The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD17-17

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



First Session

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Just.: Off. of the Public Trustee - Anl. Rpts. (2014-17),
1185
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 354, Cochrane, Joshua/Hardy, Cheyenne: Prince's Youth Serv
Award - Congrats., The Premier »
1186
Vote - Affirmative
1187
Res. 355, Immig.: Sm. Bus. - Recognize,
1187
Vote - Affirmative
1188
Res. 356, H&W: Preg. & Infant Loss Awareness Day (Oct. 15th)
- Proclaim, Hon. R. Delorey »
1188
Vote - Affirmative
1189
Res. 357, LAE - N.S. Apprentice. Agency: Collaboration - Recognize,
1189
Vote - Affirmative
1190
Res. 358, Commun. Serv. - Child Abuse Awareness Mth. (Oct.):
Worker Dedication - Thank, Hon. K. Regan »
1190
Vote - Affirmative
1190
Res. 359, Immig. - Mem. Lane Heritage Vill.: New Can. - Commend,
1191
Vote - Affirmative
1191
Res. 360, Mun. Affs. - Fire Prev. Wk. (Oct. 8-14): Firefighters
1191
Vote - Affirmative
1192
Res. 361, CCH - Watson, Capt. Phil et al: Bluenose II - Recognize,
1192
Vote - Affirmative
1193
Res. 362, EECD - Lewis, Abby: Sport Accomp. - Recognize,
1194
Vote - Affirmative
1194
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 45, Safer Homes Act,
1194
No. 46, Hearing Aids for Low-income Seniors Act,
1194
No. 47, Homes for Special Care Act,
1194
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS:
Peach, Melvin - Port Morien Legion: 65-Yr. Pin - Congrats.,
1195
Gypsophilia Band: Retirement - Congrats.,
1195
N.S. Mosquito Baseball: Canada Cuba Tour Particip. - Congrats.,
1196
Brown, Spencer/Murrant, Noah/Evans, Ethan: Skills Can
Particip. - Congrats., Mr. E. Orrell »
1196
Harvey, Dustin: Nocturne Play Inclusion - Recognize,
1196
Between Two Bays Art Exhibition: Local Artists - Inspiring,
1197
Rich. Amateur Baseball Assoc.: Teams/Coaches - Best Wishes,
1198
Gov't. (N.S.): Health Care Workers - Contract Neg.,
1198
Boys AAA Hfx. Soccer Team: Incredible Season - Congrats.,
1198
Hendsbee, Blake & Colin/George, Braydon/MacKenzie, C.J.:
Actions - Commend, Ms. K. MacFarlane »
1199
Pugsley, Dr. Don - Opinion,
1198
Can. Summer Games (2017): N.S. Team - Congrats.,
1200
2017 N.S. Hunt. Season: Tick Awareness - Inform,
1200
Pugsley, Dr. Don: N.S. Doctor Salaries - Comments,
1201
Letterick, Jack - N.S. Mid. Boys Lacrosse Team: 2017 Record
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
1201
Hill, Graeme, Death of - Sympathies,
1201
Intl. Day of the Girl: Call-Outs - Necessary,
1202
Henderson, Logan: Com. Dedication - Recognize,
1202
Lewis, Abby: School Cross-Country Comp. - Congrats.,
1203
Ash, Paul: Sch. Bd. Superintendent (1st Afric. N.S.) - Recognize,
1203
Smith, Jill: Ntl. Kids Cancer Ride - Congrats.,
1203
Nauss, Lee - Mun. of Dist. of Lunenburg Councillor: Anniv. (50th)
- Congrats., Hon. M. Furey « »
1204
Trueman, Jayden: Children's Wish Found. - Wish Granted,
1204
Rooney, Zach: Schulich Leadership Scholarship Recip. - Best Wishes,
1205
Russell, Burton: Latest Accomplishment - Congrats.,
1205
Hustins, Harvey: Brookside Cemetery Corp. - Service Thank,
1206
Powell, Carla: Canada Writes Short-List - Congrats.,
1206
Lunenburg Co. Christmas Tree Prod. Assoc. - Congrats.,
1207
Monk Renovations: Refugee Hirings - Thank,
1208
Johnstone, Yvonne: N. Syd. Garden Club Rose & Flower Show
- Thank, Mr. E. Orrell « »
1208
Hfx. West Boys Soccer Team: Gold Medal Win - Congrats.,
1208
St. Thomas More Refugee Comm. - Thank,
1209
Anna. Valley: Intl. Town Crier Comp. - Congrats.,
1209
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS:
No. 204, H&W - Surgical Procedures: Overbooking -
Process Review, Mr. L. Harrison « »
1210
No. 205, Prem.: Campaign Dir./Angus L. Club - Judgment,
1212
No. 206, Prem./H&W - Doctor Recruitment: External Agency
- Identity, Hon. J. Baillie « »
1214
No. 207, H&W - ER Closures: Patient Care - Impact,
1215
No. 208, NSHA: Board Meetings - Secrecy,
1216
No. 209, Environ. - Harrietsfield Cleanup: Election Promise
1217
No. 210, H&W: Physicians - Retirement Plans,
1218
No. 211, Prem. - Fam. Physicians: Shortage - Concern,
1219
No. 212, TIR: Port Wallace Develop. - Concerns,
1221
No. 213, H&W - Physician Shortage: Insurance Progs. - Effect,
1222
No. 214, Justice - N.S. Elections Act: Rights & Freedoms
Charter - Violation, Ms. K. MacFarlane « »
1223
No. 215, TIR - Cobequid Pass: P3 Dev. - Success Explain,
1224
No. 216, Nat. Res.: Blomidon Prov. Park - Expansion,
1225
No. 217, CCH: Parrsboro Lighthouse Soc. - Assist
1226
No. 218, H&W - Doctors N.S. Legal Dispute: Pos. Approach
1226
No. 219, Energy: Renewable Energy Gen. - N.S. Plan,
1228
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 38, Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Act
1229
Vote - Affirmative
1230
PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 38, Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Act
1230
Vote - Affirmative
1230
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ON MOTION FOR SUPPLY:
1231
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CW ON SUPPLY AT 11:04 A.M
1234
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 3:16 P.M
1234
REPORT OF CW ON SUPPLY [Rule 62G(1)]:
Motion to Concur
1235
Vote - Affirmative
1235
[INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:]
No. 48, Appropriations Act, 2017,
1235
[PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:]
No. 48, Appropriations Act, 2017,
Vote - Affirmative
1236
[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:]
No. 48, Appropriations Act, 2017,
Vote - Affirmative
1238
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., Oct. 17th at 1:00 p.m
1238

[Page 1185]

HALIFAX, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2017

Sixty-third General Assembly

First Session

9:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Chuck Porter, Ms. Suzanne Lohnes-Croft

MR. SPEAKER » : Order, please. We'll begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, in my capacity as Attorney General of Nova Scotia, I hereby beg leave to table the Office of the Public Trustee Annual Reports for 2014-15, 2015-16, and fiscal year ending March 31, 2017.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

[Page 1186]

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Premier.

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, before I do my notice of motion, do you mind if I do an introduction?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

THE PREMIER « » : I want to draw the attention of the House to your gallery, Mr. Speaker, where we're joined today by Cheyenne Hardy and Joshua Cochrane, both of whom are recent winners of the Prince of Wales Youth Service Awards.

Mr. Speaker, there are only four of those given out in Canada, and two of the award winners are here from Nova Scotia. (Applause) Joshua is joined by his mother, Ann Harrington, and friend Sergeant Roland Lawless - Roland is no stranger to this House. Roland, it's nice to see you back here again and thank you for your commitment to our country (Applause) and Cheyenne is joined by her mother, Rowena Hardy.

To both Joshua and Cheyenne, I know that the people with you are extremely proud of you, but I want you to know that all of us in this House are also extremely proud of you and what a great example you are, not only for your peers but for all of us down here. Congratulations. (Standing Ovation)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 354

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Prince of Wales Youth Service Awards encourage lasting commitment to social action by Canada's youth, with only four young people receiving this award across Canada this year; and

Whereas Joshua Cochrane of Yarmouth is dedicated to helping to end the stigma around autism, and he attends the World Autism Festival each year and reconnects with his peers from over 60 countries, learning about the challenges they face while sharing his positive determination to help break the stigma; and

Whereas Cheyenne Hardy of Dartmouth asked for the support of local businesses and leaders in Dartmouth North to help her in creating a video sharing her community's finest qualities, and Cheyenne's proud message has reached new audiences, replacing old negative stereotypes with positivity;

[Page 1187]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Joshua and Cheyenne on the outstanding achievement of receiving the Prince's Youth Service Award, thank them for dedicating their time to improve their communities, and share our pride in them as incredible young Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Immigration.

RESOLUTION NO. 355

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas October 16th to October 20th is Small Business Week in Nova Scotia, an annual celebration of entrepreneurship and the vital roles small- and medium-sized businesses play in our provincial economy; and

Whereas on Monday, October 16th, the Greater Halifax Partnership will host, in partnership with the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration, a forum for businesses to learn more about how the Atlantic Immigration Pilot can help them fill labour shortages and grow their business, and on Tuesday, October 17th, the Western Regional Enterprise Network will host a similar session in Saulnierville, Digby County; and

Whereas over 100 Nova Scotia businesses will attend these two events, the first of many similar sessions we will host with our partners throughout the province, and is one of the ways the Nova Scotia Office of Immigration and our government is investing in Nova Scotia businesses to help them succeed;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in celebrating the contribution of small businesses and recognizing the vital role immigration plays in helping to ensure our businesses succeed, our economy grows, and we build a stronger Nova Scotia.

[Page 1188]

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

RESOLUTION NO. 356

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas every day a family in Nova Scotia experiences the pain of losing a child as a result of miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal loss; and

Whereas broader public awareness of the impacts pregnancy and infant loss have on parents and families may help support those affected as they grieve; and

Whereas October 15th is a day of remembrance and awareness for pregnancy and infant loss and, this year, the annual Walk to Remember will be held on this date in Halifax and Arichat for families to honour the memory of their babies;

Therefore be it resolved the Province of Nova Scotia proclaims October 15, 2017, as Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Day.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 1189]

The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, in the east gallery, we are joined here today by Chris Parson who is a cook apprentice pursuing his Level 2. He works at Northwood Bedford Campus. As well, we have Peter Blendheim who is our Industry Training Consultant with the Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency.

Mr. Speaker, I ask the House to give them a warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 357

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Apprenticeship Agency is committed to ensuring the best possible trades training system for employers and businesses; and

Whereas the Atlantic Provinces and the Government of Canada are working together through the Atlantic Apprenticeship Harmonization Project so that apprentices can work and train more easily across the Atlantic region; and

Whereas a shared IT system for apprenticeship is being developed in partnership with five provinces that will result in greater efficiencies and modernized apprenticeship systems;

Therefore, be it resolved that all members of this House join me in recognizing the collaboration work of the province, our Atlantic counterparts, Manitoba, and the federal government to improve access to opportunities and improve the system for apprentices and employers.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 1190]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[9:15 a.m.]

The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 358

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the safety and well-being of children is of paramount importance to all Nova Scotians; and

Whereas October is Child Abuse Prevention Month, which is a time to focus on ways we can work together to keep children safe; and

Whereas government has taken steps to enhance the provisions under the Children and Family Services Act to better protect children, allow earlier intervention, and ensure children have a safe and lifelong family relationship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly thank the many Nova Scotians who dedicate their time and energy to ensure the safety and protection of children.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Immigration.

RESOLUTION NO. 359

[Page 1191]

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas immigration is an essential piece in developing and growing Nova Scotia's population, workforce, and economy; and

Whereas work at the grassroots level can have a major impact on retaining our recent immigrants, helping to build a lasting relationship with our province; and

Whereas this weekend, the Memory Lane Heritage Village in Lake Charlotte in the beautiful constituency of Eastern Shore is welcoming 150 recent immigrants as part of its inaugural Nova Scotia Forest Festival in celebration of Canada's 150th Anniversary, and the festival's theme is Forests for New Canadians;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in commending Memory Lane for their work in organizing and hosting this event that will serve to welcome our newest Nova Scotians to the rich history of forestry in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 360

HON. DEREK MOMBOURQUETTE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas October 8th to 14th is Fire Prevention Week; and

Whereas throughout our province, hundreds of volunteer and career firefighters give selflessly to help protect residents of their communities from fires; and

Whereas fire departments also help educate Nova Scotians about how to prevent fires and keep families safe;

[Page 1192]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank all firefighters in our province and encourage all Nova Scotians to know two ways out of every room, have a plan to escape during a fire, and practise that plan with their families.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

RESOLUTION NO. 361

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bluenose II is one of the most recognizable and recognized symbols of our province; and

Whereas Bluenose II just concluded a highly successful season in which she welcomed an impressive total of 108,095 people aboard and took an additional 4,416 people on 70 harbour cruises; and

Whereas this year's success underscores the importance of Bluenose II to Nova Scotians and our popularity at home and abroad, something all Nova Scotians can be proud of;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in recognizing Bluenose II Captain Phil Watson, the crew, and the Lunenburg Maritime Museum Society, who work to keep Bluenose II in its rightful place as the cultural and historic icon of our province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 1193]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Immigration.

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Gerry Mills, the executive director of the Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia - commonly referred to as ISANS - has just announced her retirement which will occur in March 2018, after an illustrious career and almost 30 years of dedicated service to helping our newest residents settle in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Gerry has welcomed thousands of new Nova Scotians to our province and has helped them build a life here, while also inspiring all Nova Scotians to welcome and help settle new Nova Scotians; and

Whereas the Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia plays a vital role in helping newcomers build a future in Nova Scotia and, by doing so, helps to strengthen our economy and revitalize our communities;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in extending our sincere thanks and appreciation to Gerry Mills for a career of loyal and meritorious service to Nova Scotia, with best wishes for the next chapter of life, including time with her four beautiful grandchildren.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : It has been brought to my attention by the Clerk's Table that this is the third Government Notice of Motion for that portfolio and we're only permitted two per day, so I'll respectfully ask the minister to reread that on Tuesday, if possible, when we resume.

The honourable Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 362

[Page 1194]

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas runner Abby Lewis, a Grade 6 student at Beaver Bank Monarch Drive Elementary School is achieving remarkable results in her chosen sport; and

Whereas the Nova Scotia School Athletic Federation found a way for her to compete in the Capital Region Cross Country Competition with her peers, and which she won yesterday at Point Pleasant Park; and

Whereas she was the fastest female of any age in the Valley Harvest 5k race and 9th overall out of 725 runners;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature recognize today the accomplishments of Abby Lewis and recognize the important opportunities that sports provide our students every single day.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 45 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 211 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Housing Act, and Chapter 213 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Housing Nova Scotia Act. (Hon. Pat Dunn)

Bill No. 46 - Entitled an Act to Provide for Affordable Hearing Aids for Low-income Seniors. (Mr. Larry Harrison)

Bill No. 47 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 203 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Home for Special Care Act, to Establish a Seniors' Bill of Rights. (Hon. Jamie Baillie)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

[Page 1195]

NOTICES OF MOTION

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

PEACH, MELVIN - PORT MORIEN LEGION: 65-YR. PIN - CONGRATS.

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Comrade Melvin Peach from Port Morien on a recent recognition he received. Comrade Melvin Peach was recently honoured with a 65-year pin, recognized as a recipient of the French National Order of the Legion of Honour medal for his participation in the Normandy campaign. Comrade Peach was given this honour at the Port Morien Legion's 80th Anniversary celebration.

I am proud to acknowledge and thank Comrade Melvin Peach on this honour that has been bestowed on him.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

GYPSOPHILIA BAND: RETIREMENT - CONGRATS.

MS. SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, tonight at the Marquee Ballroom, audience members will be treated to a bittersweet celebration. One of Halifax's and my favourite musical acts, Gypsophilia, will be playing its last show ever.

The band creates sounds like I have never heard. An original high-energy mix of klezmer, jazz, and pop, the music is beautiful, fun, and highly danceable. Over its life, the band has paid loving attention to both recorded albums and their live acts, creating out-of-time theatrical, atmospheric shows for their audiences. They are famous for their masquerade balls and for being generally awesome people to be around.

They have made five albums and toured extensively nationally and internationally, playing sold-out shows at huge festivals and tiny, intimate venues. As they write on their website, "We are so proud of all we've done together, but it is coming time for us to retire this band and move on to other creative projects."

I am grateful for the band's contribution to the cultural life of Nova Scotia and Canada, and ask the House to join me in congratulating Ross Burns, Gina Burgess, Adam Fine, Alex Frith, Matt Myer, Sageev Oore, and Nick Wilkinson for their incredible, beautiful music.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hants East.

[Page 1196]

N.S. MOSQUITO BASEBALL:

CANADA CUBA TOUR PARTICIP. - CONGRATS.

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, in February 2018, two teams of mosquito baseball players from Hants East will be among the players on Team Canada, travelling to Cuba as part of the Canada Cuba Goodwill Tour. Both teams, the Hants North Jays and the East Hants Nationals, are made up of seven 9- to 11-year-old boys. They will be playing against players their own age from Cuba, and will have an opportunity to experience life in a different culture.

The teams will be collecting new and used baseball equipment to take with them to donate to young players from Cuba. The Jays have already raised the $14,700 needed, and the Nationals are still fundraising for this trip that will help other young baseball players who are less fortunate than they are.

I would like to congratulate the coaches and baseball teams for being chosen to participate in this program and wish them a successful adventure.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I would be remiss if I didn't mention that my own son is going as part of that venture to Cuba this January. I'll be going as chaperone.

The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

BROWN, SPENCER/MURRANT, NOAH/EVANS, ETHAN:

SKILLS CAN. PARTICIP. - CONGRATS.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : I rise today to recognize three students from Memorial High School who are part of Team Nova Scotia attending the Skills Canada Competition in Winnipeg. Spencer Brown will compete in electrical and Noah Murrant and Ethan Evans will compete in robotics.

Each year more than 500 young people compete in Skills Canada's national competitions. I would like to acknowledge the achievement of these three students heading to Winnipeg after many hours of honing their skills.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

HARVEY, DUSTIN: NOCTURNE PLAY INCLUSION - RECOGNIZE

MS. CLAUDIA CHENDER « » : I rise today to recognize an excellent actor and theatre-maker, Dustin Harvey. A neighbour and resident of Dartmouth South, Dustin has been making excellent work that animates our city and others around the world.

One of his projects, Secret Theatre, is described in this way: "We are artists who work hard to develop projects that speak both to us and others about the beauty found in a shared experience. We do not merely want audiences to engage; rather, with thoughtful, playful intervention, we aim to give people a feeling they are at the heart of the experience." As an audience member, I can attest that this is the case.

[Page 1197]

On the eve of the 10th Anniversary of Nocturne: Art at Night this Saturday - the annual arts festival that draws tens of thousands to downtown Halifax and Dartmouth - Trophy, a project produced by Dustin, graces the cover of this week's issue of The Coast. In a glowing pop-up tent city in Ferry Terminal Park, 15 storytellers will sit and recount a significant moment in their lives when things changed. It will be a stunning visual and auditory experience.

For this and all of the excellent work Dustin has done from Dartmouth to Cardiff, and points in between, I ask the members of this House to join me in thanking him for his excellent contributions.

[9:30 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clare-Digby.

BETWEEN TWO BAYS ART EXHIBITION:

LOCAL ARTISTS - INSPIRING

MR. GORDON WILSON « » : It is with great pleasure that I rise today to ask the members of the House of Assembly to join me in recognizing the first annual Between Two Bays Art Exhibition. This art exhibition was held over two days last August in Sandy Cove, a community located in Digby Neck. The name comes from the fact that Digby Neck is a peninsula that separates the Bay of Fundy to its west and from Saint Marys Bay to its east.

Between Two Bays was an initiative to show the works of local artists in the community where they actually live. There is no question of the level of artistic ability in my area, a fact that is confirmed by the number of artists who have work for sale in galleries across the province.

Unfortunately, there are few opportunities when neighbours of our artists can see their art work. Between Two Bays gave the people of Sandy Cove and its visitors the opportunity to see the works of artists from Sandy Cove. There they could purchase that perfect painting, as well as maybe be inspired and learn to draw and to paint. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton-Richmond.

RICH. AMATEUR BASEBALL ASSOC.:

[Page 1198]

TEAMS/COACHES - BEST WISHES

MS. ALANA PAON « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the Little Anse Hawks Baseball Team on their recent championship win. They belong to the Richmond Amateur Baseball Association and this was their fifth consecutive win. Their opponents in the final series of the season were the Petit-de-Grat Red Caps, and the final game saw the Red Caps fall to the Hawks with a score of 19-4.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to send special congratulations to Leigh Bourque, who was given the honour of the playoff season's most valuable player. I wish all teams that play in the Richmond Amateur Baseball Association, and the coaches that support them, great success in their upcoming 2018 season.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

GOV'T. (N.S.): HEALTH CARE WORKERS - CONTRACT NEG.

MS. TAMMY MARTIN « » : News that negotiations have broken down between the Nova Scotia Health Authority and health care unions is just another example of growing problems between the McNeil Government and front-line service workers in this province.

Just as we saw with the teachers, the Liberals' attacks on health care workers with Bill No. 148 have made it impossible for the Liberal Government to negotiate contracts with the people who deliver health care in our province. What's more, the Liberals' unilateral wage freeze disproportionally impacts women, who make up 81 per cent of health care workers in our province.

These labour issues will continue to come up. We should be working with front-line staff of our health care system, not against them.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

BOYS AAA HFX. SOCCER TEAM: INCREDIBLE SEASON - CONGRATS.

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the Under 15 AAA Boys Halifax City Soccer Team on their recent victory at the Nova Scotia Provincial Championship. The team travelled to the Under 15 National Soccer Championship in Calgary, October 4th to 9th. The team represented Nova Scotia on the national stage. In their round robin, they had a heartbreaking 1-0 loss to British Columbia which knocked them out of medal contention.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the Halifax City Soccer Team on an incredible season and a great job at nationals.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

[Page 1199]

HENDSBEE, BLAKE & COLIN/GEORGE, BRAYDON/MACKENZIE, C.J.: ACTIONS - COMMEND

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise today to reocgnize the compassion and good judgment of a group of Pictou youths on Sunday, September 12, 2017.

Blake Hendsbee, Braydon George, Colin Hendsbee, and C.J. MacKenzie were walking down the Jitney Trail when they noticed an injured bird. Due to the youths' actions, that particular feathered friend's life was saved.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud of these young men for making the right decision and for the kindness and respect that they showed towards the welfare of this bird. They are our future and should be commended for their kind actions. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

PUGSLEY, DR. DON - OPINION

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Dr. Don Pugsley of Truro wrote a letter to the Truro Daily News recently. He is a family friend; he lives beside my Mom and Dad.

I read with interest that he says he has practised family medicine for more than 35 years and that he read with dismay the Health and Wellness Minister's comments that the government has a "dispute with an organization, not with Nova Scotia's physicians."

For the last year the department has refused to honour the terms of the recently negotiated master agreement between the province and Doctors Nova Scotia, he says, the consequence of which further erodes doctors' trust in the intentions of this government.

The contingency fund was created from a combination of repurposed clinical income earned by Nova Scotia's doctors and government funds to allow them to create a health, dental, and parental leave plan. He says it's not a surplus of taxpayers' money that government can just claw back at whim, and he says he's reminded of the actions of the early 1990s . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Time allotted for the member's statement has expired.

The honourable member for Glace Bay on an introduction.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : I would like to draw the House's attention to the east gallery, where we have a young Glace Bay boy I would like to introduce. Who you're seeing in front of you is Mr. Mitchell MacDonald. Mitch is 16 years old and he's up this weekend with his mom for the Liberal AGM - I know half the room wouldn't be happy with that. He's a fine young man, very mature, well beyond his years. He is very much engaged in our community in Glace Bay. Politics aside, he's a tremendous young person. He's going to be one of the leaders of tomorrow.

[Page 1200]

We're happy to have Mitch. He drove for the first time yesterday on the highway as a beginner with his mom Darla. We're proud to have him here, and we welcome him to the gallery. Please join us in welcoming Mitchell MacDonald. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore- Tracadie.

CAN. SUMMER GAMES (2017): N.S. TEAM - CONGRATS.

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : I hope many Nova Scotians had the opportunity to watch the 2017 Canada Summer Games, which were recently held in Winnipeg. It was nothing short of amazing, an opportunity to see the celebration of sport, culture, community, and the 50th Anniversary of the Canada Games. Nova Scotia finished strong with 49 medals in total. I couldn't be prouder of the athletes who represented our province.

Among all of the great athletes who represented Nova Scotia was Hannah Hubley from Sheet Harbour. She took home the bronze medal in wrestling. Congratulations, Hannah.

To all our athletes who trained so hard and to their coaches, managers, and parents, I want to say thank you for your dedication and for being such impressive ambassadors of Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

2017 N.S. HUNT. SEASON: TICK AWARENESS - INFORM

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Big game hunting season can be a very busy time for Nova Scotia regardless of whether you're a hunter, natural resources official, or a landowner. Unfortunately, we have to be aware that adult ticks are also hunting. These adult ticks can be found on vegetation basically waiting for their prey. These black-legged ticks are active September to May, depending on the weather. Although there is a risk during all months of the year, October appears to be a high-risk time. Education and awareness is very important to avoid a potentially serious problem. Nova Scotians need to be attentive to avoid being bitten by a tick.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

[Page 1201]

PUGSLEY, DR. DON: N.S. DOCTOR SALARIES - COMMENTS

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Dr. Don Pugsley has told me recently that he was reminded of the actions of the early 1990s Savage Liberal Government which arbitrarily took $10 million from physician payments because they felt health care was too expensive. He says that Truro quickly lost five family practice physicians at that time and several specialists. Health care, he says, was set back by more than a decade. Make no mistake, he is quoted as saying, this is an attack on physicians, not on an organization and one more assault on the province's ability to retain and recruit much-needed doctors.

Our physicians are the lowest-paid in the country, Mr. Speaker. We need a strong and vibrant organization for our doctors to represent them and to speak out when patient care is diminished. The government seems to prefer to see dissenting voices silenced.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Armdale.

LETTERICK, JACK - N.S. MID. BOYS LACROSSE TEAM:

2017 RECORD - CONGRATS.

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise to congratulate a talented young constituent of Halifax Armdale, Jack Letterick. This year, through hard work and plenty of training, Jack made the 2017 Nova Scotia Midget Boys Box Lacrosse team. Over the summer, the team set off to Whitby, Ontario, to compete in the national championships, and Jack and the team did exceptionally well. Although the first few games were challenging, their determination and teamwork led them to win four of the final five games of the championship, a streak that culminated in an exciting 6-4 victory over Quebec to win gold in the B division.

We're proud of Jack for scoring one of those winning points, and I know this tremendous accomplishment will motivate him and his teammates to develop even further as players. Please join me in congratulating Jack and the Nova Scotia Midget Boys Box Lacrosse Team on their impressive gold victory and thank their committed families, coaches, and community supporters.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

HILL, GRAEME, DEATH OF - SYMPATHIES

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honour the memory of Graeme Hill. Graeme was a talented young man. He was creative, a musician, a photographer, and a tireless advocate for Nova Scotia tourism. From summers on Citadel Hill to the face of the Doers and Dreamers Guide, Graeme's love for Nova Scotia tourism even took him on international trips. Nova Scotia could not have asked for a better advocate than Graeme Hill. Graeme was well loved and is deeply missed. My deepest sympathies go out to his parents, family and friends and all those who were lucky enough to know him. Thank you.

[Page 1202]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

INTL. DAY OF THE GIRL: CALL-OUTS - NECESSARY

MS. SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, Wednesday was the International Day of the Girl. I was going to write a statement about my own daughter, who is an amazing girl, but I couldn't quite find the words. I wanted to be able to say that she is a fiery, strong-willed girl and that I have faith that she will be able to do whatever she wants. I wish that for her and I want to be able to say that to her with confidence. But then I thought about the news about the powerful producer, Harvey Weinstein, and his despicable acts of sexual violence against so many vulnerable young women, and then I thought about yesterday or two days ago when Frank magazine called a Nova Scotia actress, Lucy DeCoutere, a Trailer Park Boys star, accusing her of falsely accusing Jian Ghomeshi of sexual assault.

Then I thought about the times that I have felt fear, when my boyfriend in university was encouraged by a passerby to assault me; when I was chased through a building by a stranger, and when I felt silenced or not confident enough to say how I feel about a subject important to me. So I call on this House to consider the fact that, if we are to celebrate and empower our girls, we must call out every incident of violence, emotional, physical, and sexual that we encounter. We must be brave and bold and unapologetic for this calling out. Our girls need this and deserve this. (Standing Ovation)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

HENDERSON, LOGAN: COM. DEDICATION - RECOGNIZE

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate fourteen-year-old Logan Henderson of Whites Lake. On June 10th of this year, Logan was recognized at the 3rd Annual Prospect Community's Volunteer Awards for his volunteer work through his church and his passion for engaging in the political system at all levels. All three leaders in this House would recall during their recent election campaign, receiving a question at the debate asking how those leaders would engage youth in this province.

Despite the fact that Logan is still more than five years away from being able to vote himself, he is a self-described political junkie who keeps himself and those around him informed and involved in the political process. Logan has volunteered on all three levels of government's campaigns. This summer, Logan worked through my office to establish the Timberlea-Prospect Youth Council. I would like the members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly to join me in recognizing Logan's dedication and service to his community and to keep their eyes and ears open for the day he will be able to run for office himself, as he will be a force to be reckoned with.

[Page 1203]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank.

LEWIS, ABBY: SCHOOL CROSS-COUNTRY COMP. - CONGRATS.

MR. BRAD JOHNS « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate 11-year-old, Abby Lewis. Abby is a Grade 6 Beaver Bank student and a cross-country runner who was initially denied entry into a school cross-country competition because she attends an elementary school and not a middle school or junior high. Abby's father, Shawn Lewis, appealed the decision and, thanks to the assistance of Deputy Minister Sandra McKenzie, Abby was allowed to compete in the under-14 girls four-kilometre race yesterday morning held in Point Pleasant Park. Abby won the race. I'd ask the members to join me this morning not only in congratulating Abby on her wonderful win but also in thanking the deputy minister for helping to make this possible. Congratulations, Abby.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Yarmouth.

ASH, PAUL: SCH. BD. SUPERINTENDENT (1st AFRIC. N.S.) - RECOGNIZE

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize the Tri-County Regional School Board superintendent, Mr. Paul Ash. Mr. Ash joined the Tri-County Regional School Board in March and made history as the first school board superintendent of African descent in Nova Scotia. Mr. Ash is the former director of the African Canadian Services Division of the province's Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, where he worked closely with other education units and school boards to ensure the African Nova Scotia perspective is integrated in all aspects of the education system. He also participated as a leader for many working groups, to ensure the delivery of quality programming and initiatives to support improvements to student outcomes for all students in our system. His work experience prior to joining the education department included teaching and serving as vice-principal and principal in rural community schools.

Mr. Ash has over 25 years of educational leadership experience at the school board and provincial levels, and I know both the Tri-County Regional School Board and our community are thrilled to have Mr. Ash leading the delivery of high-quality education in rural Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

SMITH, JILL: NTL. KIDS CANCER RIDE - CONGRATS.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, Jill Smith from Argyle is a 68-year-old cancer survivor. She completed her cancer treatment for her Merkel-cell carcinoma in 2014. After her treatment, a short walk to the end of the driveway was like a marathon.

[Page 1204]

In 2016, about two years after her treatment, she got her strength back and committed to cycling from Vancouver to Halifax for the Sears National Kids Cancer Ride. She felt motivated to raise funds for children and their families to help them throughout the cancer treatment process. She, and about three dozen others, rode 6,000 kilometres and all funds go directly to funding kids' cancer treatment.

Please join me in congratulating Jill Smith on completing this journey, give thanks for her unselfish acts and wish her continued good health in future endeavours.

[9:45 a.m]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

NAUSS, LEE - MUN. OF DIST. OF LUNENBURG COUNCILLOR:

ANNIV. (50th) - CONGRATS.

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, a 50th Anniversary is certainly a milestone worth celebrating. The Municipality of the District of Lunenburg will celebrate Councillor Lee Nauss' 50th year in Council next month. Having first been elected to Council in 1967, Lee Nauss has seen many changes over the years. Lee remains passionate and accessible to all his constituents. An active member in our community, you can fine Lee at a fire department banquet or breakfast, concerts and town hall meetings, just to name a few.

I'd be remiss, Mr. Speaker, if I didn't also acknowledge Lee's wife, Margaret, and their children for allowing the MODL and his constituents the privilege of having their husband and father as councillor for half a century. I know it's not always easy on the family and you are a great contributor to Lee's success.

I'd like to congratulate Lee Nauss on reaching this significant milestone and thank him for his service to his community and his province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

TRUEMAN, JAYDEN: CHILDREN'S WISH FOUND. - WISH GRANTED

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, wishes do come true, sometimes it just takes assistance. Upper Stewiacke resident Jayden Trueman, was diagnosed with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis at a very young age. Jayden was very patient and courageous as doctors attempted to regulate her condition through medication, over the course of a couple of years. Once regulated, she was able to get out and play with the other children, including taking riding lessons.

From the first lesson she bonded with her horse, Bow. After seeing the positive effects of this bond, there was a coordinated effort to make Jayden's wish of owing Bow come true. I'm told to acknowledge the collaboration of the Children's Wish Foundation, RBC and Bow's previous owner, Kim Sellars, on making this dream a possibility. I hope Jayden and Bow have many happy rides together. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

[Page 1205]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

ROONEY, ZACH: SCHULICH LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP RECIP.

- BEST WISHES

MR. BILL HORNE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Zack Rooney, a graduate of Lockview High on being awarded the Schulich Leadership Scholarship. Launched in 2012, this $100-million program funds 50 undergraduate scholarships each year across top Canadian universities, for students pursuing science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Mr. Speaker, Zack is pursuing an engineering degree at Memorial University and was awarded a $100,000 scholarship with a foundation that believes in supporting exceptional young minds that demonstrate great leadership.

I ask the members of the House of Assembly to join me in wishing Zack the best of luck in future endeavours. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

RUSSELL, BURTON: LATEST ACCOMPLISHMENT - CONGRATS.

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, Burton Russell of Kentville has been collecting newspaper clippings and memorabilia for more than 70 years. He has put that collection to good use in his latest book, Seven Decades of Nova Scotia Baseball, 1946 to 2016. It is Mr. Russell's 12th book.

Burton Russell worked as a schoolteacher for 35 years, coached interscholastic sports and began writing sports books in 1972.

Mr. Speaker, I ask this Legislature to join me in congratulating Burton Russell on his latest accomplishment.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Bedford.

HUSTINS, HARVEY: BROOKSIDE CEMETERY CORP. - SERVICE THANK

[Page 1206]

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to tell you about a Bedford resident who has been caring for our local cemetery for the last 61 years. Harvey Hustins began his involvement with the Brookside Cemetery Corporation when he was only 10 years old. That's when he first accompanied his father, Harvey Hustins Sr., to the cemetery trustee meetings and has been volunteering with the cemetery ever since.

Harvey has played an important role in the care of Brookside Cemetery grounds, coordinating mowing, seeding, weeding and planting of shrubs, hedges, pruning trees and bushes and cleaning damage due to storms. He has also straightened and levelled memorials and cared for roadways and pathways.

He was the driving force behind new fencing, construction of the new work shed and development of the lower section of the cemetery that overlooks Parkers Brook. As a result, Brookside is a place of calm, an oasis in a bustling community. It is the kind of place you want to go to if you need a long, long rest, and that's thanks in no small part to the meticulous devotion and hard work of Harvey Hustins for over 60 years.

I would ask the members of this House to join me in thanking Harvey for his decades of service to the families of Bedford.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

POWELL, CARLA: CANADA WRITES SHORT-LIST – CONGRATS.

MS. KIM MASLAND « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge and congratulate Carla Powell of Liverpool. From 1,400 entrants, Ms. Powell was shortlisted to the top five in Canada Writes, CBC's non-fiction writing contest.

Her entry, entitled The Road to Machu Picchu Starts at 385 lbs, is based on her hike of the Inca trail in Peru last September. She will receive a award from the Canada Council for the Arts, and her story will be published on CBC Books.

Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to commend Carla's courage in tackling that challenging hike, as well as her willingness to submit her writing to this public national competition.

I ask all members to join me in congratulating Carla.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

LUNENBURG CO. CHRISTMAS TREE PROD. ASSOC. - CONGRATS.

[Page 1207]

MR. HUGH MACKAY « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the Lunenburg County Christmas Tree Producers' Association. Every time I drive down Highway No. 103 to visit the many Lunenburg communities in my constituency of beautiful Chester-St. Margaret's, it gives me great pleasure to see the sign announcing that I am entering the Christmas tree capital of the world.

We often look at such signs as simply representing a community's pride. However, while this does reflect the pride that all Lunenburg County residents hold for the Christmas tree industry, this sign represents far more importance than pride. It is a reminder to all who pass, that this is a foundational economic sector for Lunenburg County and a way of life passed down through generations for many Lunenburg County families.

The sign is a reminder not just to the passing public, but to politicians such as me and my colleagues, of the importance of this industry to the economy of the region. As one of three government MLAs representing Lunenburg County, I take a special interest in the Christmas tree sector, and I am proud that this government is taking steps to stabilize and grow rural populations and rural economies.

Mr. Speaker, I ask the members of the Legislature to join me in congratulating the Lunenburg County Christmas Tree Producers' Association.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : I beg leave to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. HALMAN « » : Mr. Speaker, in the west gallery, we have a number of Grade 12 global politics students from Dartmouth East, from Prince Andrew High School, along with two of their amazing teachers, Ms. Violet Schlender and Mr. Ben Sichel. Prior to being elected to this position, I had the honour of working with Ben Sichel at Prince Andrew High School for over a decade.

Ben is the type of teacher whom every parent or guardian, wants their kid to be in their class. Ben is a phenomenal teacher, unbelievably talented. I ask the House to please give a warm welcome to the Grade 12 global politics class and their teachers. (Standing Ovation)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Lucasville.

MONK RENOVATIONS: REFUGEE HIRINGS - THANK

[Page 1208]

MR. BEN JESSOME « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize Monk Renovations for taking the initiative to help refugees by hiring Ahmad Aljwabreh as a journeyman painter and drywaller.

Dan Monk, owner of Monk Renovations, learned of the opportunity from a former client who had sponsored a Syrian refugee family. Through the client's connections with ISANS, it was discovered that Ahmad was seeking work as a painter. Working with ISANS proved rewarding, as the process moved quickly and Ahmad was working within weeks. Dan Monk was impressed with ISANS and the efficient and effective process that they have in place. Dan was impressed that ISANS also has supports in place to help both employees and employers, such as providing translators, wage assistance, language training, and job and safety training. Dan Monk said the experience was excellent and he highly recommends it to others as a great way not only to empower immigrants, but also to grow our workforce.

I would ask all members of this House to join me in thanking Dan Monk for taking this initiative to hire Ahmad Aljwabreh, and being a model for others.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

JOHNSTONE, YVONNE:

N. SYD. GARDEN CLUB ROSE & FLOWER SHOW - THANK

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : I rise today to acknowledge Yvonne Johnstone's participation in the North Sydney Garden Club's 50th Annual Rose and Flower Show.

Yvonne, who is a young 89-year-old, is the oldest-serving member of the club and is a qualified flower show judge. Over the years, Yvonne has imparted a lot of knowledge and shared many tips and secrets that she has learned over her many years of gardening. Thank you, Yvonne.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Clayton Park West.

HFX. WEST BOYS SOCCER TEAM: GOLD MEDAL WIN - CONGRATS.

MS. RAFAH DICONSTANZO: I rise today to recognize the Halifax West High School Boys Soccer Team for their recent gold medal win at the King's-Edgehill Annual Soccer Tournament.

The boys soccer team at Halifax West High School recently won their third consecutive title at this local tournament. It is an honour for these boys to be three-time defending champions. The boys played in four games throughout the tournament and won each game. In the final game, Halifax West defeated Parkview 2-1, bringing home yet another gold medal to our community.

[Page 1209]

Mr. Speaker, I ask that the members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating the athletes, the parents, and the coaching staff of the Halifax West High School Boys Soccer Team and wish them the best in the remainder of the season.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : I rise to commend the St. Thomas More Refugee Committee for all their work to bring a refugee family from Syria . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. According to my list, the honourable member for Dartmouth East has had two statements (Interruption) Oh, that was an introduction. I do apologize.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

ST. THOMAS MORE REFUGEE COMM. - THANK

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'll begin again.

I rise to commend the St. Thomas More Refugee Committee for all their work to bring a refugee family from Syria here to Dartmouth.

For over two years, this committee has been working to bring a family of four to start their new lives in Dartmouth. It was a humbling experience to welcome this family at the airport earlier this year. I wish them nothing but success and happiness as they adjust to life in Canada.

I want to thank the St. Thomas More Refugee Committee for everything they did to make it possible for this family to come here and start their new life in Dartmouth.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings South.

ANNA. VALLEY: INTL. TOWN CRIER COMP. - CONGRATS.

MR. KEITH IRVING « » : Oyez, Oyez, Oyez!

From September 14 to 17, 2017, Town Criers from around the world gathered for the Annapolis Valley International Town Crier Competition. Nineteen criers from across North America, Europe, and even as far away as New Zealand competed in Grand Pre, Windsor, and Annapolis Royal - congratulations to the overall winner, Mark Molnar of St. Catharines, Ontario.

During the week, Valley residents were treated not only to 19 splendid voices, but also to the remarkable regalia of the criers and their consorts as they visited many Valley communities.

[Page 1210]

I ask members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly to join me in thanking and congratulating town criers Lloyd Smith, Gary Long, and Peter Davies, who organized a very successful event, showing off to the world our beautiful Annapolis Valley.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie.

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : On October 1st, we all watched in despair and shock as the events of the tragic mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas unfolded. The attack resulted in the loss of 58 lives and injury to hundreds and hundreds more.

Michelle and Allan Hendsbee, of Queensport, were in Las Vegas celebrating their 25th Anniversary and were near the stage when the shooting started. Amidst the chaos of flying bullets, Allan managed to get his wife, Michelle, and a young woman, whom they did not know, to safety. Allan helped both to the ground, where he laid over them to provide additional coverage from the shots . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for members' statements has expired. We'll ask the member to read that one again on Tuesday.

[10:00 a.m.]

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition. (Interruptions) Pardon me - a thousand apologies. I did offer to make sure yesterday that you were first in line.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

H&W - SURGICAL PROCEDURES: OVERBOOKING - PROCESS REVIEW

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank you for your intervention that I do get to ask the first question and it's to the Minister of Health and Wellness.

A 70-year-old senior with colitis was scheduled to have colostomy surgery yesterday at the Colchester East Hants Health Centre. She received her surgery date weeks ago and made arrangements to accommodate that date. Then she got her medication and took those directions very closely.

[Page 1211]

When she phoned the hospital Wednesday to confirm her surgery time, she was informed that due to overbooking and staff shortages, they were unsure if they would be able to perform her surgery but that she should continue with her surgery preparations just in case.

My question is, would the department review the process of overbooking appointments for surgeries for patients who have already waited, sometimes for over a year, for their surgery?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : I thank the member for the question. Without getting into specifics of individual cases, Mr. Speaker, certainly the scheduling process for surgeries is a complex one. We want to make sure that we make the best use of the resources that we do have in the system to ensure that as many Nova Scotians as possible can receive the surgery treatments that they require.

The delays that sometimes occur on the one hand - in this case the member is referencing, where there are some challenges on the service side, but indeed, in other circumstances where patients themselves are the ones cancelling surgeries - we wouldn't want to leave the OR time go vacant. We really are trying to maximize the availability for all individuals, so we do continue to look for opportunities to improve.

MR. HARRISON « » : My constituent was instructed to continue to take the harsh medication and to phone back nine o'clock yesterday morning to see if the surgery would be possible. Not only did the patient have to endure the stress associated with the surgery, she also had the responsibility to call the hospital to see if it was available.

She found out yesterday morning that her surgery was, in fact, cancelled and no new date was issued. I know the toll that this takes on people physically, emotionally, mentally, and even spiritually sometimes. It's a heavy toll they take when their surgeries are cancelled.

Again, would the minister do some work on making sure that the communication is going to be appropriate for the hospital as well as the patient?

MR. DELOREY « » : Again, I thank the member for the question and indeed the suggestion. I would assure the member and indeed all members of the Legislature that the health authorities and the Department of Health and Wellness are continuously looking for opportunities to improve our systems. Of course, we want to see, as all Nova Scotians do, that we make the best use of our resources to ensure that Nova Scotians get the care they need and deserve, when they need it or when they're scheduled to receive it, so we make every effort to do that, Mr. Speaker.

The member brings up a good point with respect to a communication process, and if there are opportunities to improve, we'll certainly be having those conversations to see where there are opportunities. It's part of our ongoing efforts to improve the system overall. Thank you.

[Page 1212]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM.: CAMPAIGN DIR./ANGUS L. CLUB - JUDGMENT

MR. GARY BURRILL « » : The Premier says that he has not been lobbied by the Premier's campaign director but we all know that lobbyists are hired for their ability to influence public policy in a variety of ways. On the Registry of Lobbyists' website the Premier's campaign director, who I will add is a former director of the Angus L. Club, gives some insight into how this works. He declares that one of his techniques for lobbying is "informal communications."

I ask the Premier, does he hold the position that his campaign director has not had informal communications about public policy with him or any member of his staff?

THE PREMIER « » : Again, the honourable member has raised this question a number of times. I will hand that back to you so you can table it.

He's referring to Christopher MacInnes, who is no longer and has not been registered as a lobbyist. The honourable member would know that his wife happened to be my chief of staff. At the moment she retained that job, he is no longer a lobbyist in this province. He has not worked on government files.

It's unfortunate that, when someone goes along and does the appropriate thing, follows the rules, and continues to work in the process of trying to put together a government and help it work and follow all the rules in this province, the honourable member continues to find a way to call good people's integrity into question.

MR. BURRILL « » : When the Premier was asked by the media yesterday about Liberal cash-for-access events, he responded that this is a silly concern because we have some strong campaign finance laws here in Nova Scotia. But the concern is far from silly, and Party donations are not the issue. The issue is whether people should have enhanced and exclusive access to the Premier and the caucus on the basis of having donated a certain amount of money to the Liberal Party.

So I ask the Premier, why should paying $750 a year to the Liberal club ever provide enhanced access to the Premier and his caucus?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank all those Nova Scotians who participate in all political Parties in the democratic process.

[Page 1213]

In this province, we have some of the toughest rules around Party contributions. We set a limit across the province, as he would know. Part of that rationale came because of a donation that went into the NDP caucus from a labour union. It was inappropriate and had to be paid back.

We have across this province - everyone finds the vehicle through which they want to contribute to their political Party, whether it is through the Angus L. Club, in our case, or some people write a cheque to the maximum amount, and some write a cheque for a smaller amount. They continue to contribute. So we don't have the very things we're seeing across the country, like in Alberta, where the NDP Premier had $1,000 tickets for a dinner with her, and when she ended up in Ontario to support the NDP Leader for $10,000. That's cash-for-access.

What we're doing is putting out and putting online everyone who contributes to the political Party process. I think Nova Scotia should be proud of the fact that this province is leading the country in being open and transparent.

MR. BURRILL « » : I would remind the Premier that it is not me or the NDP who have alleged that membership in the $750 Angus L. Club provides enhanced or exclusive access to the Premier. These are, in fact, the words that are used in the invitations to become a member of the club. These are the words of the Liberal Party itself.

Yesterday the Premier told media that my criticism of Liberal cash-for-access events questioned his integrity. I want to make clear that I do not question the Premier's integrity. What I do question is the Premier's judgment in allowing certain people enhanced and exclusive access to himself and members of his caucus based on their financial ability to support the Liberal Party.

There's still time for the Premier to exercise better judgment here, so I will ask him, will he cancel this weekend's cash-for-access event?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, the one thing I'm grateful for is that Nova Scotians exercised good judgment and returned us to a second majority in the province. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM./H&W - DOCTOR RECRUITMENT:

[Page 1214]

EXTERNAL AGENCY - IDENTITY

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. Earlier this year, the Nova Scotia Health Authority announced that it had a doctor marketing plan led by an external agency with national and international experience to help find doctors for the 100,000 Nova Scotians who currently go without. The problem is, the Health Authority won't say who this marketing agency is. I believe that those Nova Scotians who are without a family doctor deserve to know who is out there trying to get them one.

I'd like to ask the Premier if he will tell the House the name of this international marketing agency that is out recruiting doctors for Nova Scotians.

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, it's the first I've heard of it. I will look into it for the honourable member.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I think it's very strange that this is the biggest issue in Nova Scotia today, that there are so many people without a family doctor, and the Premier's not aware of what efforts are being made to actually recruit a family doctor for the 100,000 Nova Scotians.

In fact, Mr. Speaker, reporters have asked the Department of Health and Wellness the name of this agency and how they were selected, and the Department of Health and Wellness refuses to answer the question, and I will table that information. After four days of being asked who is the agency and how are they selected, Nova Scotians are being kept in the dark. I'd like to ask the Premier, can he tell the House how this agency was selected and at what cost?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, again I want to go back to the honourable member. He asked me a question, did I know who the agency was, to which I said no, I would look into it, so let's be clear about that.

I continue to tell the honourable member, as I've said many times in this House, that efforts have been going on with the Department of Health and Wellness in communities across the province. We continue to work to build primary care facilities. The current budget has increased the number of seats at Dal Medical School for residencies, Mr. Speaker, to an additional 10. We have now an additional 10 that will be set aside for foreign-trained doctors looking for Canadian competency here in the province. Those will be ongoing.

We will continue to work with those communities across the province, and as I said in my first question, the actual specifics that he asked about, I don't know but I will inquire for him.

Mr. Speaker, I shouldn't have answered the question, I guess. He's not used to me giving him a direct answer.

[Page 1215]

MR. BAILLIE « » : You know, Mr. Speaker, it is true that I'm not used to the Premier giving me a direct answer as I'm still waiting to hear one.

Mr. Speaker, this is a very big issue: 100,000 Nova Scotians are looking for a family doctor. The Department of Health and Wellness was asked, who is this agency? How are they selected? How many doctors have been recruited? I understand that the Premier does not know the answer to those questions. That's fine, I will redirect my question to the minister responsible for the department, who has been asked this repeatedly by reporters in Nova Scotia. Will the Minister of Health and Wellness enlighten this House as to the name of the agency that has been selected, how much they are being paid, and how many doctors they've actually recruited for Nova Scotians?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the question from the honourable member. The thing that the member may not be aware of is, indeed, the recruitment process is managed by the Nova Scotia Health Authority, the IWK, for their care providers. The firm that he would be referring to would have gone through the Nova Scotia Health Authority's procurement process, to identify and provide the supports for that organization, not the Department of Health and Wellness. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness has the floor.

MR. DELOREY « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As I said, the process went through there. As the Premier has already indicated, we'll reach out to the Health Authority and get the additional details, and I will certainly endeavour to get the answers to his question. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

H&W - ER CLOSURES: PATIENT CARE - IMPACT

MS. TAMMY MARTIN « » : Mr. Speaker, last week I brought to the attention of the Minister of Health and Wellness the case of Mrs. Stella Freda Young of New Waterford who was discharged from Glace Bay ER an hour before it closed and transported to the Cape Breton Regional Hospital by taxi. I am saddened to report that Mrs. Young passed away on Wednesday.

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that the crisis in our health care system is having a serious impact on patient care. My question to the minister is, does the minister agree that Mrs. Young deserved better care than to be sent away in a taxi from a closing emergency room?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for the question. Certainly, any time that a loved one is lost in our province, our hearts certainly go out to the families. In this particular case, there were questions brought forward by some family members as to the specific care in this case.

[Page 1216]

As the member would know, I can't delve into specific personal or direct case discussions publicly, but as I stated publicly when the concerns were raised last week, I'll be engaging with the Health Authority to dig into the situation and that work is ongoing. Thank you.

MS. MARTIN « » : Mr. Speaker, in February, 68-year-old Jack Webb died after spending hours in a crowded emergency room hallway with a broken IV in his left arm, after hearing staff yell that he was not to be resuscitated.

Mr. Speaker, I'm worried about how many more family tragedies will occur before this government will act to fix the health care crisis. Will the minister admit that this government has failed in its basic responsibility to make sure Nova Scotians can die with dignity?

[10:15 a.m.]

MR. DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, again the member brings up a very specific and tragic circumstance where an individual receiving care did pass away and, again, those are circumstances that I think many people here would recognize as challenging. Certainly, sympathy would go out to the family, but what I would assert is that the member has actually misspoken, perhaps, in her comments because I think it was very clearly reported that the Health Authority has taken actions, in light of that most recent case that she had referenced, to improve the situation and to make changes in terms of how services are offered within the Department of Health and Wellness, and that's a commitment that's made to continuously improve our services across this province. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

NSHA: BOARD MEETINGS - SECRECY

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. It's bad enough that the new Nova Scotia Health Authority won't tell Nova Scotians who's in charge of marketing this province for more doctors. It's horrifying to think that they actually keep that a secret from the Premier and the Minister of Health and Wellness as well. This is a great issue with regard to how the Health Authority is being run, because it turns out that even their board meetings are kept secret from the people of Nova Scotia, contrary to all good practices of government accountability and public accountability.

The Health Authority is a $1.6 billion operation, responsible for running health care in our province, and they operate in secret. I would like to ask the Premier, does he know why Nova Scotia Health Authority's board meetings are kept secret from the public of Nova Scotia?

[Page 1217]

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank all those people who have continued to work hard to ensure that we bring together a fractured health care system into one health care system across the province, so that we can deliver services in communities across the province. As I said to the honourable member in his first question earlier on, I will do my best to get him the answer for that, acquiring it, and when I get that information, I will turn it over to him.

MR. BAILLIE « » : When the Health Authority, itself, was asked by reporters why their board meetings are kept secret from the public, the answer they gave was, only the province knows - and I'll table that for the benefit of the Premier. So, I do look forward to getting that answer from the Leader of the province in the near future, but I don't think we really need to know their detailed excuses as to why. I hope we all agree that those meetings on the running of our health care system, our public health care system, should be available to the people, the taxpayers, the patients who use it and pay for it.

Will the Premier commit today to making sure that board meetings of the Nova Scotia Health Authority, the minutes of those meetings, are made public so that people can see for themselves how their health care system is being run?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I will take that question under advisement and I will, as he has suggested, think about the possibility of that happening and be sure to communicate back to the honourable member.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

ENVIRON. - HARRIETSFIELD CLEANUP: ELECTION PROMISE - FULFILL

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The residents of Harrietsfield have been for years frustrated by the lack of action to decontaminate the former RDM Recycling plant in their community. So, in 2015, the good member for Halifax Atlantic said that the Minister of Environment was working on the decontamination plan and that it was of utmost importance to the minister - and I will table that document. Then, this May, during the election campaign, the member said, "We now have a firm commitment from the provincial government to clean up the RDM site."

Here we are five months later, and the 2017-18 budget from this government has no new funding for the Harrietsfield cleanup. Will the minister explain why his department hasn't fulfilled the good member for Halifax Atlantic's election promise?

HON. IAIN RANKIN « » : Mr. Speaker, as the member would know, we at Nova Scotia Environment have gone above and beyond our mandate to go out to the community of Harrietsfield. We've installed systems in eight homes to ensure that there's clean drinking water in the homes in Harrietsfield. The matter in terms of the cleanup is an important one. We will continue to engage with our partners at the municipality level and we will do what we believe is in the best interest of the people of Harrietsfield. Thank you.

[Page 1218]

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : We know the Harrietsfield instance; it would require a fair amount of money to be able to fully clean it up as the residents have been expecting for many years. So, it's one thing for this government to simply ignore an environmental problem plaguing Nova Scotia, but it's another entirely to say in a hastily-arranged video that it will be gone, that is a commitment - and I'll table that as well.

My question to the minister is, why did this government send one of its members to make lavish promises about the cleanup of a toxic site and then leave a community without any meaningful investment or even a plan forward?

MR. RANKIN « » : I want to commend the member's actions. He's working with the community, Marlene in the community with the member for Halifax Atlantic. We continue to be prepared to work with the community and work with the municipality. As the member opposite is probably well aware, since July there has been a court case - it has been turned over to the Public Prosecution Service and we await those results in the court.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland North.

H&W: PHYSICIANS - RETIREMENT PLANS

MS. ELIZABETH SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : Yesterday, there was an opinion piece in The Chronicle Herald that highlighted the fact that there are 132 physicians practising in Nova Scotia who are over the age of 70 - and I'll table this document. Forty-six of those physicians are family doctors. This information came from the College of Physicians and Surgeons.

My question to the Minister of Health and Wellness is, will the minister contact these 132 physicians who are over the age of 70 to find out what their future plans are for their practice, and are they in fact planning to retire within the next 12 months?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : I thank the member for the question. One of the advantages of moving to a single Health Authority across the province, the NSHA and the IWK - technically two authorities - has been the ability to get a better look at all of our systems across the board, which would include information to support our physician recruitment.

Part of that information is of course the attrition or the turnover of physicians within the province. That is one of the advantages as the NSHA builds their requirements for physician recruitment, indeed knowing in advance. The Leader of the Official Opposition previously tabled a number of documents outlining how many positions are currently being recruited for; indeed, that's because of knowledge of pending physicians leaving the system.

[Page 1219]

MS. SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : One of the reasons that we wanted to ask this question today is because we all have heard of the proposed federal tax changes. This is putting a new emphasis on this problem of so many physicians who are close to retiring. Many physicians have expressed concern to me and others that they were disappointed by the lack of support they felt from their government in fighting for them with the federal government. This is a new challenge that is going to impact the number of physicians retiring in the next year.

My question to the Minister of Health and Wellness is - I don't believe it's too late to speak up and show those physicians that you care about them, that you support them - would the minister consider speaking with Morneau and Trudeau on behalf of the physicians of this province?

MR. DELOREY « » : Indeed, as that member and all members here in the Legislature know, and I hope the members bring this information back to their constituents, especially those physicians across Nova Scotia, the fact of the matter is that we have had conversations with the Prime Minister and Minister Morneau. Indeed, my own counterpart, the Minister of Health, when she was recently appointed, we had conversations, and this was a topic of conversation as well, bringing the concerns of Nova Scotians about the proposed federal changes.

I think we have seen the results. Mr. Speaker, you have seen public statements from the federal Minister of Finance that indeed changes are imminent with the proposal that has been brought forward.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM. - FAM. PHYSICIANS: SHORTAGE - CONCERN

MR. GARY BURRILL « » : The numbers about the doctor shortage, rather than getting better, in fact are getting worse. We have a Physician Resource Plan calling for 107 new doctors and a budget that calls for bringing only eight; the Canadian Institute of Health Information reports that we have 20 fewer doctors today than when the present government took office; and, this week, we learned from the College of Physicians and Surgeons that 46 of our province's family doctors are 71 years old and older.

I would like to ask the Premier, is he at least concerned that the supply of family doctors is actually going backwards?

[Page 1220]

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank for the good work of the former Minister of Health and Wellness and the current Minister of Health and Wellness.

The numbers that he's referring to, like most numbers he refers to, he has mixed up a little bit. The fact of the matter is, what the report said is that it would require about 50 family physicians a year in the province. If he looks at the budget, in the introduction that we've increased is up to 55 that will become a year.

On top of that, Mr. Speaker, the other number that he is referring to actually refers to specialists and he knows that we increased the number of residency seats here in this province by 15, five of which will be dedicated to Cape Breton Island. To take that total up it will allow us to continue to bring in over 100 per year.

MR. BURRILL « » : Mr. Speaker, the number referred to earlier by the member for Cumberland North, which I have referred to, about 46 of our doctors who are 71 years of age and over - that does not refer to specialists. It refers to family physicians in the province.

I would like to return to the place that the member for Cumberland North was speaking about by referring to the headline of the report that we saw yesterday, "Looming family doc retirements compound health-care crisis." If the 46 of our doctors 71 years of age and over are not replaced, soon we are going to have another 100,000 people without a family doctor. Everyone in Nova Scotia, with 27 apparent exceptions . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Does the member have a question?

MR. BURRILL « » : Indeed I do have a question. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It's a question with a capital Q. I've asked it many times, in many different settings, and I'm happy to ask . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Does the member have a question?

MR. BURRILL « » : Will the Premier acknowledge that the people of Nova Scotia are in the middle of a health care crisis?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for his question. Again, the issue that was raised by the member for Cumberland North is one obviously that is an important issue here, as I've raised this issue in my own community.

There's a number of physicians who are continuing to work well beyond what some people in this House would work to. They are carrying very large practices. We know that issue is going to be dealt with. We are working with them to how do we transition their practices. We'll continue to work with them, Mr. Speaker. It's my hope they will continue to practise and continue to realize that this government appreciates all the work that they are doing. We want to continue to work with them.

[Page 1221]

The honourable member for Cumberland North raised the issue about the federal taxes. I've raised it myself with the federal Minister of Finance and the Prime Minister; I know the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board as well has raised that issue. We're going to continue to raise that issue. We look forward to some changes, and we're continuing to look forward to working with those physicians of all ages as to how we put together practices to deliver primary care to all Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

TIR: PORT WALLACE DEVELOP. - CONCERNS

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. Over the next few years the Port Wallace development is going to alter the makeup of Dartmouth East. Naturally there are concerns from residents, specifically along the Waverley Road, about the increase in traffic as that development goes up. I've heard from residents that there's great concern about that development and the new traffic.

My question for the minister is, is there a plan to connect Avenue du Portage to Highway No. 107, the Forest Hills Extension?

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : Of course, the member would be aware that there is the Highway No. 107 Burnside Bypass that has been designated as one of the areas that we intend to twin in the next seven years. I'll be happy to tell the House and the member that that project has moved fairly quickly. There's quite a bit of engineering done on that and that will speak to part of what you're talking about.

However, there are other plans in place by the department to address that bottleneck that is out there. Those growing communities need to have some alternate routes and we're looking at doing that. Thank you.

MR. HALMAN « » : I appreciate the minister's response. Following the question, of course there are some noise complaints from property owners living along Lake Micmac off Highway No. 111, and certainly with that new development taking place there's growing concerns about the increased volume of traffic.

I visited some of the properties, Mr. Speaker, and the noise is quite overwhelming. Would the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal commit to sending an engineer from TIR in order to complete a noise assessment off of Highway No. 111?

[Page 1222]

MR. HINES « » : I thank the member opposite for the question. Certainly noise mitigation is a major consideration for the department when we're constructing new arteries in particular, and we will take a look at that particular situation for that route.

[10:30 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

H&W - PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE: INSURANCE PROGS. - EFFECT

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health and Wellness. With our health care in this province experiencing a crisis, not only is the medical welfare of our constituents in jeopardy, but for many of them it is also their financial situation that is being affected. To be made eligible for workers' compensation, many health insurance carriers, as well as our CPP disability, it is necessary to have detailed medical reports completed by attending physicians. This is not possible for someone without the services of a doctor.

My question is, does the minister have any suggestions as to what direction we should be guiding our constituents?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for the question. Indeed, the process with various insurance providers, whether they be a private insurance or government programs as referenced, WCB or CPP benefits require some professional oversight to ensure the validity and accuracy of the applications. I know the members opposite have asked questions in the past about how we manage and control and maintain the integrity of the financial payments for programs within the government, and that's what these requirements are in place for.

MR. DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, timeliness is of the essence when dealing with these situations. For many of the individuals we are attempting to help, their regular income has been interrupted for a variety of reasons, usually illness or accidents. Most are forced to seek temporary support from income assistance which must be paid back when the appropriate insurances are activated. However, income assistance is inadequate and, in most cases, does not allow them to meet their financial needs.

My question to the minister is, with no immediate or short-term answers to the doctor shortage in our province, will the minister find a solution to having this type of service available for the injured and ill Nova Scotians who find themselves without a doctor?

MR. DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the question from the member. As the member noted, the way programs work like income assistance, when a payment comes in after the fact, recognizing that these insurance payments when they do get approved and the payment if there was a time on the front end that they do pay over the period of time from which they were eligible, so indeed, when there's an overlap between the multiple programs that an individual is receiving, of course, again, back to the first comment as the members opposite have questioned government about insuring appropriate controls for provincial resources, finances being spent, that is the process. We don't want people getting paid twice in two different programs. So, that's the reason for the back payments.

[Page 1223]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

JUSTICE - N.S. ELECTIONS ACT:

RIGHTS & FREEDOMS CHARTER - VIOLATION

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Justice. This past September, the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador struck down a portion of the province's Elections Act that allowed citizens to vote before all candidates had announced their intention to run. The court called the practice unconstitutional and the ruling said that the system unfairly favours incumbent candidates.

Nova Scotia also allows voters to cast ballots before the nomination period for candidates has expired. So, my question to the minister is, has the minister assured himself that Nova Scotia Elections Act does not violate the Charter of Rights and Freedoms?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for the question. We work closely with Elections Nova Scotia on the policies and procedures around provincial elections. We're guided by the case law and established principles of both the federal and provincial systems and, as we speak, we have confidence in the Nova Scotia Elections Act.

MS. MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his answer. I believe it is a situation though that we should be worried about. Free and fair voting is the cornerstone of the model of democracy, and while we want to make it as convenient as possible for Nova Scotians to vote, we also must ensure that the vote is meaningful and that one candidate is not given an unfair advantage over the others, which I think we've all seen in this province.

My question to the minister is, will he commit to seeking a legal opinion to make sure that Nova Scotia's Elections Act will not meet the same fate as currently Newfoundland and Labrador's is?

MR. FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, as I indicated in my first response, there's close collaboration, continued feedback, particularly following provincial elections, on the work that is undertaken within Elections Nova Scotia and ongoing opportunities to make progressive change in that Act.

[Page 1224]

This is work that is ongoing and I will read with interest the established case law that my colleague has referenced out of Newfoundland and Labrador, and determine if there's any need to take further action.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

TIR - COBEQUID PASS: P3 DEV. - SUCCESS EXPLAIN

MS. SUSAN LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, when asked yesterday about the Cobequid Pass, the Minister of TIR called it a sterling example of the success of P3 operations for all Nova Scotians. However, when the former Deputy Minister of Health and Wellness prepared a report on P3s at the request of the Premier's Office, he actually singled out the Cobequid Pass by raising concerns about the P3 model. The report states that an estimated more than $300 million in tolls were produced in the Cobequid Pass, for a deal in which private financiers put up $66 million. The government is paying an effective interest rate of 10 per cent for 30 years, twice its rate of borrowing.

I ask the minister, how is lining the pockets of private developers while at the same time paying double interest, a sterling example of the success of the P3 operation for all Nova Scotians?

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : I thank the member opposite for the question. P3 partnerships can allow projects to get done in an expedient manner. I would draw the member's attention to the safety aspect of this particular project and ask the member to think about the lives that were saved by the expedient manner, successful manner, that the Cobequid Pass was built. Thank you.

MS. LEBLANC « » : Mr. Speaker, the Liberal P3 school experiment was another sterling example of a successful P3 operation. After the province already paid over $800 million in leases, this government recently paid another $216 million to buy 37 of the schools. Furthermore, the Auditor General found that in two cases developers were able to make an extra $52 million by subcontracting the work back to the province. I wonder if those developers will be at the party on Saturday night.

I ask the minister, would he also like to provide a glowing review of P3 schools in Nova Scotia?

MR. HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, I would have to say that with regard to the P3 schools, I haven't seen any community in which those excellent facilities were constructed and continue to be maintained and purchased by this government, want to send it back.

Also, Mr. Speaker, I would draw the attention of the House to the hospital at Truro which was constructed under that Party's aegis where it went $80 million over budget, and to tell you that the P3 model, particularly for buildings, is used across the country and we will investigate whether or not that is the right way to go for our infrastructure to get the best value for Nova Scotians.

[Page 1225]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

NAT. RES.: BLOMIDON PROV. PARK - EXPANSION

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Natural Resources. Over the past number of years this government has purchased several pieces of land adjoining Blomidon Provincial Park on the North Mountain in Kings North. My constituents are interested in knowing what the plan for this land is.

My question for the minister is, will this land be added to Blomidon Provincial Park and used to expand the park so that it connects with the provincially-owned lands of Cape Split?

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Apologies to the member opposite, there was a lot of noise around me so it was a little hard hearing some of his question. I understand that if he could get me that information, I would certainly look into that and provide him with that information at a later date.

MR. LOHR « » : I certainly will give the minister that information about the Blomidon lands.

I have a second question for the minister on a second piece of land. The province also recently purchased about 200 acres of land on the Bay of Fundy known as Black Hole, adjacent to Baxters Harbour. This land is about 26 kilometres from Blomidon Park and not part of any existing government land. In fact, it's not clear why this land was purchased, so my question for the minister is, why was this land purchased, and what purpose does the government plan to put the land to?

MS. MILLER « » : Thank you to the member opposite for that question. I could hear it a little bit better this time, so that was great.

I just want to acknowledge that the department is always buying lots of land, DNR, to add it to our base of Crown land and to our parks land. I know that there are some additions to some parks property - I believe three or four across the province will be added to shortly. That may possibly have been one, but we'll be able to get that information to the member opposite.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

CCH: PARRSBORO LIGHTHOUSE SOC. - ASSIST.

[Page 1226]

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : My question is for the Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage. On Wednesday of this week, 100 citizens of the Town of Parrsboro met at the annual general meeting of the Parrsboro Lighthouse Society. They are worried about the future of that lighthouse. The lighthouse is vital to the tourism industry of the area, and it continues to operate - the light and foghorn continue to operate in Parrsboro Harbour. They are worried because the lighthouse has fallen into disrepair and is at risk of being torn down. They are looking to their provincial and federal governments for help in maintaining the lighthouse.

I would like to ask the Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage, can he outline assistance that his department can provide to the Parrsboro Lighthouse Society to make sure that vital asset is maintained for the Parrsboro area?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : I thank the member for a question that is very much on the minds of residents. It's very important culturally and historically to that area and its future for attracting tourists. What I can tell the member opposite - if he wants a part two question, that's fine - is that there is money in the budget, and we would be prepared to look at a proposal from that community organization.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Now that's an answer I can appreciate, Mr. Speaker.

I would like to follow up with the minister and ask him, is his department prepared to meet directly with the new executive of the Parrsboro Lighthouse Society to work through the provincial government assistance that can be provided to maintain that lighthouse?

MR. GLAVINE « » : We have department people who go and have a first-hand observation of the site and what work may need to be done. Certainly, the department is prepared to meet with the new executive director.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland North.

H&W - DOCTORS N.S. LEGAL DISPUTE: POS. APPROACH - CREATE

MS. ELIZABETH SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : I would like to thank the Minister of Health and Wellness and the Premier for their comments saying that they have been speaking up for physicians on the federal tax changes. It's good to know.

Unfortunately, the physicians themselves haven't seen that; maybe it hasn't been captured in the media. I think it's important to let the physicians' community know that you've had conversations even if they have been in private. Certainly, I have learned as an employer that my employees need to know that I care about them, that I appreciate them, that I have their back, and that I'll fight for them. I think the physicians of this province need to know that from you as well.

[Page 1227]

The current publicization of the legal dispute with Doctors Nova Scotia sends the wrong message. My question to the Minister of Health and Wellness is, have you considered what might be an effective approach in trying to change the relationship with the doctors of this province, and how can we create a more positive approach with them?

[10:45 a.m.]

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : I thank the member for both the preamble and the question. Indeed, getting the information out to physicians in terms of a particularly important topic of interest for them, that is the proposed federal tax changes, is something that I certainly share information with physicians. Again, as I mentioned in my response to the previous question, I encourage all members to let their constituents know that in fact we have been having those conversations and working on their behalf.

Again, as far as the relationship with Doctors Nova Scotia, I believe I still maintain a good working relationship with the president of Doctors Nova Scotia, notwithstanding particular concerns that they brought up, and the proposed notice for legal challenge. That's one piece of the many things that we work on together to advance the interests of physicians in this province.

MS. SMITH-MCCROSSIN « » : Now for my scheduled question. Yesterday, I read in the news locally that the CEC in Pugwash will be closed for six days, All Saints emergency for three days, and the South Cumberland CEC in Parrsboro for another three days. That's just in the next week. These recent closures mean that the people of Cumberland County are left with emergency coverage and medical care, and it will cause a dramatic overflow, overcrowding, in the regional hospital.

My question to the Minister of Health and Wellness is, are you working on a solution for all these closures of CECs, and what would that solution look like?

MR. DELOREY « » : Indeed, the health care system is tightly integrated, as the member mentions. What happens in one facility in the province can lead to impacts or effects in another facility in the neighbouring communities or region.

I assure the member and all Nova Scotians that the Nova Scotia Health Authority, when they are providing their services and scheduling, are doing so to make sure that they have the resources that are available at a particular point in time dedicated to providing and ensuring the best services are available to all Nova Scotians - that can be made at that time.

With respect to the longer-term challenge, Mr. Speaker, a lot of that - I don't think it's any secret - has to do again with recruiting and enhancing our primary care services across the province, and that work is under way.

[Page 1228]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

ENERGY: RENEWABLE ENERGY GEN. - N.S. PLAN

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : My question is for the Minister of Energy. In August, the minister said that Nova Scotia's grid can't absorb any more wind power. However, when asked about this in Estimates, the minister suggested that there will be opportunities to accept wind power once the Maritime Link comes online.

In the meantime, it seems that the minister's August announcement was simply setting the stage for allowing Emera to export more than 300 megawatts of wind energy from Nova Scotia to Massachusetts as part of its proposed Atlantic Link.

I ask the minister, does he have any concerns about exporting a significant amount of renewable energy when Nova Scotia still has a long way to go to get off burning coal?

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : I thank the member for the question. Obviously, wind power, wind energy, is important to the province. It is part of our grid. We will continue to advance wind projects for the next number of years as we move towards reducing fossil fuel usage and GHG emissions to the extent possible. Again, we are leaders on the continent in that regard.

With respect to wind, we will continue to add it to our grid, as we can, on Nova Scotia Power's terms. They are committed to moving to renewables as well. Clearly the focus on fossil fuels is something that we're all concerned about. Again, we're going to continue to lead the charge and make sure that we make decisions in the best interests of Nova Scotia ratepayers while, of course, protecting the environment.

MS. ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, we certainly need to increase our grid capacity and invest in new technologies for energy storage. But at this moment, it seems that Nova Scotia Power's parent company, Emera, is much more focused on accessing the Boston market than it is on expanding renewables in Nova Scotia. In fact, making more room for renewables here in Nova Scotia could actually hurt Emera's argument for exporting renewable energy from here to the northeastern U.S.

I think that concern about exporting renewables could be eased if the minister was able to provide Nova Scotians with timelines and targets for renewable energy generation here at home. So I ask the minister, when will he provide Nova Scotians with a plan for renewable energy generation beyond 2020?

MR. MACLELLAN « » : The short answer is as soon as possible.

[Page 1229]

With respect to tidal energy and the game-changing potential we have in the Bay of Fundy, we're advancing by way of policy, by way of investment, and by way of working with the private sector to ensure that we are the world leaders in tidal. We're making a significant program in solar, so we'll have solar projects in the mix in the very near future. That will be driven by procurement through the private sector.

Obviously hydro and what's happening with the Maritime Link is going to be a game-changer in terms of what our energy consumption is by way of renewables. We have tremendous opportunities that are coming, and we're looking forward to the future of energy . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : The time allotted for Oral Questions Put by Members to Ministers has expired.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private Members' Public Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 38.

Bill No. 38 - Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise this morning to ask for the indulgence and co-operation of all members of the House to decide on a particular important piece of legislation.

We have before us Bill No. 38, an Act Respecting Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness. This Act would establish October 15th as Awareness Day in the Province of Nova Scotia. This is an important recognition for many in the House, for all of us here in the province, and for the member for Pictou East, who introduced this bill.

It's the government's wish, therefore, to advance this bill through the Legislature today. Therefore, we require unanimous consent to bypass the Law Amendments Committee and the Committee of the Whole House on Bills and hold votes on second and third readings of this Bill immediately. To do so, I ask for unanimous consent of the House.

[Page 1230]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 38 be now read a second time.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 38.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be now read a third time.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private Members' Public Bills for Third Reading.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 38.

Bill No. 38 - Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 38, an Act Respecting Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness, be now read a third time and do pass.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 38.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried. (Applause)

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

[Page 1231]

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, would you call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole on Supply unto Her Majesty.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MR. TIM HALMAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to take a few moments to speak with regard to Supply on the budget.

Before I get to that, I think it was fantastic that we saw that bill unanimously pass, especially in front of our youth up here in the gallery. We're able to model to our young people that despite our political differences, when it comes to certain issues, MLAs in this Chamber can work together for the common good.

I have a few remarks I'd like to make regarding the budget proposed to this House. During the Thanksgiving weekend, like many other MLAs in this Chamber who are parents, I had an opportunity to spend some time with my kids. One of the things that we enjoy doing to conclude the day is to read together. Oftentimes, we'll spend about a half hour or 45 minutes at the end of the day reading and sort of talking about what we're reading.

For the last few days leading up to the Thanksgiving weekend, I was reading the Estimates for the budget. It certainly didn't take much difficulty for me to go to sleep as a result of that, but nonetheless, very interesting things in that budget.

As many people in this Chamber know, young people are very observant. They're naturally inquisitive. My oldest child asked, what are you reading, Dad, what's this all about? I explained to her what a budget's all about. It's a blueprint. It's a framework for a fiscal year. This is a key piece of legislation that goes before the House every year. She asked what was in it, and I said, well, you're asking the wrong question. You want to ask what's not in it.

Often, when examining a document, that is one of the critical questions one has to ask - what is not contained in this document? I'd like to take a few moments to point out that there are some things that need to be addressed. One of the things that's not addressed in this budget - that is not there, is lacking, is a gaping hole - is that there's no mention as to what the plan is to help revive the Nova Scotia film industry.

[Page 1232]

At one time, that industry brought $146 million to the Gross Domestic Product of our province, and added to the social and cultural strength of Nova Scotia. The film industry in our province is still paying the price for a reckless, short-sighted, and irresponsible change. This is something that we need to openly talk about. Hundreds of our skilled filmmakers have been put into economic exile as a result of the short-sighted, irresponsible change.

Why is that? Why is that not being addressed? Why is that not being talked about? Why is this government pushing it to the margins when it needs to be at the forefront?

In my community of Dartmouth East where I have many filmmakers, they ask, what's the plan to attract productions to Nova Scotia? Unfortunately, I don't have much of an answer to give them, because I don't know what the plan is for this government. Just last weekend in The Chronicle Herald, Jim Vibert had an article in which he talked about how hundreds, if not thousands, of our film workers have had to relocate across the country, specifically to northern Ontario. I'm happy to table that article, Mr. Speaker.

This was an industry that employed thousands. This was an industry that brought so much social and cultural strength to our province. I encourage this government to work with our film producers, to sit down with them and figure out a way to attract productions to our province.

When the changes were made to the Film Tax Credit without consultation, without much notification, those changes were modelled after Alberta. Just recently, Alberta has seen the error of its ways and has reconfigured the way in which it implements its film tax credit, or its incentive. I recommend we do the same thing. The film industry is a globally-competitive environment. Nova Scotia needs to get back into that competition.

I encourage this government to take a look at the changes that Alberta has made. There is nothing wrong with changing course when necessary, especially when hundreds of jobs are at risk. What we want to do is pull those skilled tradespeople back to our province and work with our film producers to revive what was once a competitive industry that employed hundreds of people and, in many respects, was the pride of Nova Scotia.

Alberta has seen the errors of their ways. They've made modifications. I encourage us to do likewise.

With respect to this budget, I have some concerns about where money is being allocated within the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. We recognize that leadership is about setting priorities. Those of us on this side of the House have a lot of questions about where the government places their financial priorities. We see in this budget $10 million being allocated to the Council on Classroom Conditions and, Mr. Speaker, I think teachers in this province were quite clear as to where the focus of our investments needs to be. That money could be immediately put into the inclusion model, making sure that our students have enough program assistance, making sure that there are more supplies for our most diverse learners, making sure that we have enough teachers to substitute, enough teachers to fulfill the French immersion and core French areas as well.

[Page 1233]

[11:00 a.m.]

Mr. Speaker, we're seeing the cracks in the system and I have concerns that the government is putting off those problems to a future date, when those issues need to be addressed now. They need to be addressed in this budget.

We also see in this budget, $8.6 million allocated to increase mental health supports, but we need to go much further. For quite some time in this province, in our schools, if a student is experiencing a mental health crisis, often that responsibility fell to the classroom teacher or a go-to teacher. Teachers have been saying for quite some time, Mr. Speaker, that often some of the situations they were dealing with were beyond their skill set. We need more concrete investments in mental health in our schools. We need mental health professionals in all of our schools and we need to get to work on that immediately.

We also see in this budget $1.4 million for additional school psychologists. Again, I'm hearing from teachers that they are happy, that certainly this is on the radar, that it is being talked about, that those supports are required. In many respects, though, it is a drop in the bucket in terms of the long-term investments that will be required in our schools.

In conclusion, Mr. Speaker, I want this government to recognize that the issues with the film industry are not going away. It is the elephant in the room, in many respects, and I encourage this government to work with our film producers to try to attract productions here to Nova Scotia because, in many respects, we're missing out on some amazing opportunities, so that Nova Scotia can attract productions and become a position of global strength in the film industry.

Again, Mr. Speaker, with respect to education, we need to see further investments in that Education and Early Childhood Development Budget, specifically as it pertains to mental health supports. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The House will now recess.

[11:04 a.m. The House resolved into a CW on Supply with Deputy Speaker Mr. Chuck Porter in the Chair.]

[Page 1234]

[3:16 p.m. The CW on Supply rose and the House reconvened with Deputy Speaker Chuck Porter in the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The Chairman of the Committee of Whole on Supply will now report:

THE CLERK » : That the Committee of the Whole on Supply has met and has come to agreement on 52 Estimate resolutions, including votes on business plans and on capital. The Chairman has been instructed to recommend these Estimates to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House concur in the report of the Committee of the Whole on Supply.

There has been a call for a recorded vote. We're all set now? The Whips are satisfied.

We'll now proceed with a recorded vote on the report of the Committee of the Whole on Supply. I'll remind all members that while we're conducting the recorded vote please remain in your seat absolutely quiet and, when your name is called, please stand tall with a clear Yea or Nay.

The Clerks will now proceed with the recorded vote.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:19 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. Churchill Mr. MacMaster 
Mr. Furey Mr. MacLeod 
Ms. Regan Mr. Dunn 
Mr. MacLellan Ms. MacFarlane 
Mr. McNeil Mr. Baillie 
Ms. Casey Mr. d'Entremont 
Mr. Glavine Mr. David Wilson 
Mr. Delorey Mr. Burrill 
Mr. Colwell Ms. Zann 
Ms. Miller Ms. Roberts 
Mr. Kousoulis Ms. Leblanc 

[Page 1235]

Mr. Porter Ms. Martin
Mr. Gordon Wilson Ms. Chender 
Mr. Hines Ms. Smith-McCrossin 
Ms. Diab Ms. Paon 
Mr. Ince Mr. Houston 
Mr. Rankin Mr. Orrell 
Mr. Mombourquette Mr. Lohr 
Ms. Arab Mr. Johns 
Mr. Horne Ms. Adams 
Mr. Maguire Ms. Masland 
Mr. MacKay Mr. Halman 
Mr. Jessome Mr. Harrison 
Ms. DiCostanzo  
Mr. Irving  

THE CLERK « » : Those in favour of the motion to concur, 25. Those against, 23.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, Would you please call the order of business, Introduction of Bills.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 48 - Entitled an Act to Provide for Defraying Certain Charges and Expenses of the Public Service of the Province. (Hon. Karen Casey)

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 48 be now read for a second time.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 48.

There has been a call for a recorded vote.

Are the Whips satisfied?

The previous instructions stand for a recorded vote.

The Clerks will now proceed with the recorded vote.

[Page 1236]

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:23 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. Churchill Mr. MacMaster 
Mr. Furey Mr. MacLeod 
Ms. Regan Mr. Dunn 
Mr. MacLellan Ms. MacFarlane 
Mr. McNeil Mr. Baillie 
Ms. Casey Mr. d'Entremont 
Mr. Glavine Mr. David Wilson 
Mr. Delorey Mr. Burrill 
Mr. Colwell Ms. Zann 
Ms. Miller Ms. Leblanc 
Mr. Kousoulis Ms. Martin 
Mr. Porter Ms. Smith McCrossin 
Mr. Gordon Wilson Ms. Paon 
Mr. Hines Mr. Houston 
Ms. Diab Mr. Orrell 
Mr. Ince Mr. Lohr 
Mr. Rankin Mr. Johns 
Mr. Mombourquette Ms. Adams 
Ms. Arab Ms. Masland 
Mr. Horne Mr. Halman 
Mr. Maguire Mr. Harrison 
Mr. MacKay  
Mr. Jessome  
Ms. Dicostanzo  
Mr. Irving  

MR. SPEAKER « » : Just to confirm, the honourable member for Halifax Chebucto changed his vote and it will be recorded as "no".

THE CLERK « » : For, 25. Against, 23.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 48, the Appropriations Act (2017) be now read for a third time and do pass.

[Page 1237]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 48.

There has been a call for a recorded vote. We will ring the bells for 20 minutes.

[3:27 p.m. The House recessed.]

[3:47 p.m. The House reconvened.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Just before we proceed with the motion for third reading, it has been brought to my attention that on Page 2 of the bill, at the end of Clause 5, there is an error in the date. It reads: April 1, 2018; in fact, it should read: April 1, 2017. I'll seek the unanimous consent of the House to correct this error on your copies.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

We'll consider that error corrected.

We'll now proceed with the recorded vote for third reading of Bill No. 48. Once again, I'll ask everybody to remain perfectly quiet until the Clerks are finished completing the vote.

The Clerks will now proceed with the vote.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:48 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. Churchill Mr. MacMaster 
Mr. Furey Mr. MacLeod 
Ms. Regan Mr. Dunn 
Mr. MacLellan Ms. MacFarlane 
Mr. McNeil Mr. Baillie 
Ms. Casey Mr. D'Entremont 
Mr. Glavine Mr. David Wilson 
Mr. Delorey Mr. Burrill 
Mr. Colwell Ms. Zann 
Ms. Miller Ms. Roberts 

[Page 1238

Mr. Kousoulis Ms. Leblanc 
Mr. Porter Ms. Martin 
Mr. Gordon Wilson Ms. Chender 
Mr. Hines Ms. Smith-McCrossin 
Ms. Diab Ms. Paon 
Mr. Ince Mr. Houston 
Mr. Rankin Mr. Orrell 
Mr. Mombourquette Mr. Lohr 
Ms. Arab Mr. Johns 
Mr. Horne Ms. Adams 
Mr. Maguire Ms. Masland 
Mr. MacKay Mr. Halman 
Mr. Jessome Mr. Harrison 
Ms. DiCostanzo  
Mr. Irving  

THE CLERK « » : For, 25. Against, 23.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : That concludes the government business for today. The House will meet again on Tuesday, October 17th, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. Following the daily routine and Question Period, we will call for second reading of Bill No. 39, Financial Measures (2017) Act. With time permitting, we will transition to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills for Bill Nos. 8, 10, and 12. I would also note that on Monday, October 16th, the Committee on Law Amendments will meet from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House now rise to meet again on Tuesday, October 17th, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House now stands adjourned until Tuesday, October 17th, at 1:00 p.m.

[The House rose at 3:52 p.m.]