The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD13-07

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



First Session

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee,
382
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 14, Justices of the Peace Act and Provincial Court Act,
382
No. 15, February Holiday Act,
383
No. 16, Chief of Protocol Appointment Act,
383
No. 17, Executive Council Act and Public Service Act,
383
No. 18, Black Cultural Society Act,
383
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 141, Chabassoll, Elaine/Cook, Sophie - Tearmann House Fundraising,
384
Vote - Affirmative
384
Res. 142, Bunker, Katie/Holland, Ms. Bev - Lockview HS
"Best Buddies" Chapter, Mr. B. Horne »
384
Vote - Affirmative
385
Res. 143, Blomidon Estate Winery - Natl. Wine Award,
385
Vote - Affirmative
386
Res. 144, CARP: Advocacy - Appreciation Express,
386
Vote - Affirmative
387
Res. 145, Power, Adrienne - Athletic Achievements,
387
Vote - Affirmative
388
Res. 146, Taste of N.S.: Showcase (04/12/13) - Congrats.,
388
Vote - Affirmative
388
Res. 147, C.B. Dist. Health Auth. - 100 Top Employers (Can. & N.S.)
388
Vote - Affirmative
389
Res. 148, Curly Portables Pub & Grub - Hants East Support,
389
Vote - Affirmative
390
Res. 149, Gray, Mildred Reid Grant - Book Publication,
390
Vote - Affirmative
391
Res. 150, Nickerson, Bill & Bertie - Anniv. (78th),
391
Vote - Affirmative
391
Res. 151, Lake, Alicia - 100-Mile Diet,
391
Vote - Affirmative
392
Res. 152, MacLellan, James Gregory: Bravery - Acknowledge,
392
Vote - Affirmative
393
Res. 153, New Ross Farm Museum - Historic Preservation,
393
Vote - Affirmative
394
Res. 154, Brewer, Adina - Natl. Child Day Poster Winner,
394
Vote - Affirmative
394
Res. 155, Walker, Rebeca - Elder Abuse Walk,
394
Vote - Affirmative
395
Res. 156, McIssac, Jon - NHL Refereeing,
395
Vote - Affirmative
396
Res. 157, Ryl. Cdn. Sea Cadet Corps Band (339 Iroquois) - Cole Hbr.-East. Passage
- Christmas Tree Lighting Event, Ms. J. Treen »
396
Vote - Affirmative
397
Res. 158, Rushton, Darrell/Pictou Co. Prostate Cancer Support Assoc
- Awareness/Fundraising, Hon. P. Dunn »
397
Vote - Affirmative
398
Res. 159, Tarek's Cafe - The Coast's Best of Food Award,
398
Vote - Affirmative
398
Res. 160, Acadia Univ. - Anniv. (175th),
399
Vote - Affirmative
399
Res. 161, Christmas in the Valley (Stewiacke): Organizers/Vols
- Congrats., Mr. L. Harrison »
399
Vote - Affirmative
400
Res. 162, Balmas, Mitchell - Hockey Achievement,
400
Vote - Affirmative
401
Res. 163, Keddy, Jeffery - Broadcast Scholarship,
401
Vote - Affirmative
401
Res. 164, Nova Insights Market Research & Consulting - Anna. Valley
C of C Award, Mr. J. Lohr « »
402
Vote - Affirmative
402
Res. 165, Glauser, Roland & Kathleen/Charlotte Lane Café
- Rest. Assoc. (N.S.) Award, Hon. S. Belliveau « »
402
Vote - Affirmative
403
Res. 166, Pugwash FD: Awards Banquet - Recipients Congrats.,
403
Vote - Affirmative
404
Res. 167, Crawford, Karl & Faye - Woodland Owner of Yr
(Central N.S.), Ms. K. MacFarlane « »
404
Vote - Affirmative
405
Res. 168, Unicorn Theatre: Efforts - Congrats.,
405
Vote - Affirmative
405
Res. 169, United Nations Intl. Vol. Day - Vols. Congrats.,
406
Vote - Affirmative
406
Res. 170, White, Jeremy/Bock, Melanie: Big Spruce Brewery
- Creation, Mr. A. MacMaster « »
406
Vote - Affirmative
407
Res. 171, Patterson Law - Cdn. Lawyer Magazine Recognition,
407
Vote - Affirmative
408
Res. 172, Arab, Rachel - Duke of Edinburgh's Award,
408
Vote - Affirmative
408
Res. 173, MacRae, Kirk - Sydney & Area C of C Award,
408
Vote - Affirmative
409
Res. 174, Sill, Zack: Pittsburgh Penguins - Call-Up,
409
Vote - Affirmative
410
Res. 175, Hfx. Central JHS - Ombudsman Youth Services Posters,
410
Vote - Affirmative
411
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 33, Prem.: Chief of Protocol - Candidates,
411
No. 34, Prem.: NSLC - PC Appt. (2003),
413
No. 35, Prem.: Chief of Protocol Position - Advertising,
415
No. 36, Prem.: Langille Hiring - Details,
416
No. 37, Prem.: Otter Lake Landfill - Commitments,
418
No. 38, CCH: Bluenose II - Minister Inspect,
419
No. 39, Immigration: Progs. - Changes,
420
No. 40, Lbr. & Advanced Educ.: Apprenticeships - Status,
421
No. 41, SNSMR: Heating Assistance - Changes,
423
No. 42, Com. Serv.: Satellite Intake Office - Fairview-Bayers Rd. Area,
424
No. 43, Com. Serv.: Background Checks - Details,
425
No. 44, Fin. & Treasury Bd.: Budget Update - Release Date,
426
No. 45, Fish. & Aquaculture: Lobster - European Market,
428
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 9, Accountability in Economic Development Assistance Act
429
431
432
434
436
Vote - Affirmative
437
No. 10, Maritime Link Act
438
439
440
441
Vote - Affirmative
441
PRIVATE & LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 11, Sir William Young's Benevolent and Charitable Fund Act
442
Vote - Affirmative
442
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 12, Occupational Health and Safety Act
442
443
445
446
447
Vote - Affirmative
448
PRIVATE & LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 13, Ladies of the Sacred Heart at Halifax Act
448
Vote - Affirmative
448
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY TO THE SPEECH FROM THE THRONE:
449
Adjourned debate
459
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5):
Lyme Disease: Issue - Recognize
460
462
464
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY TO THE SPEECH FROM THE THRONE:
466
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Fri., Dec. 6th at 9:00 a.m
468
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 176, Hafey, Lawrence - N.S. Sport Hall of Fame
Induction (2013), Hon. P. Dunn « »
469
Res. 177, Dares, Carson: Wentworth Vol. FD - Serv. (10 Yrs.),
469
Res. 178, Beaton, Danika - Soccer Achievements,
470
Res. 179, Amirault, Dora - Seniors' Kickin' Country (20 Yrs.),
470
Res. 180, d'Eon, Kathleen - Collaborative Care Team Award,
471
Res. 181, Simms, Dianne Calvert/C.B. Health Auth
- N.S. Top Employer (2014), Mr. A. MacLeod « »
471
Res. 182, Windsor Long Pond Heritage Hockey Classic
- Organizers Commend, Mr. C. Porter »
472
Res. 183, Caldwell, Earl/Nu-Air Ventilation Systems -
Everest Intl. Trade Co. Contract - Mr. C. Porter « »
472
Res. 184, Harvey, Alvin - Retirement,
473
Res. 185, Maynard, Andrew - Musical Achievement,
473
Res. 186, Pictou Co. Laubach Literacy - Success Wish,
474
Res. 187, Barron, Mr. Laurie - Yar. Co. Coach of Yr. (2013),
474
Res. 188, Horton, Bowen/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
475
Res. 189, Saunders, Brent/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
475
Res. 190, Langille, Devin/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
476
Res. 191, Gillis, Garrett/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
476
Res. 192, Zimmerman, John/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
477
Res. 193, Bent, Jonathan/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
477
Res. 194, Saunders, Kellen/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
478
Res. 195, Tulley, Kenneth/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
478
Res. 196, Taylor, Kyle/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
479
Res. 197, Taylor, Logan/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
479
Res. 198, Kobayashi, Makya/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
480
Res. 199, Schlect, Marcus/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
480
Res. 200, Taylor, Marvin/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
481
Res. 201, Ashby, Monty/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
481
Res. 202, Illsley, Patrick/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
482
Res. 203, Linsell, Stuart/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
482
Res. 204, Saunders, Terry/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
483
Res. 205, Bowlby, Tristan/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
483
Res. 206, Hung, Taylor/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
484
Res. 207, Sarikas, John/Bridgetown Sr. Boys Trojans
- Soccer Championship - The Premier « »
484

[Page 381]

HALIFAX, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013

Sixty-second General Assembly

First Session

2:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Ms. Margaret Miller

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please.

Before we begin the daily routine, the subject for this evening's late debate was submitted by the honourable member for Hants West:

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize that Lyme disease is a growing issue in Nova Scotia and ask that the government take action.

This will be debated this evening at 6:00 p.m.

We will begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

[Page 382]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition entitled Petition to Re-Pave Little Lorraine Road. The operative clause is:

"The road is in horrible condition and driving over a damaged road can hasten the wear and tear on your vehicle, increasing the costs of your vehicle's maintenance. Additionally, driving over a damaged road can be a jarring experience, particularly when you drive over a pothole unexpectedly. It was last paved 39 years ago and it is a definite safety concern for all residents who travel the road, including students who travel by bus daily!"

MR. SPEAKER « » : The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITEES

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 1 - Electricity Reform (2013) Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, without amendments.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 14 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 244 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Justices of the Peace Act; and Chapter 238 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Provincial Court Act. (Hon. Lena Diab)

Bill No. 15 - Entitled an Act to Establish a Holiday in February. (Hon. Kelly Regan)

[Page 383]

Bill No. 16 - Entitled an Act to Appoint the Chief of Protocol. (Hon. Maureen MacDonald)

Bill No. 17 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 155 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Executive Council Act; and Chapter 376 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Service Act. (The Premier)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

The honourable Minister of Finance and Treasury Board on an introduction.

HON. DIANA WHALEN » : Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that, and I just want to draw the attention of the House, and members of the House, to the east gallery where we're joined today by Jennifer MacLeod, who is one of the executives of the MacLeod Lorway Group which is an insurance company, which has a number of offices across the province and employs about 75 Nova Scotians.

Jennifer joined us today for the announcement of the February holiday because her company has led the way by having this for their own employees for the last three years. So I wonder if we could give her a warm welcome, please. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

HON. TONY INCE » : Mr. Speaker, I would also like to draw everyone's attention to the gallery. I would like to introduce Mr. Louis Gannon, the executive director of the Black Cultural Centre. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : I've just been advised by the Clerk that the petition tabled earlier is a photocopy and, therefore, is unacceptable due to the regulations and it will be returned to the honourable member.

Bill No. 18 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 101 of the Acts of 1977. The Black Cultural Society Act. (Hon. Keith Colwell, as a private member.)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that this bill be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 141

[Page 384]

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Elaine Chabassol and Sophie Cook recently joined a host of others from the Pictou Art and Craft Association to hold a Victorian Christmas craft sale at St. Paul United Church, in Westville; and

Whereas this year the funds raised will go to support the Tearmann House and the Life Shelter; and

Whereas this event is held in Westville, with the generosity being felt across the whole of Pictou County;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Elaine Chabassol and Sophie Cook and everyone who gave their time and talents to make this fundraising effort a success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

RESOLUTION NO. 142

MR. BILL HORNE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this Fall, Katie Bunker of the Youth Health Centre, along with Ms. Bev Holland of the Learning Centre, launched Lockview High's inaugural Best Buddies program, making Lockview High part of the national organization of Best Buddies Canada; and

Whereas Grade 12 student Katie Bunker met with various departments of Lockview High to obtain approval and seek support for the opening of a chapter of the Best Buddies Canada program; and

[Page 385]

Whereas the Lockview High Best Buddies program is in full operation, matching people with and without intellectual disabilities to create meaningful friendships;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly commend Katie Bunker and Ms. Bev Holland for forming and heading a new chapter, the Best Buddies of Lockview High School, and express our support for youth-led volunteer initiatives.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 143

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the National Wine Awards of Canada were held in September in Toronto; and

Whereas Blomidon Estate Winery, located on the shores of the Minas Basin near Canning, produced award-winning aromatic blends; and

Whereas the Blomidon Estate Winery's 2011 Crémant won a silver medal at the National Wine Awards of Canada - and I hope many of you took the opportunity to sample that last night;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Blomidon Estate Winery on this fine accomplishment and national recognition.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 386]

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 144

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Association of Retired Persons is a national, non-partisan, non-profit organization committed to advocating for a New Vision of Aging for Canada, social change that will bring financial security, equitable access to health care and freedom from discrimination; and

Whereas Bill VanGorder, a resident of the North End of Halifax, with a long history of volunteer work and involvement with a wide variety of organizations and good causes, has been an active member of CARP for five years, including two terms as chair of CARP's Nova Scotia chapter; and

Whereas on October 24, 2013, Bill VanGorder was elected to CARP's National Board of Directors for a three-year term;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature express its appreciation for the advocacy and services CARP provides on behalf of aging Canadians and congratulate Bill VanGorder on joining CARP's Board of Directors, adding another accomplishment to an already lengthy list of contributions.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 387]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie on an introduction.

MR. LLOYD HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to direct the Assembly's attention to the east gallery and introduce Councillor Fin Armsworthy who is with the Municipality of the District of Guysborough, formerly with the Town of Canso where he served for 14 years. I must say he has made a seamless transition onto the new council and has served the municipality as well as he had done for his former municipality. I would ask the Assembly to welcome him here today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie.

RESOLUTION NO. 145

MR. LLOYD HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Adrienne Power, originally from East Jeddore, Nova Scotia has proven that drive and determination are key in reaching one's goals; and

Whereas Adrienne's love of sports and ability to excel at them has allowed her to follow her dream of becoming an Olympic athlete; and

Whereas Adrienne has been inspired to share her life experiences with her community, Adrienne has given numerous motivational speeches to schools, business groups, community groups and sports teams, she has told her story to countless Atlantic Canadians and has inspired her audience to follow their dreams;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in recognizing Adrienne Power's athletic achievements as well as her commitment to inspiring her community and our next generation of Olympians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 388]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 146

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on December 4th, Taste of Nova Scotia hosted a showcase of locally made foods and products available throughout Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the event provided an opportunity for our local farmers, chefs, artisanal producers, winemakers, brewers and distillers to display their products for Nova Scotians to sample; and

Whereas Taste of Nova Scotia continues to promote foods and products made locally to Nova Scotians as well as the international market;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Taste of Nova Scotia for continuing to make Nova Scotia an authentic international culinary destination.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sydney-Whitney Pier.

RESOLUTION NO. 147

MR. GORDIE GOSSE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cape Breton District Health Authority has approximately 4,000 health care providers caring for the health and needs of nearly 130,000 people; and

[Page 389]

Whereas the authority has been named one of Canada's Top 100 Employers as well as one of Nova Scotia's Top Employers for 2014 by Mediacorp Inc.; and

Whereas the recognition comes in part because of the district's investment in their employees, their encouragement of fitness and recreation, their campaigns to end workplace bullying, and support for diversity;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Cape Breton District Health Authority and all of its employees on being named one of Canada's Top 100 Employers and one of Nova Scotia's Top Employers for 2014.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 148

MS. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Curly Portables Pub & Grub has been a landmark and hub of Hants East for nearly 30 years; and

Whereas Curly Portables Pub & Grub proudly displays images and artifacts from the rich history of forestry and industry in Hants County; and

Whereas Curly Portables supports numerous fundraising activities for charities and volunteer groups in Hants East;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the management and staff of Curly Portables Pub & Grub for their ongoing support of Hants East.

[Page 390]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

RESOLUTION NO. 149

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mildred Reid Grant Gray from Gabarus has just published her new book entitled Bringing Out the Untold Life: Recollections of Mildred Reid Grant Gray at the young age of 93; and

Whereas Mildred was a long-time Morse code and manual switchboard operator, and had a front-row seat as history was made in the community, sharing with people both tragedies and joys of life in the fishing village of Gabarus; and

Whereas Mildred has also said that it's not only of her life but tells the historical significance of Gabarus and how it was founded;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Mildred Reid Grant Gray on the publication, which will now take readers down memory lane with her one more time.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 391]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

RESOLUTION NO. 150

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Monday, December 2, 2013, Bill and Bertie Nickerson of Liverpool celebrated their 78th Wedding Anniversary; and

Whereas Bill, at 99 years of age, and Bertie, at 96, are still living in their home on Bristol Avenue in Liverpool that Bill helped build in 1950 ; and

Whereas the story of Bill and Bertie Nickerson is a truly incredible love story of devotion and loyalty;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Bill and Bertie Nickerson of Liverpool on the occasion of their 78th Wedding Anniversary, which was celebrated on December 2, 2013.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 151

MS. PAM EYKING « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alicia Lake of Baddeck has participated in a one-month, 100-mile diet for the third straight year; and

[Page 392]

Whereas through eating foods only grown on Cape Breton Island, Ms. Lake aims to promote healthy eating through encouraging cutting down on processed foods and showing people what is and what is not available locally; and

Whereas Ms. Lake ultimately aims to have people question what they are eating while promoting local producers;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Lake and wish her continued success in promoting healthy eating through her annual challenge of eating only local.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 152

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas James Gregory MacLellan was born in Inverness on November 17, 1923; and

Whereas James saw battle in two of the world's bloodiest wars, World War II and the Korean War; and

Whereas Mr. MacLellan was recently awarded the Ambassador for Peace medal by the Republic of Korea, and a Certificate of Recognition from the Government of Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly acknowledge the bravery and personal sacrifice of James Gregory MacLellan to bring peace to our world.

[Page 393]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

RESOLUTION NO. 153

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the New Ross Farm Museum, located in beautiful New Ross, Nova Scotia, was founded in 1969; and

Whereas the New Ross Farm Museum is a living, working farm depicting 150 years of agriculture in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the New Ross Farm Museum has a working stave mill, cooperage for making barrels, and a blacksmith who produces hardware for the farm and shoes for the oxen each year;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate New Ross Farm Museum for their hard work and dedication in preserving history for almost 50 years.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 394]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

RESOLUTION NO. 154

MS. SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Office of the Ombudsman Youth Services asked Nova Scotia students from Primary to Grade 7 to design posters that illustrate their understanding of this year's theme, Our Time to be Heard; and

Whereas there were seven winners from schools across the province for a National Child Day poster contest that displayed knowledge and ideas of children's rights; and

Whereas New Germany Elementary Grade 5 student Adina Brewer was named one of the seven winners;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Adina for her accomplishment.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

RESOLUTION NO. 155

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the children of the Clifford Street Youth Centre in North Sydney took to the streets this past summer on their second annual walk against elder abuse; and

[Page 395]

Whereas Rebecca Walker, who is the senior safety coordinator for the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, organized the walk to bring attention to elder abuse and close the gap between youth and seniors; and

Whereas as the children marched they passed out handcrafted cards to get their message out, and many joined the walk as it progressed through North Sydney;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Rebecca and her small army of children trying to make a difference.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

RESOLUTION NO. 156

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas for Truro resident Jon McIsaac a lifelong dream came true on November 21, 2013; and

Whereas Jon, a hockey referee who currently has four NHL pre-season games under his belt, will referee his first NHL regular season game in Philadelphia as the Flyers host the Buffalo Sabres; and

Whereas Jon McIsaac is also scheduled to work a second NHL contest on December 16, 2013, when the Dallas Stars visit the Colorado Avalanche;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Jon McIsaac for his dedication to refereeing, and wish him every success in his future career.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 396]

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 157

MS. JOYCE TREEN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Band 339 Iroquois is located at the Regional Cadet Support Unit at Shearwater and supports numerous functions in Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage; and

Whereas they were presented this past year with the Convoy Shield as the most efficient cadet band in all of Atlantic Canada; and

Whereas they graciously accepted the invitation to perform festival music in the attendance of the annual Eastern Passage Christmas tree lighting event at Quigley's Corner on Sunday, December 1, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in thanking the Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps Band 339 Iroquois for taking part in our community's annual tree lighting event and wish them well in all their future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 397]

The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, may I have permission to make an introduction?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Absolutely.

MR. DUNN « » : I draw the attention of all members of the House to the west gallery to a couple of constituents from beautiful Pictou Centre: Darrell Rushton and Ruth Dobbin. Darrell is a very successful businessman throughout Pictou County, Nova Scotia, and a very valuable advisor on my recent campaign. I would ask the House to give them a round of applause. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 158

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Pictou County Prostate Cancer Support Association's main goal is to support prostate cancer awareness, a disease that will claim the lives of an estimated 4,000 Canadian men in 2013; and

Whereas the association strives to reinforce the importance of regular testing, which increases the likelihood of cancer being detected at an early stage when there are more treatment options and the chance of a cure is highest; and

Whereas the Pictou County Prostate Cancer Support Association, created 13 years ago, continues to empower males across Nova Scotia and P.E.I. to take a more active approach in monitoring their number one cancer risk, prostate cancer;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate chairperson Darrell Rushton, a founding member, and his committed, inspiring and passionate association for relentlessly pursuing their awareness campaign and for fundraising to develop programs to support research that will have the potential to improve prevention and save lives.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 398]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 159

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas The Coast weekly newspaper holds an annual Best of Food competition with awards in a wide variety of categories and with the winners voted on by readers of The Coast; and

Whereas Tarek's Café, located at the corner of Robie and Russell Streets in Halifax's North End, offers a wide variety of delicious Middle Eastern food with something for everyone, including vegetarians, vegans and people with food sensitivities, so that everyone leaves happy and satisfied; and

Whereas Tarek's Café is the 2013 Gold Winner in the Best Middle Eastern/Persian category in The Coast's Best of Food awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Tarek's Café on being named The Coast's 2013 Best Middle Eastern/Persian category, and wish them many years of future success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Lucasville.

RESOLUTION NO. 160

[Page 399]

MR. BEN JESSOME « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, officially opened its doors on January 14, 1839, with two faculty and 21 students, the first class numbering a total of four students graduating in 1843; and

Whereas the university has grown and flourished over the decades, growing to 120 by the year 1900, and has grown to approximately 3,600 students today; and

Whereas Acadia University has remained at or near the top of major Canadian university rankings in its category for more than 20 years, sporting the highest number of CIS Academic All-Canadians per capita;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate university president and vice chancellor Ray Ivany; student union president Matthew Rios; the Acadia University Alumni Association; and the university's faculty and staff, as well as the entire Acadia family and the community of Wolfville on the celebration of the university's 175th Anniversary, and wish them the best of success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 161

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Christmas in the Valley is a festival that marks the start of the holiday season for many in the Stewiacke Valley every year; and

Whereas this year the festivities get underway with a supper at Springside Hall on December 6th, continue with tours of local residences that are beautifully decorated for Christmas, and then conclude with the sale of wreaths decorated and donated by members of the Upper Stewiacke community; and

[Page 400]

Whereas both floors of the Stewiacke Valley Museum have been decorated for Christmas and are open for tours from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on December 6th and 7th;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the organizing committee and all of the volunteers involved with the annual Christmas in the Valley, and wish them the best of luck with their event on December 6th and 7th.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sydney-Whitney Pier.

RESOLUTION NO. 162

MR. GORDIE GOSSE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mitchell Balmas is presently showcasing his sniping skills with the Cape Breton Tradesmen of the Nova Scotia Major Midget Hockey League; and

Whereas Mitchell is not only the top rookie scorer this season but second overall in the league; and

Whereas Mitchell Balmas was selected to Team Atlantic for the upcoming World Under-17 Hockey Challenge, to be held in Cape Breton from December 29,, 2013, to January 4, 2014;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Mitchell Balmas on his outstanding achievement, and wish him all the best in the tournament and in his future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 401]

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings South.

RESOLUTION NO. 163

MR. KEITH IRVING « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. Jeffery Keddy is a member of the Gloosecap First Nation community and a second-year student in Broadcast Systems Technology at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology;

Whereas Mr. Keddy has overcome major obstacles to pursue his chosen career in broadcasting; and

Whereas Mr. Keddy has been awarded the 2013 Alberta Equity Scholarship, funded by the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly join the Glooscap First Nation in congratulating Jeffery Keddy in his important achievement in the broadcasting field.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings North.

[Page 402]

RESOLUTION NO. 164

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 7th the Annapolis Valley Chamber of Commerce handed out the 2013 business awards; and

Whereas Nova Insights Market Research & Consulting was awarded as Outstanding Micro Business; and

Whereas Nova Insights Market Research & Consulting is a market research and evidence-based consulting firm providing services to companies across Canada and the United States from right here in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Nova Insights Market Research & Consulting for being awarded Annapolis Valley Chamber of Commerce Outstanding Micro Business.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

RESOLUTION NO. 165

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Shelburne's Charlotte Lane Café was the recipient of the Best Small Restaurant Award by the Restaurant Association of Nova Scotia on November 19, 2013; and

Whereas this is the second time in three years that Charlotte Lane Café has been selected for this award; and

[Page 403]

Whereas Roland and Kathleen Glauser, along with their staff, continually strive to create the ultimate dining experience on Shelburne's historic waterfront, taking great pride in the food they serve and the experience they provide;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Roland and Kathleen and the staff at Charlotte Lane Café for receiving the Best Small Restaurant Award by the Restaurant Association of Nova Scotia on November 19, 2013.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cumberland North.

RESOLUTION NO. 166

MR. TERRY FARRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Saturday, December 6, 2013, Andy Yarrow, fire chief of the Pugwash Fire Department, will be celebrating with his team of firefighters at their annual awards banquet; and

Whereas their work on behalf of the citizens of Cumberland County and the Village of Pugwash is vital to the success of this community and to the safety of the businesses and all the families that reside there; and

Whereas at the awards banquet the following firefighters will be honoured for the milestones they have reached in their service to the community: Robert Messenger - 40 years, John Murray - 40 years, Wendell Williams - 15 years, Murray Mills - 10 years, Donnie Allen - 5 years, and Danny Brooks - 5 years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the efforts of these brave firefighters and commend their dedication to public service, and congratulate them for their work in this organization that is so vital to this community and province.

[Page 404]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 167

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Karl and Faye Crawford of Scotsburn, Pictou County, were awarded the 2013 Woodland Owner of the Year award for Central Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Crawfords own a total of 463 acres of land, with 345 acres being forested and including mature stands of spruce, pine, and tamarack; and

Whereas the Crawfords have committed the past 34 years to creating trails, wildlife habitat, and harvestable timber, and have recently updated their plan to be more representative of protecting forest health and restoring Acadian forest characteristics;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Karl and Faye Crawford on their much-deserved award, and thank them for their preservation of our forest land.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 405]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

RESOLUTION NO. 168

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Unicorn Theatre, located in the Bay Community Centre, Head of St. Margarets Bay, has been entertaining and educating for almost 20 years; and

Whereas the Unicorn Theatre started as a drama camp held at the Shore Club in Hubbards in July 1995, where the directors were so impressed with the talent of the campers that they decided to start a year-round children's theatre program; and

Whereas in addition to giving young people a chance to perform, the Unicorn Theatre offers the opportunity to learn about performing arts;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate the Unicorn Theatre for giving young people the chance to express themselves and become more confident through performing for almost 20 years.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of the Public Service Commission.

RESOLUTION NO. 169

[Page 406]

HON. LABI KOUSOULIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today, December 5th, Nova Scotians come together and celebrate the United Nations International Volunteer Day; and

Whereas Nova Scotians have volunteered over 50 million hours in the last year to providing care, support, and generosity for those who need it; and

Whereas Nova Scotians give their time to volunteer in one of the province's more than 5,800 volunteer organizations, to help make Nova Scotia a better place to live, work, and play;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate the thousands of volunteers who take time out of their lives to help improve the lives of seniors, children, and families, and encourage more Nova Scotians to find a cause they care about and volunteer.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 170

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Big Spruce Brewing Company, on the Yankee Line Road, began supplying local licensed establishments with their locally brewed, all-natural, unfiltered, unpasteurized organic beers; and

Whereas Big Spruce is Cape Breton's first and only craft microbrewery; and

Whereas Big Spruce products continue to receive rave reviews from near and far;

[Page 407]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the initiative of the husband-and-wife team of Jeremy White and Melanie Bock in their creation of Big Spruce Brewery.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

RESOLUTION NO. 171

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Patterson Law was started in 1928 by Frank Patterson in Truro; and

Whereas Patterson Law is a Nova Scotia law firm that employs 90 lawyers and staff in offices in Halifax and Truro, and offers consistently high standards of advice and service to their many clients; and

Whereas in October 2013 Patterson Law was named among the top 10 law firms in Atlantic Canada by Canadian Lawyer magazine;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Patterson Law on being recognized for their stellar client services to the people of Truro and Halifax, and wish them continued success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 408]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Fairview-Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 172

MS. PATRICIA ARAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Rachel Arab, a Grade 10 student at Halifax West High School, was the recipient of her bronze Duke of Edinburgh's Award at a ceremony held on November 25, 2013; and

Whereas Rachel is an engaged youth with a drive for success and has many talents; and

Whereas she is a role model among her peers and continues to give back to her community;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Rachel on her hard work and success in the Duke of Edinburgh's Award Program.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

RESOLUTION NO. 173

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kirk MacRae was named the Irving Schwartz Business Person of the Year by the Sydney and Area Chamber of Commerce; and

[Page 409]

Whereas Kirk received his award at the Membertou Trade and Convention Centre, and said that Mr. Schwartz was a friend and mentor who helped his career to expand; and

Whereas Kirk has grown his Subway franchise to nine stores over the past 20 years and has always given back to the community that has supported him;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kirk for this prestigious award that recognizes his hard work, customer service, and loyalty to staff and customers through community service.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 174

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Zack Sill, the son of Grant and Tammi Sill of Birch Hill, played Junior "A" hockey with the Truro Bearcats of the Maritime Junior Hockey League before joining the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League with the Moncton Wildcats; and

Whereas while playing with the Moncton Wildcats, Sill was named Best Defensive Forward in the 2008-09 season, and was called up to the Pittsburgh Penquins organization in 2009 where he played for the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penquins; and

Whereas on November 17, 2013, Zack Sill played his first NHL game with the Pittsburgh Penquins and continues to play for the team alongside hockey greats such as Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Zack Sill for being called up to play for the Pittsburgh Penquins and wish him continued success in his NHL career.

[Page 410]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 175

MR. JOACHIM STROINK « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Office of the Ombudsman Youth Services asked students from Primary to Grade 7 to design posters that illustrate their understanding of this year's theme, Our Time to be Heard; and

Whereas much effort has gone into the artwork, and the level of understanding was apparent; and

Whereas Halifax Central Junior High School, HRM, had the best school participation, with 60 entries;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Halifax Central Junior High School, their teachers and students, for participation in the contest and fostering learning about children's rights.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 411]

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : Before I recognize the honourable Leader of the Official Opposition, I want to remind all members that the use of electronic communication devices is strictly prohibited during Question Period.

The time is now 3:01 p.m. We will finish at 4:01 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: CHIEF OF PROTOCOL - CANDIDATES

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. Yesterday I asked the Premier how many candidates there were for the job of Chief of Protocol and he didn't answer. According to a CTV report, the Premier said that some names were brought forward - and I will table that news item for the House. My simple question for the Premier today is, is the CTV report accurate?

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, first of all I want to again, today, congratulate and thank the outgoing Chief Protocol Officer for the tremendous work she has done on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia. (Applause)

I again want to remind this House that we hired a 30-year veteran of this province, someone who has worked as a journalist in both the public and private sector doing work on behalf of her clients, communicating. As well, we hired her on a contract basis where she is being paid less than the outgoing Protocol Officer - by the way, there is no buyout at the end of this contract, Mr. Speaker, unlike when the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party was hired by the former Progressive Conservative Government when he negotiated for himself a $20,000 raise for the position that he was applying for. Not only that, he negotiated for himself, on the back end, a full year's salary which would amount of $124,000.

Mr. Speaker, we're doing exactly what Nova Scotians hired us to do - protect their hard-earned money.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I see that the old, angry, attack dog Premier has now returned. Let me just say, first of all, that nothing he just said is accurate. I negotiated no such thing - and for the benefit of all members of this House, I did work in a Premier's Office once and I did leave and my severance was exactly zero dollars. So let's be clear about that.

[Page 412]

I also want to remind the Premier that during the election the Premier is quoted on the on-line service Reddit, in an Ask Me Anything session, as saying ". . . openness and transparency are values I believe in and are values I will carry into government." And I will table that statement of fact.

The Premier has given us the same non-answer to our simple questions now 10 times in a row. I will ask him to live up to the words that he spoke during the election and I will try again with a simple question. How many names were brought forward for the job of Chief of Protocol and where did they come from?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Before I recognize the honourable Premier, I want to remind the honourable Leader of the Official Opposition to keep the language parliamentary in the description of the Premier, please.

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm very proud of the fact that the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism has tabled a piece of legislation that will make this House, when it comes to economic development, more accountable than any other House in the entire country. (Applause)

Let me clear up the misconception that was brought forward by the Leader of the Progressive Conservatives. He negotiated a severance package if his contract was terminated. Unfortunately, they were returned to power and Nova Scotians had to suffer through another term of a Progressive Conservative Government, and at that point he moved into the private sector. Let's be very clear: his contract had a $124,000 severance if that contract was terminated. There is no such clause in any contract that I have negotiated as Premier of the Province of Nova Scotia.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, nothing that the Premier just said is accurate, for the record. Perhaps we need a bill that makes the Premier of Nova Scotia accountable for his own actions as well as the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism.

Yesterday I asked the Premier if this hiring of a Chief of Protocol followed his own government's fair hiring policy, and he answered yes, although I now understand his officials in fact are saying no. Clearly he skirted his own policy to hire his friend and fellow Liberal. My question to the Premier is, why is he hiding the details - simple details like, was it advertised, and how many names came forward? - instead of being open and transparent as he promised during the election?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, we were the Party that told Nova Scotians of the appointment. To correct what the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party has just said, if you look at any protocol position in this province, whether it is the Chief Secretary to the Lieutenant Governor, it is a hire that is done by the person coming in. The same thing when it comes to the Chief Protocol Officer in the Province of Nova Scotia.

[Page 413]

I want to be clear: every opportunity that the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party has had, when it has come to public money, he has made sure he's protected his own wallet. When he negotiated a contract for himself, there was $124,000, and I . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order. Order, please. I would remind all members that the Premier has the floor at the moment, and I would remind all members to please direct your comments through the Chair when you have the floor.

The honourable Premier has the floor.

THE PREMIER « » : Just in case you didn't hear what I had to say, with all the noise in the House, I want to make it clear that when the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party negotiated a contract for himself, he made sure he negotiated a full-year salary at $124,000. But even better, when he left the Premier's Office to go to the private sector he called upon his friend Mr. Harper, who appointed him to two appointments that provided him with over $300,000 in taxpayers' money. (Interruption)

Clearly, when it comes to being open and transparent, it applies to everyone but the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Acting Leader of the New Democratic Party.

PREM.: NSLC - PC APPT. (2003)

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is for the Premier. In 2003, the Progressive Conservative Government of the day appointed a former chief of staff from federal PC Cabinet Minister Kim Campbell's office to the position of Director of Corporate Communications for the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation. At that time, I'd like to table an article quoting the member for Preston-Dartmouth - now the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture - who told the Daily News that the person responsible for this hiring should quit or be fired for such a blatant act of patronage.

My question to the Premier is, does he believe the patronage appointment of the Director of Corporate Communications for the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation in 2003 was wrong and that his Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture was correct when he said that the person responsible for this patronage hiring should be held accountable?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. What this government did was hire a qualified person to fill a vacancy that was left vacant by a 30-year person who decided to retire. In this province all protocol jobs - those associated to the Lieutenant Governor's position and those associated here - have been hires that have been made by the government.

[Page 414]

It's quite interesting that the Leader of the New Democratic Party is standing in this House trying to lecture anyone when in actual fact, in the last Cabinet meeting they had, they saw fit to not only reward their political friends with very generous severance packages, they decided to top it up to a tune of $250,000. The taxpayers not only had to change governments but they had to pay out almost a million dollars to the NDP political appointees.

MS. MACDONALD « » : Well I know why the Leader of the government, the Premier, is attempting to deflect from being accountable for the patronage appointment he just made - he thinks this isn't an important issue. He told reporters moments ago in the scrum that people on Main Street don't care about patronage in Nova Scotia, and in fact he's had very few emails on this, or phone calls. Perhaps the Fisheries and Aquaculture Minister was one of those people who contacted him. Given that the member from Preston-Dartmouth, back in 2003, on the Tory patronage appointment also had this to say about that appointment, and I quote from the Daily News, "This begs the question: what else is going on?"

THE PREMIER « » : What's going on is good government in the Province of Nova Scotia. Mr. Speaker, with every contract that has been signed by this premier, there is no buyout clause in any of them and all can be terminated by any future government at any time, unlike the NDP, who were in power just a few short months ago, and what did they do in the secrecy of the cabinet room, in the dying days? They bumped up severances that were already generous for their political friends. Not only did we turf the NDP Government but we got a bill for severances for a million dollars to look after.

MS. MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, in the past 18 months two other provinces have filled the position of Chief of Protocol. In both cases they had well defined job descriptions, open and transparent hiring processes that were arm's length from the Cabinet and the Premier, hiring committees with members of Chiefs of Protocol from other provinces on them, and an independent panel, merit-based hiring.

I want to ask the Premier, why wouldn't you follow a fair-hiring process moving Nova Scotia forward instead of backward to the dark days of patronage in the Province of Nova Scotia?

THE PREMIER « » : For a minute there, when she said the dark days, I thought she was referring to the early part of October and the last four years. Let's be clear with what happens in this province, Mr. Speaker. This government, with every contract that it has signed, this Premier, with every contract that I have put my name on, there is absolutely no buyout clause in any of them. Any future government can terminate those employees as they wish.

What happened when the former NDP Government signed contracts? They added very generous severance packages, but that wasn't good enough. After Nova Scotians told them they no longer wanted them to govern, what did they do? They went to the Cabinet Room and billed the taxpayers an extra million dollars so that they can give their friends some money on the way out the door.

[Page 415]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: CHIEF OF PROTOCOL POSITION - ADVERTISING

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, yesterday I asked the Premier if the position of Chief of Protocol was advertised. He didn't answer, so we know it wasn't. Just a few months ago in this House the Premier said "The job of government and indeed any Nova Scotian is to be open and honest." I will table that for the benefit of the House.

My question to the Premier is, if he truly wanted to find the most qualified person for the job of Chief of Protocol, truthfully, why didn't the position get advertised?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, we have introduced the most open and accountable piece of legislation when it comes to economic development and the disbursement of funds of any government in the history of this country.

Mr. Speaker, at every opportunity and every turn we've told - the questions about the contracts that we have signed, I want to be very clear to the people who are listening to this and the people in the gallery - that every contract that this government has signed, every contract that I have put my name on is open and transparent and there is no buyout clause at the end, unlike what the Progressive Conservative Leader negotiated for himself about a decade ago.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I struck that severance position out of my contract and got zero - that's what I did, and I just want to make the record clear. The reason I did is because paying off your friends at the beginning of your term is no better than paying them off at the end of your term, like the NDP did.

Mr. Speaker, yesterday I asked the Premier if he consulted the Public Service Commission on the hiring of his new friend, the Protocol Officer. He didn't answer, so we know he didn't. This is the same Premier who once said in this House, and I will table this, the same Premier who said "Mr. Speaker, it's not too much to ask the Premier to substantiate his comments in the House."

So if it's not too much to ask, who was consulted on the hiring of Ms. Langille?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, as I've said many times in this House, we hired a very qualified person to be Chief Protocol Officer in the Province of Nova Scotia. We hired her on a contract basis. In that contract she's being paid less than the outgoing Chief of Protocol Officer. I want to also remind all members of this House, in case they haven't heard me, there is no buyout at the end of this contract - and just to help clarify what the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party actually did, he left in that buyout clause just in case he got fired from that position; that buyout clause of $124,000 was there so that if the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party got turfed from his job he had a soft landing.

[Page 416]

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, in this business, do you know who gets turfed from their jobs? The people who don't answer simple questions and hold themselves accountable to the people who elected them.

Mr. Speaker, yesterday we learned that the only reference collected for Ms. Langille for the position of Chief of Protocol was the Premier himself who said on YouTube: "Nothing would make me happier than to have her working as part of a Liberal Government."

Now, Mr. Speaker, that YouTube video mysteriously was taken down late yesterday. So my question to the Premier, who pledges himself to openness and transparency, if the Premier did nothing wrong, why was the YouTube video removed?

THE PREMIER « » : I'm not sure, but I will try to put it back up for his viewing pleasure if he likes, Mr. Speaker. I will endeavour to find out for the honourable member why that video was taken down. But I will tell you again, there is no buyout clause. If there's one thing we know for certain, it is that the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party certainly knows how to look after himself when it comes to negotiating a contract.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition, on a new question.

PREM.: LANGILLE HIRING - DETAILS

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, all I'll say is that this idea that we're all going to get along and co-operate has died a sorry death today. Nothing the Premier said in his answer bears any resemblance to what actually happened - and he either knows it or he needs to find better researchers.

Mr. Speaker, the Premier once said, as I pointed out earlier, the job of the government and, indeed, any Nova Scotian is to be open and honest and truthful. There seems to be some uncertainty about when Ms. Langille started with the government, so I will ask the Premier a simple and straightforward question. Once again, I hope I get a different answer than the canned answer he has given us 12 times already. On what date was Ms. Langille hired, and will he produce a signed copy of her contract before the end of Question Period today?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I can endeavour to find the answer for the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party. I can tell you that it was brought to my attention that the hire happened on Monday; I can confirm that. The media were told the next day.

[Page 417]

MR. BAILLIE « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, we're 17 questions into this and we finally have at least a little step forward in getting at what actually happened. The Premier said the media was informed on Tuesday. I do find that very interesting, for a Premier who said he wants to be upfront with Nova Scotians about this hiring. It's an important ceremonial job, but there was no press release, and there was no announcement. It was a verbal passing-on of information to the media at the end of Question Period on Tuesday.

My question to the Premier is, if this is all above-board and upfront, why was there no announcement made using the usual means of press release and so on?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, this government has done a tremendous amount of work on behalf of Nova Scotians, and unlike previous governments, we don't run down to the press release machine and throw one out. As a matter of fact, I'm not sure where the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party comes from.

I do want to remind him that there is no one from CNS who actually is in my office, because unlike previous governments, we want Communications Nova Scotia to stay away from political messages and communicate to Nova Scotians. That's what we're going to continue to do, to be open and transparent with Nova Scotians.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I think I just heard the Premier say, or acknowledge, that this was a political appointment, and that's why he didn't want to do a Communications Nova Scotia press release. Now we've made another small step forward.

We all know that if the Premier truly believed he had done nothing wrong, there would have been a proper press release. There would have been a proper announcement, and there wasn't.

All of the hiring under the government's fair hiring policy are subject to freedom of information disclosure. The Premier has now refused to answer straightforward questions 18 times here in the House of Assembly in the last two days. He has avoided being open and transparent by breaking his own rules around the fair hiring policy in the case of the Chief of Protocol. If the Premier truly believes that he did nothing wrong and truly wishes to stand by his own words, which he spoke before the election, that the job of government is to be open and transparent, will the Premier agree to release all documentation and communications about the hiring of Ms. Langille, including her contract, so Nova Scotians can judge for themselves?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I will endeavour to see if I can get that information for the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party. I want to just reassure him that there was no deal negotiated on behalf of the new Chief Protocol Officer that was negotiated for the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party when he was chief of staff, which I want to remind this House was a $124,000 soft landing, not to mention what his friend the Prime Minister provided for him: over $300,000 in payment.

[Page 418]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

PREM.: OTTER LAKE LANDFILL - COMMITMENTS

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question today is for the Premier. On October 1, 2013, the Premier, then the Leader of the Opposition, wearing a pair of orange-coloured Fall flip-flops, told the HRM council that the province should not be making unilateral decisions on issues that impact HRM, and that ". . . it's the responsibility of the provincial government to respect the decision of council." I'll table a copy of the minutes from that council meeting.

On May 21, 2013, the Premier, this time sporting a pair of yellow-coloured Spring flip-flops, wrote to the Chair of the Otter Lake Community Monitoring Committee, saying ". . . it is the position of the Nova Scotia Liberal Caucus that we will not entertain amending the Industrial Permit, nor relaxing provincial legislation or regulations that impact the operation of the Otter Lake Landfill." I will also table that.

My question for the Premier, since these commitments are obviously in complete contradiction to each other, how do you plan to keep both of these commitments?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question, Mr. Speaker, and I want to reassure her that HRM Council, through the great work by the deputy mayor, is actually agreeing with the provincial government.

MS. ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, well on Tuesday, November 12th, HRM Council voted against a motion that would stop controversial changes at the Otter Lake Landfill. This means that the HRM council is moving ahead with plans to eliminate front-end processing and the waste stabilization facility at the landfill, despite overwhelming opposition by local residents.

Yesterday the Environment Minister said in this House, ". . . it is the position of the department and the government that we will not entertain modifications to the existing approval."

My question to the Premier, given his very public commitment to respect all HRM Council decisions, now that he is Premier, how is he going to keep his commitment to the people of Otter Lake?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the Minister of Environment for the great work he is doing on behalf of all Nova Scotians but particularly the residents of HRM in making sure that they protect that facility and the environment surrounding that facility.

[Page 419]

Mr. Speaker, what I find very interesting is a question coming from the NDP about municipal government. That is the same Party that showed disregard for those elected bodies across this province by tearing up a memorandum of understanding and telling them to take it or leave it. The difference now is municipal governments across this province are grateful that the people of this province elected a new government, one that wants to work with them and be their partner.

MS. ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the Premier that I am the Critic for the Environment so I am very interested in the Otter Lake Landfill. My municipal council

in Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River and Colchester County is very pleased to see me back in this Legislature.

Mr. Speaker, on April 24th the former Environment Minister told Mayor Savage, in no uncertain terms, would HRM be allowed to change the terms of the permit for Otter Lake? At the time, Councillor Steve Adams said, "The letter from the Minister is quite definitive and that's what's put this process to an end." I will table that.

But, lo and behold, public hearings and council votes on Otter Lake continue. So my third and final question for the Premier, has his government told the HRM Mayor and council that changes to the Otter Lake permit will or will not be considered?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I think the Minister of Environment was very clear here yesterday. I'm not sure what part of his response the member opposite missed but he was very clear that there would be no changes. We would be respecting the original permit that was put in place and the process that was there.

Mr. Speaker, again, whether she is the Critic for the Environment, she is a member of a former government that showed so little regard for municipal governments across this province that I find it hard to believe there is a single municipal official who is grateful that any New Democrat is back in this House.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

CCH: BLUENOSE II - MINISTER INSPECT

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, this is a question to the Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage. The Bluenose II has always been - well, it has been in a position of pride for a good many years for Nova Scotians. In a recent question and answer, the minister said that he hasn't had the time yet to go and see this project. This project eats up half of the funding assets of the department.

My question to the minister is, why does he not feel it important to see the $16.5 million project first-hand?

[Page 420]

HON. TONY INCE « » : Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the question from the honourable member. I will mention that the costs of this project are quite complicated and they are a concern. What I will say is that this project is very near and dear to Nova Scotians' hearts and to my heart. It is a project that is going through dock trials right now and once those dock trials end and sea trials are completed, I will be one of the first people there to be on that boat and enjoy it.

MR. HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, the project so far has a quite an overrun. The original was supposed to be $375,000, but as of September, $1.3 million has been given to the project manager. Does the minister plan to continue to pay the project management costs, which are in the range of $25,000 a month?

MR. INCE « » : Mr. Speaker, thanks again for that question. We are dealing with a project that, for the first time in Nova Scotia in 50 years, we're looking at a boat that is being built to the highest standards. We are looking at safety standards, we are looking to make sure that Nova Scotians and the visitors to Nova Scotia get to enjoy this particular ship and get to be safe on the ship. So with the cost overruns we are ensuring that it is built to the highest standards.

MR. HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, the Web site says a big part of the crew's mission is to share Bluenose II with the public. We certainly are hoping that the Nova Scotians and tourists who come to our province will have the opportunity to really enjoy this boat. My question to the minister is will he confirm today that tourists and locals alike will be allowed to see Bluenose II when she's finally finished?

MR. INCE « » : Mr. Speaker, I will answer yes. Nova Scotians and tourists to the province will get to enjoy this particular vessel, they will see how beautiful it is, and they will take pride in what is Nova Scotia's ambassador.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney-Whitney Pier.

IMMIGRATION: PROGS. - CHANGES

MR. GORDIE GOSSE « » : Mr. Speaker, on November 8th the federal Citizenship and Immigration Minister made big changes to one of Canada's most popular immigration programs, the Canadian Experience Class, what they call the CEC. These changes are bad news for potential immigrants to Nova Scotia, so my question to the minister is, could she provide details about the conversation between she and her federal counterpart after she called Ottawa to express her frustration over these short-sighted changes?

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, he's addressing me as the Minister of Immigration, so I'll put that hat on for the moment.

[Page 421]

You're quite correct, there were various changes made to the CIC Act and I will certainly attempt to answer your question, but definitely not today. This is a very complicated regulation that has been made to the Act and I'm actually in the process of contacting the federal minister to have a face-to-face meeting with him.

MR. GOSSE « » : Mr. Speaker, the changes to CEC include an annual cap of 12,000 new CEC applications and a subcap of 200 applications in certain occupations. But what is most troubling about these changes were the new qualifications regarding who will be excluded from the program. Effective November 9th, experience in certain jobs will no longer qualify an applicant for the CEC; jobs like cooks, bookkeepers, food service, and retail managers, and others.

My question to the Minister of Immigration is, does the minister agree with the Conservatives that people who work in these sorts of occupations deserve less of an opportunity to become Canadians?

MS. DIAB « » : This minister is very much concerned about all Canadians and all immigrants to this country regardless of the types of positions that they are going to be employed in, and this minister will certainly be addressing these issues and every other type of issue with the federal minister.

MR. GOSSE « » : I grew up in a community of immigrants. My community was once the industrial immigration capital of Canada. My question through you, Mr. Speaker, to the minister, since immigration was a large part of the Liberal election platform, what is she going to do to ensure these changes will not have a negative effect on Nova Scotia communities?

MS. DIAB « » : I too come from a very rich immigrant community, and in fact I know a lot of the constituents of the member opposite and his community as well. We will start with an advisory committee to the Premier and we will soon be able to roll information on that, and I invite the member opposite as well as everyone else in the House if they have any suggestions or comments to please speak with me. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

LBR. & ADVANCED EDUC.: APPRENTICESHIPS - STATUS

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, this question through you is for the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education. This month the Canadian Federation of Independent Business produced a report on the state of apprenticeship in Nova Scotia. I wish I could say it was a positive report, and I'll table that. Instead, it confirmed many of our concerns. We are on track to face a serious labour crisis with high out-migration, low immigration, and an aging population. Things need to change. Young Nova Scotians are looking for leadership to make needed changes to apprenticeships. This is clearly an issue that cannot wait. My question to the minister, how much longer will small businesses have to suffer until changes are made to apprenticeships?

[Page 422]

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : I would like to welcome the member back to the House after his involuntary sabbatical. The member is correct that there are concerns around the current apprenticeship regime in this province. For example, our apprentices are starting their apprenticeships two years older than the average across the country, and they take longer to actually finish their apprenticeship - about two years longer as well. We do have a problem there with our apprentices. Nova Scotia businesses need workers and our skilled workers need experience. One of the things that we've discovered is that during a slowdown, we have workers who are not completing their apprenticeship because there is no work for them. We are actually working with the community college, with business, and we expect to have a new plan very soon. Thank you.

MR. DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, after those kind words I feel like taking a second and third question with me and putting it aside. However, I will continue. The Liberal platform suggests that there would be changes to the apprenticeship program in the current year. Nearly half of all small business owners point to apprenticeships as potential solutions to the labour shortage. They are facing many roadblocks including high costs, poaching risks, information deficiencies, inflexible training arrangements, and provincial inconsistencies across the country. This long list of barriers makes it difficult, if not impossible, for many employers to hire and train apprentices. My question to the minister is, when can small businesses expect some relief?

MS. REGAN « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you to the member for the question. Soon, very soon.

MR. DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, the government knows this is a serious issue, the Opposition certainly know it's a serious issue, the business community knows it's a serious issue, and certainly the Canadian Federation of Independent Business knows this is a serious issue.

Mr. Speaker, 7,000 new skilled tradespeople will be needed in Nova Scotia over the next seven years. We need more skilled tradespeople and we need them now. Twenty-one per cent of small business owners in the region point to restrictive ratios as an obstacle in providing apprenticeship training. Without more Nova Scotians training, the demand will be difficult to meet and small business will suffer. My question to the minister is, why does the minister continue to wait when Nova Scotia jobs and the economy are on the line?

MS. REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, in fact, we are not waiting. We are moving towards bringing in a special operating agency that will have new ratios for apprentices. However, we're not going to do this in a vacuum. We are committed to consulting with business and my answer still stands that you will see a new apprenticeship regime soon.

[Page 423]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

SNSMR: HEATING ASSISTANCE - CHANGES

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations. It's December and the weather is getting colder. We're getting calls about the Heating Assistance Rebate Program, and I'm sure the minister's office is also. However, when they were on this side of the House, the members of the Liberal Party often criticized the previous government who made changes to ensure more people would qualify for the Heating Assistance Rebate Program saying that the program was inadequate.

Therefore, Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the honourable member, has the Heating Assistance Rebate Program been changed to reflect your previous position?

HON. MARK FUREY » : Mr. Speaker, the Heating Assistance Rebate Program, as you are aware, was rolled out again this Fall. This government has committed $400,000 to assist in that program. We'll continue to monitor the program in support of those who meet the requirements through the application process.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, I know the honourable member was not here, but that was the criticism from the Liberals with respect to the investment amount. So I will take it that there have been no changes, even though they were very critical about that program.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the honourable member, with regard to the Heating Assistance Rebate Program, and I will table a passage from Hansard from the member for Preston-Dartmouth. He said, "Mr. Speaker, $200 doesn't even cover one-third of the cost of a fill-up of fuel." I would like to ask the minister, will the minister explain why he has kept the Heating Assistance Rebate Program application capped at that $200 that they so very much criticized?

MR. FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, one of the challenges we face in maintaining the program is an upload of new applicants given the expiration of the three-year period. So it is our intention to continue to monitor the program. The cap rate of $200 at the present time is valuable to recipients, they've indicated that in feedback they've provided. We'll continue with that cap at the present time. We'll continue to monitor it and depending on the upload, we may, in the future, be able to adjust that cap.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the honourable member for his answer, but I can tell him that there is no requirement to monitor the program. We know that $200, as was criticized by the Liberals when they sat on this side, is not enough for individuals or families because it does not provide enough oil for heat in their homes. I guess it is different when they sit on the other side.

[Page 424]

Mr. Speaker, the Liberals also promised to decrease nearly every government department's spending by 1 per cent. That includes the Department of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations. That would mean a cut of $0.25 million.

Therefore, I would like to ask the minister, can he tell us where the cuts will come from in his department? Does that mean that the Heating Assistance Rebate Program will be cut for the poor, or jobs in his department that help process those very applications?

MR. FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, coincidentally I met with the deputy minister this morning and we spoke about this very matter. We will be very efficient in how we address the cuts within the department but I can assure my Opposition member that we will be very frugal and very appropriate in addressing this.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Fairview-Clayton Park.

COM. SERV.: SATELLITE INTAKE OFFICE - FAIRVIEW-BAYERS RD. AREA

MS. PATRICIA ARAB « » : The Department of Community Services currently has a satellite intake office in Halifax's north end, making accessibility easier for the residents of that area. Mr. Speaker, my question through you to the Minister of Community Services is, would the minister be open to having additional satellite intake offices across the province and, in particular, in the Fairview-Bayers Road area?

HON. JOANNE BERNARD » : Thank you for that question. Yes, I would be very much open to looking at satellite offices, particularly in the Fairview area where there are approximately 1,300 families on income assistance, and also in the Halifax Atlantic area where there are currently 800 families on income assistance.

When I was a single mom and on income assistance, I actually went to the satellite office in Halifax Atlantic, when it was open in the early 1990s, with my two-year-old son. I know that sitting on a bus - well, it would be two buses from Halifax Atlantic to get to Gottingen Street - it would be a hardship. We want to remove barriers for people who are trying to go on income assistance or if they're trying to attach to the labour market through our office. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

COM. SERV.: BACKGROUND CHECKS - DETAILS

[Page 425]

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is going to be to the Minister of Community Services. A recent report by the Ombudsman revealed that Nova Scotia does not have a standard approach to performing background checks for those working with vulnerable persons. The Minister of Community Services is responsible for many programs and services that are provided to vulnerable Nova Scotians. As such, she should be particularly keen to see this issue resolved.

My question to the minister is, has the minister made any immediate changes within her department to ensure that vulnerable people are protected and background checks are done in a standardized fashion?

HON. JOANNE BERNARD « » : I'd like to thank the honourable member for the question. We will be following all the recommendations of the Ombudsman. From someone who has come from community and working with very vulnerable children and women, that absolutely is a priority in my tenure as Minister of Community Services.

MR. ORRELL « » : Thank you for that answer. Now this is a serious issue and while legislation is needed to make sure all necessary checks are performed, history has shown us that this is not something we can afford to wait on. The Ombudsman pointed out that there are many situations where service providers may not know when a background check is needed. Some do not include criminal record checks, and others do. The inconsistencies can put people at risk. My question to the Minister of Community Services is, will the minister require retroactive background checks for those who were not otherwise properly reviewed?

MS. BERNARD « » : Mr. Speaker, we will be abiding by all of the recommendations of the Ombudsman's Office. One of the things that I've currently changed, as well, is that any volunteers who want to go on any of the ABCs that are directly linked to the Department of Community Services are now, for the first time ever, required to have a background check. I feel very strongly about this. There is absolutely no reason why anyone connected with our department, dealing with vulnerable populations, does not have a background check.

MR. ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I'll direct this question to the Minister of Justice. As we've seen in situations in the past where an unfit person has been permitted to work with vulnerable Nova Scotians, we need to protect these people. This is an issue that cannot wait. My question to the Minister of Justice is, will the minister bring forward legislation this session to ensure that we have a standard approach to protect vulnerable Nova Scotians?

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, safety - safety of our children, safety of our youth, and safety of families - is of the utmost importance for us at Justice. We will work with Community Services and every other department to review what we currently have. We will work with our office and be able to - if the case determines that we need to update or amend any legislation, we will look into that.

[Page 426]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

FIN. & TREASURY BD.: BUDGET UPDATE - RELEASE DATE

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance. The Premier has tasked the Minister of Finance with the responsibility for overseeing the province's finances. This is an incredibly important task, and indeed no small job. I know that the minister is up to the task, because she has been watching the province's finances for quite some time. In fact, last April, while in Opposition, the minister expressed a lot of concern over the NDP's budget. Many Nova Scotians shared the minister's concern about the budget. Many Nova Scotians questioned whether it was actually balanced or not, and they are now anxious to see how the actual results are comparing to the expectations of the budget.

My question for the minister is, can we expect an update on the budget situation to be released before the House rises?

HON. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for that question. This is something that I know is important to all Nova Scotians, to see what the state of the finances is. We are waiting right now for a little bit more information. As the members will know, we've received new information on the economy - the growth or, in some cases, the negative growth in the economy. Some of the difficulties have been the outflow of people, a decline in population, and a higher unemployment. In the Finance Department we take all of that information to make our forecasts and to see where we're at during the year. Right now we're waiting on one further piece of information on HST.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for her answer. I'm glad to hear she's compiling additional information, because as we know, we all hear statistics over and over about the state of the province. We hear numbers like $14 billion in debt, depreciating infrastructure, 11,000 fewer jobs as compared to four years ago. In fact, we hear those numbers so much that they may start to lose their impact on some of us, but of course, not on me with my fascination for numbers. Nova Scotians do deserve to know the truth about our financial situation, and while in Opposition, one aspect of the NDP budget that the minister seemed particularly worried about were the NDP's financial revenue projections.

My question for the minister is, having now had 50 days to look at the books, is the minister confident that when she gets this final piece of information, the forthcoming update will provide this House and, in fact, all Nova Scotians, with a true representation of our bottom line that Nova Scotians can rely on?

MS. WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, thank you again for that question. The question's very good, will it be a true representation, and that's something I can assure the members of this House that it will be. We want to make sure everything is transparent and open. (Applause) Unlike the two Parties in Opposition, this government did not promise to lower the HST when we did not have money in the budget to do that. I think that's very important.

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What I see already with the revenue projections are clearly, clearly there is not money in the budget to lower the HST as both Opposition Parties promised. It was irresponsible to do so, particularly for the NDP who knew very well what the province's budget looked like. Thank you.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I again thank the minister for her answer. I'm glad to hear they're going to try to be prudent with the province's finances, although in their platform they promised many millions of dollars of spending with really no way to substantiate how they would afford them.

One question I would like to clarify this afternoon is last winter, the minister spoke a number of times about the NDP's prepayment of universities and other fiscal shell games. My sense is that the minister was deeply uncomfortable with the practice of the prior government that saw expenses shifted between fiscal years. I am also uncomfortable about this practice and worry that it is misleading to Nova Scotians. My question today for the minister is, knowing that while in Opposition the Liberal Party disagreed with the practice of prepaying universities, will the minister commit that there will be no prepayments or shifting of expenses around fiscal periods in this financial update?

MS. WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, thank you very much for the question, again. This issue won't arise in the update because that was something that happened in the budget. It was a payment made by the NDP Government at the time to load extra money into the previous year's deficit in order to show what they called a balanced budget for this current year. My fiscal update will show where we are this year going forward and how it's unfolding. As I said, I have some real concerns about the revenue estimates.

I believe I was right when I spoke here in the House when the budget was introduced. The forecast estimates were rosy, to say the least. They took the most optimistic possible scenarios in order to build the revenue into the budget. I think when I point out the recent economic information that's coming in - not the least of which is a declining population, which will be equivalent to millions of dollars less in transfer payments from the federal government - all of those figures are pointing to the fact that the NDP Government inflated their revenue figures.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

FISH. & AQUACULTURE: LOBSTER - EUROPEAN MARKET

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HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, this past Saturday was dumping day for our lobster fishers in fishing areas 33 and 34, and if the catch in fishing area 35 is any indication, they can expect another bountiful harvest this year. Unfortunately, as fishers know far too well, large harvests may bring down the prices. My question to the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture is, now that the new CETA agreement has been signed, what steps is this new government taking to increase demand for Nova Scotia lobster in the European market?

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : Mr. Speaker, this is a very important topic that the former Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture brings up. It's very important that we move forward in marketing our product as a quality product from Canada, and we're in the process of working out an arrangement with the other provinces, as the member would know. To achieve that, there's going to be a long, difficult road. There are many issues that have to be addressed that have been outstanding for more than four years.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the minister for his answer. I don't know if he managed to get down to the wharf on dumping day, but in case he didn't, I can tell you that in southwestern Nova Scotia, the temperature was low but the enthusiasm was high. My question to the minister is - it has been demonstrated over and over again that MSC certification is extremely important to the European consumer. In May of this year, my NDP Government committed to funding MSC certification for the Nova Scotia lobster industry. Can the minister provide an update on how the certification process is currently going on and will he commit to that financial commitment that we did previously?

MR. COLWELL « » : Mr. Speaker, we are working towards that certification, which is critical to the industry, and we hopefully will have it in place as soon as possible.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the minister for his answer. MSC certification is not a quick or inexperienced process. It will likely take several years before Nova Scotia lobsters receive certification. My final question, given the significance of MSC, will the minister . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for Oral Question Period has expired.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 9.

Bill No. 9 - Accountability in Economic Development Assistance Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 9 be now read a second time. I appreciate the opportunity to speak on a fundamental piece of legislation that sets the stage for how this government provides economic development assistance to business.

On October 8th, Nova Scotians sent a message. They spoke with their votes and we heard them loud and clear. On that day Nova Scotians voted for change on how this province is governed, how the government treats Nova Scotians, and how the government will address economic challenges our province is facing.

So, Mr. Speaker, today this government sits in the Legislature with a strong mandate from the people of Nova Scotia. We have a vision that builds on the strengths of our people and communities. We will work with entrepreneurs whether they operate small, medium or large businesses. We will work with organizations and work with communities. We will listen and treat Nova Scotians with respect and will be more transparent and accountable to Nova Scotians about how their tax dollars are invested.

Mr. Speaker, we come into government having to face some tough realities. We have an aging population, a shrinking workforce, and regions of high unemployment. At the same time there are skilled worker shortages, lags in productivity, and low investments in capital and R&D by the private sector, and the opportunities and challenges that come along with the globalization of business.

Mr. Speaker, we wanted to make it easier for businesses to grow, prosper and create jobs in Nova Scotia. We can do that by helping to create a fair and competitive business environment and by providing financial incentives and other forms of support to help grow their operations. Every jurisdiction in Canada is trying to do the same thing and we know we are often competing for the same opportunities. Having a clear economic vision and the right mix of programming is critical as our government creates the path for our province's economic future. Our vision includes supporting innovation, harnessing research, maximizing our advantages, eliminating barriers to competitiveness, and getting government out of the way of business.

Our government will undertake a full, comprehensive tax review. We are hoping that review will identify changes that we can make to allow Nova Scotia to have a much more competitive business environment. Businesses must be allowed to prosper but not at the expense of the true investor, which is the people of Nova Scotia. Being open and upfront with Nova Scotians is the first step in our commitment to support economic growth. Nova Scotians expressed great concern with investments made in the past. They did not understand why so much money was being invested, what the terms were, or what the outcome was expected to be.

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Mr. Speaker, we will set the bar higher and Nova Scotians will see the difference for themselves. With this legislation, Nova Scotians will have access to more information about the government's financial transactions than ever before. We will make all of our provincial investments available on-line for all to see. We will do this on behalf of taxpayers, because it's their hard-earned money and they deserve to know. It won't require a freedom of information application, and it won't fall to the media to track it down. The same information about every transaction will be posted: the type of assistance and what activities the money will be used for.

Details on all amendments will be posted, too. Mr. Speaker, no longer will amendments be done behind closed doors, as was done by the previous government. We will change the practice when it comes to amendments by putting it on-line for all Nova Scotians to see and, most importantly, for all Nova Scotians to judge for themselves.

Mr. Speaker, we will also build in regular updates. Nova Scotians will find out whether their investments are being used the way they were intended to be used. Every six months each transaction will report on targets and timelines.

This legislation affects all deals signed after this government came to office on October 22, 2013. Nova Scotians deserve this level of transparency so they can understand the results and the reasons for their investments. This is one way of showing Nova Scotians that we have heard their concerns and are keeping our commitment to transparency and accountability. (Applause)

The Opposition may claim this information was available before, but Mr. Speaker, that just isn't the case. By making such a claim, it shows the lack of respect the past government had for Nova Scotians. In fact, no other Canadian province is currently providing this type of transparency, and it certainly wasn't done in the past in our province.

Mr. Speaker, I'd now like to address the business community. With this bill, businesses will know that doing business with the province means being honest with the true investor, Nova Scotians. We are very cognizant of the fact that we must not only ensure the interests of those who we will be investing with, but at the same time, that we do not put Nova Scotia taxpayers' investments at risk.

We will develop the regulations for this legislation and we will respect our obligations under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act and trade agreements so that we strike the right balance for our province.

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Nova Scotia is open for business, and we want to attract and support companies that want to grow and prosper here. That's why we have announced the third-party review, which will be underway very shortly. It will look at the tools we use to support businesses today, through Innovacorp, Nova Scotia Business Inc., and the Department of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism. It will consider incentives being used in other jurisdictions so we can develop a mix of programs that will ensure we get the best value for money for Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, as I said yesterday, there is a sense of optimism in our province. We are looking forward to the Ivany commission's report on our best opportunities for our future economy, with Nova Scotians as true and informed partners along the way. Merci beaucoup.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to speak to this Bill No. 9, although I am somewhat perplexed as to what it really will achieve at the end of the day. For five decades, governments in Nova Scotia have been buying jobs through corporate bailouts, handouts and giveaways, and this is totally unacceptable. It's a system of economic development that really no longer works, if it really ever did.

If we look back in time, we all know that all three Parties have attempted to create and retain and maintain jobs through bailouts. Just in my humble opinion, we really, truly are all guilty and we must change. Although I don't want to backpedal a lot on it, I think that we need to realize that we need to look at the past not as a hitching post, but more or less as a guiding post, and do what is best for all Nova Scotians. We only have to look at the state of our economy and the number of Nova Scotians looking for work to know and realize that bailing out companies is not the right thing to do. Bailout economics simply do not work. As our Leader often says, if bailouts worked, then we would all have three jobs.

We know bailouts don't work. Then what does Bill No. 9 really do for us? What does it do for all Nova Scotians?

Mr. Speaker, I wonder, will this bill actually cure our sick economy? I think we all know the answer to that, it won't. I feel, personally, that we're experiencing the longest economic cleansing we ever had to in Nova Scotia and we have to ask ourselves, will it create jobs? The only job that I can really think of that it might create is a Web site administrator to post it, and I think that's pretty sad when we think about that.

I think you have to ask yourself, and really stop and think about it, does it stop the failed policy of corporate bailouts? Does this bill take decisions out of the hands of politicians so they can be made based purely on merit? Mr. Speaker, it does nothing of the sort and I'm really somewhat disappointed in this bill because it really does nothing for all Nova Scotians. Bill No. 9 doesn't say we need to do things differently to create jobs in this province, it doesn't say that all.

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What Bill No. 9 says is, let us continue doing the same thing over and over again that we complained about in expensive attack ads. Let's keep doing that but let's add a Web site while we're at it. This bill puts into law procedures about how to document the details of a failed system. Putting those details on a public Web site, though, won't tell Nova Scotians everything that we don't already know. Everyone knows that bailouts don't work.

Mr. Speaker, transparency in government is always a good thing. For instance openness and transparency in hiring practices is something that Nova Scotians expect from their government. However, I don't think Nova Scotians will thank this government for shining the light on a system that the Liberals themselves said they would put an end to. It simply is a contradiction.

We know the Liberal election campaign literature said, "Liberals will end corporate give-aways and make it easier for small businesses to succeed," I will table that for the House. There is nothing about this that says stop corporate giveaways or makes it easier for businesses, Mr. Speaker. This does nothing to fulfill the election promise and it doesn't make it easier for small businesses to succeed. Lower taxes, lower power rates, and less red tape, that's what helps a small business to succeed and I should know because I am an owner of a small business.

Mr. Speaker, our caucus cannot support this bill as it does nothing. We cannot support the old way of doing things that has failed our province and betrayed our taxpayers, thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : It is an honour to speak about this bill today introduced by the government, An Act to Ensure Accountability in Providing Economic Development Assistance in Nova Scotia. I do understand that the minister feels a need to continue to play the political perception game by presenting this bill. This bill has little substance. It is to make it look like something is being done, when actually it is just to divert the attention from the fact that while they stood on this side of the House they were very clear that they were not going to give any money to corporations. (Interruption)

Actually, Mr. Speaker, it was said over and over again. Neither the Progressive Conservatives' nor the Liberals' history is a good history in terms of bailouts over the years. We only have to mention Sydney Steel and people throughout this province know immediately what I'm talking about.

Mr. Speaker, at its core, the deliverables arising from this bill already exist, and they have for years, because in fact there is a whole office of people whose sole job is to provide information that people want and that is called the Information Access and Privacy Office. My greatest concern is whether this bill will act in a different manner. Will there be necessary disclosure of information that may be a deterrent to major businesses? We all know that businesses at that level need a competitive edge, so they are very concerned about their competitors.

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There is no information whatsoever in this bill addressing that. There has been little or no consultation with major corporations to be able to get an insight into what their concerns may be and what their suggestions may be.

What about our Privacy Act in Canada, and how is that going to fit into this particular bill? Certainly I agree, and I know my caucus agrees, that if there is a manner to make information easier to access for the people of Nova Scotia, that is the way to go. But again, I caution the minister that he needs to consult with businesses and make sure that the decision being made here may not create some lost opportunities in our province.

What I have to bring to the very point, Mr. Speaker, is that this is not about putting information on-line and being transparent. The discussion here is really about one thing, and one thing only. That is the fact that the Liberal Party, in Opposition and during the election, told Nova Scotians very loudly and clearly that they would not support funding to large corporations. That is what they said. I didn't say it; the Progressive Conservatives didn't say it; the NDP didn't say it. It was the Liberal Party going door-to-door, looking in the faces of Nova Scotians and pretending that they are honest and trustworthy by saying, we will not give to large corporations.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I would recommend that the member retract the last comments about being honest and trustworthy. It is unparliamentary to infer that other members of this House are dishonest or untrustworthy.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : I will retract the "trustworthy". Mr. Speaker, I would like to say that during the election the words that were being used were "trust," "change," and "first for Nova Scotia." Those were not our words. Those were the words of the Liberal Party. Those are the words that Nova Scotians are carrying with them each and every day, because of the fact that they did go to the polls, and they made their decision. They made their decision based on the words that they heard, and they made their decisions on belief, believing that this Party was going to come forth with change and be able, as they said, to trust them. How do you trust a newly-elected government that flip-flops immediately?

There were two major issues that were thrown at us in this House on an almost daily basis when the House was open, and I'm sure their memories are not that short. If they are, then we're really in trouble. They said time and time again, we would not give to major corporations, and we also do not think it is appropriate for Cabinet to be part of that decision-making process.

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What was the first thing they did on this file? Well, the first thing they did on this file was to decide they would give money to corporations, and the second thing is that we will leave it in the hands of Cabinet's decision. They criticized us for that. So how can you criticize a government for one way of doing business, and then you come in and you don't even attempt to change that? If that is not a true flip-flop, if that is not creating a political perception - and now the people of Nova Scotia are saying, what did we do?

I know that in four years or four and a half years it will come back to bite them. It definitely will, because people will not forget. The whole concept of corporate funding became a political perception that they won the battle on in this House and in this province. Believe me, that will go for them, too - what goes around comes around. It's a belief that I have, Mr. Speaker. And it will come around, because Nova Scotians are not going to put up with the fact that these people on the opposite side, who are government members now, knocked on doors, talked to poor individuals, talked to businesses, talked to seniors and said to them, we will not support funding major corporations. It's as simple as that.

What changed when they went into government? What changed was the political perception. They won the game, and now they're playing a different game, and that game will come back to bite them. Bill No. 9 is a waste of our paper and ink because all it is is to try to continue that political game, to tell Nova Scotians, oh, we're doing something about it. We're making it transparent. With a hit of a button, you can go on-line and see where we're spending your tax dollars - when they told Nova Scotians that they would not spend their tax dollars on major corporations, and that is what Nova Scotians are going to remember. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise today and say a few words about Bill No. 9. During the last campaign, the Liberal Party told Nova Scotians they would end bailouts. I know we're hearing some murmurs from the backbenchers over there that they're only going to end the bailouts for certain types of corporations or certain types of situations. The fact of the matter is, you can't really just define what a bailout is and keep doing the same thing and pretending it's different.

They didn't say they would tweak the bailout process. They said that a Liberal Government would end corporate giveaways. I'm sure Nova Scotians who voted to end corporate giveaways will be surprised by Bill No. 9. With this bill, the Liberals are telling voters, those people that supported them, we aren't really going to end corporate giveaways like we said we would; we're going to keep doing them, but we're going to let you know the details of them. That's just silly.

Bill No. 9 tells them that this government is not going to do what it said it would do. The history of bailouts in our province is not a happy one. You can't take a broken system and make it less broken. This government had a chance to fix it and they've decided to look the other way. This province has a history of using bailouts as a bribe to business - sometimes to bring jobs here, sometimes to keep the jobs here. More often than not, the bribes have not been successful.

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The Dartmouth company called Scanway is proof of just that. In 2010, Scanway was handed $4.75 million taxpayer dollars . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Scanwood.

MR. HOUSTON « » : I'm sorry, Scanway is an excellent catering company. I'm sorry. (Laughter) I would like to see $4.75 million worth of Unni's cooking any day of the week and I apologize for that. (Applause) We're talking about Scanwood here folks, and I apologize.

In 2010, Scanwood was handed $4.7 million taxpayer dollars to keep jobs here. Those jobs were gone within two years. That was a terrible use of our taxpayer dollars, but it's a great example of why this bill does nothing to create jobs or improve our economy. Let's imagine for one second that Bill No. 9 had been in place in 2010 when the Scanwood company got their bailout. Would that business still be a going concern because of this bill? No, it wouldn't. Would Bill No. 9 prevent the loss of jobs at Scanwood? Not likely.

You can set the bar as high as you want in terms of disclosure, but if it's a bad deal, it's still a bad deal, and it doesn't matter if you tell Nova Scotians all about it. Bill No. 9 would simply give Nova Scotians more insight into the reasons why corporate bailouts don't work and should not continue. You don't build a modern, dynamic, 21st Century economy when government tries to get in the business of picking winners and losers. You do it by levelling the playing field so all entrepreneurs can do what they do best – create jobs. You do it by lowering taxes, freezing power rates, and stopping wasteful government spending.

Mr. Speaker, if the NDP had not spent over $600 million on bailouts - $600 million - that's money that could have been used to lower taxes, which would have created jobs. The Liberals told voters that they were going to put a stop to this, and Nova Scotians believed them. Sadly, they are now walking away from that and doing something different. As my colleague said earlier, Bill No. 9 simply puts into law procedures about how to document the details of a failed system. Putting those details on a public Web site won't tell Nova Scotians anything that they don't already know. Everyone knows that the bailouts aren't working. Nova Scotians will tell you that handouts to corporations aren't putting food on their tables, or paying for their kids' braces, or putting oil in their tanks. We need new ideas in government, and this bill is just more of the same.

What Bill No. 9 is going to do is create a bunch of reports, and forms, and red tape that will actually kill jobs in Nova Scotia. It's just a bad idea. Now, as you can tell, we're disappointed by this bill because it really doesn't do anything to make the lives of Nova Scotians better. Even as it's written, it's incomplete. The bill says that the minister shall publish, twice annually, a report showing the recipient's progress in meeting targets and timelines. That report will come from the recipients, and given to the minister who will put it on-line. So what are we going to do if the recipient doesn't provide a report? Will the minister then publish a report showing what penalties or what action the minister is taking for the failure of the company to provide the reports? These are the types of things that we need to think through with this bill. If you're going to do something like that, you might as well make it complete.

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We need solutions to our problems. Bill No. 9 isn't a solution to any problem. Our caucus cannot support this bill, as it does nothing. We cannot support the old way of doing things that has failed our province and betrayed our taxpayers for so long. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I enjoyed listening to the comments from the members of the Opposition. In the last election campaign Nova Scotians spoke loud and clear about wanting to have accountability and transparency when it came to investments being made by the Province of Nova Scotia. Bill No. 9 will do what no other Canadian jurisdiction is currently doing. That is something for all of us to be proud of.

Mr. Speaker, I'm not sure if the Official Opposition may have missed this, but in the House, I've already indicated that we are undergoing a third-party review of all economic development tools that we have in the province. Even further than that, we have indicated that the Nova Scotia Jobs Fund, as it currently exists, will be no more.

Mr. Speaker, the fact that we've said that, and yet the Opposition still accuses us of wanting to do things the way they were done by the previous administration, rings hollow to say the least. The member for Pictou East says we already did one. That's a bit of the flip-flop that we're hearing from the Official Opposition. An earlier bill they brought in was to give all the Nova Scotia Jobs Fund to NSBI, arm's length, and let NSBI make their own decisions. Yet when NSBI brought forward a decision, which we supported knowing that the board, which is made up of very well-respected business leaders throughout the province, which is arm's length, came forward and said we believe this is an appropriate investment for our Nova Scotia taxpayers. The Official Opposition criticized it.

You can't have it both ways. You can't say let's change the way we do things and let NSBI have control of this, and then criticize the decisions that they make and say that's not the way it's supposed to be. So the Official Opposition has to decide once and for all what it is they want to see.

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Mr. Speaker, I have to say, I was disappointed to hear the comments made by the critic for the NDP. The suggestion that the NDP - and I'd be curious, if the former member for Halifax Fairview was here, to hear what she just said criticizing us for suggesting information be put on a Web site - and she, in turn, said you can already get that through freedom of information; why would you want to put it up on a Web site? Well, I'd love to hear what his take would be on that comment coming from his old Party, the NDP. Suggesting transparency and accountability, whether you're in Cape Breton or Yarmouth or anywhere else, that you can click on the Internet and get this information, that the NDP would now suggest no, make Nova Scotians go through the freedom of information process if they truly want to get that information - I have to say, what a marked departure for the NDP on that specific issue.

Another comment that the member made that I couldn't help - she referred to what we do as a game. Mr. Speaker, the trust that Nova Scotians have put into us is to ensure that we do everything possible to carry out the responsibility we've been given, to respect Nova Scotians and to move this province forward. I tell you, Mr. Speaker « » : for us, that is not a game.

Mr. Speaker, I do want to say that I did appreciate the comments being made, and I found them interesting, from the members for both Pictou West - the critic - and Pictou East. I do look forward to hearing their comments as we move forward in the days and weeks ahead, when it will come to issues such as DSTN, Maritime Steel, and Northern Pulp. I really look forward to hearing exactly what their positions are when it will come to addressing questions facing those companies and other companies in Pictou County.

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to seeing this bill pass. As always, we look forward to seeing it go through the Law Amendments Committee process and any changes that may be suggested at that particular time. With that, I now move that we close debate on second reading of Bill No. 9.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 9. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 10.

Bill No. 10 - Maritime Link Act.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : And the Acting Minister of Energy.

Mr. Speaker, today I move that Bill No. 10, an Act to Amend Chapter 9 of the Acts of 2012, the Maritime Link Act, now be read a second time.

This bill contains a number of important amendments to the Maritime Link Act, amendments that will help move the Maritime Link project forward. After significant efforts of government, the Department of Energy staff and interveners, to ensure ratepayers were protected, our government has introduced amendments that will enable the project to proceed. Our amendments make it clear that the URB has full authority over the project and ensures Nova Scotia Power Maritime Link (NSPML) complies with all board decisions.

This bill makes certain that the URB decisions are fully supported in legislation. We have now ensured beyond a shadow of a doubt that the full decision of the board stands. The amendments are designed to provide NSPML with a number of authorities for the construction and operation of electrical utility projects in a very limited geographic area. Most importantly, the changes will allow the project proponents to access the necessary financing with the security of the federal loan guarantee. The federal loan guarantee is a crucial component to the Maritime Link - it will significantly lower the borrowing costs of the project and save ratepayers millions of dollars. The protection of ratepayers has always been our number-one priority. As we've said before, if the project went ahead it should do so with the benefit of the federal loan guarantee.

I can also tell you, Mr. Speaker, that the province has signed a Canada-Nova Scotia indemnity agreement, and we are close to completing negotiations for use of Crown lands to build the subsea cable. We expect the Crown land use agreement for the Cabot Strait-Subsea Corridor to be finished very soon. The indemnity agreement is necessary to access federal support for the loan guarantee. As a condition of the guarantee, the province agrees it will not increase risks for the federal government. The agreement is standard commercial practice and does not impact the URB's ability to protect ratepayers' interests. At the end of the day those agreements will allow us to access up to $250 million in savings over the life of the project, putting the interests of Nova Scotia ratepayers first.

As the public record shows, we have always believed the Maritime Link was a project with potential, and we had concerns with how the deal was structured. Now that the URB has made a final decision that includes our conditions, we can move forward knowing that ratepayers are better protected. This project, as laid out in the URB decision, provides multiple benefits to Nova Scotians. We now have a guarantee of access to market energy. The result will be a competitive energy market, which we have promoted for some time. In addition to Nalcor Energy, we will be able to access competitive power from other sources. We now have guarantees of access to surplus energy, something we clearly did not have before.

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Of highest importance is the fact that risk is shifted away from ratepayers to Emera and Nalcor. Mr. Speaker, we certainly didn't have that before. The revised agreement goes even further to outline exactly what the mechanics of sales and benefits to ratepayers will be. Every single issue we expressed concern about in connection with the Maritime Link deal is now addressed in the new arrangement.

Mr. Speaker, the new and improved deal surrounding this project is good for Nova Scotians. The URB has given the Maritime Link the green light and now we will move the project toward completion with the necessary legislation. This is just one more step toward ensuring that Maritime Link benefits Nova Scotians for decades to come. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to stand and speak for a few moments on Bill No. 10. As we've said before, this caucus has never doubted the value of Muskrat Falls, a project on its own, yet we simply want to stand up for ratepayers and make sure that they are getting the best deal possible.

The project has merit. We celebrated that announcement a couple of years ago already as a win for Nova Scotia, but of course, that hinged on getting a good deal for Nova Scotians, and we're really not sure if that's true just yet.

The $1.5 billion project locks the people of Nova Scotia in for decades to come - for 35 years. At the end of that deal, we just give it to the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. That in itself is one that continues to create concern for many Nova Scotians that we've talked to - how can it possibly be that, when ratepayers are spending so much of their money on a project like this, we don't even own it in the end? It's one that doesn't necessarily have an answer coming from either government or Nova Scotia Power at this point, of exactly why that is. Why aren't we required to maintain or keep that asset for the long term?

The commitment was made by a government that was not sure that we weren't - you know, let me read that one again, Mr. Speaker. The commitment made by the government was not one that we were prepared to make without very careful consideration, but time was not permitted by government as this rolled around. In Opposition, the Minister of Energy and the Premier frequently asked the former government how much the Maritime Link would impact power bills, and now they say they'll need a crystal ball to get that answer. That's not good enough, because we continue to speak to Nova Scotians, whether through social media or as we have the opportunity to travel in our communities, and people continue to ask the question, what is this going to cost? Skyrocketing power rates have plagued family budgets for far too long here in Nova Scotia. Nova Scotians do deserve a break.

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Now, this bill that we have before us is one to match up in order to allow the federal loan guarantee to flow. It is one that is a full-out requirement. We're not sold that the Muskrat Falls or the Maritime Link is one that is going to continue to ensure that we have low power rates in Nova Scotia. As a matter of fact, by the admissions of the previous government - and we haven't had that backed up by the current government yet - it will mean an increase in your power rates for years to come. So let's hope, all of us together, that the energy coming from Muskrat Falls will hopefully be a little bit cheaper, a little more in line, and one that I hope will create a more stable power system here in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, this is a bill that's very important for that loan guarantee, and I guess as it rolls around, we are going to have to support this to make sure that those dollars flow along. So thank you very much for the opportunity to speak on Bill No. 10, and I look forward to this moving on to the next step of the process, which is off to the Law Amendments Committee.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, we will be supporting this bill going forward. I may disagree with the backslapping of the government in how they have negotiated this and taken it from the precipice, if you will, and saved all Nova Scotians. But the reality is that the Maritime Link to Muskrat Falls-Lower Churchill deal, however you want to describe it, is going to be beneficial for Nova Scotians, because it will give us long-term stable rates.

Now, I keep hearing from my friend just to my right here about their energy policy and how, you know, what are we going to do? But if you remember in the recent election, the idea was to freeze rates. There was nothing beyond that.

AN HON. MEMBER: Oh, there was way more than that.

MR. CORBETT « » : No, really, I mean (Interruption)

ANOTHER HON. MEMBER: You didn't read the rest of it, did you? Stop right there.

MR. CORBETT « » : Anyway, we all know, Mr. Speaker, that whatever you do, you just can't stop something and freeze it and say that it will not catch up with you. If we freeze somebody's wages, people will try to catch up to it, and all these things. It was an over-simplistic solution - the member had even said - a very difficult thing. I agree that Lower Churchill will give us stable rates, and that's what we've said since the get-go, Mr. Speaker. It's needed. It has to be a very serious, viable piece of our energy portfolio. We agree with that, Mr. Speaker. But the fact is that one thing that all Parties should be able to agree to in this House, from having rotated from the government side and this can go back for many, many years, is there's no simple fix when it comes to your energy costs and your needs. If someone could merely click their heels and have rates drop, there's not a government, there's not a member in here, who wouldn't agree with being able to do that. It's just common sense and a lot of times this Chamber is devoid of that but I think that even we could reach that bar, Mr. Speaker. That's the reality of it.

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Until we get to realize that there will be times - and I am sure I'll be one of them, Mr. Speaker - that our partisanship will show, but the reality is, anybody who stands up in this House and says here is the simple solution to our energy needs, is just not talking about things in the real world.

This provides us with an energy source for 35 years out. One would wish that we could do something with this tomorrow. I know the other day the minister was talking about if this was on the go today, well the fact, when the minister talked about that, it was impossible to be on the go today, that would have cost - I think his dollar figure then was like $42 a megawatt. Mr. Speaker, those things aren't there.

The energy solution for this province is a long game. It's a marathon, it's not a sprint. Therefore, with those few words, Mr. Speaker, we will support this going forward, understanding that this is a very difficult file and we hope the government does well in this and we hope that because if they do well in this, Nova Scotians will do well in this. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I move second reading of Bill No. 10.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 10. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 11.

Bill No. 11 - Sir William Young's Benevolent and Charitable Fund Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I move second reading of Bill No. 11.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 11. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Private and Local Bills.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, may we revert to the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 12.

Bill No. 12 - Occupational Health and Safety Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : I rise today to move second reading of Bill No. 12, the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotians want their workplaces to be safe, and they're eager to assist in making them so. Workplace safety fines are part of making this happen, but they need to be consistent and they need to be fair. We know employers and employees want the administrative penalty system to focus on serious and repeat offenders, and for education to be an important part of the process. During consultations, two of the biggest concerns that were noted were how the funds were spent and how penalties are appealed. We listened and we're making these changes to protect workers and keep workplaces safe.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act will be amended to change the process to appeal penalties, with the Labour Board now hearing all appeals - this includes compliance orders and administrative penalties. We're also changing how we spend the fines collected from these penalties - the money will no longer go into general revenue as they have done since 2010; in fact now they will go towards initiatives that will help make workplaces safer, as opposed to general revenue.

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Mr. Speaker, keep in mind this isn't all we're doing. These two changes are just the first steps in rolling out the new administrative penalty system. In July the proposed framework for the new system was presented to Nova Scotians and we'll be making these changes happen through new regulations in the new year. The new system will help educate employers and employees on workplace safety and will assign penalties for the appropriate types of offences, and it will focus on the most serious infractions and repeat offenders. We're stepping up our safety efforts in many ways: we're hiring more safety inspections; we're working with industry to ensure officers are getting to more high-risk workplaces; and we're improving documentation and following up on compliance orders.

This is all in an effort to make our province the safest place to work in Canada, because, Mr. Speaker, everyone should come home safe from work. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today in the House to speak to the amendments to Bill No. 12, the Occupational Health and Safety Act. This bill would be some help in putting us in the right direction to many of the challenges we are facing on work sites around this province.

Directing revenue generated by the workplace safety violations to the workplace safety initiative is a good preventive measure to put in place. Certainly prevention is an area where much improvement is needed. Our province is facing many challenges in our workplaces in workplace safety, and workplace safety should be at the top of our priority list. No one should have to go to work wondering if they will be able to make it home at the end of the day to have dinner with their family.

The number of workplace fatalities so far this year is staggering. There have been 28 workplace-related deaths in Nova Scotia this year alone. Most recently, Mr. Speaker, this Fall we lost 21-year-old Alan Fraser who fell six stories to his death on a Clayton Park work site. Sadly, the same site saw an accident the week before when a 25-year-old man pouring concrete fell from the sixth floor - he only fell about 10 feet or so, hurting his leg in the process. This would lead one to believe that we can, and must, do better.

Mr. Speaker, this change to the OHS Act will assist with the issue - there is clearly much more that needs to be done to protect Nova Scotian workers and improve the workplace safety culture in this province. In May 2013, the previous minister said that the government would accelerate a plan to hire a safety prosecutor to deal with the overwhelming number of workplace safety infractions. He said at the time it would likely happen within a month. Well, many months and a new government later, we still do not have the safety prosecutor in place.

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What we have seen from the new minister is progress on recommendations from the Workplace Safety Strategy launched earlier this year. Five new investigators will be hired, making the total number of inspectors and investigators 40. This new bill will hopefully improve the appeal process and allow for a more efficient and productive processing of administrative penalties. This will all help, but certainly more needs to be done to change the culture and it will need to involve all Nova Scotians in that process.

It's important that education and preventive programs and much more be inserted into changing this culture. Unfortunately, changing culture takes time. Workplaces that have repeated incidents, especially those with serious accidents resulting in death, need to be held more accountable and then closely monitored to ensure compliance. It is imperative that we have a safety prosecutor in place to ensure that companies are accountable and realize there are serious penalties to providing unsafe working conditions. This is extremely important, and time is of the essence.

In May, there was discussion of expediting the process. Since then, 15 more Nova Scotians have lost their lives on the job site. In my own constituency of Pictou Centre, the Pictou County Injured Workers Association has been critical of the government for a lack of action on the prosecutor front. We cannot wait any longer for workers to be put at risk without holding the workplaces accountable.

We also need to address the prevention side of work public safety. Some have suggested a safety ombudsman or expanding the powers of the current ombudsman to investigate reoccurring workplace complaints and issues. As of right now, there is a confidential government 1-800 number for employees or employers to call should they want to report a violation. An ombudsman would be another avenue to report concerns in your workplace.

Today there was an article on allnovascotia.com examining the circumstances around the death of a 50-year-old shipyard worker who sadly took his own life. I'll table that. There were allegations of bullying within the workplace. The company did investigate the allegations and stated that, ". . . bullying wasn't a factor in Mackenzie's death and the company has looked into allegations of intimidation and harassment and taken disciplinary action." The article called for an investigation by the provincial Department of Labour and Advanced Education, to conduct anonymous interviews and clear the air about the working conditions at the shipyard. It may find that changes are needed in the workplace culture at the shipyard before the heavy lifting on the combat ship contract begins. The article raises some interesting points when it comes to the safety of our workers.

In conclusion, the commonality between these suggestions is that changes to workplace safety need to be made. This should be a priority for the government and they need to address the bigger picture of prevention and prosecution to protect all Nova Scotian workers. This bill seems to be a step in the right direction for workplace safety and we are interested in hearing from presenters at the Law Amendments Committee.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the minister for bringing this forward. We will be supporting the bill. I don't know what's new in it in some ways, but anything that inches even worker safety forward we would support. There are some issues when it comes to the idea of getting more inspectors and the fines and so on because this is more from words, I would hope, of caution than of criticism. I would hate to see inspectors turn out to be ticket writers as opposed to people who really help with workplace safety. They are the front line for working men and women in this province, to keep them safe.

The idea in other areas, when these - I guess that's an issue that I bring up, because on its face it looks good when you say that those fines will be going into certain programs and not into general revenue. Sometimes those things have to be - I don't know if it's thought through completely or not. That would be a cautionary note from me. The fact that as it sits now, some of our programs as they relate to OH&S are jointly sponsored, if you will, by the department and by WCB's accident fund. Has the department sat down with WCB and asked them to perform an expanded role here in the prevention of workplace accidents? Are we saying the reality is that more and more we see accidents happening in the workplace, in businesses that are not covered by WCB, and would universal coverage be of value in there?

I also would hasten to note that one wonders if we're going to hire new inspectors, but also that the department will be under the 1 per cent cut, so I wonder how that kind of evens out with one another.

The idea of workplace safety is one that we as politicians can talk about in here - the minister would know from the recent campaign that's going on, and it's all about returning home safely. I want to congratulate the minister and the staff on those ads. To my mind, she and I have some of the same background at one time, and I think we agree with the effectiveness of that advertising. It's to that point that we can't lose sight of what government's role is here, and that is to protect the women and men in the workplace. We need to make sure that every workplace is as safe as possible.

I've been involved in enough collective bargaining sessions, and I remember two things that were told to me during my first go-round with collective bargaining by a mentor out of Montreal. He said, when the employer says it's not about the money, it's about the money, and that there's no such thing as an unsafe worker, there's just an unsafe workplace.

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We have to make sure that when the inspectors go in, they are looking for the real thing also. I'm sure the minister is aware. What we need is to get at the root of the problem. For instance, if someone had a low bottle of eyewash, should we give them a citation or should we just say, look, get it fixed? That's common sense. But if someone has open wire hanging down and someone could get flashed out, that's serious. I know the folks, the inspectors, and they do a good job.

They need the tools. That's all they ask for, the proper tools to do it. It's impossible to think that we could hire enough inspectors to cover every workplace. We have quite a few police officers in this province but crimes still happen, that's just the reality. Again, as one chap I worked with years ago once told me, locks only keep out honest people, Mr. Speaker.

The idea is that the inspectors cannot prevent every accident from happening but I would think, given the proper tools, they will prevent many of them and, with education, we will prevent even more. Once we get a culture in this province that every workplace has to be as safe as possible, that's when it will be a success, Mr. Speaker.

With those few words, Mr. Speaker, I wish the government well with this bill. More importantly, I wish - as the member for Pictou Centre just quoted about the amount of workplace deaths this year - that we can stand in our place next year and he says you know what, I stood in here this time last year and said 28, this year it was zero. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I just wanted to rise to share an idea with the minister today. I was going to wait until I got to that side of the House but who knows if that will happen so I might as well share it now and, if it helps, it's good for everybody.

The idea is this - and I think this would be smiled upon by everybody in the workplace - the idea is why don't we start calling these people who are going in from the government, why don't we call them safety facilitators instead of having them go in as enforcement officers or inspectors. It may help, if our goal is to reduce injury and death in the workplace, having people come on the site who are there for employers, so the employer feels they are there to work with them, to help them. I think it creates a better atmosphere. If the goal is to reduce the number of injuries and deaths, I think it would have greater impact.

I want to share that today with you. I don't know where it will go from here but hopefully it may be of some assistance. Thank you.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I do want to commend the members opposite who spoke on this particular bill. I know they all came with good ideas and great thought. I did want to update some of the members on some of the points they raised. We continue to work towards having a prosecutor in place. Of course the Public Prosecution Service is arm's length from government, so while we can move things towards getting a prosecutor, it will not be a prosecutor from the Department of Labour and Advanced Education, it is the Public Prosecution Service that actually has the prosecutor but we are close, I believe, to having that in place.

In terms of what happened at Irving last week, I did offer to meet with the workers. In fact, I was here waiting to meet with them on the first day. In the end, they decided not to but that offer still stands and should they feel they need to meet with me, that they want to bring any safety concerns to my attention, that offer still stands.

The member for Cape Breton Centre said he didn't know what was new in the bill. One of the things that is new, of course, is that the money is not going into general revenue and, in consultations with stakeholders, the stakeholders were unanimous. Every single one of them said that this should not be a cash grab, this money should be going to workplace safety initiatives. That's what we have committed to and that is what we are doing, what we are making possible by passing this particular legislation.

The member for Cape Breton Centre also asked if the Workers' Compensation Board was consulted. In fact, the Workers' Compensation Board was consulted on this bill and they were in the room when the bill briefing took place. So, yes, they were consulted.

I do want to thank Nova Scotians for their commitment to having safer workplaces. One of the things that the tragic incident in Clayton Park had the effect of was to concentrate Nova Scotians on what a tragedy and how unnecessary that was. I think for all of us, all of us who have, you know, kids who are in their early twenties or older or younger, all of us could put ourselves in the place of those parents that day, getting the call about their son. I can tell you it took place just as I was speaking as the minister for the first time, opening a safety conference. When I came down off the stage, I found out that in fact the accident had been a fatality and that it was a young person. I can tell you that, as the mom of a 23-year-old, I felt that very keenly.

I want to thank the members opposite for their comments. I want to thank Nova Scotians who have responded to our commercials. We've been hearing actually a lot about them. I was at a dinner earlier this week and I can't tell you the number of people who came up to me and said, I really love those new commercials. There's a little bit of tension - you're not sure if it's going to be one of those ones where somebody drops the phone or whatever, but it underlines why we want people to come home safe from work. Whether it's to their family, or their friends, or their dog, we all have a reason to want to come home safe from work.

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With that, Mr. Speaker, I now move that we close debate on second reading of Bill No. 12.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 12. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 13.

Bill No. 13 - Ladies of the Sacred Heart at Halifax Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I now move second reading of Bill No. 13.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 13. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Private and Local Bills.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

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GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, it is a privilege for me to stand in this historic Legislature and give the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne. I have been given the great honour by the residents of Chester-St. Margaret's to represent them as their Member of the Legislative Assembly for a second time.

In 2009, I ran provincially for the very first time, so winning was exciting and a bit nerve-racking. I know that many of the first-time members here today know what I'm speaking about. Added to my new life was the honour of being appointed the Minister of Community Services, Minister of Seniors, Minister responsible for the Advisory Council on the Status of Women Act, and Minister responsible for the Disabled Persons Commission Act. The learning curve was steep and the speed to step up to the plate was fast.

I was determined to give 110 per cent because I was given the privilege and trust by the people of Chester-St. Margaret's and to represent all Nova Scotians as a member of the Executive Council. My life's path into provincial politics has not been a journey that I have taken on my very own. My husband Wayne, and our son Brandon, who is 21 years of age, have been right by my side, along with my parents, Olaf and Patricia Peterson, all from Chester. My oldest brother, Derek, also has worked and still works hard to keep me informed on the local "Timmy-talks" from Tim Hortons.

Family means everything to me. When I lost the love and support of my other brother, Darryl, when two years ago at the age of 52, he died from a massive heart attack, it was very devastating to me and my family. I miss him dearly and I know, though, that he's following me on my journey.

Each step I have taken to become an MLA and to do my job has been guided by an active and supportive constituency association. I truly appreciate all they have done and the hundreds of hours they have given to me. I also want to express my gratitude to my friends, acquaintances, and community members who have offered their time and support to me as their MLA. During the recent election, I was humbled by the number and the diversity of those who donated their time, their finances, and resources to my re-election. It is a very humbling experience and I know that those in the House today feel the same way when people come together to support you.

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I have lived in the Chester area all of my life. I've been very fortunate that my husband and I were some time ago able to purchase my nan's home and to be able to renovate it. That is why I've had the privilege to be in the Chester area and to work in Chester, along with work at one point for Halifax County and then Halifax Regional Municipality.

Chester-St. Margaret's, as many of you know, is an absolutely beautiful constituency starting at Bayside and travelling around from the beautiful community of Bayside to the East and West Dovers. The scenic route is breathtaking. Then you take a trip into, of course, Peggy's Cove, where you see the icon of Nova Scotia and Canada, and that is the Peggy Cove's lighthouse.

Continuing on our trip throughout Chester-St. Margaret's takes us to small communities like Glen Haven, Seabright - and along that route, once again, the beauty is just breathtaking when you look at the ocean. We know many, many people that have worked and lived by the ocean and made it a part of their lives. In fact, my grandmother on my father's side is from Tancook Island and so I have a close connection to Tancook. It's interesting when you look back into your family history and you just see the different cultures coming together. In fact, my grandmother married a gentleman from Sweden. You would never think there would ever be a love story of a lady from Little Tancook Island meeting up with a fine gentleman from the Country of Sweden. (Interruption) My colleague is asking me what the story is about. But it was quite a love story - there was a 13-year difference in their ages, my grandfather was older than my grandmother, but boy, it was quite a love story.

I was very fortunate that I had the opportunity, as a little girl, to grow up by the ocean. My grampie and my gram did have a little cottage on the water, so I spent many hours fishing off the wharf, catching eels, and going out on the boat with my grandfather, on his Cape Islander and fishing with him. He often sang a little song, saying: Fishie, fishie in the brook, come and bite on Essie's hook. I'll never forget those words from my grandfather from Sweden. Of course his name was Eric, and hence Peterson.

On my mother's side we have a combination of Captain Timothy Houghton, who was one of the first discoverers of the Chester area. He is one of the first captains who sailed in. In fact, a lot of people do not know this story, but the Village of Chester was saved by women. What they did is there's a huge hill that looks over the ocean - and I'm sure the future will be the same, in terms of women saving this province and the rest of Canada and the world. (Applause) Thank you very much to my women colleagues - what the women did, because the men were off doing their thing at the time and there were very few men in the village, and there was an attack that was going to take place. I believe it was a French ship at that time.

There's a huge hill that they call the Blockhouse. The women were very quick in their thinking, and what they did is they took their red capes - they were red on the inside and black on the outside - and they flipped them around quickly, they took their broomsticks and they marched up and down the hill so the enemy actually thought it was the military and they left, and I think they went over and actually attacked Lunenburg.

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It's quite a story and actually part of my history because of the Houghton family, one of the Houghton women was involved in that, so my heritage goes back to the English culture.

Another interesting fact, I have a family member who had been very much involved in our family tree, and she has gone back many, many centuries and there are actually two famous people on our family tree. One is Katherine Hepburn, because she used to be a Houghton before she was Katherine Hepburn - and this one will get some giggles from you, the other one, and I'm sorry my hair is not long enough and I will not do this anyway, it was Lady Godiva, but I have no desire to ride a horse in the fashion that she did.

On the other side, my grandmother from the Houghton side, actually married into the French culture, a gentleman from Quebec, so there's quite a mixture inside of me and I think that's what makes for being an interesting individual. I'm very proud of my family and my family's history, and I'm very proud that as a person who grew up in the Chester area that I'm able to represent such a beautiful constituency.

As we talk about our travels, you know you look at also the Tantallon-St. Margarets Bay area that is just booming, growing rapidly, and the community is working very hard to deal with that growth. There's a lot of volunteerism; there's a group like the St. Margaret's Bay Stewardship Association. They put a lot of effort in to make sure that, as the growth is expanded from the city to that area, there's planning from all levels, from the municipal level right through to the provincial level.

Along our tour - and I will call it a sight and taste sensation tour, because that was a program that I was proud to initiate as a tourism program when I worked many years ago for Halifax County. It was called sight and taste sensation, where you travelled through the Chester-St. Margaret's Bay constituency area and stopped into businesses to look at the products and have a look at the beautiful sights, stop in restaurants, and have a taste of the lovely cuisine.

As you travel through the constituency, each and every little community along the way was part of that and very much a wonderful place to experience. It brings me to the Hubbards area. Many people here know of the Shore Club - I can see some heads going up and down - and the fact that there were many dances there, parties there, lobster suppers.

In fact, a couple of years before Jack Layton's death I had the privilege of having Jack and Olivia stay at my dad's cottage, that used to be my grandmother's from Tancook. We went to the Shore Club for a lobster supper, and boy, could Jack and Olivia dance together in fine fashion. When Jack passed away it was very, very hard, I know, on many of us in Nova Scotia and throughout Canada. He set a standard that we need to be working to meet each and every day, especially us in this House as political people, and to remember the dream he had and what he talked about in terms of working together, of loving and respecting each other rather than hating and fighting with each other. Hopefully we'll be able to make sure those words ring for many, many years in the future, in Nova Scotia and the rest of Canada.

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Off from Hubbards we'll take a little trip now going around what we call Aspotogan Peninsula, the Blandford area and the Bayswater area. In fact, many people don't realize it, but there is a monument to the Swissair crash in Bayswater, because that's where the remains of those who lost their lives on that flight are buried.

I can remember that night so distinctly. My husband and I had just gone to bed - it was probably about 10 p.m. or 10:15 p.m. - and we could hear this real loud noise go over our house, and we were just wondering, it sounded like a train wreck, and we're going, what would that be? It wasn't long after that we heard all the sirens and hopped out of bed and discovered the terrible tragedy that took place. We also knew many of the fishers who went out to recover and to work, to help others in that terrible, terrible situation. Some of those people have never been the same. They gave in an instant, and in that instant their lives have been affected ever since.

It is a lovely monument, so if you haven't had the opportunity to go to the monument it will bring tears to your eyes. When you stand there you'll see some tattered old flowers and some tattered old teddy bears that were left in memory of some of the children. But it is a good opportunity to go and say a couple of prayers and to realize just how precious life is, and that each and every moment that we have to be in this world and to help others is one that we should be very grateful for. I do know that each and every one of you in here understand that, or you wouldn't be in here. What you're doing and what you're trying to accomplish to help others is not an easy job.

Around the Aspotogan Loop it's another very scenic view, a wonderful community - a lot of community spirit in the smaller communities on the South Shore of Nova Scotia. As you take that trip and then you eventually get into Chester. I know a lot of people recognize Chester, especially for the fine homes that are there, the diversity of the people and some of the people who live in the community of Chester such as Mr. Risley of Clearwater and Colin MacDonald from Clearwater. Colin was a wonderful support for me during the election. He actually bought the old liquor store in Chester to put some of his antique cars in and he allowed me to use it during the election.

I don't know how many people - the old liquor store has been closed for maybe a couple of years but every day we got a few people driving in wondering where the liquor store was. Part of our election campaign was to address their needs and tell them where they needed to find the new liquor store.

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Chester has a lot of diversity and has a lot of needs also. When you put those combinations together, it gives you a real diversity from those who do not have very much, to those who are extraordinarily wealthy. Chester is also known for Race Week. Although I grew up in the area and spent a lot of time on the Cape Island boats doing the fishing, I never had the opportunity to do much in the area of sailing. I'm sure there are some people here who are sailors. I can't imagine if you're a sailor that you didn't have the opportunity to actually be involved in Chester Race Week because the whole village just explodes with a lot of fun and parties.

As you travel through Chester-St. Margaret's and go towards the communities of Chester Basin, we go out past Canaan and towards Windsor where you have a few more farming communities along with the New Ross area. I was extremely pleased and felt very honoured with the fact that, as the representative for Chester-St. Margaret's, I was able to help the Ross Farm with part of a dream that they were trying to accomplish for over 10 years and that was to start building towards having a learning centre. What it will be is a centre that will provide people with the opportunity to learn the old ways, the old crafts. You'll be able to learn how to cook from centuries ago, you'll be able to learn how the clothing was made.

A lot of people don't know that the Ross Farm does a lot of work on movie sets. When it's a historical movie set, they will make props for the movies. I also missed when I was talking about Hubbards, we have - and I had the privilege to be involved in this also and that's the opening of the North American Rug Museum. I know people often kind of think, a rug museum, that couldn't be very interesting but I encourage each and every one of you, if you have the opportunity to travel with your family, please go see the rug museum. It has hooked rugs that are just incredible, they look like pictures - when you look at them, you have to look twice.

There is one piece there that's absolutely incredible. It is a huge Noah's Ark that was given by a rug association in Ontario. All the little animals are hooked to look three-dimensional. It's unbelievable to even to see. It's hard for me to describe it so you really need to stop in and see it. What they've also done to help the community is to continue that craft and they'll involve students and they also bring in senior women who may be widowed and do not have a lot in their lives but they get the opportunity to make a little bit of money on the side plus be able to interact and socialize with other people.

As I mentioned, also in New Ross, a lot of people do not know there's a new winery there called Muwin Estate Winery and the wine is fabulous and it is sold in our liquor stores throughout Nova Scotia - not in all of them so sometimes you have to be searching for it. They send a great deal of their product, actually, to Japan.

Lots of times we have these hidden treasures that we do not even know are in our backyard, so I think it's important, as a MLA, to encourage our own community members to travel within and to encourage Nova Scotians to take the opportunity to travel.

[Page 454]

The far end of my constituency takes you through Chester Basin, right through to the communities of Gold River, where we have an Aboriginal community. I had the pleasure, in September, to go to an Aboriginal event that was just incredible. They danced for hours. They were in their authentic costumes. Everybody was welcomed. They provided you with the opportunity to learn about the Aboriginal culture. You had an opportunity to taste some of the foods that are authentic, especially moose meat.

I have to tell you, I do like moose meat; I have no problem with moose meat. It depends on how it is cooked.

AN HON. MEMBER: Best hamburger in the world.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Yes, the best hamburger because there's not a lot of fat in it. And deer, although I have a little bit of a hard time with picturing the image of little Bambi and then eating the deer, but I do. I don't like when I see the deer, though, on top of the trucks because my dad used to hunt and when I originally went out with my husband, he used to hunt. We dated 13 years before I got married to him and now we've been married 25 years. It took a while to prepare him for life with me.

I did good because when I won the first election, I said to him, dear, I really should be able to give you something for all your support. This is a hard-working man who works at a hardboard plant, Louisiana Pacific. He's worked there for 25 years. He loves NASCAR; he doesn't have a political bone in his body. He loves doing landscaping but he's a bit of a neat freak, which is no problem for me because what he asked for was a Dyson vacuum cleaner and I bought him a yellow Dyson vacuum cleaner. They didn't have any orange but I bought him a yellow one. Do you know what, ladies? I'm not allowed to touch it. Isn't that nice? I'm not allowed to touch it. He takes that vacuum cleaner out - and I hope the men are listening to this - he takes that vacuum cleaner out and I think he even waxed the vacuum cleaner.

He doesn't permit me to do too much housework, which I'm not going to complain about because when we originally moved into nan's house, I was so excited that we were in my grandmother's house. You know how strange life can be because the night my grandmother passed away was the night that I actually got pregnant with my only son, and we couldn't have any more children, and it's like a miracle to me that she left the world and I became pregnant and at the end of the day we ended up in nan's house, living.

We renovated the whole house and there was one spot in particular where nan always had her rocking chair. One day I said to my husband, oh my goodness, we put a rocking chair in the exact spot. Nothing else in the house would have fit anywhere else, because of the fact that we just totally changed it. The rocking chair was actually Wayne's grandfather's rocking chair because nan's rocking chair was given to my brother. My grandmother knew my husband's grandfather, so it is funny how all that comes together.

[Page 455]

You probably remember the times when - you know, my grandmother did this, she painted everything. Paint was the big thing and we love all this beautiful woodwork and my grandmother painted everything. I don't know how many coats of paint were on the beautiful staircase in the house. There were so many coats that we ended up having to actually burn it off. I was so proud of that beautiful wood that I thought I would impress my husband by "Pledging" the stairs. Well, that did not work. I'll tell you, when I heard that "boom, bang, boom, bang, ouch," I knew it was from "Pledging" the stairs, kind of making it a little slippery. They looked beautiful, and he didn't kill himself, and I did tell him I had all of his life insurance paid up. We do those kinds of things in life, but when you have a partner for that long and you've dated them for 13 years and been married to them for 25 years, we're almost like Archie and Edith now.

The one thing I think that has gotten us through all of the turmoil and the difficulties in life is having respect for each other. At the end of the day we can laugh with each other and we can laugh at each other and we have respect. That's what I do hope that we can carry on within these walls as we do our jobs. I know that it gets tough - and I'm the worst one. I think you've already heard my heckling skills. I try very hard, but I'll just let you know it doesn't work. My husband hasn't succeeded, so I don't think anybody in here will succeed, but I will now formally let you know that I do have a challenge with heckling. But I think you already know that.

I have to say that it has been such an interesting life for me, and that I am so proud that I represent Chester-St. Margaret's. One of the things that I did learn very quickly, and that was the same as my new colleague on the government side, the member for Lunenburg, was the importance of roads, roads, roads. I do know my former colleague from Lunenburg, Pam Birdsall, knew that too, and worked very hard to make sure that a lot of the roadwork was done - and roads that normally didn't get any attention. I do remember a time when we met with the Christmas Tree Growers Association, and there's a road called Stanburn Road that was in terrible shape. They weren't able to get access to the trees, so they were very concerned about that. Pam worked very hard to make sure the standard of that road was changed.

I worked very hard on the road file, and was able to have about $28 million in road improvements put in Chester-St. Margaret's over the four and a half years in government. I do know that my friend on the other side who is in charge of TIR knows where I'm going with this. I'm not going to heckle, I'm just going to say that I do really wish there was a reconsideration in terms of the asphalt plant. I know we have different opinions on that, but I saw roads in Chester-St. Margaret's being paved that didn't see a touch of pavement in over 50-some years. I truly believe that having that asphalt plant set up as standard - because I know what was happening, and I know many people know what was happening years before we had that plant. The fact is that there was really no competition in the road paving industry in Nova Scotia.

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There was one major company, and I don't need to say their name. I know you know who they are, because the owner lives in the Chester area. As companies will do, it's their job to make the most money that they can; that's why they're an entrepreneur. The tenders that were coming in were higher than necessary and there was no competition to encourage them to lower those tender numbers. I do know that by having that asphalt plant, that set up a whole different circumstance in our province. It did encourage other competition to come in, and the reason it did is because now that particular company that had basically had a monopoly on road paving, suddenly they were lowering their prices, and because they were lowering their prices, the other companies now could compete. So that's the real story behind the asphalt plant. You didn't even have to start that plant up because it created a whole different environment for the paving industry. I believe the business case that we presented showed that there was a saving of $50,000 or $51,000 per kilometre. So it makes sense that you were able to take those extra dollars and reinvest in other areas.

One of the other areas that we reinvested in too was the chip sealing, and that's why the chip sealing crew was so important. I had so many roads chip sealed. It is a wonderful product because those roads that used to be sand sealed - sand sealing is so expensive. So it was an option there for us to be able to have these roads chip sealed. There were many, many roads in Chester-St. Margaret's that were chip sealed and people were extraordinarily pleased with that.

So, you know, I really do encourage the minister to take another look rather than it being, okay, we were on this side, when we were over there, we're NDP, we're Liberal. Now because it was an NDP's thing, we don't want it. I really do hope that, I know that the Liberal Party said they are going to do things differently. So if they're going to do things differently, I hope they would take that political part out and really have a hard look, because we will find out in four and a half years who's right on this one, believe me, because roads are critical in rural Nova Scotia. We'll be able to see at the budget process of where that saving is because, once again, I think we have created a situation in the province that it will be difficult for those smaller road-paving companies now to compete again.

That's why some of our roads in very rural areas weren't getting done either: because of the fact that the larger company just did not want to put in a bid. It wasn't worth it for them to move their equipment and all the work when they knew there were many greater projects at their fingertips that they could get, so that was ignored. So I really do encourage you to have more discussions about that.

One other area that I would like to focus on that I didn't see a lot about in the Throne Speech, which really does concern me because of my recent role as Minister of Community Services, and that's with respect to many areas in that department and certainly for persons with disabilities, Madam Speaker. We worked very, very hard to move that whole file along and to help those individuals and families who have disabilities. I have to be honest.

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When I went in as minister, I was quite surprised at how neglected that area was. There was not a whole lot of investment. What we were looking at was a province where people with disabilities have been working so hard and have the desire to be able to live in their communities. People with disabilities, I often would say, are actual people with abilities; people with disabilities have the ability to teach us. They teach us what's really important in life. They teach us how to be motivated. They teach us how to not give up.

So I don't want your new minister, or the new government, to give up when it comes to people with disabilities. It took a while for us to get the strategy in place, and the reason for that is there was always a distinction between the advocacy groups standing outside, looking in the window of Community Services. And they were not invited in. The reason being - it's just a part of - it wasn't staff's fault, it was the way we developed over hundreds of years of government to create a system. That system is what I as a minister always blamed the problems on; not the people, not the staff, but the system. It's really hard to change a system if you don't go to the root cause, and often the root cause in government is policies, and policies that are 20 and 30 years behind.

So I do encourage you to take a hard look at those policies and make every effort to change them. One of the other tasks that I had was now to bring people together in a restorative approach and start talking around the table. I was absolutely surprised how many people said to me we've never been invited into the minister's office. That takes time, trust had to be rebuilt and trust only can be rebuilt if you show action.

One of the major, major projects with those with a disability that we took upon ourselves was to work with the disabled community - those people who used to rally outside, yell at government, saying they weren't being heard - and bring professionals to the table, people like Michael Kendrick who wrote a report over 10 years ago about the issues in this province, about not having enough infrastructure to allow people to live in their community and to deinstitutionalize this province for those with disabilities. And so he came to the table, and a gentleman called Michael Bach, who is world renowned on working on how communities and governments can plan and finance for those changes to allow opportunities for people to live in community.

That is the struggle that you will face that we faced, and that is that the infrastructure is not there because there was no planning in the past. When we announced the transition and the pathway for people with disabilities to support every effort to build more infrastructure to allow communities to have people living in and having choice - it's all about choice. That's what we worked and that pathway and that strategy I hope, I really hope, that you will continue and you will continue the financial aspect and planning for that because it would be such a shame after all that work and coming together that that would be lost.

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May I ask, Madam Speaker, how much time I have?

AN HON. MEMBER: Time's up.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : It is not. Madam Speaker, how much time do I have? It's usually an hour, and I'm just wondering. (Interruption) But can I restart? It's not hard for me to restart, believe me. And then I can go a bit more after that? Okay, that's good.

I have to say that's one thing my husband always says, that there are days he wants to send me to Michelin to get my tongue retreaded, so now you'll know why. But once again we have that love and affection and respect for each other.

ANOTHER HON. MEMBER: Wise man.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Yes, he is a wise man and he says, yes dear, often. (Laughter)

So I have to bring up my concern that I didn't see a lot in the Throne Speech around that commitment for people with disabilities and continuing on that path of deinstitutionalization. It's not an easy path to take, but for the first time in the province's history you've brought together every group that had an interest in this. We brought together parents, and we brought together people who have disabilities and we, with staff, developed a new relationship - and I hope that relationship doesn't get broken and I hope that that relationship continues with the commitment for that strategy.

The other strategy that I'm very proud of is the Housing Strategy and that was the first housing strategy that this province ever created. I don't want to sound like we're bragging but it was a lot of hard work and that, once again, was bringing partnerships together. The focus on that strategy was we had four different pillars and the pillars were looking at the need for more partnerships with municipalities, with the province, with the federal government. We looked at homelessness and we had started a program where we supported outreach workers. They worked very diligently with people who were homeless and we were able to find homes for 280-some people within an 18-month period.

The other part of that strategy focuses on seniors and what we can do, and what now you can do, to make sure there are programs and opportunities for seniors to stay in their homes as long as possible. Another major part was looking at what I was just talking about, and that was deinstitutionalization and allowing for us to go forward with more infrastructure so people do have an opportunity to say, I would like to live in my own home community where my mom and dad live and not be shipped off miles away.

I know this will be challenging because it's going to be challenging for you in terms of budget. I was very concerned to see that to take 1 per cent out of Community Services actually equates to almost $10 million. I was happy that the minister said that it would not be taken out on the backs of the people who the department supports. I will watch that, and I know that Nova Scotians will watch that, and will watch to see if people will lose their jobs because when people lose their jobs it also means that those supports are going to create detrimental situation with those supports.

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There are many things we can do. We are here to represent the people of Nova Scotia and we are here to take action. We often say that actions are louder than words, so here's another little suggestion I have that will really show the people of Nova Scotia that you will take action and that you will do things differently and change. On August 28th I was at a leadership forum at Neptune . . .

MADAM SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I am sorry to interrupt you at this time. We are approaching the moment of interruption. Would you mind if we suspended this for a moment?

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : I will adjourn debate, Madam Speaker.

MADAM SPEAKER « » : Thank you so much.

For reasons that will become apparent, the honourable Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

HON. TONY INCE « » : Thank you, Madam Speaker. Ladies and gentlemen and my colleagues and everyone in the House, it has just become apparent and just recently I've heard that the past president and a great leader of human rights has just passed, Mr. Nelson Mandela. I'd like to ask that the House respectfully take a moment of silence for that, please.

[A moment of silence was observed.]

MADAM SPEAKER « » : Totally unexpected.

The motion is to adjourn.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We have reached the moment of interruption.

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The adjournment motion was submitted by the honourable member for Hants West:

"Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize that Lyme Disease is a growing issue in Nova Scotia and ask that the government take action."

ADJOURNMENT

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

MADAM SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

LYME DISEASE: ISSUE - RECOGNIZE

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Madam Speaker, most Nova Scotians enjoy walking, jogging, camping, fishing, hunting in the woods and parks of Nova Scotia. In some areas of Nova Scotia, citizens have to be conscious of the blacklegged tick. We have many types of ticks in Nova Scotia, but only the blacklegged tick carries the bacteria that can cause Lyme disease. Citizens are told to use preventive measures.

Some of the areas that are well known for blacklegged ticks carrying Lyme disease are areas like Lunenburg, Shelburne, Queens, Yarmouth, Halifax area and Pictou County. Preventive measures that have been mentioned to residents of Nova Scotia are things like wearing light-coloured clothing, pulling socks over pant legs, wearing pants and long sleeved shirts, spraying clothing and many others.

In the past 10 years, there have been 150 confirmed cases where Lyme disease was contracted in Nova Scotia. In 2012 alone, there were 50 cases reported. Doctors Nova Scotia indicates that the number of cases is expected to grow over time. Too many Nova Scotians are unaware of the dangers associated with tick bites and it is not well communicated when spikes occur in the blacklegged tick population.

I would like to see the government take a proactive approach to notifying the public about the possible dangers. I am sure most, if not all, members of this House would agree with a proactive approach. I know that in Opposition, the now Minister of Labour and Advanced Education pushed the previous government to be proactive on how to combat ticks and what to do if they are bitten.

People that start experiencing neurological symptoms, memory problems, digestive issues, migraines and other forms of chronic pain are sometimes infected by the blacklegged tick. Lyme disease will cause a host of different symptoms and it is important that patients receive the proper treatment. Chronic Lyme disease complex is known as the "great imitator" and I think therein lies the problem. It can mimic numerous chronic diseases because its symptoms often involve multiple body systems at the same time.

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I also have another major concern. It appears many doctors do not possess the comprehensive treatments needed to help patients reach a full recovery. Making the correct full diagnosis involves a series of detailed tests with specialized parameters. There have been many cases of people infected by Lyme disease in this province that I had the opportunity to talk to, and it seems wherever they go there are no answers. In fact, the answers are there's something else wrong with you.

One good example of that is a very young cousin of mine, a young, healthy female. She received a tick bite while she was camping in Ontario. In the ensuing number of years, she went through a multitude of various physicians in Nova Scotia and still continued to get answers that the family were not pleased with. In fact, this young lady was told it was all in her head, that she was having some mental problems, and she was sent to a psychiatrist to have that diagnosed. Later on she did find out she did carry Lyme disease. It is a problem with adults and especially children in campsites and running around the parks, woodlands, and beaches of our communities, especially the ones that are infected by Lyme disease, the high-population areas.

Three years ago in September, my beautiful black Lab came into my house and accidentally I checked him and found a couple of ticks around his neck area. I took the Lab to a veterinarian clinic. They removed the tick and suggested I take it to Natural Resources, which I did. They sent the tick to the lab in Truro, where they in turn identified it as a blacklegged tick and then sent it to a lab in Saskatchewan. I was told at that time in September that if this tick was carrying Lyme disease I would hear back from the lab in Saskatchewan. This was in September. I didn't hear anything, so I assumed everything was okay. The following May I received a letter stating that the tick that was taken from the neck of my pet was carrying Lyme disease.

Again, there are all kinds of examples around the province. I'm sure any member here can stand up and say, I have a neighbour, I have a friend, I have a relative who has had experiences with tick bites carrying Lyme disease.

My colleague for Pictou East has had similar problems in his area with regard to tick bites on his family pets, horses used by many, for riding lessons and so on. It seems to be prevalent in our area. I have a cottage at Melmerby Beach, a beautiful beach area, and my pet does not run loose. Whenever he leaves my house he's on a leash, but he will still invariably pick up a tick or two over the two or three weeks during the summer months.

I can recall many people mentioning to me that they were experiencing problems with blacklegged ticks, and they would go to a doctor in Port Hawkesbury. I was told by them he seemed to be the only person who would address the concerns and perhaps do something about it. I'm not sure how accurate that information is, but it's what I've been told time and time again.

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There is a lady in our community who has been suffering from Lyme disease for quite some time. She's a lady from New Glasgow, Brenda Sterling-Goodwin. She is certainly an advocate for people who are suffering from Lyme disease. She has done a considerable amount of research over the last few years and was responsible for taking a doctor into our area to speak to anyone interested. A crowd of about 200 showed up at the Wellness Centre in Pictou County. This particular retired doctor had done extensive research on Lyme disease. The information he relayed to us that night was something that the medical profession, in his opinion, should address and start doing something about not only in Nova Scotia but right across the country. He gave examples where he was chastised for being involved with Lyme disease and basically saying, look, this does happen, this is a problem. We have to start doing something about this. We can't ignore it any longer.

The problem exists, and it's existing in Nova Scotia. I'm standing here tonight hoping that the government will take the proactive approach and do something about it. Thank you, Madam Speaker. (Applause)

MADAM SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. KELLY REGAN « » : Madam Speaker, I do like seeing you in the Chair. I would like to thank the member for Hants West for the topic today on ticks, and also the member for Pictou Centre for his thoughtful remarks around Lyme disease. While the member was away on his sabbatical, involuntary sabbatical as my husband refers to it, having taken one himself - he may not know that I spoke on this topic quite a bit in the last Legislature. In fact, I managed to earn the nickname of the "Bedford Tick" from my colleague, the member for Richmond at the time. So that was my nickname in caucus.

My area, Bedford, is one of the areas that is an epicentre for ticks as well in this province. Back in 2009, when I went door-to-door in one of the neighbourhoods close to my home in fact, I heard about it as I went door-to-door. It certainly was brought home to me when I had two households right next door to each other where the father in the one household had in fact contracted Lyme disease and ended up with neurological symptoms, and then next door a child, I think he was about 8 years old at the time, he was having problems with his knees and they didn't know what was going on. His neighbour said, you know, you might want to get tested for Lyme disease. So he ended up getting tested and in fact he had Lyme disease and that boy will be on, I think it's anti-inflammatories, or anti-arthritics, for the rest of his life as a result of Lyme disease.

The tricky thing about Lyme disease, what a lot of people don't realize, is it depends where the spirochete burrows in your body and that I guess determines what your symptoms are going to be. So if the spirochete goes to your heart, you could have heart symptoms. If it goes to your brain, you'll have neurological. If it goes to your knees, you could have joint problems. So it's a tricky spirochete, and as the member for Pictou Centre mentioned, it depends on where it goes what your symptoms are going to be and it mimics other diseases. That's what makes it so tough for doctors to diagnose.

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I also, you know, there has been more education I think in the last few years than there had been previously but I'm still concerned. I still get e-mails from people who say, you know, I was in at emergency, I saw a doctor and they said, oh, Lyme disease, you get that from mosquitoes - and maybe you can somewhere, I don't know, but all I know is I've only heard about ticks. So I'm not convinced that all doctors, all GPs, are getting sort of the message on Lyme disease, and that is a concern.

In fact, earlier this year I went and met with Doctors Nova Scotia to urge them to make sure that their members get good education around that particular issue, because it just seems to me it's one of those front-line issues that's easy to miss, and because it mimics so many other things, it's easy for us not to diagnose it properly. One of the things with Lyme disease - I have notes here, oh boy, don't know where they went. It was kind of a busy day. One of the things that I did just before the election was I actually wrote to all the Health Ministers in the four Atlantic Provinces at the behest of the then-Opposition Leader who said that Nova Scotia isn't the only province that is dealing with this right now in Atlantic Canada.

It was actually prompted by something that was sent to me by a constituent, Donna Lugar, who has Lyme disease and is very involved in this. She noted that a member in New Brunswick - not Jody Carr - Jack Carr from New Brunswick, had actually introduced a motion in the House. I think it was around something like: Therefore be it resolved that New Brunswick recognize that Lyme disease is a considerable public health concern - or something like that. I thought that was a significant development because all three Parties came together to, in fact, pass that resolution.

The numbers in New Brunswick are nothing like the numbers here in Nova Scotia but it seems they're being more proactive about it than what I saw here. So I wrote to the Health Ministers of all four provinces. P.E.I. responded first and the minister there said it was going to discuss it with his officials. Newfoundland and Labrador responded next and said they were up for actually having it on the agenda, and that's what I asked for, was to have the Health Ministers put it on their agenda for their next Atlantic Provinces meeting. Then Nova Scotia responded and said that they would bring it to their officials, so I think the officials from the four provinces would start talking.

New Brunswick was last and oddly sort of the least encouraging of the bunch. To me that was a step forward because, for example, in Newfoundland and Labrador they had very few cases but they knew that they have ticks there so they knew that it was only a matter of time before it happened there.

On P.E.I. they didn't appear to have any infected blacklegged ticks there but they were getting cases where people had gone off the island and had, in fact, contracted it somewhere else.

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One of the things I've done in my riding in trying to raise awareness about Lyme disease, of course, is we've put information in my newsletter. We did bring in that same doctor that I think you are referring to, even though I took some flack in the House here for it. We had a great turnout for that particular doctor coming in.

We also held viewings of the movie Under Our Skin, which is a movie that you can order on-line. Occasionally they have free viewings on-line as well. It is about Lyme disease. It's good. It's scary. It's a little long, actually. As a former director, I would have chopped it up into bits because it goes off in a bunch of different directions and it's hard to follow, I think. In the end it covers a lot of area, though, so if you really want a Lyme education, it's a good film. You can find it on-line and order it on-line.

I do think that when you have people who come to you and say, I had to go out of province to be diagnosed or I have to go out of province to be treated, that causes me great concern because if you get diagnosed out of province and you get your treatment there, then sometimes what we have seen is that some of our Lyme disease sufferers have had difficulty getting treatment once they get back here. So they might have treatment outside the province but then they come back and their specialist says, I can't see you because you're doing this unauthorized treatment, or something like that. It's bad enough that they're sick and then they have to turn around and deal with this. So that has been a concern for us as well.

I would actually like to take this moment - I know I am almost out of time - but I would like to mention to folks that ticks are still active at this time of year and they will be active until, I think, it has been four days of minus-four degrees or lower. So we need to make sure that people know that ticks are still active, if they're out with their dogs or their kids, and all of the things that the member for Pictou Centre said about covering up and doing the fashion crime of pulling your socks over your pants - those are important when you're out there. I really would encourage anyone who was interested to learn more about it to check the government's Web site on Lyme disease. Thank you.

MADAM SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Madam Speaker, it's a great pleasure to have an opportunity to participate in this debate this evening on an issue that is certainly very important. It's particularly important, I think, to people who have experienced the symptoms of Lyme disease, having been bitten by one of these blacklegged ticks that carry the disease. As laypeople in this Chamber, we don't necessarily know a lot about the science behind Lyme disease. We rely on people who actually do research and know a fair amount.

I have to say over my time here in this Chamber we have discussed this matter a number of times. At one point I sat in the chair of the Minister of Health and Wellness and had an opportunity to actually talk to people who know way more than I knew or will ever know about infectious diseases, of which Lyme disease is one. Although having said that, I learned a great deal from talking to people who are infectious disease specialists over at the Capital District Health Authority. I also had a friend who was bitten by a blacklegged tick. She lives in the beautiful, beautiful community of Blue Rocks on the South Shore.

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People will know that there are three areas off Nova Scotia where blacklegged ticks have been found in sufficient numbers that on a regular basis the Province of Nova Scotia, generally through the Public Health division of the Department of Health and Wellness, put out advisories to people who live or who are travelling in those areas to let them know that these are areas where blacklegged ticks have been identified through a very active surveillance process, that the Department of Natural Resources, in collaboration with the Public Health agency of the province, has conducted.

There have been areas identified in Lunenburg County, of which the community of Blue Rocks, for example, would be one. There are also areas near Melmerby Beach that the member for Pictou Centre has made reference to in Pictou County, and out in Bedford near Admiral's Cove Park. This is not to say that those are the only areas where blacklegged ticks, which carry Lyme disease or the bacteria that will lead to Lyme disease, exist, but these are the areas that have demonstrated in sufficient quantities that it is a concern. But no doubt there are other parts of our province where you need to be vigilant and worry about this.

My friend who was bitten recognized immediately that she had a problem when she had the bulls-eye rash. She presented herself to her general practitioner, her family doctor, who immediately started her on a series of antibacterial pharmaceutical drugs that are designed to treat the bacterial infection. Within a matter of weeks, the rash was gone and everything was fine, and she does not carry or have any symptoms as a result of having prompt treatment.

What I understand is that the difficulty, of course, is if you do not identify that you have been bitten and your symptoms go untreated for some considerable period of time, the impact can be quite dramatic.

When I was Minister of Health and Wellness, I met with, first of all, Doctor Bob Strang, our Chief Medical Officer who, on a regular basis, sends out materials and oversees the production of public information, warnings, and notices that are sent out and distributed through the district health authorities, through the medical officers of health in those district health authorities and, as well, Doctors Nova Scotia whom the member from Bedford made reference to. They provide information to all of their members across the province and that information is constantly being updated, just like information you would receive around adverse reactions to some drugs. As the science evolves the continuing education for physicians evolves.

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I think it is very important that we continue to communicate with physicians and with members of the public with respect to where blacklegged ticks have been identified. The Department of Natural Resources, no doubt, will need to continue to do surveillance around the province to identify those hot spots. We need an educated public that is aware of the things they can do to prevent being bitten by ticks. I'm one of these people who not only is paranoid about blacklegged ticks, but just ticks in general are pretty unpleasant so you avoid as much as possible going into tall grass and areas where you don't have your pants stuck into your socks, and things like this. You need to check yourself really, really well after you've been out enjoying nature, which we all should probably do more.

We need to take some personal responsibility; we need also to continue to communicate with the public; we need to educate the public; and we need to support our physicians with good science-based information. We need to be absolutely aware and confident in the infectious disease folks who work here and treat Lyme disease on a regular basis.

I had the privilege of meeting with those physicians and they track the numbers of cases of Lyme disease in the province - and indeed they have grown over the last number of years. Recently I learned that, as the member for Pictou Centre indicated, Lyme disease is something that your pet can contract, and of course that makes sense, and they are our family members, so probably around education and training of veterinarians so that they are able as well to treat our pets.

I think that the sad reality is that with the changing climate and with the movement of some of these insects and other predators, Lyme disease has been well established in the northern U.S.: in Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, and New Hampshire. It was really a matter of time before we would see it here in Nova Scotia. It's an important topic, and I thank the honourable member from Hants West for bringing it forward.

MADAM SPEAKER « » : Thank you, and I wish to thank all the members who participated in the Adjournment debate this evening.

[GOVERNMENT MOTIONS]

MADAM SPEAKER « » : We will resume with the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Madam Speaker, I am not going to take too much more time, because I know everybody is hungry here this evening.

As I was saying before, the challenges that the government will face in terms of the expenditures and where monies will be cut and to make sure that any cuts that take place in departments do not affect the people of Nova Scotia directly is going to be quite a challenge. I do know that one thing I was always taught, and I taught my son, was the importance of leading by example. I know that is what the new government has also talked about.

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Leading by example means that it is so important for us to show Nova Scotians that actions are louder than words. I know that any of you here who have children, you have said that, and you want to make sure that you're teaching your children, that you set an example for your children. It's very important that we do the same as politicians, that we set examples for all Nova Scotians. We know from knocking on those doors not so long ago how disgusted people are in the political system and see politicians as being elitist and taking every opportunity to fill their pockets. We really do need to work hard to show that that's not the reality, that everyone here dedicates themselves and works long hours. We want to set an example.

I know that the Premier knows that, because - as the Leader of the Official Opposition - he actually said that on August 28th when there was the leadership forum at Neptune Theatre. He said that government has to look at itself with expenditures.

I do want to offer a suggestion that when we talk about change - something we did change as the NDP Government was a decision that we did not have to put on paper and force anybody to do. Our Cabinet members did not take any car allowance at all if they were Cabinet members. The car allowance equates to about $700 a month, plus a gas card. That gas card gives you a full tank of gas all the time; that gas card actually gets your oil changed and your tires changed. If people remember, there was quite a bit of kerfuffle around that about five years ago, because there were fleet vehicles. I don't have to go into that long story.

At that time the government of the day made a change by creating an allowance of $700 a month plus that gas card. I am proud to say that I didn't accept it, and our Cabinet members did not accept it, to lead by example to the people of Nova Scotia, so they would know we were serious about knowing how difficult it is for many Nova Scotians to try to decide between having a heated house or putting food on the table for their children.

I encourage the new government to follow the precedent that we set. What we did is we took the mileage coverage that any person working for government would take. I stand in this House tonight, and I encourage you to have that discussion. Please show an example to the rest of Nova Scotia that if the NDP was able to do that and set that precedent, that the new Liberal Government will continue that precedent. Thank you.

MADAM SPEAKER « » : The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. TERRY FARRELL « » : Madam Speaker, that concludes the government's business for the day. I move the House do now rise to meet again tomorrow from the hours of 9:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. Following the daily routine, we will have second reading of Bill Nos. 14, 15, 17, and 18. If time permits, we will continue Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

[Page 468]

I move the House do now rise.

MADAM SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House do now rise, to meet again on Friday, between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We stand adjourned until 9:00 a.m. tomorrow.

[The House rose at 6:35 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

[Page 469]

RESOLUTION NO. 176

By: Hon. Pat Dunn « » (Pictou Centre)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lawrence Hafey of Stellarton, the gritty Irish boxer nicknamed the "Nova Scotia Wildcat," has been inducted into the Nova Scotia Sports Hall of Fame and has taken his place alongside the province's best boxers; and

Whereas it has been almost half a century since Lawrence walked into a boxing gym near Trenton, where he began training that helped him develop into a determined and fearless boxer; and

Whereas Lawrence Hafey fought over 40 amateur bouts, 73 professional matches, and once boxed four bouts in 27 days, and became known for not being knocked out or stopped in his first 55 professional matches;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Lawrence Hafey for being a 2013 Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame inductee and for winning the Eastern Canadian Welterweight title in 1973 and the Canadian Middleweight title in 1975.

RESOLUTION NO. 177

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Official Opposition)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Carson Dares was recognized in Wentworth this month for his 10 years of service with the Wentworth Fire Department; and

Whereas each year the community salutes the Wentworth Volunteer Fire Department for their courage, dedication, and concern for people in the community; and

Whereas the members of the Wentworth Volunteer Fire Department put their lives at risk to serve and protect the people of their community and are always available day or night in an emergency;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Carson Dares on his 10 years of service to the Wentworth Volunteer Fire Department and thank him for his dedication to his community.

[Page 470]

RESOLUTION NO. 178

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Official Opposition)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Danika Beaton of Springhill is a member of the Holland College Hurricanes soccer team and will be participating in the Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association soccer championships in Surrey, British Columbia; and

Whereas Danika is a returning player who was a part of last year's Hurricanes squad that hosted nationals in Cornwall; and

Whereas Danika is a hard-working student who shows impressive leadership skills by helping to prepare the younger players for the championship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Danika Beaton on her outstanding achievements and wish her continued success in all future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 179

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in 1994 Dora Amirault, a resident of Lower Eel Brook, started a seniors' line-dancing group called Seniors Kickin' Country; and

Whereas Dora Amirault started the group with just 15 members but over the years more than 500 people have participated and there is now a membership of around 100 and is open to anyone age 50 or older; and

Whereas now in its 20th year, Seniors Kickin' Country has entertained at seniors' homes, parades, variety shows and Breakfast Television and continues to be a great source of exercise and camaraderie;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Dora Amirault for reaching 20 years with Seniors Kickin' Country and thank her for her dedication and wish her continued success.

[Page 471]

RESOLUTION NO. 180

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kathleen d'Eon, a local Barrington Passage pharmacist, was recognized with the Collaborative Care Team Award earlier this Fall, having been nominated by her pharmacy team; and

Whereas the award is presented to pharmacists who show excellence in working with other health care professionals in the community, by collaborating with doctors, nurses, and dieticians from the local long-term care facility; and

Whereas Kathleen d'Eon has been pharmacy manager at Shoppers Drug Mart in Barrington Passage for 20 years, building relationships with her customers and doctors in the area;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kathleen d'Eon on receiving this award and wish her well in her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 181

By: Mr. Alfie MacLeod « » (Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cape Breton Health Authority has been named one of Canada's Top 100 Employers, as compiled by Mediacorp Inc., and has also been recognized as one of Nova Scotia's Top Employers for 2014; and

Whereas Dianne Calvert Simms, district CEO, says that these designations belong to their staff because it reflects the hard work and commitment of their team; and

Whereas Ms. Calvert Simms also believes the recognition reflects a strong commitment to a healthy and productive workplace, which also benefits our communities, patient-centred care, and the people they serve;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate and thank Dianne Calvert Simms and all the staff at the Cape Breton District Health Authority who work with 270 hospital and community-based physicians to provide primary, secondary, and tertiary care to 130,000 people.

[Page 472]

RESOLUTION NO. 182

By: Mr. Chuck Porter « » (Hants West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas eight teams, 80 players, one frozen pond and one unbeatable experience is how Windsor's Long Pond Heritage Hockey Classic is being described, as anticipation builds for the February, eight-day-long festivities kicking off Hockey Week in Windsor that will run between February 8th and 15th; and

Whereas organizers have been meeting since September in preparation for this year's classic, which will be the second annual because last year's classic was cancelled due to a mid-February blizzard; and

Whereas it is anticipated two major celebrity names will be announced in less than 10 days and they will in turn join other well-known hockey and television personalities such as Forbes Kennedy, from Prince Edward Island; ex-NHL referee Charlie Banfield, from East Hants; and Home Hardware Gardening guru, Mark Cullen;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the planning which goes into such a major event and commend organizers such as Windsor Hockey Heritage President, David Hunter; Danny and Andrew Dill; Town Recreation Coordinator, Vanessa Roberts; Windsor Town Councillor, Dave Seeley; Kings-Edgehill Headmaster, Joe Seagram; and Windsor RCMP Detachment member Duane Ivany for their outstanding work to make the 2014 Long Pond Hockey Classic an unforgettable weekend of memories and good times.

RESOLUTION NO. 183

By: Mr. Chuck Porter « » (Hants West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nu-Air Ventilation Systems Incorporated has been a family owned and operated company based in Windsor since its establishment in 1992; and

Whereas Earl Caldwell, president of Nu-Air, recently signed a $15 million distribution agreement with Everest International Trade Co. Ltd; and

[Page 473]

Whereas 15 to 20 assembly line workers will be hired to meet the new production demands for 35,000 residential heat-recovery ventilator systems which will make their way to China over the next five years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Earl Caldwell and Nu-Air Ventilation Systems on securing this major contract for the company and wish them all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 184

By: Mr. Chuck Porter « » (Hants West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alvin Harvey recently retired and was recognized by the Town of Windsor for his 22 years of service as a public works employee; and

Whereas the job of a public works employee requires someone who has multi-dimensional skills including being able to brave the bitter cold and wind and snow to ensure sidewalks and streets are safe for the general public each and every winter; and

Whereas Alvin, a resident of Ardoise, was described at his retirement ceremony by Mayor Paul Beazley as a dedicated and hard worker and someone who could be counted on for keeping Big Bertha, better known as the town's large snow blower, on the road well beyond its life expectancy;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly wish Alvin Harvey the very best with his retirement and thank him for his many years of dedicated service to the Town of Windsor's Public Works Division.

RESOLUTION NO. 185

By: Mr. Chuck Porter « » (Hants West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 16-year-old Avonview High School student Andrew Maynard of Windsor is turning a number of heads with his multi-talented musical ways and his vast collection of guitars; and

Whereas Maynard is especially adept at playing the banjo but has no difficulty playing other instruments such as a guitar, bass, mandolin, trumpet and stand-up bass; and

[Page 474]

Whereas Andrew presently has a collection of 40-odd instruments including 26 guitars and thoroughly enjoyed playing at the Eastern Canadian Bluegrass Awards in Truro in October;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly commend the musical talents and love of music of one Andrew Maynard of Windsor while wishing him every future success with whatever instrument he picks up and continues to play in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 186

By: Mr. Tim Houston « » (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Laubach Literacy has reported that Pictou County Laubach has had the busiest year yet, and has expanded its services to meet the needs of the community; and

Whereas more workshops and more student tutors have been added to help meet the needs of adults with low literacy skills; and

Whereas all of this is offered free of charge and made possible by funding from the United Way and many volunteers;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly wish Pictou County Laubach continued success in their endeavours and thank them for all they do to improve adult literacy in Pictou County.

RESOLUTION NO. 187

By: Hon. Zach Churchill « » (Minister of Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Laurie Barron been selected as the 2013 Yarmouth County Coach of the Year; and

Whereas Laurie is the very talented coach of the impressive Yarmouth Mariners Junior A hockey team; and

Whereas Laurie was assistant coach of Team Canada East during the World Junior Championships held in Yarmouth in 2012, and was assistant coach of Team East for the 2013 Canadian Junior Hockey League Prospects Game, and continues to be a tremendous community asset who gives of his time freely to Yarmouth County Junior Hockey;

[Page 475]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Laurie Barron on his selection as Yarmouth County Coach of the Year 2013, and thank him for his continuing contribution to minor league hockey in the Yarmouth community.

RESOLUTION NO. 188

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Bowen Horton on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 189

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 476]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Brent Saunders on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 190

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Devin Langille on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 191

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 477]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Garrett Gillis on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 192

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member John Zimmerman on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 193

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 478]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Jonathan Bent on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 194

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating keeper Kellen Saunders on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 195

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 479]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Kenneth Tulley on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 196

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Kyle Taylor on his two game winning goals in the final game and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 197

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 480]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Logan Taylor on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 198

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Makya Kobayashi on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 199

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 481]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Marcus Schlect on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 200

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating assistant coach Marvin Taylor on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 201

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 482]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team manager Monty Ashby on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 202

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Patrick Illsley on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 203

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 483]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating assistant coach Stuart Linsell on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 204

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating head coach Terry Saunders on another successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 205

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 484]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Tristan Bowlby on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 206

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member Taylor Hung on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 207

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bridgetown Regional High School Senior Boys Trojan Soccer team captured the NSSAF Division 3 Senior Boys Soccer Provincial Championship on November 2nd, in Antigonish, by defeating Forest Heights 2 to 0 in the championship game; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Senior Boys Trojans are no strangers to provincial wins, having captured six titles in the last eight years; and

[Page 485]

Whereas through sound coaching, hard work, dedication, and team spirit throughout the season, this team was able to proudly secure the coveted title once again;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating team member John Sarikas on a successful soccer season and wish him continued success in the future.