The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD16-11

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



Third Session

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

SPEAKER'S RULING:
Unparliamentary comment by C.B. Richmond MLA
(Point of Privilege by Mr. A. MacMaster » [Hansard p.761, 10/28/16])
Not a breach of privilege
827
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Nat. Res. - Electrical Power Generation: Forest Biomass - Usage Cease,
828
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee,
829
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Human Resources Comm.: Anl. Rept. (2016) - Table,
829
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 241, Atl. Can. Career Wk. (10/31 - 11/04/16) - Recognize,
830
Vote - Affirmative
831
Res. 242, Movember Can. - Support,
831
Vote - Affirmative
832
Res. 243, Blomidon Estate Winery: Crémant 2013 - Natl. Wine Award
832
Vote - Affirmative
833
Res. 244, Steinhart, Thomas/Distillery: Awards - Congrats.,
833
Vote - Affirmative
834
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 52, Halifax Regional Municipality Charter,
835
No. 53, Mental Health System Public Inquiry (2016) Act,
835
No. 54, Environment Act,
835
No. 55, Municipal and Other Authorities Pension Plan Transfer Act,
835
No. 56, Sexual Violence Action Plan Act,
835
No. 57, Dignity for Victims of Sexual Violence Act,
835
No. 58, Mental Health Court Expansion Act,
835
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS:
Springhill Mine Explosion (1956): Victims - Remember,
835
Rural Communities: Gov't. (N.S.) - Engage,
836
Open Farm Day: Antigonish Farms - Thank,
836
Caribou/Wood Islands: Ferry Serv. - Continue,
837
Muslim Commun. (Hfx.): Coats for Humanity - Thank,
837
Men of the Deeps - Anniv. (50th),
838
Movember Movement - Support,
838
Pate, Kim: Senate Appt. - Congrats.,
838
Dalrymple, Barry: Retirement - Well Wishes,
839
MacDougall White, Patricia: Lawrence Acad. Athletic Hall of Fame
- Induction, Mr. E. Orrell »
839
Natl. Truth & Reconciliation Comn. - 17th Call to Action,
840
Hfx. Co. U-18 Girls Soccer Team - SportChek Natl. Club
Championship, Mr. J. Stroink »
840
Holder, Donald: Boston Marathon - Congrats.,
841
Blois Fam.: Dairy Ind. - Support Thank,
841
Steele, John & Janet et al: Commun. Gym - Creation Thank,
842
CBU: Refugee Scholarships - Congrats.,
842
Foley, Dr. Anita: Guysborough Mem. Hosp. - Dedication,
842
Stinson, Emily - Success Wish,
843
Chernin, Gail Rudderham - N.S. Barristers' Soc. Award,
843
Whynot, Shawn: Creativity - Congrats.,
844
Pictou Co. First Nation - Fire Hall Const.,
844
Cdn. Parks & Wilderness Soc.: NDP Gov't. - Land Protection,
844
Wheaton's (Berwick): Rebuilding - Best Wishes,
845
Fisher, Laura: Mental Health Init. (Kentville) - Congrats.,
846
O'Brien, Dr. Dan - NSCAD Independence,
846
Stuart, Jarret/Caldera Distillery - Spirits Award,
847
Thomas, Owen - ALS Advocacy,
847
Angelina Kaulback et al - Birthday (80th),
848
Stack, Brady - Amherst Golf Club: Hole-in-One - Congrats.,
848
Northside Sports Hall of Fame: Inductees (2016) - Congrats.,
848
Mobile Food Market (Hfx.): Organizers - Thank,
849
MacNeil, Loretta: Inspiration - Congrats.,
849
Barb's Benches: Baillie Fam. - Courage Thank,
850
Chow, Dr. Carlyle - Dal. Medical Alumni Assoc. Award,
850
Kenzieville Cemetery: Revitalization - Participants Congrats.,
850
Windsor Karate Club - Anniv. (35th),
851
Rob's Farm Market (Hammonds Plains) - Farm-Fresh Produce,
851
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS:
No. 159, Prem. - Teachers: Conciliation Bd. - Refusal Confirm,
852
No. 160, Prem. - Doctors: Locations - List Table,
853
No. 161, Prem. - Richmond Scandal: Separation - Time Frame,
854
No. 162, Prem.: Lbr. Negotiations - Details,
855
No. 163, Mun. Affs. - Richmond Expenses: Min./C.B.-Richmond MLA
- Discussions Confirm, Ms. K. MacFarlane « »
856
No. 164, Mun. Affs. - Richmond: Innappropriate Spending
- Gov't. (N.S.) Response, Mr. A. MacMaster « »
857
No. 165, Energy: Independent Power Producers - Tariff Structure,
859
No. 166, EECD: École Bois-Joli - Status,
860
No. 167, Health & Wellness: Seniors Pharmacare Changes
- Consultation, Hon. C. d'Entremont »
860
No. 168, Health & Wellness: Long-Term Care - Doctor Referrals,
861
No. 169, Nat. Res. - Clear-Cutting: Goal - Timeline,
862
No. 170, Bus. - Mun. Red Tape: Removal - Timelines,
863
No. 171, LAE: Dorsey Recommendations - Implementation,
864
No. 172, Prem. - Film Tax Credits: Campaign Promise - Consistency,
865
No. 173, LAE - Conciliation Board: Participants - Withdrawal,
866
No. 174, Bus.: DSME - Status,
867
No. 175, EECD: Early Childhood Educators - Wage Grants,
868
No. 176, LAE - Conciliation Bd.: Teachers Refusal - Confirm,
869
No. 177, Internal Serv.: Access to Information Fees - Increase Explain,
870
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
871
876
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Wed., Nov. 2nd at 1:00 p.m
889
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 245, MacDonald, John Garth - Tema Conter Award,
890
Res. 246, Bowie, Angus: Antigonish Co. Mun. - Serv. Thank,
890
Res. 247, Chisholm, Liz: Antigonish Co. Mun. - Serv. Thank,
891
Res. 248, Chisholm, Carl: Antigonish Co. Mun. - Serv. Thank,
891
Res. 249, Roy, Dr. Carole: Antigonish Film Fest. (Anniv. 10th)
- Dedication, Hon. R. Delorey « »
892
Res. 250, Van de Sande, Casey: Atl. Agric. Hall of Fame
- Induction, Hon. R. Delorey « »
892
Res. 251, Gotell, Devin: Rio Paralympic Games - Congrats.,
893
Res. 252, H.M. MacDonald Elem.: Terry Fox Run - Congrats.,
893
Res. 253, Steinhart Distillery: Recognition - Congrats.,
894
Res. 254, St. F.X.: "My Kitchen" Dining Option - Congrats.,
894
Res. 255, Sullivan, Donna - Antigonish C of C Award (2016),
895
Res. 256, Tony's Meats - Antigonish C of C Award (2016),
895
Res. 257, Steinhart Distillery - Antigonish C of C Award (2016),
896
Res. 258, Mayhew-Gallant, Carly - Antigonish C of C Award (2016),
896
Res. 259, RJ MacIsaac Const. Ltd. - Antigonish C of C Award (2016),
897
Res. 260, Muttart, Peter: Kings Co. Mayor - Election Congrats.,
897
Res. 261, Raven, Pauline: Kings Co. Coun. - Election Congrats.,
898
Res. 262, Hodges, Meg: Kings Co. Coun. - Election Congrats.,
898
Res. 263, Hirtle, Brian: Kings Co. Coun. - Election Congrats.,
898
Res. 264, Snow, Sandra: Kentville Mayor - Election Congrats.,
899
Res. 265, Savage, Cate: Kentville Coun. - Election Congrats.,
899
Res. 266, Maxwell, Cathy: Kentville Coun. - Election Congrats.,
899
Res. 267, Gerrard, Craig: Kentville. Coun. - Election Congrats.,
900
Res. 268, Bolland, Eric: Kentville Coun. - Election Congrats.,
900
Res. 269, Andrew, John: Kentville Coun. - Election Congrats.,
900
Res. 270, Pulsifer, Lynn: Kentville Coun. - Election Congrats.,
901
Res. 271, de Jonge, Mark/Olympic/Paralympic Athletes - Congrats.,
901
Res. 272, Boyd, Danielle /Olympic/Paralympic Athletes - Congrats.,
902
Res. 273, Rafuse, Erin/Olympic/Paralympic Athletes - Congrats.,
902
Res. 274, Blank, Ashley/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
903
Res. 275, Conrad, Candace/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
903
Res. 276, Conrad, Courtney/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
904
Res. 277, DeKoe, Lianna/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
904
Res. 278, Diab, Monica/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
905
Res. 279, Gaudet, Melissa/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
905
Res. 280, Goodfellow, Adelle/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
906
Res. 281, Hardy, Kim/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
906
Res. 282, Huck, Jeanette/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
907
Res. 283, Huck, Leanne /Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
907
Res. 284, MacDonald, Kate/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
908
Res. 285, MacDonald, Samantha/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
909
Res. 286, Moore, Brianne/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
909
Res. 287, O'Donnell, Tiffany/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
910
Res. 288, Read, Ally/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
910
Res. 289, Santilli, Rieka/Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer Team
- Congrats., Hon. L. Diab « »
911
Res. 290, Ackerman, Laura: N.S. 4-H Pro Show - Congrats.,
911
Res. 291, Munroe, Emma: N.S. 4-H Pro Show - Congrats.,
912

[Page 827]

HALIFAX, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2016

Sixty-second General Assembly

Third Session

1:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Gordon Wilson, Mr. Keith Irving

MR. SPEAKER » : Order, please. Before we begin the daily routine, I'll present the Speaker's Ruling on the outstanding point of privilege.

SPEAKER'S RULING:

C.B. Richmond MLA made Unparliamentary comment by C.B. Richmond MLA (Point of Privilege by Mr. A. MacMaster [Hansard p761, 10/28/16]) Not a breach of privilege

A challenge to repeat a defamatory comment outside the Chamber is not a breach of the privileges of a member who has made the defamatory comment in this House under the protection of parliamentary privilege.

On Friday the member for Inverness rose on a point of privilege. He made an unparliamentary comment and I moved to another question as a result. He said during the comments that surrounded the exchange that the member for Cape Breton-Richmond had challenged him to repeat the comment outside the Chamber and this was a threat to bring legal action against him if he did. The member for Inverness said that such a threat interfered with his privilege to speak freely in this Chamber.

I did not hear the comment the member for Inverness says the member for Cape Breton-Richmond had made, and it does not appear in Hansard, but if I had heard it, I doubt that it would have caught my attention. That type of challenge is sometimes made here and in other Legislatures when comments are made that would be actionable if made outside the Chamber, in which members are protected by parliamentary privilege.

[Page 828]

In fact, in fairly short order after the House rose on Friday, I had the Chief Clerk research our library and produce a number of examples of previous comments from Hansard in this Chamber in which this type of challenge, to repeat a defamatory comment outside of the House, was either made or referred to.

A challenge to repeat a defamatory comment outside the Chamber is not a breach of privileges of a member who has made the defamatory comment in this House under the protection of parliamentary privilege.

We'll begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, may I also do an introduction to begin with?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MS. ZANN « » : Thank you. I'd like to draw everybody's attention to the west gallery where we are joined by not only Gary Burrill, our fearless Leader, but also Helga Guderley, John Himmelman, Jim Harpell, Jamie Simpson, Geoff LeBoutilier, David Patriquin, and Raymond Plourde.

If they could all please stand and receive the warm welcome of the House, we'd appreciate that. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to introduce a petition entitled "Stop using forest biomass for electrical power generation."

Nova Scotia's forests are rapidly disappearing. More and more forests are being chipped and burned for electricity generation, mutilating our landscapes and reducing shelter and food resources for wildlife. Is this destruction of Nova Scotia's forest ecosystems the 'green energy' we want?
Clear cutting entire forest stands for electricity generation is the lowest end use of our forest resources and is spoiling our forests for recreation, putting small manufacturers out of business and preventing an ecofriendly diversification of our forest economy . . . Clear cutting for biomass energy production is harmful to wildlife habitat, water cycles, soil nutrients . . .

[Page 829]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Would the member be able to read the operative clause?

MS. ZANN « » : Certainly, Mr. Speaker. The operative clause for this is - and I have also affixed my signature: "Premier McNeil, please end the use of forest biomass for power regeneration, as demanded by more than 28,000 people who signed . . ." online, and 1,000 people who have signed these hard copy versions of this petition. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 33 - Fences and Detention of Stray Livestock Act and Fences and Impounding of Animals Act.

Bill No. 36 - Gaming Control Act.

Bill No. 41 - Residential Tenancies Act.

Bill No. 44 - Maintenance Enforcement Act.

and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hants West.

MR. CHUCK PORTER « » : Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, I am pleased to rise and table the annual report.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The report is tabled.

[Page 830]

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Before I do a government notice of motion, I would like to make some introductions in advance, please.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. CHURCHILL « » : I beg leave to welcome some visitors to the east gallery today on behalf of the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. This week, October 31st to November 4th, is Atlantic Canada Career Week, and this is an opportunity to highlight career awareness for students from Primary to Grade 12 and for post- secondary students.

I wish to introduce students from Eastern Shore District High School today, and I would ask those students to rise as I read their names. Rebecca Humphries and Brook Forgeron are here with teacher Sean Kent. We are also pleased to welcome students from Citadel High School today: Will Holmes, Sebastian Smith, Jack Kelly, and their teacher Paula MacNeil. I would also like to welcome three co-operative education students today who are learning about careers in the Public Service: Michaela Bowles from Cole Harbour District High School; and Ariel Simard and Chloe D'Eon, both from École Secondaire du Sommet.

I would like all members of the Legislature to welcome these students as they develop an entrepreneurial mindset and explore career opportunities. Please know that we all wish you the very best in the future. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 241

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Atlantic Canada Career Week supports career awareness for students from Primary to Grade 12, and post-secondary students; and

Whereas this resource supports creating career exploration opportunities and experiences for students to discover an entrepreneurial mindset and spirit; and

[Page 831]

Whereas Nova Scotia is committed to improving career-readiness for students along with awareness of the importance of teaching entrepreneurial attributes across the curriculum;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature recognize October 31 to November 4, 2016, as Atlantic Canada Career Week in the Province of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : May I make an introduction?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. GLAVINE « » : Joining us in the gallery today are several key people involved with Movember Halifax and Prostate Cancer Canada Atlantic. Could they please rise as I introduce them so that they may receive the warm welcome of the House? They are Scott Priske, Movember Halifax; Mike Milloy, Movember Halifax; Mark Peyton, Movember Halifax; Lucas MacFayden, Movember Halifax; Peter Mallette, executive director of Prostate Cancer Canada Atlantic; and Ellen Townshend, manager of corporate development, Prostate Cancer Canada Atlantic. I would ask all members of the House to join me in giving our guests a warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

RESOLUTION NO. 242

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas one in eight men has the chance of getting prostate cancer in their lifetime, with 1,000 being diagnosed with testicular cancer this year, and one in five will experience a mental health problem each year; and

[Page 832]

Whereas Movember Canada is committed to raising awareness about men's unique health issues and the effect these illnesses have on fathers, sons, brothers, uncles, boyfriends, and husbands across Canada and the world; and

Whereas Movember Canada encourages men to grow a moustache throughout November to start conversations about men's health while raising awareness and funds for men's health projects and research;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House support this initiative in any way they can, and thank Movember Canada for the work they have done to help stop men from dying too young.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Environment.

RESOLUTION NO. 243

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Agriculture, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following regulatory resolution.

Whereas the Crémant 2013 from Blomidon Estate Winery was awarded the gold medal ranking by the National Wine Awards of Canada for 2016; and

Whereas Blomidon Estate Winery has become a popular destination because of its scenic location, and reputation for top-quality wines, both of which play a part in the winery's success, and acquisition awards on a national-international level; and

Whereas this year marks the award's 16th Anniversary and includes over 1,500 nominations from 230 different wineries across the country;

[Page 833]

Therefore be in resolved that all Members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Blomidon Estate Winery and its Crémant 2013 on this recognition of their excellent product, and for continuing to contribute to the growth of the wine industry in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Environment.

RESOLUTION NO. 244

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Agriculture, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following congratulatory resolution.

Whereas the gin, maple vodka, and habanero vodka from Steinhart Distillery in Arisaig all won awards at the New York World Wine and Spirits Competition and the San Francisco World Spirits Competition this year; and

Whereas Thomas Steinhart built the distillery in 2012 and founded the company, which provides employment opportunities for Arisaig residents, while including locally-sourced herbs, spices, and berries in the production of his spirits; and

Whereas this distillery represents Mr. Steinhart's long family history of distilling spirits which dates back over 300 years, and originates from rural Germany;

Therefore be in resolved that all Members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Thomas Steinhart on the success of his distillery and award-winning spirits, while recognizing his contribution to the local economy, and to growing the spirit industry in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 834]

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Environment.

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker. Again, on behalf of the Minister of Agriculture, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I'd just like to remind the honourable member that we can only do two, per day, per minister, so we'll save that one for tomorrow.

The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to make some introductions.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. CHURCHILL « » : Thank you very much. I'd like to bring the members' attention to the east gallery, where we have numerous representatives from business associations who are here today in support of the bill I'm about to table. We have Karla Nicholson, Executive Director of Quinpool Mainstreet District Association; Patty Cuttell-Busby, Executive Director, North End Business Association; Paul MacKinnon, Executive Director, Downtown Halifax Business Commission; Juanita Spencer, Executive Director, Spring Garden and Area Business Association; Michelle Champniss, Executive Director, Sackville Business Association; Graziella Grbac, Executive Director of The Village on Main Business Association.

We also have Margaret R. Moore; Richard Connolly; Bill Cooley; Matina Kousoulis; Andrew Murphy; Vange Panopalis; Frank Evans; Shawn Cleary, councillor-elect for District 9, is here as well, and a friend of mine from Saint Mary's University; and, I believe we also have Bruce Fisher in attendance today who is representing HRM. (Applause)

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

[Page 835]

Bill No. 52 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 39 of the Acts of 2008. The Halifax Regional Municipality Charter. (Hon. Zach Churchill)

Bill No. 53 - Entitled an Act to Require a Public Inquiry into the Mental Health System in Nova Scotia. (Hon. Jamie Baillie)

Bill No. 54 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 1 of the Acts of 1994-95. The Environment Act. (Hon. Denise Peterson-Rafuse)

Bill No. 55 - Entitled an Act to Facilitate the Transfer of Pension Plans of Municipal and Other Authorities to the Public Service Superannuation Plan. (Hon. Randy Delorey)

Bill No. 56 - Entitled an Act to Address Sexual Violence at Colleges and Universities. (Hon Jamie Baillie)

Bill No. 57 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 14 of the Acts of 1989. The Victims' Rights and Services Act. (Hon. Jamie Baillie)

Bill No. 58 - Entitled an Act to Require the Expansion of the Mental Health Court Program. (Mr. John Lohr)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland South.

SPRINGHILL MINE EXPLOSION (1956): VICTIMS - REMEMBER

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge the 60th Anniversary of the explosion that ripped through the No. 4 Mine in Springhill, on November 1, 1956. The community of Springhill was built on the hard work, integrity, and values of those men and boys who, on a daily basis, went down in the mines to make a living for their families. The commitment they made to the community and the impact they had on the Town of Springhill and its residents is very much felt to this day.

I ask that all members of this House remember the men and boys who lost their lives that day while earning a living for their families, thereby making a commitment that we will never forget what they have done for Springhill, for their families, and for the Province of Nova Scotia.

[Page 836]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

RURAL COMMUNITIES: GOV'T. (N.S.) - ENGAGE

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : It is no secret that rural communities have been struggling under this current government. However, it now seems that the "death by a thousand cuts" approach has been altered to allow for some heavier blows. As more and more rural communities lose their schools and their doctors, many Nova Scotians in those communities are worried about the future of the place they call home.

Yes, change is a necessary part of life. However, how we approach change can make all the difference. This government has shown no support for hub schools. This government is withholding billing numbers for new doctors without having a short-term plan in place.

Mr. Speaker, I think it's high time for this government to start engaging rural communities, many of which are already seeking a divorce.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Antigonish.

OPEN FARM DAY: ANTIGONISH FARMS - THANK

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Every year, farms across Nova Scotia open their doors to the public on Open Farm Day. Today I would like to take a moment to recognize the farmers of Antigonish who graciously opened their doors to us this year.

West River Holsteins is an award-winning dairy farm owned by Jack Thompson and Rhonda MacDougall. Both Jack and Rhonda have been pillars of the agriculture community of Antigonish, having filled more roles than I could possibly list in this short time.

Lindenright Holsteins is another award-winning dairy farm, owned by Harry, Joanne, and Jason Van der Linden. The family milks approximately 90 head on their 200-acre farm, which was established in the early 1980s.

Swinkels Bee Products is a relatively young operation that has found success in the industry through bees and honey products after only a few years.

Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues in the House of Assembly to join me in thanking West River Holsteins, Lindenright Holsteins, and Swinkels Bee Products for opening their doors to Antigonishers interested in the agriculture industry and to congratulate them on another successful and educational Open Farm Day.

[Page 837]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

CARIBOU/WOOD ISLANDS: FERRY SERV. - CONTINUE

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I stand today to raise awareness about the reduction and, at times, absence of ferry service between Caribou and Wood Islands during this past summer. This had an immediate economic impact on the local businesses dependent on tourism. It also had a tremendously negative impact on local businesses and the trucking and lumber industries.

This government must take concrete steps to ensure that a reliable two-ferry service scheduled between Nova Scotia and P.E.I. is part of the federal government's plan. Caribou is the third-largest entry point into Nova Scotia, and the case must be made that there is more monetary return in this service than elsewhere in Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I call on the Premier to make this a priority and to reassure the businesses in Pictou West that he understands and will fight to keep two ferries running between Pictou and Wood Islands.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MUSLIM COMMUN. (HFX.): COATS FOR HUMANITY - THANK

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : For the second year in a row, the Muslim community of Halifax is mobilizing our community to help those in need through Coats For Humanity. Last year they collected 1,200 new or gently-used winter coats and then gave the gift of warmth by distributing them to non-profit organizations.

This year, donations are being accepted until November 10th at a number of locations, including SimplyCast on Tacoma Drive in Burnside, Bedford Orthodontics in the Sunnyside Mall, and the student unions of both Dalhousie and Saint Mary's universities. The coats will go to good homes through organizations like the Brunswick Street Mission, Adsum House, and Phoenix Youth.

I thank the Muslim community of Halifax for their leadership, energy, and community spirit.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

MEN OF THE DEEPS - ANNIV. (50th)

[Page 838]

MR. DAVID WILTON « » : I want to take a moment to recognize the Men of the Deeps and congratulate them on their 50th Anniversary today. The Men of the Deeps are a group of 27 active members, three of whom are founding members.

Established November 1, 1966, the Men of the Deeps founded a coal miners' choir and shared their stories worldwide. They have sung the stories of the Cape Breton coal-mining experience in every corner of the world. Rita MacNeil was inspired by the Men of the Deeps and wrote Working Man in tribute to these fine gentlemen. Coal Town Road and Coal Tattoo were also among the favorites. Once again I want to congratulate the Men of the Deeps on their 50 years, and best wishes for their concert and reception this evening and best in their future.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

MOVEMBER MOVEMENT - SUPPORT

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, today, November 1st marks the beginning of Movember, a fairly recent installation of what I'm sure will be a long-standing tradition. Movember is a movement for men's health and against prostate cancer. It began as a conversation in 2003 between two friends in Melbourne, Australia about how moustaches were disappearing from current fashion trends. It has since turned into an international and quirky awareness and fundraising campaign. With a modest beginning of only 30 participants, it has grown to over five million participants worldwide. To date, 1,200 men's health projects have been funded as a result of this initiative.

You can rest easy knowing that you don't have to grow a moustache to participate. But I do, however, encourage everyone to support the Movember movement and change the face of men's health. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

PATE, KIM: SENATE APPT. - CONGRATS.

MS. MARIAN MANCINI « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like the House to join me in congratulating Kim Pate on her appointment to the Canadian Senate. A fellow graduate of Dalhousie Law School and an executive director of Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies, Kim's relentless devotion to social justice is incomparable. Her work and effort have been praised through the legal community with Justice Louise Arbour recognizing her intensity of commitment and dedication, particularly in regard to the Commission of Inquiry into the Kingston Prison for Women.

In 2014, Kim was awarded the Order of Canada for her advocacy of marginalized and incarcerated women. As a senator, she has committed to tackling the urgent issue of segregation and indigenous overrepresentation in Canadian prisons. I want to wish her the best of luck and congratulate her on this exciting new chapter.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

DALRYMPLE, BARRY: RETIREMENT - WELL WISHES

MR. BILL HORNE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to thank and recognize Barry Dalrymple for his service to the community and hard work as HRM Councillor for District 1, Waverley-Fall River-Musquodoboit Valley. Barry has worked hard as a member of HRM Council since 2008. He is currently a member of six committees including chairman of the Grants Committee and vice-chairman of the Environmental and Sustainability Committee. He is also an active supporter and member of the Shubenacadie Watershed Environmental Protection Society and the Trails Committee.

I would like also to thank Barry for his years of dedicated service to numerous volunteer organizations such as the LWF Community Hall, Fall River District Lions, Fall River Lions Christmas Express, and the Waverley Sports Bar.

Barry has an avid interest in baseball and is an executive director, treasurer of LWF baseball with a membership of over 400 players aged 4 years to 19 and up. On behalf of our residents, I wish Barry a happy and healthy retirement.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

MACDOUGALL WHITE, PATRICIA:

LAWRENCE ACAD. ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME - INDUCTION

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : I rise today to congratulate former Westmount resident Patricia MacDougall White on her induction in the Lawrence Academy Athletic Hall of Fame this summer. Patricia was recognized for soccer, hockey and softball during her time at Groton Massachusetts Prep School. She was a recipient of many athletic and academic awards and went on to star in women's soccer at St. Francis Xavier University. It's a true honour to have this opportunity to recognize the abilities and success of this multi-talented young woman. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

NATL. TRUTH & RECONCILIATION COMN. - 17th CALL TO ACTION

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MS. LENORE ZANN « » : The 17th call to action from the National Truth and Reconciliation Commission's final report reads as follows: "We call upon all levels of government to enable residential school Survivors and their families to reclaim names changed by the residential school system by waiving administrative costs for a period of five years for the name-change process and the revision of official identity documents, such as birth certificates, passports, and driver's licenses, health cards, status cards, and social insurance numbers." The Shubenacadie Indian residential school was named numerous times in this report. Victims of the residential school system here in Nova Scotia accounted for numerous abuses in that testimony.

We, as a province, must do everything we can to redress this legacy. I look forward to hearing the Minister of Service Nova Scotia, his plans to fulfill this call to action in the days and weeks ahead. Consultation is surely needed.

To be continued.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

HFX. CO. U-18 GIRLS SOCCER TEAM

- SPORTCHEK NATL. CLUB CHAMPIONSIP

MR. JOACHIM STROINK « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate the Halifax County United under 18 girls soccer team on their success at the recent SportChek National Club Championship held in Vaughan, Ontario. These young women, representatives of Nova Scotia, came home with well-deserved bronze medals.

Over the five-game tournament the team allowed only two goals and four shutouts. They were also the only team in the tournament to finish without a single yellow card or red card, demonstrating great sportsmanship.

I'd like to recognize the team members: Breagh Bates, Haley Birrell, Alex Doane, Katelynn Fines, Danielle Fougere, Shikha Gupta, Madison Lavers, Claire MacDougall, Shae McKenzie, Meghan McNeill, M.J. Miller, Emily Mongeon Breanna Roach, Taylor Slipp, Abby Smilestone, and Jane Stevens, as well as the coaching staff, Lorie Bates, Maggie Malone, and his final game as coach after six national tournaments, Mike Malone.

Congratulations to all.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

HOLDER, DONALD: BOSTON MARATHON - CONGRATS.

[Page 841]

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, Donald Holder, of Long Point, Inverness County, completed the Boston Marathon this Spring with a time of three hours and 25 minutes. His intensive training regimen saw him running five days per week, all through the winter, leaving Donald well prepared for the physical demands of the marathon. He never missed a day.

Mr. Holder used his trip to Boston to raise funds for the United Way of Cape Breton, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, and the Canadian Diabetes Association. Congratulations to Donald Holder on completing a race which tests the very limits of humanity.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, the American election is only a week away. Many Nova Scotians have been following the presidential race south of the border. For anyone who has watched the debates, it is clear that Donald Trump has a very loose relationship with the truth. PolitiFact has been fact-checking his claims and ruling them as truth, false, or pants-on-fire.

In the first debate alone, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Trump said 34 false things. As an Opposition Party, it is our job to hold the government to account - and I think this government may be trying to break Mr. Trump's record.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, I remind the honourable member for Queens-Shelburne that that's not an acceptable Member's Statement.

The honourable member for Hants East.

BLOIS FAM.: DAIRY IND. - SUPPORT THANK

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, the Blois family of Gore, Hants County, have been in the dairy business for eight generations, since 1784, and have one of the oldest farms in North America. Now known as Courthouse Hill Farm, they hosted their first-ever milk run event in early August.

The public was invited to a six-kilometre run through hayfields, pastures, and dairy barns. The point of this fun run was to educate the public about the dairy industry. Dairy farming is a primary industry in this part of our province. The run was a tour of the farm with stops for milk as hydration and snacks of cheese. The runners were given swag bags with information about dairy farming and products collected from producers province-wide.

I would like to ask all members of this House of Assembly to join me in thanking the Blois family for their innovative support of our dairy industry. Thank you.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

STEELE, JOHN & JANET ET AL: COMMUN. GYM - CREATION THANK

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased today to acknowledge John and Janet Steele, and Blaine and Karen North of Canning. Together they created a community gym which has contributed to the physical health and fitness of many in our community. The gym is located in a garage on the North property and Janet Steele, along with her assistant John Steele, serves as the professional trainer.

Both the Steeles and Norths offer their services on a volunteer basis with only nominal fees for participants. Their dedication to four times per week workouts is inspiring and matched only by their efforts to make it fun.

My sincere thanks on behalf of all who have benefited so much from their gym. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

CBU: REFUGEE SCHOLARSHIPS - CONGRATS.

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, I wish to acknowledge the creativity and leadership of students at Cape Breton University who proposed a couple of months ago to offer 10 bursaries to refugees who have settled in Cape Breton. I wish to also thank the board of governors of the university who approved this idea last week. The bursaries will be offered in perpetuity, meaning that children who arrived as refugees will be eligible to apply when they reach university age.

I join the leadership of Cape Breton University and its student union in their hope that this gesture may encourage families to make Cape Breton their forever home.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore- Tracadie.

FOLEY, DR. ANITA: GUYSBOROUGH MEM. HOSP. - DEDICATION

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : I rise today to put a much-deserved spotlight on a very special woman, Dr. Anita Foley. The people of Guysborough and area couldn't have known 40 years ago, when this spectacular woman arrived, that she would change their lives forever. The commitment Dr. Foley offers to her patients is remarkable. Dr. Foley once was alone in her practice for seven months. During that time, she was on call seven days a week, 24 hours a day. She worked a full day in the office of her practice, served patients at the hospital, and solely manned the emergency department at the hospital as the physician on call.

[Page 843]

As a result, the emergency department in Guysborough Memorial Hospital has never closed in 40 years. On June 25th, Guysborough Memorial Hospital celebrated the opening and naming of the new wing of their hospital, the Dr. Anita Foley Health Services Centre. I am truly moved by the dedication of Dr. Foley. Throughout her career, she has touched the lives of so many and truly makes a difference every day.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

STINSON, EMILY - SUCCESS WISH

HON. PAT DUNN « » : I rise in my place today to recognize a very successful, impressive, and motivated individual: Emily Stinson from Stellarton. Emily is a Dalhousie University graduate, obtaining her master's degree of science in physiotherapy, along with her Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. Stinson's determination, self-discipline, and exceptional ability allowed her to successfully meet the challenges of the university level. Emily has accepted a position in the Halifax Infirmary, and is looking forward to the exciting opportunities it will offer. I would ask all members of this Legislature to join me in wishing Emily continued success in her new career path.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

CHERNIN, GAIL RUDDERHAM - N.S. BARRISTERS' SOC. AWARD

MS. MARIAN MANCINI « » : Each year, the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society honours a member for their distinguished service to the profession and to the public. That award was given last Friday to Gail Rudderham Chernin, Q.C., from Sydney, Nova Scotia. Gail is the daughter of Dot and Nelson Rudderham. For many years she ran her own practice, and now is senior counsel at Breton Law Group in Sydney.

When she received her award, she made three points. She encouraged young lawyers to become involved in their community and to give back to society. Secondly, she recognized the role that lawyers have played in changing society as champions in the courts for human rights. Thirdly, she dedicated the award to her late mom, and to all mothers who have pushed and encouraged women of Gail's generation to achieve their dreams.

Gail's mother, Dot, died of breast cancer last month. Gail is currently the national secretary of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation. I ask the House to congratulate this outstanding Nova Scotian.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Armdale.

WHYNOT, SHAWN: CREATIVITY - CONGRATS.

[Page 844]

HON. LENA DIAB « » : I rise today to acknowledge the skill and creativity of a constituent of Halifax Armdale: Shawn Whynot. Shawn is the music director at Bethany United Church and has been honing his skill as an internationally trained organist for more than three decades. Shawn is a music instructor here in Halifax and has performed all across Atlantic Canada.

He has also found a very unique way to share his talent with our community. On the Saturday before Halloween, Shawn performed a spooky musical soundtrack set to the classic 1927 silent horror film The Cat and the Canary, at Bethany United. Shawn's music punctuated the tense and the lighter moments of the film, and his performance showcased both his ability and his stamina as a performer. But this is not the first time that Shawn has tackled such a feat. He recreated the Phantom of the Opera and the soundtrack of the 1923 version of the Hunchback of Notre Dame last year.

I applaud Shawn and ask all members of the House of Assembly to join me in wishing him and his family continued success.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

PICTOU CO. FIRST NATION - FIRE HALL CONST.

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Recently, Pictou Landing First Nations gathered together in what is known as a smudging ceremony. Chief Andrea Paul explained that the ceremony is to get rid of the negative and replace it with the positive. That was exactly the spirit of the day, as firefighters from the reserve and neighbouring communities celebrated the ground-breaking for a new fire hall. Construction will begin immediately on the three-bay building, and the expected completion will be in approximately three months.

After being without a fire hall for a couple of years, and with all the challenges that that presents, there is already renewed interest in the department from a membership perspective, and excitement is spreading throughout the community. I congratulate Pictou Landing First Nations, Chief Paul, and firefighters past and present.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

CDN. PARKS & WILDERNESS SOC.: NDP GOV'T. - LAND PROTECTION

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to draw the attention of the House to an exciting announcement by Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, thanking Nova Scotia's Government for protecting approximately 0.25 million hectares of land, including half of all remaining large intact forests, which were added to the Parks and Protected Areas system in Nova Scotia.

[Page 845]

Mr. Speaker, this announcement was made on August 1, 2013, and was addressed to the former NDP Government. According to the 2013 release, Chris Miller, CPAWS national conservation biologist, said that Nova Scotia was emerging as a leader in Canada for the protection of wilderness, great progress is being made protecting the most ecologically significant areas of the province, including important coastal areas, large intact forests and rare species habitat.

In August 2013 this announcement concluded a multi-year process to identify lands for protection, involving several rounds of public and stakeholder consultations and clearly stated that with the new protected areas . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order. The time allotted for the member's statement has expired.

The honourable member for Kings West.

WHEATON'S (BERWICK): REBUILDING - BEST WISHES

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, the month of October was host to Small Business Week, a celebration of entrepreneurship in business development. With this in mind, I'd like to formally recognize the success of a small business, a Maritime family company in the Annapolis Valley that has steadily grown over the past 25 years.

Wheaton's began with humble origins in 1990. Owners Kay and Garnet Wheaton opened a country store, beginning as a renovated barn. Wheaton's expanded and eventually grew to include a production facility, five stores located throughout the Maritimes, selling homemade Nova Scotia pine, oak, maple, and cherry furniture, along with an assortment of other goods.

In 2013 Cider Press Café was added to the original Berwick location. Unfortunately the original store was destroyed this past May in a devastating fire. A temporary store was quickly built and business continues as usual. Wheaton's will be rebuilt and a brand new location will be opening in Berwick in the Spring of 2017, with all the employees being rehired.

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the constituency of Kings West, I'd like to recognize the success, growth, and opportunities that Wheaton's has provided to its employees, in addition to the services and products offered to the public over the past 25 years. I'd also like to wish Wheaton's all the best as they begin a new chapter . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Time allotted for the member's statement has expired.

The honourable member for Kings North.

[Page 846]

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. LOHR « » : I'd like to direct all members of the House to the west gallery where we have Matt Whitman, Councillor for District 13, Hammonds Plains-St. Margarets - give him the warm welcome to the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

FISHER, LAURA: MENTAL HEALTH INIT. (KENTVILLE) - CONGRATS.

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize the hard-working community and members and organizations committed to bringing awareness to mental health in our area. In early September a new bench was installed in Miner's Marsh, in Kentville, to boost hope for those with mental illness and bring awareness about mental health and an end to the stigma in the community.

The bench was inspired by the experience of recent NSCC Business Administration graduate Laura Fisher during her community leadership course last Fall. With the help of the community health board funding the project took off. There is an image on the bench depicting four people holding hands in solidarity as they look at the sunrise over Cape Blomidon and the message on the bench states: You are Not Alone.

Mr. Speaker, I wish to congratulate Laura Fisher for her initiative and her commitment to mental health in our area.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

O'BRIEN, DR. DAN - NSCAD INDEPENDENCE

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, sadly we lost a great person on October 30th with the passing of Dr. Dan O'Brien. Dr. O'Brien was past president of St. Thomas University, as well as NSCAD. While at NSCAD Dr. O'Brien was instrumental in ensuring that NSCAD remained an independent institution.

It was an honour to meet Dr. O'Brien and to work with him as MLA. Before the election of 2013 when I met Dr. O'Brien, true to himself his first question was, will you commit to keeping NSCAD independent for three years so we can prove that we can be financially secure? After speaking to our Leader and now Premier, I was pleased to tell Dr. O'Brien that his request would be honoured.

Mr. Speaker, as an independent NSCAD lives on and, true to what Dr. O'Brien worked for and believed, NSCAD is financially stronger today and is not under threat anymore of losing its independence under this government.

[Page 847]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

STUART, JARRET/CALDERA DISTILLERY - SPIRITS AWARD

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Mr. Jarret Stuart, founder of Caldera Distillery, on receiving a silver medal at the International Spirits Challenge in the U.K., and a bronze medal at the World Spirits Competition in San Francisco, for Caldera's Hurricane 5 whiskey. The whiskey is handcrafted, aged, and bottled on-site at the distillery.

Established in 2013 in the historic shipbuilding town of River John, Caldera is named after the second-largest ship built in the community. The Caldera was the pinnacle of what a small town of skilled shipbuilders could accomplish. The name Hurricane 5 refers to a storm that blew through the small community on October 18, 1939, and was recorded on an old beam in a barn that is still standing today on the distillery property.

I congratulate Jarret Stuart and wish him continued success.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

THOMAS, OWEN - ALS ADVOCACY

HON. MARK FUREY « » : There aren't many of us who set out to be heroes. Owen Thomas of Bridgewater has become just that. After receiving the devastating diagnosis of ALS at the age of 31, Owen has become an advocate for the Right to Try Act. He has dedicated his time and energy to bringing awareness and a voice to those who want to live out their lives their way.

Owen has opened the eyes of many that although terminal illness is devastating, it is not the end of the book. He is choosing to carry on, to live life to the absolute fullest and, at the same time, fighting for others who find themselves in similar circumstances.

Owen is an inspiration and a hero for his optimism and strength. I wish him nothing but many happy days ahead.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

ANGELINA KAULBACK ET AL - BIRTHDAY (80th)

[Page 848]

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, 1936 and 1937 must have been celebrated years with plenty of cigars and congratulatory exclamations of "It's a beautiful baby girl," or "It's a bouncing baby boy," as proven by the numerous 80th birthday celebrations that I've been privileged to attend in my constituency recently. I wish to continue the celebrations by extending official greetings to Angelina Kaulback, Logan Fleck, Joyce Geddes, Elzear Sabourin, Muriel Smith, Floyd Mesheau, and Hazel Dunn.

Best wishes to all those celebrating this milestone birthday. I hope your special day was filled with love, laughter, family, and friends. I wish you health and happiness for many more years to come.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland North.

STACK, BRADY - AMHERST GOLF CLUB : HOLE-IN-ONE - CONGRATS.

MR. TERRY FARRELL « » : I would like to recognize Brady Stack of Amherst, a young member of the Amherst Golf Club. The 10-year-old aced the par 3 number 4 hole at the Amherst club on Monday, July 11th, using a driver - making him the youngest player to sink a hole in one in the course's history.

I would ask that the members of this Nova Scotia House of Assembly join me in congratulating Brady on achieving this hole in one at the Amherst Golf Club and wish him future golfing success.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

NORTHSIDE SPORTS HALL OF FAME: INDUCTEES (2016) - CONGRATS.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : I rise today to congratulate the inductees in the Northside Sports Hall of Fame 2016. The athletes this year are John Ratchford, Dave Ratchford, Dave O'Quinn, Kevin MacRae, Ken Simpson, and Leo Doyle. The Notre Dame Athletic Club was recognized as a team entry. Again this year, the talent pool from the Northside is significant.

I would like to thank the Northside Sports Hall of Fame organization for their countless hours of research and efforts to recognize these individuals.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Fairview-Clayton Park.

MOBILE FOOD MARKET (HFX.): ORGANIZERS - THANK

[Page 849]

MS. PATRICIA ARAB « » : I would like to recognize the Mobile Food Market of Halifax for turning a regular Halifax city transit bus into a market that was supplying all areas of Halifax with fresh and high-quality fruits and vegetables.

For the 21-week pilot, it made stops in the HRM communities of North Preston, East Preston, North End Halifax, Spryfield, and Fairview. The project was sponsored by Partners for Care, the Nova Scotia Health Authority, HRM, and the Ecology Action Centre. Aimee Carson, the community food organizer at the EAC, described the project best as a way of addressing food insecurities across the city and helping people gain access to fresh food. In our community, it certainly did both and was a great success.

I would like the members of this Nova Scotia House of Assembly to join me in thanking Aimee and the organizers of the Mobile Food Market in making access to these foods easier for my constituents and the constituents of my peers.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

MACNEIL, LORETTA: INSPIRATION - CONGRATS.

HON. PAT DUNN « » : I rise in my place today to salute Stellarton resident Loretta MacNeil.

At 90, Loretta still receives great satisfaction and comfort from her beautiful painted works of art. Initially, Loretta learned the art of pottery, making many items and getting better with time and practice. She later enrolled in a painting class that was instructed by local well-known artist Dan Munro. Dan encouraged Loretta to do her own thing, which she did exceptionally well.

At her present time in life Loretta still paints, and her beautiful abstract works of art are being exhibited at the deCoste Entertainment Centre in Pictou. I would ask that all members of this Legislature join me in congratulating Loretta MacNeil for being an inspiration to all.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

MR. BRENDAN MAGUIRE « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction and draw your attention to the east gallery, where my former high school teacher, and a very patient individual, and good friend, Mr. Hugh Fraser, is. Very patient. (Applause).

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

BARB'S BENCHES: BAILLIE FAM. - COURAGE THANK

[Page 850]

MR. BRENDAN MAGUIRE « » : Mr. Speaker, on October 23rd, Shubie Park in Dartmouth was taken over by Spryfielders. Hundreds of people packed into a community room to witness the provincial launch of Barb's Benches. On October 19, 1990, Barb Baillie lost her life when she became a victim of domestic violence. Barb left behind five children, Denenia, David, Mark, Craig, and Chad. These children have shown tremendous courage, telling the world their stories, in hopes of helping others.

The purple Barb's Benches will be located throughout Nova Scotia: one, as a reminder of other victims of domestic violence, and two, to give others a safe place and information on where to seek help. Thanks to the Baillie family for showing so much courage.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

CHOW, DR. CARLYLE - DAL. MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOC. AWARD

MS. PAM EYKING « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Dr. Carlyle Chow of Baddeck on being this year's recipient of the Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association Family Practice Physician of the Year award. Dr. Chow has been part of our community for 48 years.

In addition to serving the people of Baddeck, he continues to help First Nations communities in Waycobah and Wagmatcook. For many years he has provided health care screening, illness prevention, diabetes care, and other services, with the support of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. In 1995, Dr. Chow even helped to fundraise enough money to build a new hospital. Dr. Chow also encourages medical students to consider practising in rural communities.

Mr. Speaker, Dr. Chow is a true role model for our young medical students and all members of our community. I wish to congratulate him on this award, and thank him for years of service in our community.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

KENZIEVILLE CEMETERY: REVITALIZATION

- PARTICIPANTS CONGRATS.

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, it's often said that everything old can be new again, and this applies to the revitalization of the Kenzieville Cemetery. Located in the centre of the community, with a new sign and brick pillars, this cemetery pays tribute to the families who settled in the area, with many descendants still there.

Volunteers have maintained the cemetery over the years and when it became obvious that restorative work was required, a committee was formed and the fundraising began. Restoration is ongoing but the improvement so far is spectacular. Those who have passed into eternity at the Kenzieville Cemetery, although perhaps sometimes forgotten, will forever be a reminder of the early settlers. Congratulations to all those who worked so hard to make this possible.

[Page 851]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hants West.

WINDSOR KARATE CLUB - ANNIV. (35th)

MR. CHUCK PORTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize the Windsor Karate Club who celebrated their 35th Anniversary with a dinner and dance on September 17, 2016, at the Three Mile Plains community hall.

In 1981, David Griffin started the Windsor Karate Club and moved to the old Mapleton hall in Three Mile Plains in 1998, where the non-profit organization has resided ever since.

David and his wife Theresa hold classes five to six days a week, with students ranging from seven years in age, to adult. They are seeing second-generation students whose parents were instructed in the skills of karate at the club as well.

I'd like to congratulate David and Theresa on the Windsor Karate Club's 35th Anniversary, and on receiving the Karate Nova Scotia Club of the Year award and wish them many more years of success. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Lucasville.

ROB'S FARM MARKET (HAMMONDS PLAINS) - FARM-FRESH PRODUCE

MR. BEN JESSOME « » : Mr. Speaker, small business and buying local are important to the economy of Nova Scotia. Rob's Farm Market is a small fruit and vegetable stand set up in late Spring to mid-Fall, that provides our community with the opportunity to purchase farm-fresh produce.

Rob Johnson of Canning has been setting up shop in Hammonds Plains since 2011. He began by selling produce out of his vehicle, accompanied by a couple of tables set up on sawhorses, with a canopy-type cover.

As the need and demand grew, he built a stand that he now sets up for his open season. The fruit and vegetable stand is located on the busy Hammonds Plains Road where thousands of cars drive by daily. It is a visible . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Time allotted for Statements by Members has expired.

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ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM. - TEACHERS: CONCILIATION BD. - REFUSAL CONFIRM

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. No reasonable person wants a teachers' strike. Parents don't want it, students don't want it, the vast majority of teachers, although they voted overwhelmingly against this Premier - they don't want to go on strike. That's why they offered to put the whole issue to a conciliation board. Can the Premier confirm for this House that his government has said no to a conciliation board with teachers?

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL » : Mr. Speaker, we said that we would be willing to go to the conciliation board.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, their school year is at risk. Students in Grade 12, and all grades, want to know that they will get through the entire year without a strike. The time for political games is over. Did the government write to teachers and say no to conciliation board, or communicate it as a "no" in any other way?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, in no way did we say we would not go to a conciliation board. What we asked from teachers last week was a list of what they wanted to talk about. We provided back to them the things we wanted to talk about. They said no.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, there is only one Premier. It's his job to make sure that our classroom is not interrupted. Every day, he says it's up to the union, it's up to the union. Well, at some point, it's up to him. Why did he not agree to put this whole matter to a conciliation board in the first place, so that parents and students could have the comfort of knowing that at least he's trying to work this out?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question again. I want to tell him we agreed to the conciliation board. We have talked about all the things that were part of that, which would have been the classroom conditions across this province. I want to remind the honourable member that in the first three budgets that we presented to this House, we invested heavily in classrooms, and their party voted against those. Our record on defending and working with classroom teachers speaks for itself. And their record in this House voting against it also says what they think about classrooms.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

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PREM. - DOCTORS: LOCATIONS - LIST TABLE

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is also to the Premier. When this government went for looking votes in the last provincial election, they promised a doctor for every Nova Scotian, and I will table this. Now they are telling people to call 811 to add their names to a waiting list. Last week a high ranking official in the Health Authority said that every community cannot expect a family doctor. Apparently the promise should have read, a doctor for some Nova Scotians. Will he table a list of communities, like Weymouth, that will no longer have a doctor?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. There is a physician working in Weymouth now, along with a nurse practitioner. We have continued to work with communities across the province to provide the infrastructure and the work environment that healthcare professionals that want to work in, which a collaborative practice.

He referred to 811 - we have asked Nova Scotians across the province who are looking for a family physician to call 811, so that we can keep a record of communities where we are seeing growth. At the same time, we want to make sure that if they require medical attention at that time, we can then direct to 811, where there are health care providers, which in turn, can direct them to the right health care institution.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, in his column in the Local Express this weekend, John DeMont wrote "People after all don't want to move to places without schools, doctors and hospitals for their children". Families and communities deserve to know what their government plan to do to keep their promise of a doctor for every Nova Scotians, and I just tabled that.

Would the premier tell Nova Scotians what criteria the government is using to decide which communities will no longer have billing numbers issued by the Nova Scotia Health Authority?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want again thank the honourable member for his question. We have said time and time again - and as I've said the Minister of Health and Wellness has said - that we are looking for collaborative practice, and teams across this province because it's what health care providers are telling us they want to operate in.

We have a rural residency program that is bringing those health care providers out in rural communities. We're very proud of the announcement last week with nurse practitioners and family practice nurses, that we will be hiring across the province who will work in communities to enhance some of the collaborative care teams we have now, which 14,000 other Nova Scotians with access to that health care team - that will also provide them with access to a family physician. So, we are continuing to work with communities across this province so we make sure we respond to their needs.

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MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, the Premier keeps talking about collaborative practice, but as I told this House last week, the president of Doctors Nova Scotia has said that doctors have not been consulted by either the government or the Nova Scotia Health Authority to help shape these teams. I am beginning to wonder if the Premier actually understands what the term "collective" means.

Mr. Speaker, will the Premier tell the people of this province how many years they will have to wait for this government to meet the promise of a doctor for every Nova Scotian?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, again, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank doctors and health care providers across this province who are working with government to ensure that we provide collaborative practices in communities across Nova Scotia so that communities and the residents of those communities have access to primary care. We're going to continue to work with those communities to make sure that we provide that in communities across this province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM. - RICHMOND SCANDAL: SEPARATION - TIME FRAME

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : The expense scandal in Richmond is now ensnaring the Liberal Party more and more every day. Now we know that the scheme to take taxpayers' money from the people of Richmond and put it into the bank account of the local Liberal Association was actually initiated by a known organizer of the Liberal Party. Only today did the Party, or its caucus, take action and apparently end their employment with him.

I'd like to ask the Premier, why did he wait until it became public to take action to separate his employment relationship with Mr. Sampson, who initiated the scheme to take taxpayers' money and give it to Liberals?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As he would know, individuals made personal cheques to an event that was held in that constituency. They made a decision following that. Elections Nova Scotia is looking into that, and that is up to Elections Nova Scotia from there.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Well, it's up to the Leader of the Liberal Party how he wants his Party to conduct business, and business under the Liberal Party in Richmond County is to conspire to take money from taxpayers and put it in the local Liberal account. That's in the Premier's jurisdiction.

In fact, when the NDP received illegal contributions a few years ago, the Premier at that time said: It's awfully strange, though, that when the microscope went on for them, all of a sudden they decided they'd better start handing the money back.

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That money still sits in the Liberal bank account. Now that the microscope is on him, will he give the money back to the taxpayers of Richmond?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, again, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. The Liberal Party is not under investigation. As much as he wants to continue to repeat falsehoods, there is nothing associated with the Liberal Party.

What he was referring to with the New Democratic Party was clearly laid out that there was an illegal contribution provided to their campaign, and they were provided back. What we have here is that there are councillors in Richmond County who bought a ticket to a Liberal event and were reimbursed by the taxpayers of Richmond County and then asked for a tax receipt, which we all know is inappropriate. Elections Nova Scotia is dealing with those individuals, not the Liberal Party.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I'd like to remind the honourable Premier that the term "falsehoods" is unparliamentary.

The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

PREM.: LBR. NEGOTIATIONS - DETAILS

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. After three years in this office, it is clear that this government does not support the aspect of collective bargaining. Take arbitration, for example. This government used to support arbitration until it didn't like the Jim Dorsey findings and fired him. Fast-forward a year, and we have Bill No. 148 - a threatening piece of legislation that would dictate the terms and conditions of contract as soon as arbitration is underway.

So I ask the Premier, why does this government continue to cherry-pick its way through labour negotiations?

THE PREMIER « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, the reason is that the previous government decided they were going to open the chequebook up to organized labour and take money out of classrooms across this province. The previous government decided it was going to grow wait-lists in this province. The previous government ignored the issues of Victoria General Hospital. That's why we're dealing with this in a way that Nova Scotians want us to, in a thoughtful, methodical way.

Not a single member of a union in this province is losing a dime. What we're saying to everyone in this province is that we all have to be part of the solution of moving this province forward. If you want me to invest in classrooms, then the growth of your benefits has to slow down. If you want me to fix the VG, the growth of your benefits has to slow down. But let me be clear: not a single member of a union in this province is losing a dime, Mr. Speaker, unlike when that Party was in power, when every student in this province lost $65 million. (Applause)

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MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, through you, if I had a Snickers bar, I would offer it to the Premier, because he's not quite himself when he's angry. (Laughter)

Labour relations have shrunk to a new low under this government. I have witnessed all-night House sittings so this government can ram through its next labour bills. I have seen more health care workers at the Law Amendments Committee than we have seen passengers on this year's Yarmouth ferry. Now, we are at the brink of the first provincial-wide teachers' strike in the history of Nova Scotia.

This government is telling teachers that the collective bargaining process has run its course even though the teachers . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Does the member have a question?

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, my question to the Premier is, will he admit today to the teachers, the nurses, health care workers, and all Nova Scotians, that this government has failed to respect the collective bargaining process?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, just the opposite, it's actually the lawyer representing teachers across this province who sent a letter to every teacher saying the government has respected the negotiation. Both parties came to the table with different offers, and we came to a resolution, but let me be clear: when that member was in government, we saw union leader after union leader after union leader march their way across to the Red Room, and take away the right to strike from paramedics in this province. When we stand in this House, we're defending all Nova Scotians, not a select few that that Party did when they were in government.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

MUN. AFFS. - RICHMOND EXPENSES:

MIN./C.B.-RICHMOND MLA - DISCUSSIONS CONFIRM

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Municipal Affairs says he has not talked to the member from Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie about allegations of improper expenses in Guysborough. My question is, has the minister discussed allegations of improper expenses in Richmond with the member for Cape Breton-Richmond?

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, the record is clear on this. There are individuals that made decisions in relation to reimbursements that were very wide, that did include a donation to political parties, and that also included other things that everyone in this House knows were inappropriate. The appropriate authorities are investigating those allegations, and it's incumbent upon all of us to allow Elections Nova Scotia and the RCMP to do their due diligence in this investigation, so we can have a full understanding of what the issues are.

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MS. MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, we certainly are getting some clarity on the full issues. I mean, today, this made national news, and Richmond isn't the only municipality where irregularities in expenses are being investigated. The Ombudsman's Office is taking a look at Guysborough Country too, and in Allnovascotia.com yesterday, the Minister of Municipal Affairs said he hadn't even bothered to ask his Cabinet colleague, the former Warden of Guysborough, about the allegations.

So, I will ask the minister, is he not interested in what's going on with the taxpayers in Guysborough, or is he afraid to ask his colleague?

MR. CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, imagine that member saying that when for the first time in Nova Scotian history, we have a government that's moving forward municipalities to put all of their expenses online to bring a standardized level of transparency and accountability and regulatory framework around expenses for the first time in this province's history. The record of . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs has the floor.

MR. CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, We look forward to continuing our work with our eager municipal partners who share our desire to ensure that we are the most transparent province in this country.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

MUN. AFFS. - RICHMOND: INAPPROPRIATE SPENDING

- GOV'T. (N.S.) RESPONSE

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Municipal Affairs. Isn't it interesting that those involved in the Richmond spending scandal were clamouring to pay back the money they claimed to attend the member for Cape Breton-Richmond's re-election fundraiser as soon as it became a media issue for this government last week? Only when those involved had the pain of embarrassing the Liberal Party did they jump to action to try to clear up that mess for the benefit of the member for Cape Breton-Richmond, proof that this has been a Liberal Party operation. (Interruption)

Isn't that why - and I hear the laughter on the other side, but they're showing diagrams on the national news today highlighting the connection - isn't this why the government avoided this issue for months to pretend the inappropriate spending did not exist?

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HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : The appropriate authorities - the Ombudsman's Office, Elections Nova Scotia, and the RCMP - are investigating. I know the member opposite has argued in this Chamber that the executive branch of government interfere in each of those arm's-length organizations. Now we know what kind of government we're going to have if the PCs are in place - one like their friends Donald Trump and his Republican buddies have down south of the border. It's absolutely ridiculous, Mr. Speaker.

MR. MACMASTER « » : Maybe I should have put the comb-over on today, Mr. Speaker.

The only thing I can tell you that I've said in this Legislature is that until the people of Richmond County got the Ombudsman involved, this government ignored their pleas for help. Those involved were clamouring to clean up the mess for the member for Cape Breton-Richmond, but there has been no such urgency to pay back the other thousands of dollars they owe the people of Richmond. I guess until that becomes an embarrassment for this government, we won't see a dime of that money. Also, according to the minister, as he was quoted in All Nova Scotia, we won't see any more municipal forensic audits.

Does the minister care about the cost of the audits, not in terms of dollars, but in terms of the cost they will have to a damaged Liberal brand in other parts of this province?

MR. CHURCHILL « » : Just to be clear, we said that we would not do a forensic audit of every single municipal unit in the province. I think all of us here can agree that that would not be an appropriate use of funds, or fair to all of those municipalities.

But what we are doing is considering the various options to ensure that there is public confidence in our municipal expense program across the province - we are considering spot audits; we are considering investing in a Municipal Auditor General. We're looking at all of the recommendations that came forward from the Ombudsman's Office, which I will remind that member is an independent office of this government for good reason. It cannot be directed by the Executive Council. They need to be independent. I would ask my colleague Mr. Trump to please stop encouraging us to . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. You've put me in an awful position to perhaps rule that the term "Trump" is unparliamentary. I'll have to think about that.

The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

ENERGY: INDEPENDENT POWER PRODUCERS - TARIFF STRUCTURE

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HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : My question is for the Minister of Energy.

Earlier this year, many independent power producers appeared at the URB hearing about renewable to retail. They raised concerns about the tariff structure proposed by Nova Scotia Power for access to the use of the grid. Since that time, I understand the URB has ruled on the proposed tariff structure.

I'd like to ask the minister, what has been done in response to the independent power producers on the ruling of the URB?

HON. MICHEL SAMSON » : I guess the easy answer would be to ask the independent power producers.

Mr. Speaker, the fact is that prior to our being elected, no one other than Nova Scotia Power could provide electricity to Nova Scotians. Our government changed that. We changed the rules to allow a structure to be in place to allow independent power producers to sell directly to Nova Scotians. The process involved legislation in this House, and it involved a hearing from the Utility and Review Board. Those tariffs have now been set in place. There is now the opportunity for independent power producers to put a business case together to sell directly to Nova Scotians.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : In 2013, the Liberals could not have been more explicit in their promise. That platform reads: "We will break Nova Scotia Power's monopoly." I will table this.

However, three years later, the government seems to be rather silent on this issue, so I'd like to ask the minister, when will this government break Nova Scotia Power's monopoly?

MR. SAMSON « » : That's a bit rich coming from a government that watched for four years as power rates were going up by 7, 8, 9, and 10 per cent, which placed a tremendous burden on Nova Scotians. On the other hand, last year we saw a slight decrease in power rates, and this year there was no increase in power rates in our province.

The fact is that it will now be up to private industry, via independent power producers, to be able to put a business plan together to sell directly to Nova Scotians. We have established a framework to allow that to happen, which is a first-ever in our province. I expect that, before too long, the member is going to see more activity on this matter.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

EECD: ÉCOLE BOIS-JOLI - STATUS

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MR. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. Will the province be purchasing or negotiating a lease extension for École Bois-Joli?

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Thank you for the question. It gives me an opportunity to say that we have worked very closely with all the partners in the P3 schools. We have notification dates that we have had to meet. We have met those in the past, and we have met this one, which was October 31st. There will be information and a release to the effect of the decisions we've made.

We have worked with our partner and agreed that those releases would go out jointly. The partner of whom we are speaking is currently out of the country, and will be back tomorrow. A release will be made then.

MR. YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, as the minister may be aware, parents, teachers, and the school board were expecting to find out Monday and there's actually a public meeting planned Thursday night. I think I just heard the minister say that the announcement will be made tomorrow, and I'd like her to just confirm that. There is a public meeting scheduled Thursday night to actually discuss development and transportation issues around that site, and it was scheduled that day, specifically, because they thought they would know by Monday of this week what would happen with that school.

MS. CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, perhaps if the member wants to talk about a specific school, we can do that. The decision as to whether we continue a lease, or whether we purchase a school has nothing to do with whether a school will close. All the schools that are being considered as part of the P3, have been identified by the school boards as schools they need in order to continue providing programs, and there is no question about whether those schools will close or not. So, if there's a suggestion in the community that a P3 decision that was to be notified on Monday will impact on whether the school stays open or not, is completely untrue, it has no impact on whether the school will remain open or not.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HEALTH & WELLNESS: SENIORS PHARMACARE CHANGES

- CONSULTATION

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Health and Wellness. This winter the Liberals cancelled their hikes to Seniors' Pharmacare following a province-wide backlash. The province promised consultation before further changes would be made to the program. I think in one of his scrums the minister even said that consultation would be happening in October. It is now November, and no notice of consultations have gone out to the partner groups.

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My question to the minister is, will the minister please tell the House when the consultations will take place, and why seniors don't know about it already?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : I think we have made it very clear to Nova Scotians that certainly, for next year there will be no increase in the Seniors' Pharmacare rate, that program will remain as it is this year. I would say that within the next couple of weeks, the full consultations will be underway, and outlined as to how all Nova Scotians can participate.

We're very interested in hearing, especially from those 55 to 65 years old, and their suggestions on keeping the program sustainable over the next decade or two.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : Well, I hope the minister is okay with those groups not really believing him at this point, until a true consultation actually happens. In the winter, seniors' groups were shocked by the huge increases their Pharmacare premiums were going up, and with no dates, no information, no feedback, we have to take the minister for his word and I can accept that. But they were promised a full consultation in October and it hasn't happened yet.

What precautions is the minister taking to ensure that the upcoming consultations are not a sham, like they were the first time?

MR. GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, yes, I agree with the member opposite that we did rely very heavily on the Group of IX to give us feedback but unfortunately, they didn't consult widely. This time we'll be consulting, obviously the Group of IX will be part of that, but in terms of the full public participation, this will be outlined here within the next couple of weeks as to how all Nova Scotians can have a say in the future of Seniors' Pharmacare.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HEALTH & WELLNESS: LONG-TERM CARE - DOCTOR REFERRALS

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : My question is to the Minister of Health and Wellness again.

Seniors being placed in long-term care facilities are required to have a family physician before they can be admitted. Many homes struggle to find a doctor for these seniors, and when they do it's a favour done by that physician because they know how dire that situation is. This comes on top of the added struggles caused by this government's decision to cut funding to long-term care facilities. We've talked about the 1 per cent cut each year a number of times in this House of Assembly.

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Does the minister agree that it is appropriate, given the unfunded vacancies for family physicians in so many areas of the province, that we ask these doctors to do so much more?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : What I can tell the member is that certainly a number of doctors - with their Care by Design program - are very, very willing participants in the care of our seniors in many parts of the province. We also have nurse practitioners, RNs, who are involved with their care plan. Now we have paramedics who are coming to nursing homes as well, especially in terms of stabilizing patients who do sometimes run into issues that can easily be addressed and not have to take them to an ER.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : These are our most vulnerable, the people we take care of as a province. We know that there is a gap here that needs to be truly filled. I think what the minister tends to present to us are a number of stopgaps in order to try to fill some of those things on a temporary basis, whether it's bringing in paramedics, whether it's bringing in nurse practitioners, or what have you. I do want the minister to acknowledge the problem, which I think he did in his previous answer but, truly, how is he going to make sure that doctors are available to these long-term care facilities without it being too much of a burden on those long-term care facilities in the first place?

MR. GLAVINE « » : The majority of our nursing homes do have access to a family doctor, a physician, in the community or proximity to come in to deal with serious issues involving our seniors in nursing homes. What we're talking about is the appropriate level of care at particular times. They don't need to see a doctor on all occasions. In fact, our paramedics are well trained; they're now assisting with palliative care as well. So I feel very confident in the array of clinicians who work in our nursing homes.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

NAT. RES. - CLEAR-CUTTING: GOAL - TIMELINE

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : My question is for the Minister of Natural Resources. Listening to the minister's non-answers on clear-cutting thus far, I don't know whether to laugh or cry. The minister states in this House that when it comes to a clear-cut target that "the goal is unchanged." I will table this. However, I will remind the minister that we are at the five-year mark and the goal of 50 per cent has not, I repeat, has not been reached.

I would like to ask the minister, what new timelines has his department set out to reach this target?

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : Anyone looking objectively at the workforce of the Department of Natural Resources will see that it is a science-based department and makes its decision based on that science. It's not an arm of industry; it's not an arm of special-interest groups in particular, or landowners, or otherwise. It is a department of professionals, be they biologists, geologists, surveyors, foresters, hydrologists, entomologists, park planners, firefighters, or other professionals. They are Nova Scotians who care greatly about our land, water, and air, and a sustainable future - and I am very proud of all of them.

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MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Last year we were told by this government that the province was on track to meet the 50 per cent target. However, through a freedom of information request, our caucus has obtained the percentages of clear-cutting on Crown lands, interestingly enough, for 2013 and 2014. In 2013, 64 per cent of the harvesting on Crown land was clear-cutting; in 2014, that number increased to 71 per cent - and I have tabled that.

I'd like to ask the minister, how will the province ever meet this 50 per cent target if clear-cutting on Crown land under this government is actually increasing?

MR. HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, of course the member would understand that there are individual variations on the road to success that occur, situations that influence things on an annual basis, and our objective remains unchanged. I am very pleased with the progress we made on the strategy at the five-year mark, and stay tuned.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

BUS. - MUN. RED TAPE: REMOVAL - TIMELINES

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Business. Small businesses are the engine of our economy in providing jobs and prosperity to our communities. One of these businesses is Oceanstone Seaside Resort in Chester. Tim Moore employs 45 people at Oceanstone, but bureaucracy and red tape have him rethinking his investments in this province. I will table that.

Mr. Speaker, we know that if one business complains, likely 9 out of 10 would not be complaining or would not seek the publicity. My question for the minister is, every session this government brings amendments to the HRM Charter to this House, when will the minister act to cut job-killing municipal red tape?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, in the last budget we have just introduced the Office of Regulatory Affairs and Service Effectiveness. They are doing what I would consider groundbreaking work around red tape reduction. The Halifax Regional Municipality has recognized the value of that provincial office. They have agreed to partner with the office, provide funding and a single resource, to further review circumstances within HRM for the sole purpose of seeing the same objectives that the province has achieved.

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MR. LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for that answer; however, ground breaking is not reducing red tape.

Mr. Speaker, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business says there is far too much red tape in Nova Scotia. The organization says excessive red tape has driven some business owners out of the province and they say municipal red tape can be counterproductive.

My question for the minister is, will the minister act immediately to support small businesses and cut this serious red tape problem?

MR. FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, if my colleague was talking to CFIB he'd know the track record of the province. The Atlantic vice-president has said that Nova Scotia is leading the country in red tape reduction. We look forward to the CFIB scorecard this coming February.

HRM has recognized the work that the province is doing, Mr. Speaker, they've recognized the work that the Office of Regulatory Affairs is doing, and they want to be part of that work. They are contributing a resource so that the office can support the work and objectives of HRM as well.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

LAE: DORSEY RECOMMENDATIONS - IMPLEMENTATION

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education. In May 2013, the member for Preston-Dartmouth, Critic for the Workers' Compensation Board, questioned the NDP Government on why they haven't made the changes to the WCB Act recommended by the Dorsey report. In fact the Liberals, while in Opposition, heavily criticized the NDP for doing nothing and ignoring injured workers. Surely this government wouldn't do one thing in Opposition and then do the complete opposite in government.

I'd like to ask the minister, three years into the mandate, what action has the minister taken to get which Dorsey recommendations implemented?

HON. KELLY REGAN » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. As the member well knows or should know, WCB is undergoing some improvements right now. There are a number of different aspects they are working on, Mr. Speaker, and I'd be happy to sit down and walk the honourable member through that, if he'd identify which particular issues he's interested in.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I will take the minister up on that and sit down and talk about some of these recommendations and where we're going. I would say today that back in the Fall of 2013, while campaigning, the Premier filled out a survey from the Pictou County Injured Workers Association and the Premier ticked off "yes" to all their statements. One of the statements was a statement that the low level of benefits to workers needs to be addressed. So clearly, while on the campaign trail, the Premier thought we should address the low level of benefits to injured workers.

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Three years later I'd like to ask the minister, what action has this government taken to address the low level of benefits that the Premier saw as a problem when he was pandering for votes?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I'd like to remind the honourable member "pandering for votes" is an unparliamentary term.

MS. REGAN « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question and, of course, the honourable member would know that the level of benefits is predicated on the amount charged to businesses, so if he would like to have businesses increase the amount that they pay towards WCB, please, speak out and let us know, and I'll be happy to pass that along to WCB. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

PREM. - FILM TAX CREDITS: CAMPAIGN PROMISE - CONSISTENCY

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, last year the Premier said that the Nova Scotia Film Tax Credit was the richest in the country, which was not factual. The Premier also said that it was far too rich for Nova Scotians and that the tax credit amounted to a 65 per cent subsidy to the entire industry - again, not factual. The Premier also said that the industry was not experiencing growth with the Film Tax Credit in place - not factual; in fact, with the Film Tax Credit in place, the film and TV industry supplied $180 million to the GDP along with 3,200 jobs in 2014.

So my question for the Premier is, does he believe that these statements and his attitude is consistent with his 2013 campaign promise to extend the Film Tax Credit for five more years?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, what I said was as a percentage to the growth in Canada, Nova Scotia's growth had not changed and, yes, we were providing a 65 per cent labour subsidy in this sector. We believe we have struck a balance that provides a 25 per cent all-in spend balance across Nova Scotia sectors that are supporting and investing in the film industry - and we're beginning to see the results of that.

MS. ZANN « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, I have to repeat - 65 per cent of the entire industry is absolutely non-factual; it is not true. Also, the industry was growing until the changes were made and now, unfortunately, they're not growing as fast as they were. Industry representatives are telling me that this government, without stakeholder consultation or consideration, undertook significant changes to the independent filmmaking structure in Nova Scotia, which caused a cultural and financial meltdown that has affected the lives of countless Nova Scotians. So, to make it plain, this would be like suddenly forcing the fishing industry back to fishing with nets and dories in order to try to catch the same amount of fish.

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So my question for the Premier is, how can the Premier justify cutting a rebate of $24 million to a thriving creative economy and then turning around and giving the same amount in payroll rebates to some of Canada's richest banks like the RBC, TD, and Butterfield's offshore bank in Bermuda?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for her question, and I again want to tell her and all members of this House we have the largest subsidy of any sector that we have in this province, the film industry. It's a 25 per cent all-in spend. I'm not sure whether she is against those other jobs that she's referring to within Nova Scotia; I'm not sure whether she's opposed to those jobs; or was she going to think that we should take $65 million out of classrooms to do that? (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable Premier has the floor.

THE PREMIER « » : . . . a balance to be fair to all Nova Scotians, Mr. Speaker, we're all going to be part of getting ourselves back to balance and we'll all be part of the growth.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

LAE - CONCILIATION BOARD: PARTICIPANTS - WITHDRAWAL

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education. The Teachers Union asked for a conciliation board; the government repeatedly has said that they want to talk to teachers. Here we are on the deadline.

I would like to ask the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education, has she received notice from either party either withdrawing their interest in the conciliation board or declining to participate in a conciliation board?

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question, and I would remind the member that the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education deals with these parties confidentially and we don't typically talk about what they're telling us. Thank you.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education of her own words in this House last week where she said she would separate herself from the government, from the Executive Council, and act impartially between the teachers and between their employer, which is the government. That remains true today. The fact of the matter is that the government put out a statement earlier today. It says that the Nova Scotia Teachers Union has declined the opportunity to participate in a conciliation board. That is either true, or it is not true. I would like to ask the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education, on behalf of all parents and students who want to know the answer, did the Teachers Union decline the conciliation board, yes or no?

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MS. REGAN « » : As I have previously indicated, we do prefer that the two parties speak for themselves.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

BUS.: DSME - STATUS

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : My question is for the Minister of Business. DSME was placed in receivership in February 2016. Since that time, PricewaterhouseCoopers has received about $700,000 in fees, and they continue to get more fees every month. In June, PricewaterhouseCoopers said that they had received a number of offers to buy the plant as a going concern. That was in June. We stand here today in November. People want to know what's happening. I would like to ask the minister, can he update the House on the status of the DSME situation, with the offers from the people who want to buy it as a going concern?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : The receiver in the DSTN matter continues to engage proponents. That work continues. We want to be very diligent in the work that is undertaken, and we want to ensure, where opportunities exist, for continued operation of that facility in Pictou County, that that will be the priority. As we speak, those discussions continue.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Well, time is moving on, and the Minister of Business, the person responsible for business in this province and economic development, has a role to facilitate a discussion and some positive movement on this, yet we're seeing nothing. People are wondering what the minister is doing. Many people are saying he's not doing anything. Today, I kind of heard an answer from him that suggested the same thing. I would like to ask the minister, what is he doing? What role is he taking? PricewaterhouseCoopers will sit there for as long as it takes and get a monthly fee. The Minister of Business should be trying to facilitate business. What is he doing?

MR. FUREY « » : That member is an accountant, and he knows that government should not be interfering in processes that receivers undertake. Rest assured (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable Minister of Business has the floor.

[Page 868]

MR. FUREY « » : We have full confidence in the receiver. We will be diligent in the work to find and secure employment for Pictou County. I want to remind that member that web.com just announced, through work with this government and NSBI, 300 positions in Pictou County. That's what this government is doing for Pictou County. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill- Millbrook-Salmon River.

EECD: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATORS - WAGE GRANTS

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : When this government brought forward their budget in the Spring, they promised that new wage grants for early childhood educators would give a much-deserved increase to these workers. The minister also said that she would bring wages up to the national average, both of which I would applaud. Unfortunately, what she meant was that grants would bring early childhood educator wages up to the 2012 national average, and that some workers would see increases in wages. What we're hearing now from the sector is that centres that were already paying fair wages have seen little benefit, and many long-serving educators have not had a pay increase.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Does the member have a question?

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : My question for the minister today is, does the minister think it's acceptable that long-serving, early childhood educators have not seen any benefit from this new grant?

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : I'm really happy that the topic of child care has been raised in the House today. We certainly have recognized as a government that, for too long, wages for early childhood educators were kept at the bottom, as far as a comparison across Canada. I would also suggest that the subsidy for parents was kept too low. In fact, for over a period of four years under the previous government, $6 million was taken away from early learning in this province.

MS. ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, while I do agree with the minister that this is a very important topic and that these educators need to have their wages raised, and also have better subsidized care for the parents, in fact, under the NDP we invested $28.8 million in early learning and child care, and we also increased subsidized child care spaces in 2011 and 2012.

Mr. Speaker, the shortage of child care spaces has been a problem for a long time. The actions of this government have made the sector even more unstable, so by setting wages, capping fees, and distributing grant funds unevenly, the government has actually put both private and non-profit child care centres in a difficult situation.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Does the member have a question?

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MS. ZANN « » : My question, Mr. Speaker, for the minister is, if grants don't make up the difference between wages and fees, both of which have been set by the province, then how does the minister expect child care centres to actually remain open?

MS. CASEY « » : One of the first things we did was to do a review of child care across this province. There were two findings in particular that were very disturbing, one was that many parents who were eligible for a subsidy, because of their income, were not able to pay the difference between the subsidy and what the fees were being charged by the operators, so we immediately invested in subsidies for those parents. In order to keep that gap from getting wide, there certainly had to be a cap on the parent fees.

We've put that cap on. It has allowed more than 700 new families to take part in subsidized daycare, which is absolutely the right thing to do.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

LAE - CONCILIATION BD.: TEACHERS REFUSAL - CONFIRM

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education. The government put out a statement today that says the Teachers Union declined to participate in a conciliation board. That statement could only be made to the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education, who is the one that either side appeals to, to call for a conciliation board.

The government is already talking about what the teachers may or may not have done. That minister has a duty to be impartial, she has an opportunity to bring together a conciliation board, and end this impasse without a strike.

I would like to ask her straight-up, for all the parents who are wondering, when the government says that the Teachers Union declined to participate, is that statement accurate?

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : As I have already indicated to the member opposite, this is a confidential process, we prefer that the parties speak for themselves, they have spoken. Thank you.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I will redirect my question to the Premier because obviously the finger-pointing has begun. The childishness about who said yes and who said no is not worthy of a Grade 3 classroom, and yet that is exactly the game-playing that the government is now participating in. If the Premier has a letter from the Teachers Union saying we will not participate, he should table it.

Better than that, and this is my question, Mr. Speaker, rather than play such childish, finger-pointing games, will he, before the deadline later today, say yes to conciliation and end this sorry mess?

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THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. If you don't mind, I'll read from the bulletin put out by the Nova Scotia Teachers Union, bullet three: the President responded to the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development this morning stating the NSTU will not accept any preconditions to a conciliation board referencing our belief in free and full collective bargaining.

Mr. Speaker, we said we're more than prepared to go and sit down at the conciliation board. They said no.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

INTERNAL SERV.: ACCESS TO INFORMATION FEES - INCREASE EXPLAIN

MS. MARIAN MANCINI « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Internal Services. Since 2013, the number of information requests received by government departments has been relatively stable. However, the fee estimates issued have more than tripled. In 2013, fee estimates for information requests received by government departments totalled $10,683 but in 2015, fee estimates were $32,543. I'll table that.

My question for the minister, can he explain why there has been such a dramatic increase in fees for access to information?

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, contrary to what the member is stating, the amount of applications for FOIPOP requests have gone up significantly, over 25 per cent. The amount of fees the member is . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Time allotted for Oral Questions Put by Members to Ministers has expired.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

MS. PAM EYKING « » : It gives me great pleasure to once again stand in this remarkable, time-honoured building. It gives me equal pleasure to stand amongst my esteemed colleagues and friends, my fellow members of this Legislative Assembly. For me it's both an honour and a privilege to represent the good people of Victoria-The Lakes. It's a provincial riding that spans over 3,400 square kilometres. Just to put that in perspective, if you were to get into your car in Baddeck and drive to Halifax, it would take the same amount time to cross Victoria-The Lakes by car.

Since the last sitting of the Legislature, our community welcomed thousands of visitors from around the world. Communities have hosted major events and festivals, and businesses have seen a busiest tourism season in years. As MLA for such a geographically large riding, I spend many hours travelling, trying to meet as many of my constituents as I can. I continue to hear that our residents expect this government to work hard for all Nova Scotians, and I feel confident that we are moving in the right direction.

Victoria-The Lakes is specially known for its home of the world famous Cabot Trail, one of the world's most scenic destinations. This rural riding is supported by our roads, the Cabot Trail being a major artery in a system of roads. Victoria-The Lakes residents need to feel safe. They want their roads well-maintained to travel on. For far too long, the roads in this riding have been neglected, put on the back burner, to worry about another time. I am proud to say that this government does not view Victoria-The Lakes this way.

This government has seen continuous investment in infrastructure spending, not only in this riding but across the province. This government is investing over $480 million in roads, schools, health care, and public infrastructure, through the 2016-17 Capital Plan, which includes funds set aside to participate in the anticipated federal government's Infrastructure Program.

It is not just the Cabot Trail that brings so many visitors to our community. Each year, hundreds of events take place in Victoria-The Lakes giving locals the opportunity to showcase their communities. Festival Baddeck is just one example of these events. On three occasions this summer, Chebucto Street in Baddeck was closed to traffic, and thousands of locals were treated to free admissions. A street festival - a street party, it was for all ages. Eager patrons flocked to experience our village at its finest. It was complete with buskers, music, dancing, local food, artisans, and so much more.

Baddeck is also quickly becoming the place to be when it comes to live theatre in Cape Breton. For the second consecutive year, both The Bells of Baddeck and The Young Ladies of Baddeck returned for live performances. A third production, Harvest, was added this season by Theatre Baddeck to give visitors and locals yet another opportunity to see live theatre in our area. Victoria County has the highest number of business establishments per capita, as indicated by the Canadian Business partners survey.

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Our community is one where artisans craft beautiful, unique items: leatherworks, pottery, glasswork, textiles, and so much more. Often those pieces are representative of the connectedness to the land and the culture.

Over a thousand rooms available across the riding - hotels, restaurants, shops, and industries - are open for business. The communities here are teeming with community spirit, co-operation, and potential. Residents of Victoria-The Lakes are proud of our local resources, products, artisans, and culture, and are capitalizing on the opportunities that come along with living here.

The Ivany report set out a goal for Nova Scotia to double its tourism revenues to approximately $4 billion annually. Each year this goal was set in 2014. The province has seen record growth in tourism thanks to the actions of this government. It supported the industry. Such actions include transforming the Nova Scotia Tourism Agency into a private-sector-led Crown Corporation.

Tourism Nova Scotia developed a strategic plan for the organization that articulates how it will align resources and prioritize opportunities to drive sustainable growth and lead the tourism industry toward the $4 billion revenue goal. The plan focuses on four key strategies: attract first-time visitors to Nova Scotia, invest in markets of highest return, focus on world-class experiences, and build tourism confidence.

The World-class experience: EXCELLerator partner program offers eligible operators the opportunity to work with Tourism Nova Scotia experts to develop one of 15 experiences that create a buzz and inspire first-time visitors to travel to Nova Scotia. Operators will benefit from one-on-one coaching, research, professional development, marketing asset production, and so much more.

The Inspiring Content partner program is designed to increase production and use of quality content when promoting Nova Scotia experiences to potential visitors. Partners, individual operators, or groups will have the opportunity to invest between $5,000 and $50,000, which will be matched by Tourism Nova Scotia, to produce photography and video assets.

Search Engine Marketing, or SEM, is an Internet marketing approach where search term ads are purchased and appear on Page 1 of Google search results in an effort to gain traffic and visibility for one's website. Tourism Nova Scotia's SEM program will provide eligible partners, individual operators, or groups with an opportunity to buy search terms through the Nova Scotia Tourism Google account that would be promoted in Tourism Nova Scotia's key markets. Tourism Nova Scotia will match partners' investments, have Google experts project-manage the buy, track conversations, and provide monthly reports and partners.

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These record tourism growths are not only happening across the province but in the community of Victoria-The Lakes. The Seawall Trail Society, which was established in 2014, is committed to building a world-class hiking trail connecting Meat Cove to Pleasant Bay. Mr. Speaker, my husband and I had an opportunity to help them fundraise this summer with a little hike of 10 kilometres. It was probably one of the better days I had this summer. We certainly enjoy hiking while the views are incredible, and that's just a small, small sample of the span that this hiking trail is going to encompass. I'm really about this project. The vision is to create a three- to five-day excursion experience that will attract hikers from all around the world, support local businesses, and generate self-sustaining revenue streams.

This government's support will move the Seawall Trail Society closer to creating a long-distance hiking trail through spectacular northern Cape Breton, with a $20,000 grant through the planning assistance program of the Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage. I've been so impressed by the vision to create a world-class destination for northern Cape Breton. While the society is still in the planning stages, this sign of a government's support is critical to making the vision a reality. I look forward to seeing the result of this investment and to the day when hikers will be able to enjoy the spectacular natural beauty of northern Cape Breton.

We have also seen major investment in our local golf industry, with the announcement that GolfNorth has been selected by Parks Canada to enter into a 42-year lease for the operation of Cape Breton Highlands Links and Keltic Lodge. This commitment from GolfNorth comes from the firm belief that Cape Breton golf, specifically the Highland Links coupled with the Keltic Lodge, have significant potential for growth.

The Highland Village Museum, an outdoor living history that tells the story of Gaelic settlement in Nova Scotia, is located on a stunning 43-acre property overlooking the majestic Bras d'Or Lakes in Iona, Nova Scotia, the heart of central Cape Breton. The Highland Village Museum is actively planning a multi-million-dollar expansion to capitalize on the growing tourism market.

Like so many areas in Cape Breton, fishing and agriculture continue to be very important industries in Victoria-The Lakes. Community markets, where local farmers can sell their products to residents and visitors, are thriving. Communities like Englishtown and Bay St. Lawrence welcome visitors with open arms, as they showcase delicious local products during their mussel festival and crab festival.

Victoria Co-op Fisheries just celebrated 60 years of harvesting and processing a significant portion of East Coast's finest and tastiest seafood. Located in the pristine Northeast Highland Region of Cape Breton Island, this co-operative purchases locally harvested seafood from its members. Once processed, the products are shipped worldwide to many customers, not only across North America but also to Japan, Vietnam, China, and Hong Kong. Our Premier just recently went over to Asia to promote local product, and I'm hearing from local stakeholders that it was a very successful event. We're really, really proud of that, that he recognizes the industry and is helping us drive it forward.

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Like all Nova Scotians, our residents care deeply about health care. When our residents are sick, they need access to quality care and should not have to travel hours from home to access basic services that should be offered in their community. Our residents don't want to feel like second-class citizens because they chose to live in rural communities. We know we need more doctors in rural areas and this government is taking steps to address this issue: $7.5 million is earmarked specifically for recruitment and retention of physicians.

This money will be used to recruit new physicians in primary health care and specialist categories where there is a need, such as emergency care, critical care, medical pathologists, and anaesthesiologists. There is also funding to support the creation of a new collaborative care practice and to support innovative technologies that will improve access to health care.

This investment is already proving beneficial to residents of Victoria-The Lakes, with the announcement of Dr. Emily Beaton. She will be setting up practice in Victoria County Memorial Hospital in Baddeck and accepting approximately 1,200 patients to her family practice, in addition to those she has already accepted. As well, Stacy MacDonald will be located in North Sydney and she is ready to accept 1,000 new patients. She will be serving Sydney Mines, Florence, Brad d'Or, Boularderie, Boularderie Island, Georges River, and many more areas.

Victoria County has one of the oldest populations in the province and we need to continue the conversation on how to support these residents as we age. One issue I hear often is that our seniors want to be able to stay in their homes safely and happily. I am proud of the accomplishments of this government on addressing this issue. We are investing in an additional $14.2 million in home care support, home nursing, the Caregiver Benefit Program and the Wheelchair Loan Program this year. Since 2013 we've increased spending on these programs by $59.1 million. On any given day more than 14,000 Nova Scotians receive home care or home care support services. In total, the province now spends $255.3 million each year on these services.

Some highlights from this year's additional $14.2 million investments are: $4.2 million more for home care nursing and nursing clinics; $7.4 million more for home support services like bathing, meal preparation, and other tasks for daily living; and $1.2 million for the Caregiver Benefit Program, helping to support family members who care for loved ones in their home.

This government has also introduced changes to the long-term care policies to improve access to care. Patients can now choose to stay in their homes longer. Mr. Speaker. Just from personal experience and I know in talking to many of my constituents, seniors want to stay in their homes as long as they can. That's the vision of this province - to help them do that - and I'm really, really proud of that because I've heard it first-hand so much and, again, I've experienced it with my own family members.

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Not only will this government support, help Nova Scotia seniors live more independently and safely in their homes, but to be active in their communities. Forty-four non-profit groups promoting seniors' health, security, well-being and community participation will receive funding totalling about $542,000 through the Senior Safety and Age-Friendly Community grants. The Red Cross is receiving $20,000 for their Seniors' Safety program.

Mr. Speaker, if we truly expect people to continue to live and stay in rural areas of this province we need to offer the services that allow them to do so. We are also investing $6 million in 2016-17 to find ways to improve access to high-speed Internet. Access to reliable Internet should not be something that only those in urban areas have.

There's little wonder why people want to stay and work in Cape Breton, Victoria-The Lakes, and little wonder as well why people from all over the world move here and visit or come to start new businesses - they recognize the potential that is offered here and the support they can receive from this government. Just to name a few of the many attractions that draw people to our unique region, we could start with the Gaelic College, a world-renowned educational institution, that has an international reputation for its contribution to the promotion and preservation of traditional Gaelic culture.

We also celebrate the upstart of a resident craft brewer in the Nyanza area. The owner-operator, Jeremy White, is not only an expert brewmaster, but also a marketing genius.

We boast two First Nation communities, Wagmatcook and Eskasoni, Eskasoni being the largest Mi'kmaq community in the world. They are thriving under the strong leadership of both Chief Leroy Denny and Chief Norman Bernard, and it's a pleasure to work closely with both chiefs, and their councillors, to assist in any way that I can help.

Creative, small businesses like Hank's Family Farm add richness to our community in offering unique family experiences, along with field-fresh produce and home baking for visitors to enjoy. Hank's Family Farm is a vegetable operation, but they expand on that with a petting zoo and a little Dutch village. We even farmed our rabbit out to them because we were away so much we had to have that rabbit go somewhere. Cupcake couldn't be happier than she is at Hank's Family Farm, and it allows us an opportunity to take our grandson down and visit his beloved rabbit.

Also, they have a great experience at Halloween, they set up a haunted house, and they have baked goods and a garden store. So, they're just really creative, and I want to commend them with that. I understand first-hand how difficult it is to make money in a vegetable operation. The family went on to the next generation, and I just have to commend them for their creativeness.

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Let's not forget the Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site. It celebrated its 60th Anniversary this summer; a lot of sixtieths this summer.

Cape Bretoners are proud, resourceful and generous people. One of the many examples of this is the Mammo Warriors, an amazing group of Boularderie's island ladies, who have fundraised over $100,000 for breast cancer. Every community works hard to fundraise and keep their halls going, and keep their communities rich, warm, and vibrant places for everyone to live, work, and enjoy.

So, Mr. Speaker, I couldn't be more delighted than I am to work beside all those fine folks. I call them my friends, my neighbours, my family, and my fellow Cape Bretoners. I'm proud to be their voice, and I look forward to supporting them as I have in the past, going forward in any way that I can. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure to rise today and speak on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne, and I do want to say what an honour it is for me to be able and stand here in this place, to represent the people of Northside-Westmount, one of 51 in the province to be able to be elected into this building to try to do our best to make sure the province moves forward, and help the people in our constituencies. I know in this Legislature, we're all good people. We all have different backgrounds and we all come from different areas of the province, where there are different problems and different concerns from the public.

If I may, I was given a book about two weeks ago written by a former MLA in this building, Mr. Gerry Doucet. In his book, he wrote a letter - rebroadcast and republished in the Richmond County record - stating 10 good rules to follow while you are in public life. If I may, it says:

  1. Regardless of votes for you or against you, you must represent all the people in your constituency, and you must represent them equally and fairly;
  2. You must be the kind person who really cares for people, not just someone who wants to make a name for themselves or for their own sake;
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  4. You must know and understand the people that you represent;
  5. You must work hard, and you must work hard on the shoulders and the hopes and the problems of many thousands of people. You must prepare to work just as hard to try to help an individual, or a family in need of welfare assistance, or to improve or build a paved road or bridge, or to find new jobs for people bringing new industry;
  6. You must give leadership and on occasion, if necessary, you must have the political courage to stand up for what you believe to be right and just, especially in the long run, if it's going to be at the advantage of the constituency and the people in the constituency. You can't always be a yes-man;
  7. You must think positively, not negatively. You must be one who builds, not one who destroys, or breaks down, and you must think big;
  8. You must be completely and impeccably honest. You must be a person that the people can trust, and who commands respect;
  9. You must be the kind of person who is able to get along with people. By himself he can do very little, it is only if he is the kind of person with whom the people are prepared to work and co-operate that things can really get done;
  10. You must be able, even the best-intentioned representative in the world falls short of the mark, unless he's got the stuff upstairs to produce it; and
  11. He must genuinely like people, and must so badly want to serve people at every failure or disappointment, and those are many, only be there to serve to make work all the harder.

Mr. Speaker, I believe this to be true. I believe everyone in this building believes this to be true. I hope that we all follow those 10 rules. Because you know, when we get along, we get a lot more done, but in my experience here, there have been some problems.

I don't want to say that anyone is intentionally doing anything to hurt anybody else. But let me give you one example. Last year, a group of people, headed by two young ladies on the Northside - the Northside Soccer Association - Angela Hall and another young lady, her name escapes me right now, but it will come to me - they put an application into the Kraft Project Play Project. The contest would award $250,000 to an organization to help with a sporting event, the sports field, the repair and, Mr. Speaker, you wouldn't believe how this brought the community in Cape Breton together.

When it came to voting time, to go around the community and see the people with the phones in their hands, voting and voting and voting - people from all over the Island - there were people from Glace Bay, people from Sydney - it brought a group of people in the community together, such that that small, little community in Cape Breton, in North Sydney, was able to win that $250,000.

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Mr. Speaker, I was at the celebration the night when they announced that Munro Park had won, and the looks on the faces of the kids that were there, and the parents' faces, the soccer coaches - it was amazing. But that's only where the work started. From there, they got a group together which I was asked to be a part of, to try to get the rest of the money to complete the project. We brought a specialist on turf - the soccer field itself had no drainage. If it rained, seagulls would swim in there, we would see ducks in there - they couldn't play soccer on it for days. The field itself was chewed up, and there were potholes, there were sinkholes, there were areas in the field with no grass.

So the specialist came and told us what it would take to resurface that field. Lo and behold, Mr. Speaker, if you've ever done any yard work around your own house, where you put sods down and where you try to do a new lawn, it costs a lot more than the $250,000 that Kraft awarded this group of people - and the other lady is Sandy Cantwell-Kerr, by the way, I remember that name now. So they put a group together, a group of municipal officials, a group from ACOA, myself, a couple of parents, a couple of interested citizens, and they were going to need another $300,000 or $400,000 to complete this project.

At that time, I wrote two letters to the government looking for some money to help with this program. I was told at that time that there was no money available, but that there would be programs coming in the future, and that they would let me know. I thought that was great.

I asked a question in December that year - this was started in September - and I was told again that there was no money involved. But I was also told to get the proposal in, we'd hate to see the project not go ahead for the sake of whatever money they were looking for. So I did. I got the proposal in, and I gave it to the Premier. A week or two later I was told that he wasn't handling that file, and to give it to the Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage, which I did.

I passed it in, and I was told that that proposal wasn't complete, but that they were going to look into it and get it completed. There were two names on the bottom of the letter that was sent to ACOA for their ask, and I was told that they would be the ones.

A couple of weeks later I inquired again, and nobody knew anything about the proposal. I got a call saying they didn't get it. So I left my home one morning at 5 a.m. and I delivered the proposal directly to the department and put it in the lady's hand.

And then, Mr. Speaker, I was told that it was too late, that the time for the application had passed. I started in September, the application was due in April, and it was too late.

[Page 879]

CBRM put in $125,000 and ACOA put in $100,000, and now the project won't be complete as-is because we don't have the money from the province. I asked the question again last week, and in Question Period we heard that it also happened to the member for Inverness about one of his concert proposals, and he was told to reapply. I didn't get the answer about if I should reapply or if my application from September, December, March, and April would be appropriate.

In reading these "10 good rules to follow," somebody's not following those rules. It's disappointing - not for me as the member for the area, and not for the municipal or the federal politicians, but for the good people who run the Northside Soccer Association, who take the gear home every night and put it in their basement, who end up having to - no washrooms for the children, no playground, no benches for the parents to sit on. We've got a beautiful field. We've had all that rain and all that flooding, and you drive by the field and it's just like the day it was put there. There wasn't a drop of water on it. It worked just the way the gentleman, the turf specialist, told us it would work.

But we only have that now, just a field. We don't have nets. We don't have bleachers. We don't have a storage place - the parents and the coaches are still taking that equipment back and forth to their homes, or they will be.

I'm hoping that in the future I'll be able to see that come from somebody on the side of government to make sure that that project is complete - not just for the children of the Northside and not just for the parents of the Northside, but for every child who plays soccer in Cape Breton. It's an amazing facility. The field is beautiful right now. But it's not complete.

We'll get into the flooding, Mr. Speaker. As everybody knows, the last two or three weeks in Cape Breton have been a challenge. We had the highest rains we've had in years. We had the perfect storm, I guess they'd say. Tides were high. Water couldn't escape the areas that were rained on. It was hitting a wall of water at the ocean, and we had some massive flooding.

That affected a lot of people in Cape Breton, especially in the Sydney area and some of the people in the surrounding areas. But I do have to thank all the volunteers who pitched in that day, all the volunteers who came out - the fire departments, Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, EMO officials. They were out pumping basements. The Nova Scotia Power Corporation was hooking power back up on the houses that it could.

It even went to the point where I had a call when I was on my way here one day, from a friend of mine in Truro who had a little company that he deals with there that had two extra generators, and he wanted to send them to Cape Breton. He got his own delivery guy out of bed that night at nine or ten o'clock, threw those generators on the truck, and sent them to North Sydney so people who had no power could use them to help their sump pumps, their freezers, their fridges.

[Page 880]

That was unsolicited. He did that out of the goodness of his heart. That's the type of people who we had contributing to the success of the cleanup of the flooded area in Cape Breton.

There are still a ton of challenges, but you have to say, when Cape Bretoners are needed, they step up to the plate. I applaud every individual, from the top down to the very bottom of people, who have stepped in.

I know the municipal officials, our provincial MLAs, they all chipped in to do their part to try to resolve that situation. Again, I want to thank all the people for that happening. It just shows the resiliency of Cape Bretoners and the heart that Cape Bretoners have to help the people in need at the time.

They did the same during the Fort McMurray fires. There were concerts, there were fundraising efforts, and it was just amazing to see people spring into action to help out.

As I am speaking of elected officials, Mr. Speaker, I'd be remiss if I didn't congratulate the incoming council. The mayor who has been re-elected, Mayor Clarke; the councillors who represent my area, Earlene MacMullin, Steve Gillespie, and Clarence Prince; and all the council. I enjoyed working with the last council, I will enjoy working with this council, and I will do whatever I can to help move Cape Breton forward with this council. I know their heart is in the right place and that they are going to do the same thing.

I just want to thank all the candidates, all the people who were elected. It takes a lot to put your name on a ballot. You put yourself under scrutiny every day. Even when you are running for council, people are asking you questions and they are letting on that things might be your fault, so it takes a large person to put their name on the ballot. It takes an even larger person to survive after the fact. We all know that here, Mr. Speaker, that when you put your name out there and you get elected, it's not a nine-to-five job. A lot of us work very long hours and then jump in our car and drive to Halifax, or jump in the car early in the morning and come here and sit for long hours.

I know that last night being Halloween, some of the members who have small children got up at four or five or six o'clock this morning and drove here to have their caucus meeting and sit in the Legislature, where we are scheduled to be until eight o'clock tonight. That's a commitment that nobody in this Chamber takes lightly. I do say that when that happens, people don't understand the travel behind people from Yarmouth, the people from Cape Breton, and everybody in between. Even if you live an hour away, it's an hour in, it's an hour out, and it's time to sit here. Sometimes the people who live closer, they do a lot more hours because it's easier for them to come into the city for a meeting instead of the person who lives four or five hours away.

[Page 881]

Again, thanks to everybody who put their name on the ballot municipally, provincially, and federally but because we had our municipal, that's the one I was targeting right now.

We have a bunch of groups in our province that by their own means volunteer a ton of hours to help community groups, to help community businesses to survive and thrive. I'd like to throw out there a thank you and a congratulations to the organizers of one of the Chase the Aces that is going on now on the Northside. It's called Northside 4 Chase the Ace. There are four groups involved in that: the Haley Street Adult Services Centre, the junior golf program at Seaview Golf Club, the Northern Yacht Club, and the new Emera Centre Northside.

The countless hours these people put in to organize this event - they've been putting it on now - I think there's 18 cards left, so they've been putting it on now for a number of weeks. All week they staple tickets together. They sell tickets all week in certain areas. Businesses take these tickets into their business to try to help out all these organizations. They are down to 18 cards now and the estimated jackpot this week is $580,000, of which 20 per cent goes to the person whose ticket is drawn. If they win, that's what they get. The groups behind it take a split of that. I heard that in Inverness, after it was done, it was equivalent to 10 to 12 years of fundraising for those groups.

When you think about that, that takes a burden off the Department of Community Services, the Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage, the departments that provide funding to these, the emergency services provider funding. It allows that money to be spent in other places. So you've got to take your hat off to the people - the organizers and the volunteers - who make this happen every week. The more money that goes up there, the busier they are, the more people you have to go on, the longer it takes to do that. Again, thank you to all the people involved in that.

Mr. Speaker, we're at an important time of year here in Nova Scotia. We're coming up on Remembrance Day in our province. I've seen the poppies that people wear in this Chamber as remembrance of the people who served our country to give us the ability to stand here in our place to represent the people we represent. You've got to take the time to go to a service, to go to a Legion, to go to an Army Navy Club on Remembrance Day just to talk to some of the veterans. They're getting older. I noticed that in my area over the last number of years.

I've taken my children to Remembrance Day services since the time they were old enough to go and remember because I think it's important that we pass that on to our children, the importance of what veterans and what military people - the people who wear a military uniform of some sort - do for us now. They keep us safe. They allow us to do our business without any interference from anybody outside who doesn't agree with what we do. It's democracy.

[Page 882]

I have four Legions in my area - the North Sydney Legion, the Florence Legion, the Sydney Mines Legion, and the Legion in Westmount - and I have an Army Navy Club. That is the longest day of my year. I start in the morning at one of the Legions in North City for breakfast. Last year, I had the honour of being the guest speaker at the Legion in Sydney Mines and laying a wreath on behalf of the province. I go to either the Florence or the North Sydney Legion after that because their service is a little later. Then I go to each of the Legions and talk with the veterans afterwards. It starts at eight in the morning and usually doesn't end until eight or nine o'clock in the night. It could go on longer, but every year since I've been elected, it's been a weekday, and we've had to be back here in the Legislature the next day. So I've been jumping in my car after nine or 10 o'clock and driving here to be prepared.

That's only a small sacrifice compared to what veterans and military people have done for us. I would like to just recognize Remembrance Day here and give a shout-out to all of the members of all the Legions for all they do for our community and for what all the Legion members and all the veterans and people in the military have done for us and will continue to do for us. I want to thank them for that.

One of the major challenges in our province right now is the doctor shortage. The estimate is that there are 100,000 people in Nova Scotia and 10,000 people in Cape Breton alone. Minding the language, that's a conservative estimate - not a Progressive Conservative estimate. We've been pushing and asking the government, the Health Authority, and Doctors Nova Scotia. We've met with them all. We've met with individual doctors to try to help the situation. We can't bring politics into this, as much as we want to, because it's people's lives that are at stake.

The Minister of Health and Wellness has estimated that 3 per cent to 4 per cent of people in the province don't even look for a doctor. If there is 100,000 that we know have no doctor, and 3 per cent to 4 per cent who don't look for a doctor, then we're probably talking about 200,000. (Interruptions)

I hear the Health and Wellness Minister over there trying to correct me on something, but we'll listen to what he has to say when he gets his chance, Mr. Speaker. I appreciate it, because I love to listen to the minister.

They're telling us the way to go is collaborative practices. Doctors coming out of med school today want a life to go with their medical practice. You know what? There's not a person in this Legislature or in this province who wouldn't agree with that. But when we put this in place, we're saying it's five to 10 years before it happens. Some people won't be around in five to 10 years - they need that doctor now. We need a solution in the meantime. We have those solutions. We have doctors who want to practise in the province.

[Page 883]

We've heard from some people down in the Weymouth area that they've taken the billing number. They won't allow a doctor to go there after the community down there was told that if they did, they would have a doctor.

We have to put our heads together to come up with ways to solve this problem. It's not a one-government problem, although it seems to be worse under this government, I've got to say. I've been here for five years, and I worked in the health care system for 25 before that. It doesn't seem like there's ever been that much of a problem until this last couple of years. I'm not pointing fingers about that, but we need to come up with a solution to it. I've had some conversations with the Health and Wellness Minister. He's an honourable man; he has some ideas; and I told him that I'd be willing to share in those ideas and help whatever way I can because I have one of those students who are away studying to be a doctor, and I would hope because she wants to that she would be able to come back to our province and practise the way she wants. But if we're going to do collaborative practices, we're talking five to ten years away. So that is a solution, but it's not an immediate solution.

Now, we also heard today that there are a couple of doctors in the area coming, new to our area, and I commend them for having the ability to go through school and decide to come here to practise. But they're taking 2,000 patients, Mr. Speaker, 13 in one and 1,000 in another, and one of our own doctors on the Northside who had difficulties - and, I won't get into that; that's another story - he had 2,000 patients. So those two doctors aren't even making up for the one who is not practising now.

We're told there are ten more coming to the area - that's great. We've lost 30 in the last year in Cape Breton. I'm not a great mathematician, I'm no accountant like some people in here but lose 30, gain 10 - some of the 30 that are left had 3,000 or 4,000 patients per. It just doesn't add up to me that that's a solution - it's a start, but it's not a solution. And we had one of the doctors who came to us who wanted to go to Cape Breton that had a very, very hard time to get there because someone else wanted her somewhere else, I'm sure. So it ended up that she did come to the area and congratulations for that.

We've had a couple of big meetings. We've had a doctors' meeting in Sydney where 1,000 people showed up. Some of the doctors I never heard say a word when I was in practice in physio spoke openly about the problems and the concerns of the health care system - I've never seen that in my 25 years. Doctors are usually people who go to work - they do their job, they go home. They internalize any problems they might have because that's not moving it forward, moving our patients forward or helping them. They are frustrated as well, so we need to do whatever we can do to help that, to try and make sure that we do everything we can to assist these doctors and we do everything we can to assist patients who don't have a doctor.

My fear is with the announcement that people who don't have a doctor have to register for 811, if they don't do that, we're going to look at that as not being a major problem. A lot of people get frustrated; they call the line, it's busy, and they don't get back. Some of the changes that went on in some of the nursing homes where you called and you didn't need it right away, they took you off the list, so they're saying that that list has been cut down and eliminated in some places, but only because people refused at the time and were taken off that list. I'm hoping this is not another way to try and look at the numbers and say it's not a big priority because there's not as many people as we think, because people who need a doctor need it now.

[Page 884]

Our population is aging. We have higher industrial-related illnesses, sicknesses, than some of the other areas. We've had traditional industries - coal mining, fishing, forestry, all areas with high incidents of injury, and incidences of disease. And, then, we're getting older, and as you get older you need a doctor more. (Interruption) I see that, Mr. Speaker, thank you, I appreciate that. We're all in that boat, some of us more than others. But when you think of your parents and your grandparents and your neighbours who are getting older, who need more attention, sometimes the one doctor is not enough. My own family doctor has, oh, I'd say between 5,000 and 6,000 patients, so it would take four doctors to replace him. With any kind of luck, he's not ready to go anywhere soon, because I still think I'm going to need him in the near future. So I hope that's not the case.

That's something that we need to work on. But in order to do what we need to do in the health care system and the education system, we need to create jobs. We need to bring more new money into our province, and one of the ways we do that, and we've been doing that, is with tourism.

In a recent article in a magazine called Elevate, we had an article on tourism called the Trump Bump and Then Some, and if I can I'll read a few things from that article. It says,

". . . a surge of interest in Cape Breton brought on by local radio personality Rob Calabrese's tongue-in-check website urging Americans to move to the island if Donald Trump becomes President of the United States . . ." - I understand that Donald Trump might be unparliamentary as of this afternoon, so if it is, I'll withdraw it - ". . . We've had 625,000 unique visits to the website on Cape Breton Island from the U.S. alone, versus 136,000 visits from this time last year."

Over 500,000 more visits to a website in Cape Breton. If a quarter of those people come to the island or come to the province, that's a big boost in our tourism industry.

The growing interest in Cape Breton is more than a blip. "'We are market-ready', says [Tourism Director Mary] Tulle, explaining that today's travellers are looking for more than just attractions." They're looking for experiences: ". . . sleep in a treehouse, cook lobster on the beach, listen to great music, drink some Big Spruce beer." That's one of the breweries in our area; Breton Brewery is another.

[Page 885]

The popularity of these two industries has come a long way over the last year or two, but they also face their challenges. I was talking to the owners of both Big Spruce Brewing and Breton Brewing, and they are paying more tax on their product than the wine and sprit industry in the province. How do they expand if they can't get the same treatment as other distilling and brewing industries in the province, and are paying twice as much on their ability to distil and brew that beer? They would love to use that money to expand their canning lines or to get themselves into different markets. Without it, some of them are becoming stagnant. The industry is growing, so we would like to see them get the same treatment as their counterparts in the province. They're not asking for anything more; they're just asking for the same treatment.

With that, tourism grows. I was in one of the breweries on a visit one day, and he had some American tourists out in his tasting area, but he could only sell the tasters in four-ounce glasses. They wanted to sit there and have a drink of the product, but he could only do it four-ounce glasses because that was the rule put upon him, the red tape put upon him. They wanted to buy it to take it with them to try it, and it's just one of the things.

I'm hoping that, in the future, the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board, who looks after the NSLC, will sit down with these people and come to a conclusion on this to allow them to grow and expand their business. That will put more money into our economy, which will free up more money for us to use in our health care system, our education system, our policing system, and our community services system.

God knows, Mr. Speaker, people in the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal could use more money on the sides of the roads or in their RIM budget. The people in Community Services would love to have a little more in their benefits. We could use the money to help rebuild the VG, to do repairs and maintenance on the other institutions in the province, and to help with our classroom teachers. That would be a bonus. Let's hope that happens.

This so-called Trump bump - we'll know next week if we're going to have these people come to live in our area. I think the American election is next Tuesday, and something that started off as a joke on the radio may turn into reality. We'll know for sure if this is going to happen. So we can hope and pray that we get more visitors, but if more people want to come and live in our area, we'll gladly accept them.

I've been very fortunate in my area to work with good people at the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. I hope the minister is listening when I say this: the people I have to work with daily from the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal have been excellent. My area supervisors, the people in charge, will talk to me when I call. They will give me an answer. It might not always be the answer people or I want to hear, but at least we know where we stand. The ability to work with these people makes my job easier. It puts people's minds at ease, but again, they could use more money to do their job. That's why we need to grow our economy, to make sure that what we need we can provide to these people.

[Page 886]

Just last year some of the money that was spent on the RIM budget didn't go in areas that some people thought it should have. I know when you come off the Newfoundland and Labrador ferry in my constituency, and you are heading out of the area - it's a beautiful area, but when you can't put the time in or you don't have the money or the staff to do that, to keep it up right, what do people see when they enter or leave the province? It's not something we want to have people remembering when they're here.

You want to make sure they remember our beauty, our hospitality, our people. That's the one thing I get when we go anywhere. They ask, are you from Newfoundland or Cape Breton? They get the accent. They always talk about the hospitality they've received when they've been in our area.

This year was a banner year for tourism in my area. I've seen a lot more people in the downtown going into our little shops and businesses and restaurants, and we've had a few new ones open. (Interruption)

I don't even know if people know where New Waterford is. The member from New Waterford talks about all the people in New Waterford. Anyway, I know where it's at because I've been there.

When you look at the shops that have opened - there's two or three little cafés and restaurants that have opened this year - it shows you that people have the confidence to invest in our area. We have to do whatever we can to keep people coming to our area. The little blips like this Trump bump, these articles where people go and talk about our hospitality - we want to make sure we keep that up. (Interruption)

The Red Shoe, yeah, I've been there, too.

Our population is aging. We know that when people get towards the end of their ability to live on their own at home, they need nursing home care. We've had many concerns about nursing home care over the years as far as the number of nursing homes, the number of beds available to our seniors. I think its 1,000 people a week in the province who turn 65; I could be wrong in quoting that.

When it comes to the point where you can't get along by yourself at home or with assistance, we want to make sure that people can live their days in dignity, that they have a place to go where they'll be well looked after. I know the nursing homes in my area do a great job of that. The staff, the management, and the people who live and volunteer there do a great job. We want to make sure that there's money in the budget to keep that up.

[Page 887]

We've heard a lot in the two weeks of this session about budget cuts to those nursing homes. We hear it's because there are private sides to the nursing homes, and there's this, and there's that. But that could be our own parents, our own grandparents. I know nobody in this Legislature wants to see anyone live sub-par. They don't want to see their grandparents not have the things they need to survive, the care, the food, or even the entertainment.

The people who do all this have to have the tools to do that. We can do that by growing our economy and putting more money into that system. That's something I would like to see move ahead. I would like to see more of that. We've put more money into home care - still not enough if we're going to keep people at home and not build more facilities for seniors to go to. It's a start.

I've gotten calls in my office from a number of people who either ended up in hospital a couple of days longer or couldn't stay at home and didn't have a nursing home to go to and ended up going to the hospital until there was one available. That's a cost that we don't need to incur. We could save money by having a cost-effective place for them to go or cost-effective home care.

Just recently, we heard of an incident where one of the women's shelters in our area is willing to take someone to look after them, but they don't have a health care card. In order to go around that, they could go back to an institution to get the card, but it would cost money. I know the Minister of Health and Wellness and the Minister of Justice are working on that, and I hope that that comes to a conclusion very quickly because the people who will provide that care want to help. That's the stuff that we can get to work on.

In the Speech from the Throne, I was shocked but quite happy to hear, under post-secondary education, that if a student finishes their university degree in four years, their provincial student debt is forgiven. Up until then, I was under the impression that it was the interest on the provincial portion of the student debt. I hadn't heard that announcement. I hadn't seen it anywhere. I spoke to a bunch of students at the time, and they didn't really know anything about it.

What I'm hoping is that if that is actually the case, more people would take that and use that to keep our students here in our province because when they cut the Graduate Retention Program where there was $50 million available, that money wasn't reinvested in the education of our, I'll say our youth, our children - because I have a couple of them who are there now - to the extent that we thought would have been appropriate.

So that's a good start. Some upfront grant money out of that would be another big help because that would allow some of our students who don't have the means to come up with the money up front to attend university and allow them to strive as high as possible and, hopefully, stay here and be productive members of our society and not have to leave.

[Page 888]

We talked about vocational schools. Not everybody who goes to school is going to be a doctor or a lawyer - and not everybody wants to be. But, we're always going to need someone to repair our roof, to fix our electrical system, to put in a new sink, the washer, the dryer, and to plumb our home. We need welders, as we see with the Irving Shipbuilding contract. We've done a little bit to get that way, but wouldn't it be great if we could bring that vocational training back so the person who doesn't really want to go to the university level could start that in high school.

In my situation, in my constituency, I have a place called Memorial High School. It's a composite high school - I believe it's the only composite high school east of Montreal - where you can get your first-year trade in welding, plumbing, electrical, carpentry, automotive repair, heavy-duty repair, shipping and receiving. What a great start for a kid who comes out of school and has his first block under his belt. Just has to go get some hours to go to work, and after he gets those hours wouldn't it be great that he could go back to that same school or a vocational school and do his next block of education in the evenings while he's still working - no gap in pay, no gap in ability to pay your car, your rent, raise your family. It would be ideal. So, that's one of the things that we were proposing that we do in this province, and I hope the government will take us up on that and move forward with it.

In the Speech from the Throne, they also said they're going to waive the fees for anyone to write their GED who hasn't had a Grade 12. That's a great idea, but what do they do with when they're done? They move on and they go to vocational school, community college, university - and I hope that that will lead us to some more assistance for those people so that they can work themselves into that area.

So, last of all, Mr. Speaker - and I know everybody is not wanting to hear "last of all" when I'm speaking, but I want to thank my family, my wife and children and my mum, who without their support I wouldn't be able to do this job, and my assistant in the office who, when I'm here in Halifax or when I'm out of the office, takes care of everything to everyone's satisfaction - and the compliments I hear on him in my office, people who have concerns and problems - and I thank the constituents of Northside-Westmount for the patience they show in me, for the confidence they've put in me to help with their problems. And to all the businesses and all the constituents, I want to thank them for allowing me to be their representative, and in the future, hopefully, they'll come to me with any problems, and we'll help resolve those.

So, thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I'd like to ask the member for Northside-Westmount to table two documents, one was the article, and the webpage. Thank you very much.

The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 889]

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, that concludes the government's business for today. Tomorrow being Opposition Day, I would call upon the Official Opposition House Leader to give the hours and business for tomorrow.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Official Opposition House Leader.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Tomorrow, Opposition Day, we'll be meeting between 1:00 and 5:30 p.m. We'll be calling two bills, Bill No. 34 and Bill No. 45, for debate after the daily routine and the orders of the day.

With that, I move that we do now rise, to meet tomorrow between the hours of 1:00 and 5:30.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House now rise to meet again on November 2nd between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.

Would those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We stand adjourned until November 2nd at 1:00 p.m.

[The House rose at 3:55 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

[Page 890]

RESOLUTION NO. 245

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. John Grath MacDonald was recently honoured with the Public Service Award from the Tema Conter Memorial Trust in Toronto, a leader in providing peer-support, family assistance, and training to public safety and military personnel dealing with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder;

Whereas Mr. MacDonald, who lives with PTSD himself, planned the first ever "Helping the Helpers Awareness and Education Day",

Whereas "Helping the Helpers Awareness and Education Day" is now an annual event, raising awareness of PTSD in frontline professions while connecting hundreds of attendees with keynote speakers and clinical education;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate John Garth MacDonald on receiving the 2016 Tema Conter Memorial Trust Public Service Award and his hard work in bettering the lives of those with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

RESOLUTION NO. 246

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. Angus Bowie, former councillor for District 7 of the Municipality of the County of Antigonish, did not reoffer in the 2016 municipal election; and

Whereas Mr. Bowie has dedicated the past 18 years to diligently serving the residents of his district and of his municipality; and

Whereas long-serving municipal leaders such as Mr. Bowie leave meaningful and lasting impacts in their communities through their service;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Mr. Angus Bowie on his successful terms as councillor for District 7, and thank him for his contributions to municipal politics in Antigonish County.

[Page 891]

RESOLUTION NO. 247

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ms. Liz Chisholm, former councillor for the Town of Antigonish, did not reoffer in the 2016 municipal election; and

Whereas Ms. Chisholm has dedicated the past 12 years to diligently serving the residents of her community; and

Whereas long-serving municipal leaders such as Ms. Chisholm leave meaningful and lasting impacts in their communities through their service;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Liz Chisholm on her successful terms as councillor, and thank her for her contributions to municipal politics in the Town of Antigonish.

RESOLUTION NO. 248

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. Carl Chisholm, former mayor of the Town of Antigonish, did not reoffer in the 2016 municipal election; and

Whereas Mr. Chisholm has dedicated the past 8 years to diligently serving the residents of his community; and

Whereas long-serving municipal leaders such as Mr. Chisholm leave meaningful and lasting impacts in their communities through their service;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Mr. Carl Chisholm on his successful terms as mayor, and thank him for his contributions to municipal politics in Town of Antigonish.

RESOLUTION NO. 249

[Page 892]

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dr. Carole Roy is celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the creation of the Antigonish International Film Festival on October 21st to 23rd, 2016; and

Whereas Dr. Roy arrived in Antigonish in June of 2007 and, not knowing anyone, had organized, within four months, a committee, venues, and funding for a festival with 30 films with 900 viewings; and

Whereas Dr. Roy has enthusiastically continued to contribute her efforts and expertise to grow a successful film festival;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly extend special congratulations to Dr. Carole Roy for her dedication and motivation to the Antigonish International Film Festival on the occasion of its 10th Anniversary.

RESOLUTION NO. 250

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas each year the Atlantic Agriculture Hall of Fame inducts one new member from each of the four Atlantic provinces; and

Whereas Casey Van de Sande has been named the 2016 inductee for the province of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Mr. Van de Sande has shown an unwavering dedication to Nova Scotia's agriculture industry, both as an industry member and as a volunteer;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Casey Van de Sande on his induction to the Atlantic Agriculture Hall of Fame.

RESOLUTION NO. 251

[Page 893]

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. Devin Gotell of Antigonish represented Canada in four swimming events in these past 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and

Whereas this was Devin's third time representing Canada as a Paralympian, having done so in both 2008 and 2012; and

Whereas Devin's success not only underscores his dedication and skill, but has inspired many members of the community by demonstrating what hard work and perseverance can achieve;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Devin Gotell on representing our country as part of Team Canada during the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Paralympic Games.

RESOLUTION NO. 252

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the students and staff of H.M. MacDonald Elementary School recently held their annual Terry Fox Run; and

Whereas participants surpassed their fundraising goal of $222.00 by more than $40, sending a total contribution of $266.60 to the Terry Fox Foundation; and

Whereas H. M. MacDonald Elementary, along with countless other schools and community groups across the country, have helped the Terry Fox Foundation raise over $650 million for cancer research in Terry's name by continuing his Marathon of Hope;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate the students and staff at H.M. MacDonald Elementary on their successful Terry Fox Run and thank them for their contributions to the fight against cancer.

RESOLUTION NO. 253

[Page 894]

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Steinhart Distillery is a young, small distillery situated among the rolling hills along the picturesque coastline of Arisaig, Antigonish County; and

Whereas even before the company officially turned a year old, Steinhart products began garnering recognition both from local patrons and on the international stage, recently winning top honour at both the San Francisco World Spirits Competition and the New York Wine and Spirits Competition; and

Whereas Steinhart's wide variety of products and flavours showcase unique innovations, such as the habanero vodka, while others like the haskap gin incorporate a unique and unforgettable Nova Scotia taste;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Steinhart Distillery on their recent recognition at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition and the New York Wine and Spirits Competition, and join me in wishing them continued success.

RESOLUTION NO. 254

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas St. Francis Xavier University has recently opened My Kitchen, a new dining option where students can prepare their own meals using fresh, healthy ingredients in a fully-stocked kitchen that features all the appliances and cooking tools of home; and

Whereas access to the facility is included in student meal plans at no additional cost, allowing students to have more control over their diets, while learning important aspects of food preparation and healthy eating; and

Whereas St. Francis Xavier University is only the second university in Canada to offer a facility of this kind to students, underscoring their dedication to students, and openness to innovation;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate St. Francis Xavier University on the launch of its new My Kitchen dining option.

[Page 895]

RESOLUTION NO. 255

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce recently recognized outstanding members of the Antigonish business community during the annual Antigonish Business Awards and Gala; and

Whereas Donna Sullivan of Stylistic Hair Care was named recipient of the Outstanding Customer Service Award; and

Whereas this award puts the spotlight on employees who have demonstrated outstanding customer service to their customers through their knowledge, accessibility, courteousness, helpfulness, and responsiveness;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Donna Sullivan on being named recipient of the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Customer Service Award for 2016.

RESOLUTION NO. 256

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce recently recognized outstanding members of the Antigonish business community during the annual Antigonish Business Awards and Gala; and

Whereas Tony's Meats was named the inaugural recipient of the Export Recognition Award; and

Whereas this award recognizes a business that has demonstrated success in expanding its markets outside of Nova Scotia, and entering new markets for exporting its goods or services beyond the Nova Scotia borders;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Tony's Meats on being named recipient of the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce Export Recognition Award for 2016.

[Page 896]

RESOLUTION NO. 257

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce recently recognized outstanding members of the Antigonish business community during the annual Antigonish Business Awards and Gala; and

Whereas Steinhart Distillery was named the inaugural recipient of the Export Recognition Award; and

Whereas this award is designed to highlight a new, profitable business showing excellence in new or innovative products or services, quality of merchandise, customer service, job creation, growth potential, markets served and community involvement;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Steinhart Distillery on being named recipient of the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce Emerging Business Award for 2016.

RESOLUTION NO. 258

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce recently recognized outstanding members of the Antigonish business community during the annual Antigonish Business Awards and Gala; and

Whereas Carly Mayhew-Gallant, owner of Truffle Troll was named the inaugural recipient of the Young Entrepreneur Award for 2016; and

Whereas this award is designed to recognize youth who have excelled in the development and enhancement of the economic infrastructure, and contributed to the prosperity and well-being of Antigonish through entrepreneurship;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Carly Mayhew-Gallant on being named recipient of the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce Young Entrepreneur Award for 2016.

[Page 897]

RESOLUTION NO. 259

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Finance and Treasury Board)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce recently recognized outstanding members of the Antigonish business community during the annual Antigonish Business Awards and Gala; and

Whereas RJ MacIsaac Construction Ltd. was named the inaugural recipient of the Ian Spencer Excellence in Business Award; and

Whereas this award recognizes business that have demonstrated successful business practices and strong corporate responsibility and community service, in memory of Mr. Spencer's commitment to bridging the gap between businesses and the community;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate RJ MacIsaac Construction Ltd. on being named recipient of the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce Ian Spencer Excellence in Business Award.

RESOLUTION NO. 260

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Peter Muttart participated as a mayoral candidate in the 2016 Kings County municipal election; and

Whereas Peter Muttart was the successful candidate and will serve as the first mayor for the County of Kings;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate him on his achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 261

[Page 898]

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Pauline Raven participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Kings County municipal election; and

Whereas Pauline Raven was one of the nine successful candidates and will continue to serve as councillor for District 2 on Kings County Council;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate her on her achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 262

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Meg Hodges participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Kings County municipal election; and

Whereas Meg Hodges was one of the nine successful candidates and will join the Kings County Council as councillor for District 1;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate her on her achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 263

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brian Hirtle participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Kings County municipal election; and

Whereas Brian Hirtle was one of the nine successful candidates and will continue to serve as councillor for District 3 on the Kings County Council;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate him on his achievement.

[Page 899]

RESOLUTION NO. 264

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sandra Snow participated as a mayoral candidate in the 2016 Town of Kentville municipal election; and

Whereas Sandra Snow was the successful candidate and will now lead the Kentville Town Council in her position as mayor;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate her on her achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 265

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cate Savage participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Town of Kentville municipal election; and

Whereas Cate Savage was one of the six successful candidates and will join the Kentville Town Council as councillor;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate her on her achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 266

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cathy Maxwell participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Town of Kentville municipal election; and

Whereas Cathy Maxwell was one of the six successful candidates and will join the Kentville Town Council as councillor;

[Page 900]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate her on her achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 267

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Craig Gerrard participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Town of Kentville municipal election; and

Whereas Craig Gerrard was one of the six successful candidates and will join the Kentville Town Council as councillor;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate him on his achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 268

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Eric Bolland participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Town of Kentville municipal election; and

Whereas Eric Bolland was one of the six successful candidates and will continue to serve as councillor on the Kentville Town Council;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate him on his achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 269

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas John Andrew participated as a councillor candidate in the Town of Kentville municipal election; and

[Page 901]

Whereas John Andrew was one of the six successful candidates and will join the Kentville Town Council as councillor;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate him on his achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 270

By: Mr. John Lohr « » (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lynn Pulsifer participated as a councillor candidate in the 2016 Town of Kentville municipal election; and

Whereas Lynn Pulsifer was one of the six successful candidates and will join the Kentville Town Council as councillor;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate her on her achievement.

RESOLUTION NO. 271

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Province of Nova Scotia had nine athletes competing in the Olympic Games and seven athletes competing in the Paralympic Games this year in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and

Whereas Halifax Armdale's own Mark de Jonge performed well at the Games, placing seventh overall in the Men's K1 200m Sprint Kayak event; and

Whereas all of the Nova Scotians on Team Canada made us exceptionally proud through their inspiring athletic performances;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Mr. de Jonge and all our amazing Olympic and Paralympic athletes on their success, thank them for representing our province so well, and wish them the best of luck in their future training and competitions.

[Page 902]

RESOLUTION NO. 272

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Province of Nova Scotia had nine athletes competing in the Olympic Games and seven athletes competing in the Paralympic Games this year in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and

Whereas Halifax Armdale's own Danielle Boyd performed well at the Games, placing sixteenth overall in the Women's 49erFX Sailing event; and

Whereas all of the Nova Scotians on Team Canada made us exceptionally proud through their inspiring athletic performances;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Boyd and all our amazing Olympic and Paralympic athletes on their success, thank them for representing our province so well, and wish them the best of luck in their future training and competitions.

RESOLUTION NO. 273

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Province of Nova Scotia had nine athletes competing in the Olympic Games and seven athletes competing in the Paralympic Games this year in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; and

Whereas Halifax Armdale's own Erin Rafuse performed well at the Games, placing sixteenth overall in the Women's 49erFX Sailing event; and

Whereas all of the Nova Scotians on Team Canada made us exceptionally proud through their inspiring athletic performances;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Rafuse all our amazing Olympic and Paralympic athletes on their success, thank them for representing our province so well, and wish them the best of luck in their future training and competitions.

[Page 903]

RESOLUTION NO. 274

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Ashley Blank for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 275

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Candace Conrad for her invaluable contribution to the team.

[Page 904]

RESOLUTION NO. 276

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Courtney Conrad for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 277

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

[Page 905]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Lianna DeKoe for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 278

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Monica Diab for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 279

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

[Page 906]

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Melissa Gaudet for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 280

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Adelle Goodfellow for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 281

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

[Page 907]

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Kim Hardy for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 282

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Jeanette Huck for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 283

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship, and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

[Page 908]

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Leanne Huck for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 284

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Kate MacDonald for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 285

[Page 909]

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Samantha Macdonald for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 286

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Brianne Moore for her invaluable contribution to the team.

[Page 910]

RESOLUTION NO. 287

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Tiffany O'Donnell for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 288

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

[Page 911]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Ally Read for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 289

By: Hon. Lena Diab « » (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 22nd, 2016, the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team pulled off an impressive 3 to 1 victory over the Halifax County team, winning the Nova Scotia Soccer League Championship and securing their spot at Nationals for the fourth consecutive year; and

Whereas the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team competed in early October at the 2016 Sport Chek National Championship in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, winning three games, tying one, and losing one; and

Whereas the team played their very best and placed fifth in all of Canada, scored 14 goals, and only let opposing teams score against them six times overall;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Dunbrack Premier Women's Soccer team for representing our province so well and congratulate Rieka Santilli for her invaluable contribution to the team.

RESOLUTION NO. 290

By: Hon. Margaret Miller « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 39th annual Nova Scotia 4-H Pro Show has taken place this Fall, in Truro, at the Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition Grounds; and

Whereas the 4-H Pro Show provides a venue for competing 4-H members to showcase their skills and learn from their competitors; and

Whereas Laura Ackerman of Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia, is a member of the Shu-Mil 4-H Club;

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Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Laura Ackerman on winning the Royal Dairy Classic Competition at the Nova Scotia 4-H Pro Show.

RESOLUTION NO. 291

By: Hon. Margaret Miller « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 39th annual Nova Scotia 4-H Pro Show has taken place this Fall, in Truro, at the Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition Grounds; and

Whereas the 4-H Pro Show provides a venue for competing 4-H members to showcase their skills and learn from their competitors; and

Whereas Emma Munroe of Enfield, Nova Scotia, is a member of the Shu-Mil 4-H Club;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Emma Munroe on winning the Champion Rabbit Showman Competition at the Nova Scotia 4-H Pro Show.