their bedtimes with them, excitedly asking - and I hope this does not reflect badly on my mothering - "Who's babysitting us tonight?"

Finally, I'd like to thank the people of Dartmouth North for sharing a little bit of their lives with me when I knocked on their doors, met them in the streets, or saw them out in the community. While campaigning I was often moved by the generosity of spirit of the people I met, which was particularly striking when it was juxtaposed against poverty and a sense of general hopelessness. While campaigning, I appreciated people's willingness to engage in a political conversation, and I grieved for the conversations that couldn't happen because people were withdrawn and separated from a system that had let them down so many times before.

Being a new member of this House, I asked for advice about how to construct this speech, and many trusted people told me to take my listeners on a tour of the riding I represent. As Dartmouth North is an incredibly beautiful, vibrant, and diverse place, I think it would take well over my allotted hour to give that tour justice, so I will just give some highlights here.

In the City of Lakes, Dartmouth North is home to nine of them, perhaps the most notable being Albro Lake, Little Albro Lake, Lake Banook, and Lake Micmac. We have two boating clubs, one terrific community-oriented library, one golf course, several excellent schools full of dedicated and hard-working teachers, one amazing community food centre, and starting tomorrow, exactly one IKEA store.

Dartmouth North is home to the traditional Mi'kmaq community of Turtle Grove, which was nestled on the shores of the harbour, just down from what is now Tufts Cove, home of the cloud machine smoke stacks. Turtle Grove was completely wiped out during the Halifax Explosion, and many people died there. I only learned about Turtle Grove's plight in the last couple of years, and I'm still appalled by the lack of attention paid to the Mi'kmaq people when the accounts of the explosion made their way into history books.

Dartmouth North also has three correctional facilities, the best known of which is the Central Nova Scotia Correctional Facility, where 77 per cent of the population is in remand. In a recent visit hosted by the honourable Minister of Justice, we learned that the people who live there are referred to as offenders in spite of 77 per cent of them awaiting trial.

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Dartmouth North is home to many public sector workers - teachers, nurses, home care workers, civil servants, and bus drivers. Many are represented by unions that also have their home offices in Dartmouth North - the NSGEU, CUPE Nova Scotia, SEIU, the Nova Scotia Nurses' Union, and more. These people feel betrayed that their democratic right to fair and free collective bargaining has been stripped from them through the actions of Bill No. 75 and Bill No. 148.

In Dartmouth North, we have the highest amount of people using the Employment Support and Income Assistance program in the province. In my short time as MLA, I have heard countless stories of people on the system who simply cannot afford to make ends meet. Their housing amounts are wholly inadequate, and people consistently spend their food allowance to supplement their rent. Food bank usage is rampant, and people are afraid of getting kicked out of the food bank system for abusing it, yet their kids are still going to bed and to school hungry. Today there was an article in the Chronicle Herald about Catherine Stevens hoping to hear good news in today's budget. I am so sorry she has not received the news she was hoping for.

Dartmouth North is home to many people who are working together to make sure their community remains a great place to live: the folks at the Take Action Society and the Farrell Hall Benevolence Society, everyone involved with the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre and Dartmouth Family Centre, parishioners from churches to outreach programs, and members of the Islamic Association of Nova Scotia who worship at the Dartmouth masjid and contribute to the community in very tangible and generous ways. The list goes on and on.

There are also some incredible artists living in Dartmouth North: Guyleigh Lee Johnson, a spoken-word artist and poet whose book Expect the Unexpected challenges stereotypes of living in North Dartmouth; and Ursula Johnson, a Mi'kmaq activist and installation artist who was a 2016 finalist for the Lieutenant Governor's Masterworks Award and is currently a finalist for the national Sobey Art Award. Both make their homes here.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I'll conclude my little tour of the physical community, and I'll continue with a bit of a tour of my cultural community.

I am an actor and a singer. In the interest of full disclosure in this House, I feel I should let everybody know that probably the first $5 of money I ever made in the entertainment industry was singing as the lead singer in a rock band at the nomination rally of Jerry Lawrence in Timberlea in 1989. I hope that my colleagues to the right of me will appreciate my solidarity (Interruption) transgression. We were really good. Our band was named Elixir. For almost 20 years, I have been a part of the theatre community in Nova Scotia, and most of my career has been with a company - and I'm going to cry when I talk about this - called Zuppa Theatre.

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[5:00 p.m.]

My colleagues at Zuppa and I have created a true ensemble company based on the values of vigorous experimentation, artistic excellence, and true collaboration. With Zuppa, I have taken shows to audiences in Nova Scotia, around Canada, and internationally. I have taught and directed countless young theatre-makers and I am proud of the theatre we create. I'm deeply grateful to Ben Stone, Alex McLean, and Stewart Legere for their support of me.

Many people have asked me about the seemingly strange leap from theatre-maker to politician and wonder how I ever envisioned that shift in my life. Acknowledging the "all politicians are actors anyway, eh" comment, complete with a hardy elbow jab or back slap and then moving on. The truth is there are some similarities to the jobs if the jobs are done well.

At the heart of our work at Zuppa is a devotion to real collaboration. When creating a new work, we share ideas and sources and then we respond to each other with new ideas and directions. If we don't like an idea, we need to propose something else and we need to try every idea before it's thrown out. This is a time-consuming and sometimes patience-trying process but the result is, usually, worth it.

When a performance gets in front of an audience, there's more. The performers generously offer what we have made and then listen for the audience's response. A good actor must always be a good listener for there is no other way to determine if what she has offered is good or of use. We must listen and then respond again with generosity and love for the audience.

It occurs to me, Mr. Speaker, that this is not dissimilar to the Law Amendments process in this House, or at least what it should aspire to do. Artists in general, it seems to me, practise the art of listening to the world around them and then respond to what they hear with creativity and, sometimes, sympathy and empathy. I believe it's our job as politicians to do something like this and so I will respond to the people of Dartmouth North by celebrating their strength and tenacity but also by fighting for social and economic justice for our community's most vulnerable people.

I will oppose government decisions which are counter to our democratic rights and freedoms, and I will challenge systemic racism whenever I witness it. I will oppose the value of a balanced budget when it means that to get there child poverty rates must rise and sick people must go without family doctors. (Applause) Thank you.

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I acknowledge that like in the theatre and in many other art forms there will be times when I spectacularly fail at my task, but there will be also times that I'm successful in helping someone to see the world a little differently and maybe even experience it with a little more ease. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

MS. KIM MASLAND « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am very proud to stand, in one of the hottest buildings I've ever worked in in my entire life, today to deliver this speech.

It is such an honour and a privilege to rise before you today to respond, on behalf of the constituents of Queens-Shelburne, to the Speech from the Throne.

I would like to extend my congratulations to all of the members of this House who have been newly elected or re-elected in their respective constituencies. Representing the riding of Queens-Shelburne brings me great joy and I would once again like to extend my thanks to the voters who entrusted me to be their voice here in Halifax.

All members of this House of all political stripes understand the commitment and dedication that goes into hard-fought campaigns, and without the help and support of thousands of volunteers across this province none of us would be here. We are blessed to live in a democracy where our citizens feel empowered to participate in a democratic process, to work and campaign for what they believe in.

Mr. Speaker, I was introduced to politics at a very young age by my grandfather, George Fancy, a trooper of the Second World War. He taught me the importance of the democratic process and to always stand up and fight for what is right. I witnessed through him the importance of loving your country, your province and the people who surround you. He also taught me the importance of being a Progressive Conservative and what it means to be a Progressive Conservative.

It was my grandfather's words, his explanations and my silent observations of him standing tall on Remembrance Day with his medals clinging, his hand trembling as he would salute and a tear that would trickle down his cheek while the bugle played The Last Post. That is what led me to understand my direction and why I stand on the floor of this Legislature today.

Mr. Speaker, at this time I would like to thank our Leader of the Official Opposition, the member for Cumberland South, for believing in me and making numerous trips to Liverpool to talk about my candidacy. The last conversation we had was in a café on Main Street in Liverpool, which is now the home of my constituency office. Thank you for your guidance and leadership.

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Mr. Speaker, I would like to acknowledge all the volunteers who gave tirelessly of their time and talents during the hard-fought election campaign. My team was dynamic and full of energy. Although there are too many to name individually, I know I would not be standing before you today without them. As well, I'd like to recognize and give a special thanks to the core members of my leadership team who believed in me throughout this journey and helped me every step of the way. To start, my campaign manager Mr. Grant Webber. He is someone I chose to help me for a special reason. For 20 years I managed campaigns for other candidates and I acknowledged that that would be one of my biggest challenges, the challenge to step back from that role and, instead, be the candidate. Grant certainly made that less challenging for me and it is the joke between us that he is the best campaign manager I ever had.

Mr. Speaker, Annette Burke, my scheduler and amazing social media guru, she was hands-down the reason our campaign was voted the fourth best social media campaign out of all 191 candidates. I am proud to stand here today and say that she has continued this journey with me and is now my constituency assistant. And Kristopher Snarby, my communications manager who spent days prepping for debates, listening and timing my speeches over and over again and always being there to guide me. And of course John Murray, my fundraising chair, and all the generous donors who donated to my campaign; we would not have been able to run a successful campaign without you.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to extend my deep gratitude to John Leefe. John has been my political mentor and friend for years. John stood in this House for 21 years, representing the people of Queens County, was the Minister of Fisheries, Minister of Environment, and Minister of Natural Resources. While a member of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition, he served as Chair of the Public Accounts Committee. He was also the Mayor of the Region of Queens Municipality from 2000 to 2012. John's commitment to the people of Queens is commendable and his commitment and guidance offered to me during the recent campaign is something for which I will ever be grateful. I am blessed to have such political guidance as I go forth in my career and I've been told that I do sit in his chair.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to acknowledge former Member of Parliament Gerald Keddy whom I worked side-by-side with, as a staffer for 18 years. Gerald also played a huge role in my life as a political mentor. During my years of working with Mr. Keddy, I helped constituents navigate the complex bureaucracies to ensure that government treated them fairly, but it wasn't the big projects that we were able to deliver on that brought me the most satisfaction, it was helping families who were waiting for EI payments with no food on the table, or assisting a student who was denied a student loan.

I will never forget the words of wisdom shared with me by Gerald in my early years of working with him. He said that it's not the big things that people will remember you by; it's the small things. I feel that is a very important lesson, and words for all politicians to remember and use to guide their decisions and compassion. Mr. Keddy taught me hard work, dedication to the people you represent, and to never give up. (Applause)

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We all know we could not have gotten here today without the support of our families. I would like to acknowledge the unconditional support that my husband, Adam, has provided to me over the past year as I embarked on this journey. I would also like to acknowledge and thank my beautiful daughters, Kelsey and Kieran, who have always been my biggest fans. They have always been my reason for strength and determination, and their support was like no other. There's also my grandson, Easton Starrett Robar, who missed many FaceTimes with Nannie during the month of May. My grandson and his generation are the reason why I finally made the step into political life.

I'd like to recognize my parents, Dwight and Louise, and my brothers, Shawn, Trevor, and Tristan. Although I was the oldest and the only sister, they taught me to be confident and strong throughout our childhood. I would also like to thank their spouses, Karla, Dawn, and Sarah, for being with me every step of the way, and my grandmother, Pauline Brown, who worries way too much about me in political life but is my ambassador in her community and church.

A special thanks goes to Samantha and Braeden, who are on the path to success, and who I would love to have be part of the big decision-making, and to my lifelong friend Kim MacDonald, who has always been my rock.

I would also like to acknowledge and compliment my predecessor, the Honourable Sterling Belliveau. Sterling worked hard for the people of Queens-Shelburne and was highly respected by the members of this House and the constituency. (Applause) Sterling got to make a decision that many of us who are elected officials do not: he chose when to retire. I know that if he wished, he could have continued to serve the people of this riding for many more years. Thank you, Sterling, for your dedication, and I wish you a well-earned retirement from public life.

Mr. Speaker, like all members of this House, I am privileged to represent a beautiful corner of our province. The constituency of Queens-Shelburne is a large area with so much natural beauty, and its landscape and its people. We have so much to offer in our corner of the province: beautiful beaches, parks, historic lighthouses, and cultural facilities like the Astor Theatre, Perkins House, and the Osprey Arts Centre in Shelburne. We have modern schools with incredible teachers, and health care services that are truly top notch.

The constituents of my riding are hard-working, resilient people. As many of you know, our region has had significant challenges over the years, such as the closure of the Bowater Mersey paper mill in Brooklyn and the changes in the fishing industry in Queens and Shelburne Counties. Like many parts of rural Nova Scotia, we have seen an out-migration of our youth and more and more challenges for families to stay home to raise their families.

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It is my hope that over the next few years Queens-Shelburne will continue to innovate and reinvent itself. We have so many natural resources and strong human resources to work with.

We need to continue to grow our economy and encourage innovation and entrepreneurship with our small business owners. Small businesses are the heart and soul of the communities, and there are many examples of businesses in our area that contribute to our community and its economy. Did you know that Liverpool and Shelburne are home to two unique craft breweries?

[5:15 p.m.]

Hell Bay in Liverpool and Boxing Rock in Shelburne produce amazing products, and I encourage all of the members in the House to grab a pint some time you are visiting the beautiful constituency of Queens-Shelburne. We have amazing ports, Port Mersey Commercial Park and Shelburne Ship Repair Facility that are open for business. Like I mentioned before, we are blessed with amazing scenery. We are blessed with a growing eco tourism industry. We are home to Kejimkujik National Park in North Queens, the Thomas H. Raddall Provincial Park and seaside adjunct in South Queens

We are also home to numerous provincial parks that continue to attract tourists from around the world. White Point Beach Resort is a year-round destination and employs many residents of Queens-Shelburne. We also have a new development on Summerville Beach with the new, improved Quarterdeck Beach Resort. This shiny new facility is wowing people from home and abroad and, if you are in the Summerville area, I would encourage you to check it out.

Tourism continues to be a major growth opportunity for small towns in rural Nova Scotia but the province must be supportive and aggressive in supporting this industry. There is a tremendous opportunity to increase the tourism sector of our rural and small-town economies but it cannot be done without absolute dedication of the provincial government.

Our region focuses a great deal on cultural events and activities. The Whirligig Festival and Founders' Days in Shelburne are crowd favorites, as is Privateer Days and the Ukulele Ceilidh in Liverpool. Liverpool is home to the Biennial International Film Festival, which has been providing audiences with incredible entertainment since 1992.

This year, Shelburne played host to the tall ships when they were touring our province. Events like this are the fabric of our community and the volunteer hours that go into hosting these events is worth acknowledging. Volunteers not only organize events like those I mentioned above, they also organize smaller, more frequent events in every nook and cranny of my constituency, events such as community breakfasts, community outreach events, church groups, planked salmon dinners, strawberry suppers, and more.

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I am also so very proud of our local volunteer fire departments, search and rescue, women auxiliaries - all volunteers who provide wealth and richness that is unparalleled, and they deserve our thanks and praise. While many other things I have outlined thus far are areas for us to celebrate, our region faces a number of great struggles that we, as a House, need to try to address in the coming years.

Like many parts of rural Nova Scotia, we are struggling with high levels of out-migration. Our population is aging, and the stress that puts on our health care system is becoming harder to support with each passing year. We need to do more to support our incredible health workers. We need to strive towards fewer emergency room closures. Roseway Hospital in Shelburne has faced numerous temporary closures over the past year and this is completely unacceptable. We need to reduce wait times at the Queen's General Hospital. People waiting for hours to simply just have their prescription filled. We need to attract doctors and nurses to rural Nova Scotia to ensure that all Nova Scotians have equal access to quality health care.

Mr. Speaker, I had an 87-year-old gentleman reach out me and say he was giving up because he was going to stop taking his prescriptions. He had no family doctor and he couldn't bear to sit in a waiting room in an ER for eight hours to renew his prescriptions. That is not right. We need to consider what we have lost as result of regionalization and, more recently, centralization.

Mr. Speaker, many of our most vulnerable are seniors. In my previous job as senior safety coordinator for Queens County, which was one of the most rewarding but most challenging, I saw first-hand the struggles that our seniors are facing on a daily basis. I feel it is very important for all of us in this House to make sure you recognize the importance of the Senior Safety Program and reach out and thank the senior safety coordinator in your county the next time you see them.

It would shock you to see what some of our most vulnerable citizens are facing, and we need to do a better job of taking care of this generation. During my time as senior safety coordinator, I discovered every level of abuse of seniors who live in our communities, people who are living around us - seniors forced to choose between eating healthy or putting oil in the tank for heat, social isolation, and fear and confusion caused by undiagnosed geriatric diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer's. Many seniors are waiting eight months to a year to see geriatrician.

I also discovered elder abuse and neglect. I'll tell you, Mr. Speaker, about one of the worst instances I encountered as a senior safety coordinator in my first week on the job. The RCMP had received a well-being check for a gentleman from a postmistress because the gentleman had not been to pick up his mail for three weeks. When the RCMP and I arrived, we found the gentleman had been sitting in the corner, no heat, in multiple layers of clothes, with mold growing up his windows. His food had expired. The food on his table was from July and had expired. He was so badly neglected that they had to cut the clothes off of this 87-year-old gentleman. It took much time for me to convince him to seek medical care. When he finally did, he passed away four days later. Luckily, because of senior safety, he passed away with dignity. He was warm, he had a full belly, and he died clean.

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It is truly heartbreaking to witness what many of our seniors are faced with during their last years. We need more long-term care facilities and beds as there are currently not enough for the heavy demands that are being placed on our long-term care system.

My grandmother Melva Fancy was forced to stay in hospital for months before placement and was bumped around from one facility to another until finally being placed in an area close to her family. Although she was well cared for, she was forced to live her last years in a room shared with another resident in very small quarters with no privacy. Sadly, during her last moments, my daughters and I sat beside her bed while a curtain separated us and another resident as we said goodbye. My grandmother played a huge role in my life, part of the reason I am who I am today, and she deserved better.

We need to advance to the next chapter of the Continuing Care Strategy. We need to restore food budgets to long-term care facilities. Our parents and grandparents should not be forced to eat on $5.00 a day while in long-term care. They deserve a good home-cooked meal.

Our home care workers do the best with an insanely busy schedule to meet the demands of all of their clients, but I heard loud and clear on the doorsteps that they don't feel like they're able to meet the needs of their clients like they would like to.

We are in dire need of affordable, accessible housing. We need a government that will implement a housing strategy which will develop partnerships across the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors to ensure we have appropriate housing.

Seniors issues and concerns are extremely close to my heart and will remain there. I am very passionate about representing them and will continue to advocate on behalf of all seniors in this province.

Mr. Speaker, while campaigning and since being elected, I continue to hear from teachers, parents and students about the challenges they are facing on a daily basis. Our education system needs a major overhaul. Every day that passes, more children are slipping through the cracks and our children are our future. They deserve the best quality education that we can offer.

Our teachers and other public sector employees deserve to be treated with respect. They need to feel like they are being listened to and that their concerns are being heard. Unfortunately, far too often successive governments have ignored the advice that the front line workers have been trying to provide and, instead, make decisions from glass towers in Halifax. I feel it is time for all levels of government to work with those on the ground to improve all of the systems in this province. (Applause)

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Mr. Speaker, I also would like to talk about mental health. Too many times I read obituaries of those who have lost their battle with mental illness. We have a crisis in our mental health system and we do not have the time to wait any longer. People are suffering every day trying to navigate a system that is broken. I have had too many people share their stories of despair, fear and loss of their family member. I heard the story of a young girl from a mother last Saturday in my office, who showed up at the local emergency, begging for help and she continued to sit in that ER room for nine hours, crying alone. I am so thankful that that young girl never left those doors because the outcome may have been different.

We need to establish mental help crisis response centres in all parts of Nova Scotia, to divert people undergoing a mental health crisis from emergency rooms to a facility staffed by trained mental health professionals. Mr. Speaker, last year 60 people died from opioid overdoses in our province. This is a serious issue, one that needs action to mitigate this crisis immediately. Many addicts do not choose this lifestyle. They often fall through the cracks at a younger age, due to mental health issues. I have heard from teachers telling me they see more and more children with severe mental health issues that they are unable to address due to lack of resources. As these children turn into young adults, many of them turn to drugs and self-medicating simply as a way to cope.

I am proud to live in a community where family physicians recognize that the opioid crisis is much closer to home than Vancouver or Toronto and they treat addiction to opioids like the illness it truly is. They work shoulder to shoulder with the opioid replacement therapy team to provide the care, counselling and therapy essential to ensure that patients affected by addictions can lead full and productive lives. These professionals in this clinic have saved lives and continue to save the lives of many of our youth.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to touch on bullying and cyberbullying. I am a mother of a daughter who was severely bullied. The impact of the bullying found me struggling with sorrow for my daughter. A feeling of helplessness and significant frustration as a parent. Luckily for my family, my daughter is alive. (Applause)

[5:30 p.m.]

The bullies did not convince her that she was worthless and to take her life, but sadly for many others, they did. Too many mothers and fathers have lost their children to the fingertips of keyboards owned by bullies. In my family, they have left scars that will last a lifetime. They change timelines and aspirations, and miss family time, all of which we'll never get back. There was nobody to help. Educators did not respond, and police intervention was not successful due to the lack of legislation needed to enforce accountability for these bullies' actions. These bullies want to hurt our children and intentionally impose pain and suffering. They need to be held accountable for their decisions and their actions.

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The government sitting across from me in the House say they intend to introduce legislation to deal with this issue, but the Premier has said not to expect much from the legislation as it could be pushed back to the next session. Mr. Speaker, this is not accountable. It has been two years since the Cyber-safety Act was struck down by the courts, and families need help now. It is my hope that this government will introduce legislation that has some teeth without further delay.

Recently I met with a constituent whose daughter was bullied. In conversation, she said this government needs to create legislation that responds to a wide range of situations yet is flexible enough to effectively respond to exceptional circumstances. I ask this government to take this into consideration because I firmly believe that it is worth the investment to reduce the incidence and impact of bullying.

I would also be remiss, Mr. Speaker, if I failed to acknowledge those voters in Shelburne who feel they have been neglected in this House. When electoral boundaries were changed in 2012, Shelburne County was left without its own individual voice in Halifax. While I do my absolute best to represent the voters of both Queens and the eastern portion of Shelburne County, I made a commitment during the campaign that I would stand before this House to fight for Shelburne County to once again have its own independent voice here in the Nova Scotia Legislature. Every county in this province deserves a voice at the table, and splitting Shelburne County into two halves and forcing a union with Argyle and Queens was not the correct decision. I vow to be a strong voice for those folks in Shelburne who made it clear that during the next election campaign, they will once again have their unique voice at the table in this House.

This government has outlined its direction for our province in the Speech from the Throne under headlines of "A Healthier, Stronger Nova Scotia," "More Opportunity for All Nova Scotians," "Education for Prosperity," "Opportunity and Jobs for Young Nova Scotians," "Helping Those Who Need It Most," "The Power of New People and New Ideas," "New Markets," and "Opportunity and Optimism." I hope that they do not remain just headlines. I hope this government will step up and begin the hard work that is needed. We are beyond just words. We need vision, and we need action.

I would also like to thank my amazing colleagues and caucus staff who have made this transition and learning curve much easier. I look forward to spending many more years with my new family.

In closing, let me say I have seen first-hand the impact that a caring elected representative can have on people's lives. The idea of taking care of each other has underpinned my entire career. In fact, it has driven my entire life.

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I have made a commitment to the people of Queens-Shelburne, and I can assure you that I will work hard to have their concerns heard, working on their behalf. This is not about us. It is about the constituents we represent and this beautiful province that we live in. Thank you. (Applause)

I move adjournment of debate on the Address in Reply.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is to adjourn debate. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, that concludes the government business for today. We'll meet tomorrow, Wednesday, September 27th, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. Following the daily routine, we will go to Opposition business, followed by government business, which will be the Address in Reply.

I now look to the Official Opposition House Leader for his business for tomorrow.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Official Opposition House Leader.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Hopefully, on Opposition Day it will be a little cooler. After the daily routine and Question Period, we will be calling Bill No. 5, which is sexual assault education for judges, and we'll be calling Resolution No. 160, which is condemning the Liberal tax changes.

I move that we do now rise to meet again tomorrow between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is to rise to meet again tomorrow between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[The House rose at 5:36 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

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Tabled September 25, 2017

RESOLUTION NO. 160

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Official Opposition)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the pending small business tax grab by the Federal Liberal Government will hurt Nova Scotia small businesses and our economy; and

Whereas hundreds of Nova Scotia doctors spoke out on Saturday, September 23rd, about the devastating effect these same tax increases will have on their ability to serve patients; and

Whereas Nova Scotia already has a massive doctor shortage and a fragile small business sector;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature condemn the proposed federal tax changes and call on the government to publicly oppose them.

RESOLUTION NO. 161

By: Hon. Leo Glavine « » (Communities, Culture and Heritage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the community of East Dalhousie, lying on the southern edge of Kings County, was founded in 1817; and

Whereas on the 17th of September, 2017, the residents of East Dalhousie planted a red maple tree to formally celebrate the 200th anniversary of their community; and

Whereas the longstanding community spirit displayed by the residents of East Dalhousie should be held as an example to all Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the residents of East Dalhousie as they proudly mark the 200th anniversary of their community in 2017.

RESOLUTION NO. 162

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By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas, with a wave of positivity these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with FEED NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada; Timberlea Tidal Impact participants were: Skyler Bell, Connor Chapdeline, Emily Delong, Tim Estey, Nicholas Khoury, Peter Khoury, Zack Logan, Aliana MacDonald, Mikayla MacDonald, Hunter McNamara, Bridgette Moore, Peter Moore, David Richardson, Grace Richardson, Noah Richardson, Sydney Schwarz, Logan Swan, Brianna Tasco, Laurie Brown, Megan Churney, Alisha Doucette, Louise Knowles, Michaela Larade, Lacey Leblanc, Josh Smith, and Mathew Wilton;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking the Tidal Impact team for their community outreach and wish each of them all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 163

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with FEED NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

[Page 336]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Aliana MacDonald, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 164

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with FEED NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Alisha Doucette, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 165

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with FEED NS; and

[Page 337]

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event sponsored by the Youth and Family Department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Brianna Tasco, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 166

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Bridgette Moore, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 167

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

[Page 338]

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Connor Chapdeline, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 168

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking David Richardson, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 169

[Page 339]

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Emily Delong, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 170

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Erin Jackman, for his leadership and support of the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group and wish him all the best for the future.

[Page 340]

RESOLUTION NO. 171

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Grace Richardson, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 172

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

[Page 341]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Hunter McNamara, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 173

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Josh Smith, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 174

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

[Page 342]

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Lacey Leblanc, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 175

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Logan Swan, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 176

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

[Page 343]

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Pastor Louise Knowles, the associate pastor of family ministries at Timberlea Baptist Church, for her commitment to community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 177

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Mathew Wilton, for his leadership and support of the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 178

[Page 344]

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Megan Churney, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 179

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Michaela Larade, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

[Page 345]

RESOLUTION NO. 180

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Mikayla MacDonald, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 181

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

[Page 346]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Nicholas Khoury, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 182

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Noah Richardson, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 183

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

[Page 347]

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Peter Khoury, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 184

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Peter Moore, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 185

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

[Page 348]

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Skyler Bell, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 186

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Sydney Schwarz, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for her community outreach and wish her all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 187

[Page 349]

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Tim Estey, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 188

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group partnered with youth from Lewisville Baptist in Moncton, bringing the number of volunteers to close to 800 youth serving in the metro Halifax and Bridgewater areas this summer; and

Whereas with a wave of positivity, these young people had an uplifting effect on the community; together they collected 5,867 kilograms of food - enough for 12,950 meals - on their food drive in partnership with Feed NS; and

Whereas Erin Jackman and Mathew Wilton were the local area team coordinators for this event, sponsored by the Youth and Family department of the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Zach Logan, one of the youth participants in the Timberlea Baptist Church Tidal Impact Youth Group, for his community outreach and wish him all the best for the future.

[Page 350]

RESOLUTION NO. 189

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas 18-year old Alexandra Meredith Doane of Brookside was a member of the Female Soccer Team Nova Scotia lineup;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Alexandra for representing the province on this national stage and wish her well in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 190

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas 17-year old Billy Laurette of Timberlea was a member of the Male Baseball Team Nova Scotia lineup;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Billy for representing the province on this national stage and wish him well in the future.

[Page 351]

RESOLUTION NO. 191

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas 18-year old Cian O Siadhail of Timberlea was a member of the Male Soccer Team Nova Scotia lineup;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Cian for representing the province on this national stage and wish him well in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 192

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas 16-year old Haley Autumn Kardas of Whites Lake was a member of the Female Soccer Team Nova Scotia lineup;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Haley for representing the province on this national stage and wish her well in the future.

[Page 352]

RESOLUTION NO. 193

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas 18-year old Jane Anne Stevens of Upper Tantallon was a member of the Female Soccer Team Nova Scotia lineup;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Jane for representing the province on this national stage and wish her well in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 194

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas Jason Hansford-Smith of Upper Tantallon went as part of the mission staff for Team Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Jason for his support of our young athletes on this national stage and wish him well in the future.

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RESOLUTION NO. 195

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas 16-year-old Ryan Munro of Timberlea was a member of the male basketball Team Nova Scotia line-up;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Ryan for representing the province on this national stage and wish him well in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 196

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas celebrating the Canada Games 50th Anniversary and Canada's 150th birthday, the 2017 Canada Summer Games are this country's largest multi-sport event for young athletes; and

Whereas the 2017 Canada Summer Games were held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, July 28 to August 13, 2017, featuring 16 sports, over 250 events, and a major cultural festival; they welcomed over 4,000 athletes and coaches and more than 20,000 visitors; and

Whereas Tammy Wiseman of Terence Bay went as manager of wrestling for Team Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating and thanking Tammy for her support of our young athletes on this national stage and wish her well in the future.

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RESOLUTION NO. 197

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Prospect Communities Farmers' Market was first launched on April 23, 2017, and runs bi-weekly at the Prospect Road Community Centre; and

Whereas the vision for the market came in response to community feedback and is a collaboration between the Resource Opportunities Centre (ROC) and the Spryfield and District Community Market; and

Whereas market coordinator Marian Munro coordinates both the Spryfield and District Market and the Prospect Communities Farmers' Market, ensuring that residents of both communities have regular access to fresh produce and local arts and crafts;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the ROC and Marian for making the dream of a local farmers' market a reality for residents of the Prospect area and wish them well in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 198

By: Hon. Iain Rankin « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on June 10th this year, Vivian and Lloyd were recognized at the 3rd Annual Prospect Communities Volunteer Awards for their volunteer work; and

Whereas Vivian and Lloyd have given freely of their time and talents to facilitating and promoting the Prospect Road Jammers sessions that take place every Friday evening at the Prospect Road Community Centre; and

Whereas the jam sessions are always well attended and enjoyed; the sessions bring out residents' secret talents and create a warm welcoming environment for musicians of all types to come together to share their talents and tap their toes;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Vivian and Lloyd for their commitment to nurturing the musical community of Prospect and wish them both all the best in the future.

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RESOLUTION NO. 199

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Anne and Darrin Butcher of Porters Lake, Nova Scotia, are the owners and operators of Atlantic Tiltload Limited; and

Whereas Anne and Darrin have been supporting the Make-A-Wish Foundation, which grants wishes to children and youth dealing with life-altering medical conditions; and

Whereas Anne and Darrin's annual Night of Three Wishes has raised over $300,000 for the Make-A-Wish Foundation since 2010, making dozens of dreams come true for children and youth who need it most;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking Anne and Darrin Butcher for their selfless support of the Make-A-Wish Foundation and for improving the quality of life for countless children along the way.

RESOLUTION NO. 200

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Anna and Sam Anjoul are the owners and operators of Anna's Café & Grill at 5151 George Street in the Halifax Regional Municipality; and

Whereas Anna, Sam and their dedicated team have served members of the Legislative Assembly and the public with professionalism and courtesy since they opened their original location in Scotia Square in 1980; and

Whereas Anna and Sam have enriched our community and local economy since they immigrated to Canada in 1976 from Lebanon by founding a small business and thereby creating employment in our community;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly join me in expressing our sincere gratitude for Anna and Sam Anjoul's exemplary customer service and cordial hospitality and for their outstanding example of entrepreneurship for our citizens and ongoing commitment to the success of our province.

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RESOLUTION NO. 201

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Benjamin Towns is a resident of the Eastern Shore and has been an active volunteer in the community; and

Whereas Benjamin Towns has been a member of the Halifax Regional Municipality Station 23 Volunteer Fire Department for 10 years, having bravely served our community to protect our local residents;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly join me in thanking Benjamin Towns for giving of his time and talent for the safety of the area residents who are served by Station 23.

RESOLUTION NO. 202

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Craig Beckett is a resident of the Eastern Shore and has been an active volunteer in the community; and

Whereas Craig Beckett has been a member of the Halifax Regional Municipality Station 19/20 Volunteer Fire Department for 20 years, having bravely served our community to protect our local residents;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly join me in thanking Craig Beckett for giving of his time and talent for the safety of the area residents who are served by Station 19/20.

RESOLUTION NO. 203

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By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Chief Andrew Higginbotham is a resident of the Eastern Shore and has been an active volunteer in the community; and

Whereas Chief Andrew Higginbotham has been a member of the Halifax Regional Municipality Station 24/25 Volunteer Fire Department for 10 years, having bravely served our community to protect our local residents;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly join me in thanking Chief Andrew Higginbotham for giving of his time and talent for the safety of the area residents who are served by station 24/25.

RESOLUTION NO. 204

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sylvanus Dooks Jr. is a resident of the Eastern Shore and has been an active volunteer in the community; and

Whereas Sylvanus Dooks Jr. has been a member of the Halifax Regional Municipality Station 26 Volunteer Fire Department for 45 years, having bravely served our community to protect our local residents;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly join me in thanking Sylvanus Dooks Jr. for giving of his time and talent for the safety of the area residents who are served by station 26.

RESOLUTION NO. 205

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cory Young is a resident of the Eastern Shore and has been an active volunteer in the community; and

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Whereas Cory Young has been a member of the Halifax Regional Municipality Station 23 Volunteer Fire Department for five years, having bravely served our community to protect our local residents;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly join me in thanking Cory Young for giving of his time and talent for the safety of the area residents who are served by Station 23.