The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House resumed on:
September 21, 2017.

Hansard -- Fri., June 4, 1999

First Session

FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 1999

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
Speaker's Ruling on Previous Point of Privilege:
Health - Care: Advertising - Public Funds (Point of Privilege by
Mr. J. Holm) Page 6580
No Point of Privilege 6757
No Contempt of House 6758
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Private and Local Bills Committee, Mr. P. MacEwan 6758
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Anl. Rept. of the Public Prosecution Service, Hon. R. Harrison 6759
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 112, House of Assembly Act, Mr. H. Fraser 6759
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 3218, Nat. Res. - Mi'kmaq Fish & Wildlife Comm'n.:
Ecology Award - Congrats., Mr. R. Chisholm 6759
Vote - Affirmative 6760
Res. 3219, HRM - Hfx. City Clock: Commemoration Hfx. Explosion
(06/12/17) - Symbolism (09:04:35 [a.m.]) Recognize, Dr. J. Hamm 6760
Vote - Affirmative 6761
Res. 3220, Educ. - P3: School Site Selection - Guidelines Estab.,
Ms. E. O'Connell 6761
Res. 3221, Fin. - Budget (1999-2000): Cauldron Unused - Confirm,
Mr. G. Balser 6761
Res. 3222, Halifax Fairview MLA - Election (04/06/96): Best Wishes -
Express, Ms. Helen MacDonald 6762
Res. 3223, Health - AIDS: Fight Against - Need Recognize,
Mr. G. Moody 6763
Vote - Affirmative 6763
Res. 3224, Commun. Serv. - Bill Hirtle (Bridgewater): Volunteer
Activities - Congrats., Mr. L. Montgomery 6764
Vote - Affirmative 6764
Res. 3225, Fin. - Debt: Increase Address - Plan Outline, Mr. J. Holm 6765
Res. 3226, Health - South Shore Reg. Hosp. (Bridgewater):
CAT Scanner Fund-Raising - Volunteers & Stiles Family Applaud,
Mr. J. Leefe 6765
Vote - Affirmative 6766
Res. 3227, Commun. Serv. - Mineville Commun. Assoc.:
Incorporation - Congrats., Ms. Y. Atwell 6766
Vote - Affirmative 6767
Res. 3228, Justice - Shel. Inst. Abuse: Rights Disregarded -
Recognize, Mr. M. Scott 6767
Res. 3229, Environ. - Improvement: Participants - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Chard 6768
Vote - Affirmative 6768
Res. 3230, Nat. Res. - Mi'kmaq Fish & Wildlife Comm'n.:
Ecology Award - Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 6768
Vote - Affirmative 6769
Res. 3231, DFO - Fisherman (N.S.): Discrimination End - Petition,
Mr. Charles MacDonald 6769
Vote - Affirmative 6770
Res. 3232, Lbr. - Volunteer Firefighters: Tax Relief -
Commitment Failure Condemn, Mr. J. DeWolfe 6770
Res. 3233, Fish. - Coastal Commun. Network: Policy Initiatives -
Support, Mr. John Deveau 6771
Res. 3234, Educ. - French Public Speaking (N.S.): Jenna McNeil
(G7-Truro) - Winner (Group) Congrats., Mr. J. Muir 6772
Vote - Affirmative 6773
Res. 3235, D-Day (06/06/44) - Veterans: Heroism - Thanks Offer,
Mr. W. Estabrooks 6773
Vote - Affirmative 6773
Res. 3236, Fish. - Budget (1999-2000): TAGS - Inefficiency Condemn,
Mr. N. LeBlanc 6774
Res. 3237, Fin. (Can.) - Civil Service Pension Plans (Bill C-78):
Changes - Condemn, Mr. H. Epstein 6774
Res. 3238, Housing & Mun. Affs. - Cumb. South: Pty. Assts. -
Process Review, Mr. M. Scott 6775
Res. 3239, Sports - Baseball (Senior-Dartmouth Mooseheads):
Players (21, 19 & 72) Retirement - Congrats., Mr. D. Dexter 6776
Vote - Affirmative 6776
Res. 3240, Gov't. (Ont.) - PC Party Re-Election: Ontarians -
Common Sense Congrats., Dr. J. Hamm 6777
Res. 3241, Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Hwy. Projects: Common Sense -
Approve, Mr. B. Taylor 6777
Res. 3242, GG (Can.) - Heroism Honour: Charles Winsor (Enfield) -
Recognize, Mr. John MacDonell 6778
Vote - Affirmative 6778
Res. 3243, Educ. - Dal. Univ. Alumni Teaching For Excellence
Award (1999): Dr. Phil Campagna - Congrats., Mr. E. Fage 6778
Vote - Affirmative 6779
Res. 3244, WCB - Injured Workers: Citizens Valued -
Comp. Adequately, Ms. R. Godin 6779
Res. 3245, Agric. - Dun Huang Award (China-1999):
Dr. Sam Asiedu (NSAC) - Congrats., Mr. J. Muir 6780
Vote - Affirmative 6780
Res. 3246, Educ. - School Bds. Assoc. (N.S.): Child Poverty Survey
(28/05/99) - Commend, Ms. E. O'Connell 6781
Vote - Affirmative 6781
Res. 3247, Transport. & Pub. Wks.: Transport. Safety Week
(06-12/06/99) - Recognize, Mr. B. Taylor 6781
Vote - Affirmative 6782
Res. 3248, Educ. - Eskasoni Learning Ctr.: Initial Year - Congrats.,
Ms. Helen MacDonald 6782
Vote - Affirmative 6783
Res. 3249, Sports - Racquetball (N.S.-1999): Adrien Deveau (Yar.) &
Dan Smith (Hfx.) - Recognition Congrats., Mr. John Deveau 6783
Vote - Affirmative 6783
Res. 3250, Gov't. (N.S.-Lib.) - Govern Responsibly, Mr. D. Dexter 6784
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 113, Financial Measures (1999) Act, Hon. D. Downe 6784
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ON MOTION FOR SUPPLY:
Mr. F. Corbett 6785
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. R. Harrison 6788
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ON MOTION FOR SUPPLY:
Ms. Y. Atwell 6789
Dr. J. Hamm 6792
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON SUPPLY AT 11:28 A.M. 6796
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 3:37 P.M. 6796
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 3:38 P.M. 6796
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 3:39 P.M. 6797
CWH REPORTS 6797
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 97, Business Efficiency (1999) Act 6797
Mr. Kevin Deveaux 6797
Vote - Affirmative 6798
No. 98, Motor Vehicle Act 6798
Mr. Kevin Deveaux 6799
Hon. Manning MacDonald 6800
Vote - Affirmative 6800
No. 99, Direct Sellers' Regulation Act 6800
Ms. Y. Atwell 6800
Vote - Affirmative 6801
No. 100, Commercial Arbitration Act 6801
Mr. Kevin Deveaux 6801
Hon. Manning MacDonald 6801
Vote - Affirmative 6802
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Mon., June 7th at 3:00 p.m. 6803

[Page 6757]

HALIFAX, FRIDAY, JUNE 4, 1999

Fifty-seventh General Assembly

First Session

10:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Ronald Russell

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Mr. Donald Chard

MR. SPEAKER: Before we commence with the daily routine, I would like to provide a ruling on government advertising in response to a point of privilege from the honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

On Wednesday, June 3, 1999, the honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid rose on a point of privilege indicating that the government was abusing the privileges of all members of the House by using public funds to pay for an advertisement entitled, A Message to Nova Scotians About Our Health Care.

The member for Sackville-Cobequid, in support of his point of privilege, tabled a copy of the advertisement and Hansard excerpts from the Ontario Legislature for January 22, 1997. On that occasion, the Speaker of the Ontario Legislature, in considering a point of privilege that dealt with a somewhat similar advertisement by the Ontario Government of the day, ruled that there was no point of privilege. Similar points of privilege raised in the House of Commons regarding government advertising have also been ruled as not establishing a prima facie case of privilege. I am also ruling, after a careful examination of the advertisement that appeared in The Daily News of Wednesday, June 2, 1999, that there is no point of privilege.

6757

[Page 6758]

The member for Sackville-Cobequid also requested a ruling as to whether the advertisement constituted contempt of the House. An identical situation arose in the House of Commons with regard to an advertisement placed by the federal Department of Finance outlining changes to the federal sales tax with the inception of the goods and services tax.

After assessing the situation from the perspective of privilege, Speaker Fraser then proceeded to assess it from the perspective of contempt. In the course of ruling that there was no prima facie case for breach of privilege or for contempt, he identified the differences between the two in the following terms:

"All breaches of privilege are contempts of the House, but not all contempts are necessarily breaches of privilege. A contempt may be an act or an omission; it does not have to actually obstruct or impede the House or a member; it merely has to have the tendency to produce such results. Matters ranging from minor breaches of decorum to grave attacks against the authority of Parliament may be considered as contempts.".

Speaker Fraser ruled that the government never intended that the advertisement be anything more than informational, as the government did not suggest that the matter in the advertisement would not be coming before the House of Commons for debate and eventual disposition.

In the case of the point of privilege brought forward in Ontario, Speaker Stockwell accepted an Opposition motion to immediately debate the following motion, "that the government be censured by the House for its contemptible advertising campaign.". I do not agree with Speaker Stockwell's decision to accept that motion for debate and certainly not for immediate debate. In any event, that motion was defeated in the Ontario House.

Now, with regard to the situation brought forward by the honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid, I find there is no contempt of the House, as clearly - albeit in somewhat fine print - the advertisement states that the changes outlined in the advertisement are, "improvements your government is proposing", which would indicate that any necessary legislative change would require House approval for implementation. If anybody wants a copy of that ruling, I have some additional copies. (Applause)

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Private and Local Bills, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

[Page 6759]

Bill No. 95 - Lunenburg Common Lands Act.

Bill No. 103 - Gaelic College Foundation Act.

Bill No. 106 - Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities Act.

and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. ROBERT HARRISON: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table the Annual Report of the Public Prosecution Service for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1998.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 112 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 1 (1992 Supplement) of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The House of Assembly Act. (Mr. Hyland Fraser)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 3218

MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Ecology Action Centre has awarded its 1999 Sustainable Communities Award to the Mi'kmaq Fish and Wildlife Commission; and

[Page 6760]

Whereas the commission has done an outstanding job coordinating how Mi'kmaqs use and manage natural resources; and

Whereas the commission has been helping Nova Scotia Mi'kmaqs prepare to regulate themselves as more treaties and disagreements are resolved;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Mi'kmaq Fish and Wildlife Commission on this award and on their continuing good and important work in natural resources management.

Mr. Speaker, I would seek waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 3219

DR. JOHN HAMM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 82 years ago, the Halifax Explosion rocked the City of Halifax and surrounding areas killing over 1,000 people and injuring thousands of others; and

Whereas the City of Halifax has marked this historical event through the installation of a new clock at City Hall; and

Whereas this clock will be frozen at 9:04:35 a.m., the exact moment of the 1917 explosion;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the symbolism of this new clock as a commemoration of one of the most momentous events to ever occur in Nova Scotia and that has contributed so significantly to the rich history of Halifax.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

[Page 6761]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

RESOLUTION NO. 3220

MS. EILEEN O'CONNELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas it was once considered unethical and an abuse of the public interest to choose a school site so government friends can reap private profit from the public investment; and

Whereas this Liberal Government thinks such abuses are an act of creativity; and

Whereas hundreds of Kings County families face needless school busing if Bill Wade profits at their expense from the latest Liberal creative bookkeeping;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the government to establish strict conflict of interest guidelines for school site selection, so that quality of education replaces quick bucks for patronage pals as a driving force in these decisions.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 3221

MR. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas literary comparisons are often used by speakers to illustrate a point; and

[Page 6762]

Whereas analogous comparisons of this government's Finance Minister to wooden puppets, evil sorcerers or wizards is an effective way to highlight the fact that the government's Budget Address should only be contained in a story that starts with the words, once upon a time; and

Whereas the recipe required for this year's fairy tale budget must surely have included a full moon, baying hounds, eye of newt and numerous incantations of a satanic nature;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Finance and his coven of colleagues reassure Nova Scotians that this budget was not conceived around a cauldron to chants of boil, boil, toil and trouble.

Mr. Speaker, I seek waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Richmond on an introduction.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I direct you and the House to your east gallery where today we are joined by two residents of Richmond County who have served the residents in several capacities for numerous years and have certainly been leaders in the economic and social revival of our county. I would ask them to stand, Warden Richie Cotton and Deputy Warden Gail Johnson. I would ask the House to welcome them here today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 3222

MS. HELEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas three years ago today, in a by-election, the electorate in Halifax Fairview chose Eileen O'Connell to represent them in this Legislature; and

Whereas Halifax Fairview voters repeated that feat in the general election last March; and

Whereas Eileen represents her constituents with care and compassion;

Therefore be it resolved that this house express their best wishes to the honourable member for Halifax Fairview on this very special day and look forward to her three-peat.

[Page 6763]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 3223

MR. GEORGE MOODY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas there are more than 500 reported HIV cases in Nova Scotia and more than 33 million people infected with HIV worldwide; and

Whereas men, women and children in Nova Scotia continue to fight a daily battle with this disease; and

Whereas on Saturday night, an AIDS Memorial and Candle Light Procession will be held in Halifax's St. Matthew's United Church;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the need to continue the fight against this deadly disease and to remember those who have lost their lives to AIDS.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Annapolis.

[Page 6764]

RESOLUTION NO. 3224

MR. LAWRENCE MONTGOMERY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[10:15 a.m.]

Whereas Bill Hirtle is a leader in his community and has recently been recognized as Representative Volunteer of the Year for the Town of Bridgetown; and

Whereas Bill is active in the Lions, the Legion, in his church, is former president of the Business Education Teachers Association and has given his time to Bridgetown High, which has produced many outstanding track and field athletes;

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We seem to have a background noise. Okay, that seems to have solved it, whatever it was.

The honourable member for Annapolis.

MR. MONTGOMERY: Whereas Bill's volunteer activities extend to the community recreation association, the board of directors of the Halifax YMCA, the Eden Golf and Country Club and the Victoria General Hospital, as well as the Bridgetown and Area Health Centre Society;

Therefore be it resolved that this House extend sincere congratulations to Bill Hirtle and recognize that the Town of Bridgetown has benefited tremendously from his many selfless volunteer activities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

[Page 6765]

RESOLUTION NO. 3225

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia's off-book Nova Scotia Resources Limited debt will reach approximately $700 million by the end of this year; and

Whereas revenues from the sale of NSRL's share of natural gas revenues must go to pay for its $85 million outstanding development costs and revenues from Cohasset-Panuke have dried up; and

Whereas interest costs are piling on and the debt is projected to exceed $1 billion in a few years;

Therefore be it resolved that the Liberal Government outline its plans for addressing this ballooning mortgage on our children's and province's future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 3226

MR. JOHN LEEFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ozzie Stiles and his daughters have personally led the way in demonstrating that large obstacles can be overcome by hard work and community strength; and

Whereas a month after Ozzie's wife, Gail lost a hard-fought battle with cancer, the Stiles family urged the community to rally together to raise funds for a CAT scanner; and

[Page 6766]

Whereas in less than a year, volunteers raised approximately $212,000 toward the cost of a $1 million scanner, which will be installed at the South Shore Regional Hospital in Bridgewater;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud the hard work and dedication of the community volunteers and of the Stiles family for all their efforts in providing such a valuable contribution to community health.

Mr. Speaker, I seek waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 3227

MS. YVONNE ATWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the seeds for the development of a community association for the community of Mineville were planted through the Mineville women's coffee club; and

Whereas the Mineville Community Association was official incorporated as a non-profit group on April 28, 1999, with the first public meeting held on June 2, 1999; and

Whereas the neighbourhood association is aimed towards working for community development and recreation in order to address community issues;

Therefore be it resolved that this House commend this group for their efforts in establishing this forum whereby community members can meet, discuss and resolve those issues related to maintaining a stable, healthy, safe and prosperous community for all residents.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

[Page 6767]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

RESOLUTION NO. 3228

MR. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Liberal Government has failed to fairly address the plight of all those involved with the Shelburne institutional abuse allegations; and

Whereas when asked if he felt responsibility to those who felt that they had been wrongly accused, the Minister of Justice said that he recognized the need to respect the rights of all individuals involved in the process; and

Whereas withholding information from those who want to be made aware of the accusations against them creates a cloud of suspicion over all individuals involved and flies in the face of the minister's statements;

Therefore be it resolved that the minister recognize the rights of all individuals involved in this process have not been respected and work toward amending a process that has made victims of everyone.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

[Page 6768]

RESOLUTION NO. 3229

MR. DONALD CHARD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the week of May 30th to June 5th is Environment Week; and

Whereas the designation of this week helps focus attention on the valuable contribution of volunteers and professionals alike to a cleaner and healthier environment;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the countless volunteers and professionals in Nova Scotia, from the Department of the Environment to the Ecology Action Centre, who have contributed and continue to contribute to improvements in the environment of this province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 3230

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia's oldest environmental organization, the Ecology Action Centre, recently announced its 1999 Sustainable Communities Award; and

Whereas this year's recipient is the Mi'kmaq Fish and Wildlife Commission; and

Whereas the annual award goes to an organization in Nova Scotia that demonstrates environmental sensitivity, supports local level economic development and promotes a strong sense of community;

[Page 6769]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Mi'kmaq Fish and Wildlife Commission on this award and extend best wishes to them in their future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 3231

MR. CHARLES MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in 1996 the total amount of snow crab harvested in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence was 17,035 tons while the total percentage allocated to and harvested by Nova Scotian mid-shore fishermen was 4.18 per cent of the mid-shore harvest; and

Whereas the landed value of this resource to Atlantic Canada is in excess of $77 million per year and the industry represents 18,000 jobs to Atlantic Canada; and

Whereas despite Nova Scotia's historic rights to the fishery in the southern Gulf, the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans overlooks adjacency rights for the southern Gulf snow crab fishery, while at the same time recognizing adjacency for exploratory rights on the tail of the Grand Banks;

Therefore be it resolved that this House immediately petition the federal government to end DFO's long-standing discrimination against Nova Scotia fishermen so that they may achieve their rightful place in the fishery.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

[Page 6770]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bill Wade's service to the Liberal Party is widely known, in particular, in his work to grease the revolving door to and from the Liberal Leader's Office; and

Whereas in this post-colonial era, Bill Wade can no longer expect a knighthood or some similar honour for his labours to keep the Liberal Party alive; and

Whereas taxpayers and students are now expected to pay in dollars and pay in bad educational decisions for Mr. Wade and associates to have honour of windfall and profits and honour in development opportunities at public expense;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the Liberal Party to dig into its trust funds and pay to Mr. Wade what it owes him rather than imposing an unwelcome school site on Kings County students for Mr. Wade's companies to be rewarded by private profit and public expense.

MR. SPEAKER: I would like to have a look at that notice of motion before it is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 3232

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteer firefighters make a valuable contribution to Nova Scotia; and

Whereas this contribution appears to be obvious to everyone except for the Minister of Labour and his Cabinet colleagues; and

[Page 6771]

Whereas instead of a promised tax credit for the volunteer firefighters, which the Liberal Government has already agreed to, the minister is now providing a reduction in license plate fees;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Labour and the Minister of Finance be condemned for failing to fulfill a commitment of tax relief and instead providing a nominal gesture that does not adequately demonstrate the value which these volunteer firefighters have in each of our communities.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Yarmouth.

RESOLUTION NO. 3233

MR. JOHN DEVEAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia's Coastal Communities Network, CCN, is a volunteer association of organizations whose mission includes the creation of strategies and actions that promote the survival and development of Nova Scotia's coastal and rural communities; and

Whereas CCN members have expressed deep concern regarding the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans' devolution of marine infrastructure; and

Whereas DFO Small Craft and Harbours' plan to implement harbour authorities is without financial support, organizational training or long-term planning in place;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture support the policy initiatives of the Coastal Communities Network and urge the federal government to reconsider its abandonment of Maritime coastal communities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

[Page 6772]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice was a little too long.

[The notice is tabled.]

Order, please. The notice of motion submitted by the honourable member for Cape Breton Centre is out of order as it imputes motives.

The honourable member for Kings North.

MR. GEORGE ARCHIBALD: Mr. Speaker, I rise to make an introduction if I may. In your gallery, Mr. Speaker, I would like to introduce to you and to all the members of the House two very distinguished people from the Town of Kentville. The Mayor of Kentville, Mr. Gary Pearl is there; and the Chief Operating Officer for the Town of Kentville, Mr. Bill Boyd is in the gallery as well. So I would like to introduce them and for the members of the House to bring them greetings. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill.

RESOLUTION NO. 3234

MR. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jenna McNeil, a Grade 5 student at St. Mary's Elementary School in Truro, won first place in a provincial French public speaking contest; and

Whereas acting as a tour guide for her "Ile de Paradis" she finished first among the 17 speakers in her age group from across the province; and

Whereas using an idea from a French textbook unit on islands, Jenna drafted her speech in English and changed the words she knew to French before receiving help with translation;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Jenna McNeil for her initiative and hard work which enabled her to become a provincial champion in French public speaking.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 6773]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 3235

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas "We Will Remember", as we pledge each November 11th, the contribution that our veterans have made to our country's history; and

Whereas these veterans displayed untold valour on many occasions; and

Whereas it will be 55 short years this Sunday, June 6th, that Canadian troops, along with our Allies, stormed the beaches of Normandy;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House offer their thanks to all veterans as we remember their heroism on D-Day, June 6, 1944.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Argyle.

[Page 6774]

RESOLUTION NO. 3236

MR. NEIL LEBLANC: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Tuesday, the Finance Minister boasted about the dollars the province will be adding to the early retirement plan for fishermen and fish plant workers under the TAGS 2 Program; and

Whereas questions about the status of the province's position in providing its share of the retirement package have been raised by members of the PC caucus for almost a year now; and

Whereas continued stalling as well as the government's refusal to address numerous demands to lower the retirement age has made it difficult for many workers to move on with their lives;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture and the Minister of Finance be condemned for failing to address this issue efficiently and in the best interests of those affected.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 3237

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Minister of Finance reported yesterday on progress made in negotiations towards a revised system of governance for the Public Service Superannuation Plan; and

[Page 6775]

[10:30 a.m.]

Whereas changes to the plan are mandated by the Financial Administration Act, to take place only through negotiations with the affected parties, namely the beneficiaries of the plan; and

Whereas the federal government is moving unilaterally through Bill C-78 to attempt to change federal pension plans for its employees without any negotiations;

Therefore be it resolved that this House condemn the federal government for attempting to make significant changes to its employees' terms and conditions of employment outside of the collective bargaining system.

Mr. Speaker, I seek waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

RESOLUTION NO. 3238

MR. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the alarming increases in both assessment rates and the number of appeals to those assessments in Cumberland South continue to be a concern for area residents; and

Whereas the minister has demonstrated a clear lack of concern for the people of this area by continuing to be uncooperative in providing a reasonable explanation as to what went wrong; and

Whereas public faith in the assessment process has been undermined by the minister himself;

Therefore be it resolved that the minister take an interest in the concerns of Cumberland South residents relative to this issue and initiate a comprehensive review of the process used to assess their properties.

[Page 6776]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour.

RESOLUTION NO. 3239

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jay Washington, Greg Marquis and Todd Parker were members of the Dartmouth Mooseheads, winning nine Nova Scotia senior baseball league titles; and

Whereas these three exceptional players led the Dartmouth team to a national championship last year, and defeated the Kentville Wildcats for the Nova Scotia Championship; and

Whereas all three players have retired and the baseball team has retired their numbers, 21, 19 and 72, to mark their achievement;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Greg Marquis, Jay Washington and Todd Parker on their achievement and wish them success in the years to come.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

[Page 6777]

RESOLUTION NO. 3240

DR. JOHN HAMM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ontarians yesterday returned Premier Mike Harris and his Tories for a second consecutive term, a feat not seen for 30 years; and

Whereas Mike Harris succeeded by showing that his actions are as good as his words when it comes to election promises; and

Whereas the hapless Liberals and the formerly recognized NDP have been left in the Tory Blue Machine's dust;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Ontarians for having the common sense to return the Harris Tories, which proves that honesty and solid performance really does pay dividends.

Mr. Speaker, I seek waiver.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: No.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

Order, please. The chitchat across the floor will cease.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 3241

MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas rural roads in Nova Scotia are a disgrace and some of the worst in North America; and

Whereas this year will see $32 million less spent on our bridges and highways systems; and

Whereas this Liberal Government has no trouble finding millions of dollars for projects in the Minister of Economic Development and Tourism's riding;

[Page 6778]

Therefore be it resolved that the Liberal Government gets serious in Cabinet and say no to pet political projects and yes to common-sense highway projects.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 3242

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas heroes are usually the last to recognize their efforts; and

Whereas Charles Winsor of Enfield had been honoured some years ago by the Government of Canada for heroism; and

Whereas Mr. Winsor was honoured again for heroism on May 10th by the Governor General of Canada, Roméo LeBlanc;

Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize and thank Mr. Winsor for his selflessness in risking his own life to save others incapable of saving themselves.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cumberland North.

RESOLUTION NO. 3243

MR. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 6779]

Whereas the 1999 Alumni Award of Excellence for Teaching was presented during Dalhousie University's convocation ceremony last week; and

Whereas the award is presented annually to a professor who, in the eyes of students and peers, has displayed the qualities of superior teaching, enthusiasm and commitment to students; and

Whereas Dr. Phil Campagna, an associate professor with Dalhousie's School of Health and Human Performance was this year's recipient of this honour;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend our congratulations to Dr. Campagna on this prestigious award and wish him continued success.

Mr. Speaker, I respectfully request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank.

RESOLUTION NO. 3244

MS. ROSEMARY GODIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Department of Labour recently tabled its Workers' Compensation Board of Nova Scotia 1998 Annual Report; and

Whereas the report claims a successful year in 1998 despite challenges and the high level of public scrutiny; and

Whereas that public scrutiny was initiated only because of the initial efforts of the Pictou Injured Workers Association;

[Page 6780]

Therefore be it resolved that this government move on from self-congratulations to acknowledging that injured workers in Nova Scotia are more than a financial bottom line and are valued citizens who deserve to be adequately compensated.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill.

RESOLUTION NO. 3245

MR. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bible Hill resident Dr. Sam Asiedu was the winner of the 1998 Dun Huang Award from the Republic of China for research in the field of potato production; and

Whereas this award honours foreign experts who show great dedication and outstanding contributions to Gan Su economic development, scientific teaching and personnel training; and

Whereas Dr. Asiedu is a Professor at the Nova Scotia Agricultural College;

Therefore be it resolved that all members congratulate Dr. Asiedu for winning the 1998 Dun Huang Award and for adding to the excellent academic reputation of the Nova Scotia Agricultural College.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

[Page 6781]

RESOLUTION NO. 3246

MS. EILEEN O'CONNELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Friday, May 28th, the Nova Scotia School Boards Association released the results of its child poverty survey; and

Whereas the report provides both a clearer picture of what schools are doing to combat poverty and a sense of the effect of poverty in the province's schools; and

Whereas this child poverty survey is one step in the association's plan to alleviate the effects of child poverty;

Therefore be it resolved that this House commend the Nova Scotia School Boards Association on this much-needed initiative and wish it well as it completes its action plan to help alleviate the negative effects of child poverty.

Mr. Speaker, I seek waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 3247

MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas National Transportation Week is June 6th to June 12th; and

Whereas this year's theme of Transportation: Safe, Reliable and Efficient, highlights the role of technology in Canada's transportation industry over the last century; and

Whereas the transportation industry is the largest employer in Canada;

[Page 6782]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize transportation safety week and the significance of the transportation industry to the Province of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 3248

MS. HELEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the first graduating class of the new Eskasoni Learning Centre have received their diplomas; and

Whereas the Eskasoni Learning Centre is regarded as the finest aboriginal high school in Canada and preserves the Mi'kmaq language and culture; and

Whereas the school represents a positive partnership between the people of the Eskasoni Reserve and IBM Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the students of the Eskasoni Learning Centre, as well as the partnership which has made this excellent school possible.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 6783]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Yarmouth.

RESOLUTION NO. 3249

MR. JOHN DEVEAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Adrien Deveau of Yarmouth as been named Nova Scotia Racquetball Association Male Athlete of the Year and, with Dan Smith of Halifax, has been named Team of the Year; and

Whereas the Deveau-Smith team won first place in both singles and doubles at the nationals last May in men's "C" class; and

Whereas Adrien Deveau and Dan Smith are excellent role models of Nova Scotia's athletes;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Adrien Deveau and Dan Smith on their recognition and wish them all the best in their next challenge.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. GEORGE MOODY: Mr. Speaker, I rise on an introduction. I would like to introduce in the west gallery, 24 Grade 6 students from St. Mary's Elementary School. With the 24 Grade 6 students are Mrs. Marlene Connell, a teacher; Mrs. Rowe; Mr. Collins; and Mrs. McDonell. I would ask them to rise and receive the welcome of the House, please. (Applause)

[Page 6784]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour.

RESOLUTION NO. 3250

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Liberal spin doctors spread like oil in recent weeks to whisper that the NDP wants an election because it is sliding downhill in public support; and

Whereas the spinners suggested that it was a big mistake, soon to be confirmed by that God like polling, for anyone, much less the Party that tied the almighty Liberals, to be eager to defeat the Liberals in an election; and

Whereas Nova Scotians got a glimpse of just how much this government is motivated by desperation over its impending fate and failing grip on power;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urges the Liberal Party to stop spinning, stop citing imaginary polls and either govern responsibly or be gone.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please revert to the order of business, Introduction of Bills.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 113 - Entitled an Act Respecting Certain Financial Measures. (Hon. Donald Downe)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read a second time on a future day.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

[Page 6785]

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and that the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Supply unto Her Majesty.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I rise today to say a few words about the budget and its lack of focus on an area that has been devastated economically in this province, and that is Cape Breton Island. In this announcement this week, when the minister stood up and tabled his budget documents, the only reference to Cape Breton was the matter of $80 million being spent in Cape Breton in conjunction with the federal government and his government. Now this is a $12 million outlay by this government which was already announced back in February of this year. So this is not new money for economic development in Cape Breton. One has to ask, has this government abandoned industrial Cape Breton? I think when we look at some of the facts the answer is clear, yes, they have.

[10:45 p.m.]

I am going to speak about an area in my own riding that could benefit when they talk about economic renewal for Cape Breton; the area is Dominion Beach which was turned over to the province from the Town of Dominion in 1973. Since that time there has been some infrastructure work done in that area and it has been a focus of some sort to turn it into a recreational park area. The good citizens of Dominion have worked long and hard to develop this area in the last five or six years, with no help from the provincial sector. I will cite one thing in particular from recent memory. In the last month and a half there have been dead seal carcasses washing up along this stretch of beach.

The local Councillor for the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, Darren Bruckschwaiger and myself, had made representation to local DNR officers to go to the beach and have these carcasses removed, to little or no avail - they did some work but the carcasses are still there. One might say, what does this have to do with the economic development of this area? Well, it has a lot to do with it because this area is probably the only major beach recreation opportunity within the Sydney-Glace Bay region.

The beach is used 12 months of the year not only by people who enjoy the beach and the sun during our summer months, but as an area for people who enjoy a walk along the beach in the not-so-warm periods of the year. It is also used by people for birding and for people that roam, what we refer to in the area, as the sand dunes or the flats. Now these areas are sensitive ecosystems and it is an area that if this government was serious about renewing

[Page 6786]

the economic face of industrial Cape Breton, it would be an area that it would look at very seriously. But by its omission of not including any such thing in their budget, they have said, we don't care, we are not really going to be involved with any kind of economic renewal in industrial Cape Breton.

The government talks in terms of helping change the face of the economy in the area but they really do little or nothing. This area has an aspect of growth that could only help. We sit down there and hear all the negatives about the environment of industrial Cape Breton. This is an area that certainly should be exploited and exploited in a good way; yet, they do not want to do something as simple as go and aid the people who use the beach every day. Let's not even talk about the big picture of developing it as a major tourist attraction. I will give you, by way of example, the problem with the seals.

I had been getting phone calls from my office and I know for a fact that Councillor Bruckschwaiger was encountering the same problems as he is from the Town of Dominion. He was getting calls because there were these carcasses left lying rotting on the beach. People would go out there, take their pets for a walk and there are areas to let their dogs have a run. What would happen is they would come back and the odour coming off them was something to behold because of these rotting, decaying carcasses. DNR's position on this was we will get around to it.

I guess one has to ask, how long will these carcasses be there? We have been fortunate enough to be visited by some fine weather this early in the year, so one would assume with this on the go that people would be taking advantage of the beach much earlier than usual. So we have these tourists coming down to use the lovely beach at Dominion. What is going to happen? They are going to be chased because of its unkempt nature. Mr. Speaker, that is one of the areas on that lovely beach that is just being forsaken.

Let's talk about some other economic uses for that area. That area is historical in the fact that for years schooners would actually come into that Lingan Bay area and load and off-load coal and ballast, as the need be. Now, when the ballast was being used, it helped in a large way to buffer the loss of the sand because it would act as a breakwater. Well, as times and technologies changed, the three-masted schooner is not used widely any more so that system has stopped.

So we are saying, why not look at a way to stop the erosion of that beach, to help renew a contact with an area that was traditionally there. If we could look at something from the investment of a pedway that would adjoin the beach, as it was at one time, with the community of Lingan, it would be immeasurable the amount of people you could attract. You would have about a three to three and one-half kilometre stretch of wilderness area. You would have a beach in one area, Mr. Speaker, and on the other side, you would have these sand dunes with many different floral growth. Also, the area of birding is truly immense.

[Page 6787]

My daughter's Grade 10 honours biology class teacher for the last 20 years has taken his Grade 10 honours class to that area just because of its uniqueness. Yet this government doesn't seem to want to develop that uniqueness and say, look, this could be part of the new economic revitalization of industrial Cape Breton. Yet they would just as soon say, oh, no, the Premier is much too busy trying to get an enhanced severance package and that's it. "That's end of story."

Those things combine with just a straightforward ability to have roads. The highway infrastructure, in particular, in my riding has been neglected for years. One would wonder why, because they certainly had, as they would like to put it, the availability of a Liberal member to support their every whim there. Yet these roads are in horrendous shape. One road in particular, which I happen to share with the member for Cape Breton Nova, I think he has three residents on it, is Centreville Road in . . .

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: I've got five on it.

MR. CORBETT: He has got five now, Mr. Speaker. It is a veritable housing boom. (Laughter) I think its three and I think he has a hard time counting. Yes, it is referred to as Rabbit Town Road. I am sure that the Speaker knows it well. That area has been neglected for years. The road is virtually impassable some days. (Interruption) After five houses it gets progressively worse. The ditching hasn't been done there for years and yet, what's the response of this government, it is to cut funding or no funding to secondary roads. I say, shame on them and shame on the minister.

There are many other roads of a secondary nature in the area, but two I would like to speak about are roads in subdivisions. These subdivisions by nature are newer homes and with newer homes comes young families, school-aged children and so on. Now, because of antiquated cost-sharing arrangements between the province and municipalities, what comes into effect is basically referred to as the 15 year rule that in the old County of Cape Breton, if the road is less than 15 years old, it is totally the responsibility or can be cost-shared with the province. After 15 years it becomes the responsibility of the province.

These people are paying some of the highest taxes in the Province of Nova Scotia for services that they do not even get. I have had numerous conversations with the Department of Transportation to see what we could do with these. Because of the treatment the municipalities receive from this government, the CBRM is virtually broke and has no money to provide basic road construction and maintenance for these residents. So it should become incumbent, I think, upon the provincial government to say we are in there, we will help you do this.

One particularly annoying fact is that one of these areas, the Ashdale area in my constituency, is 14 years old. The road is in treacherous shape. They have had people slide off it in the winter because the road comes to a T and the people have slid right through the

[Page 6788]

intersection and into a ditch. If these people want paving this year, they want them to cost-share. There is no onus on the developer, the municipality is walking away from any onus and the province certainly is not bellying up to the bar, so to speak, to pay for those people.

We have a similar problem in the Nicklewood subdivision of my constituency, Mr. Speaker, a road, basically 12 to 13 years old, new homes, problems again during the school year in the winter of access by school buses where the bus driver, for safety concerns, will not even attempt to travel that road, which I respect and I think the residents respect because safety is paramount.

This government has to realize that it has the onus to support the people in Cape Breton and support a real way of revitalizing the economy of that area. One is a project like I have talked about with the Dominion Beach area. Certainly another one is providing infrastructure and certainly one of the large areas, when we talk of infrastructure, is roads. I know the Minister of Transportation and Public Works is over there hanging on my every word and I ask him if he would come down some day to see these great residents, talk to them, and tell them exactly why he does not have the financial wherewithal to help pave the roads. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: I would ask for agreement of the House to revert for a couple of minutes back to Presenting Reports of Committees and the time used in that particular venture will not be taken off the 45 minutes.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. ROBERT HARRISON: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Chairman of the Law Amendments Committee, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 102 - Petroleum Resources Removal Permit Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

[Page 6789]

I have had a further request from the Minister of Health with regard to a ministerial statement. Do I have the agreement of the House?

SOME HON. MEMBERS: No.

MR. SPEAKER: No, very well. We are back on the debate going into Supply.

[GOVERNMENT MOTIONS: ON MOTION FOR SUPPLY resumed]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MS. YVONNE ATWELL: Mr. Speaker, it is indeed a pleasure to rise this morning to say a few words about some of the budget items, as well as to say a few words about the beautiful constituency of Preston.

[11:00 a.m.]

As I look through the Budget Speech that was presented the other day and flip through those 29 pages, there is certainly a lot there to talk about. I am going to take a few minutes to talk about one area of that budget that is very important to the residents that I represent, that is the issue of roads. The number of people who call my office to complain or make suggestions about how bad the roads are and what is needed to improve them is about 75 per cent of the calls that I get in my office.

One of the reasons for that is, during the last election many of the residents, particularly the residents along the Myra Road in Porters Lake, were told that they were getting their road re-paved to the tune of about $775,000. Those people on the Myra Road are still waiting and still asking this question. They had been told during the election campaign and I guess it must have been an election promise, that the road would be paved shortly after the election. They believed that, of course. Now that road is not paved, there is no money that I can see in this budget that would assist those residents in getting that road paved in the near future.

That is just one of many roads in the Preston riding. Of course, there is the issue of all the secondary roads and, for example, there are roads that have never been re-paved, and I suspect not even patched very well. Some of them are so bad, particularly Upper and Lower Partridge River Drive and Brooks Drive, that the yellow line that runs down the centre of the road is quickly disappearing in the crack of the road. That tells you how very bad these roads are. Also, in certain areas of that riding, when you drive up a hill or down a hill, you really feel as if you are on a roller coaster because it is so bumpy. People's cars are being wrecked, but nobody is listening.

[Page 6790]

The whole issue of secondary roads needs to be addressed, there needs to be money in this budget for it; of course, there isn't. I asked the Minister of Transportation, how is he going to deal with these issues? There is also the issue of William Street that is still outstanding, I really haven't heard any kind of response from. This road has not been paved, and I hear it has sort of been on the books for the last 17 years.

The road issue in that particular riding is very serious. There are many other issues within the Preston constituency, but I want to talk a little bit about community development in that area as well. Over the last several months there have been many people in the community who have gotten together to clean up the community in some instances. For example, there is a lot of garbage along provincial highways, and while this is not the responsibility of the individuals who live along that highway, there are neighbours who will continually go out and try and pick up the garbage in the gutters.

However, they can't remove the large items, such as refrigerators, coaches, stoves, et cetera. That is where the dumping is taking place. That issue as well needs to be addressed with the department. The areas along Lake Echo, Porters Lake and the areas of North and East Preston that are quite isolated in many ways and there is not a lot of people that travel those roads particularly in the middle of the night, other than very large trucks. Therefore it is easy for people to dump their garbage along the side of the road.

I will go back a bit to the issue of community development. Very recently we have had several groups within the community that have come together and have taken the responsibility of looking at ways in which they can develop their community.

The small community of Mineville, on which I gave the resolution this morning, about five young women who came together and formed a coffee club. They came together to talk about issues in their community - most of them have small children - and decided that that community needed to be developed and that community needed a head start. So they brought together a number of people in the community and have decided to call their community, to use the words, a resource community because they, themselves, want to put a lot of effort into ensuring that there is proper recreation for the young people in their community, ensuring that there is some kind of community development and growth and are willing to share and participate to make sure that happens. However, it needs support. It needs support from the various levels of government.

These are some of the efforts that are taking place in the community, in the areas of North and East Preston as well, in the area of Humber Park, through the various churches within the community. They are coming together to support the community by developing food banks which, of course, it is wonderful that there are those volunteers in our community who continue to develop food banks.

[Page 6791]

Very recently, I went to one of the food banks that are sponsored by the church on the day they were packing. Then I went on the day that they were actually giving out the food. While, you know, this is wonderful that we have so many volunteers and so many caring churches in our community that do this kind of work, it is shameful and embarrassing to see that in a time when there is wealth that our communities have to go to food banks, when there is not enough money around, there are not enough jobs, people who live on social assistance are not getting enough to feed themselves and their families, people have to work in low-paying jobs where they don't make enough money to support their families and they have to rely on food banks. While this is a nice initiative on the part of the community, a wonderful one as well, it makes me feel quite sad inside that we live in a society that has so much and where some people have so little.

Because of that, the community itself is trying to find ways to develop some community gardens but we do have a government that needs to actively look at how they are supporting the poor people of our province.

We have wonderful day care centres and I have spoken of this many times before because I am so impressed with the day care centres in the community and they continue to work very hard to assist the community in various programs, prenatal programs that are attached to the day care centres. Many of these centres are also struggling, struggling to maintain their funding source, struggling to ensure that they have good programs and they are always, usually, in the red. However, they keep on struggling, they keep on providing the kind of care and resource within the community that we need.

Of course, day care buildings, as well, that have been around for a number of years and I speak now of the day care centre in East Preston. That day care centre is coming up to its 25th year of being a very solid icon in the community. It now needs renovations to that building. After 25 years of children using the building, and using it for other programs in the community, of course, that building needs some repairs. There again, we have a wonderful community that comes to the assistance of something like the day care, who will organize their time and their efforts to volunteer time to do some of the work there. However, they can't do all the work because everything costs dollars. Once again, it is trying to find those resources so that that day care will continue to serve the community on an ongoing basis without a leaky roof or leaky windows.

Also, in the community, as well, we see the concerned issues around health. With the shortage of doctors, nurses and other health care professionals, those communities that are outside the main core often have a very difficult time being able to access those services. If you don't have a car or transportation to get to a doctor or hospital when you're sick, then chances are you will stay home until you are deathly ill before you will go to a physician, if you can find one. Oftentimes what happens is those individuals end up going to emergency services.

[Page 6792]

We need wellness clinics in our communities, where people can go to get regular check-ups, where women can go for regular breast examinations, where people can take their children to make sure that they have the kind of services that health care should provide. We also see in our communities, the whole issue around recreation which is lacking in many instances. There again, I think individuals, organizations and groups - and we have many - do what they can to assist in trying to develop recreation programs, particularly for our young people. We hear so often that young people don't have a place to go, in terms of recreation, particularly out in the rural areas. It is a very major concern.

Once again, the young people, along with community members, like people from the Lions Club and others in the area of Lake Echo, have come together to develop some kind of recreation program for the young people. What is wonderful about this is that young people themselves are involved in this process, deciding the kind of recreation they would like to see in the area. They too need the kind of support that government can give them in terms of financial assistance, because they will do part of the work, but we have to do our part as well as government representatives.

I see people coming together and growing and learning how to take back their communities, and this is very encouraging. This is why, when I look at the budget and I look at what is there for community economic development, when I look at the sad state of health care, it really frightens me to think that the next generation, where my children and grandchildren will be raised in a time when they may not be able to reap the benefits of the work that their parents are doing now because things will be in a state of chaos, particularly around our health care system.

It is hard enough now to find a doctor who will take patients; it is difficult enough to find a physician who has the time to spend with those patients to ensure that they are comfortable. I can imagine what will happen in the future when that $600 million has been frittered away and then we are right back to where we started.

Mr. Speaker, I thank you again for the opportunity to speak this morning.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

DR. JOHN HAMM: Mr. Speaker, I thought I would take a few minutes and perhaps review for members of the House, who haven't been here since 1993, some of the changes that have gone on and some of the planning that appeared to be going on with health reform in this province. I remember very clearly in 1993 - and I don't have the document with me, but it was Government By Design, and the government keeps coming out with these documents - there are many members of the House who weren't here back in the early days of the Liberal Government following the election of 1993, but we all remember very clearly their exuberance when they came to power with a huge majority that ran rampant over this

[Page 6793]

Legislature until the election of 1998 when, in fact, a little bit of balance was restored to this place of legislation.

What the government was saying then, what they were going to do with health care is, over the next four fiscal years, they were going to initiate a program of reform of our health care system that would result in a 12 per cent reduction of spending in health care; that would amount to about $150 million. We were guaranteed time after time by the then Minister of Health that, in fact, this could be accomplished and still provide an acceptable level of health care in the Province of Nova Scotia. So that is where this government started. They started saying we can cut this money from health care, we have a plan, although the plan was as difficult to access as the plan is today, but that is where we started and we went down a road in which the government said that we will deinstitutionalize health care. We will have a very seamless change from institutional care to home care. To a certain extent that was a reasonable objective if, in fact, it could be carried out within the confines of a coordinated plan.

[11:15 a.m.]

What happened over the next number of years? Twelve hundred nurses were dismissed from the health care system; 30 per cent of the acute care beds in this province were, in fact, abolished. But we did not have a rapid introduction of a home care program that made up for the changes that were happening in our institutions. We are all now being reminded by government on a regular basis, something that they did not seem to acknowledge until very recently, that with our aging population, we must go slow and tread softly because the demands on the health care system would be increasing and, as predicted, they have increased but, unfortunately, the government did not make provisions for the changing demographics in this province. We have not had that seamless change from institutional care to home care.

What we have are stories of long waits in emergency departments, many people spending nights in emergency departments sleeping on stretchers, many people who used to be admitted to hospital, in fact, being sent away because there are no beds. We have, in fact, many hospital beds in this province on a regular basis occupied by those who require long-term care, a care that costs roughly 20 per cent of acute care, and so many of our health care dollars are being spent looking after these people in acute care institutions.

The issue of providing early retirement for nurses so, in fact, 1,200 to 1,300 nurses could be discharged from the health care delivery system in this province and now we have a plan in which we are going to spend tens of millions more to provide the hundreds of new nurses that we are going to require over the next two years.

[Page 6794]

Another bad thing happened. Health care in those days at the local level was controlled and administered at the local level. Local people who depended on their health care delivery in that community had control over the provision of health care in that community. There was a system of built-in accountability that does not exist today and what has occurred, of course, is not only are there diminishing numbers, either deficiencies in the availability of doctors and a deficiency in the amount of nursing care that is available in the long-term care sector and in the acute care sector, but there is that lack of accountability, that lack of participation by health care providers, that has resulted in huge morale problems in the health care system, further impeding the ability of the health care system to deliver what all Nova Scotians and, in fact, all Canadians expect and that is reasonable health care delivered at the local level and that there is a system of accountability, a process of accountability in place.

We have the nursing shortage. You just have to go into any hospital and they will talk about the casualization process that has resulted in poor planning, is costing money, and it is costing us so many nurses that have left this province and now we are going to have to spend tens of millions to try and attract some of them back.

The doctor shortage. I had an opportunity in Question Period the other day to question the minister when he made the statement. Only three communities to his knowledge were still being under-doctored. I provided him that day with a great list, but a new one came to mind because it came to my attention just in the last few days, that the Spryfield area is under-doctored. A number of doctors have left Spryfield, and they are having difficulty attracting doctors to Spryfield. The last time I looked, Spryfield was the metro area.

How many times has this Minister of Health gotten up and said the metro area is over-doctored, we have enough, they are just in the wrong places. The example is always too many doctors in metro and not enough doctors in rural Nova Scotia, and yet we have this area in metro - Spryfield - now under-doctored. I am told by the people in that area that many residents of Spryfield are, in fact, without a doctor.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Don't forget Dartmouth.

DR. HAMM: The member for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour just said don't forget Dartmouth, and I won't forget Dartmouth because Dartmouth is under-doctored.

No one is accountable. That is the problem with health care delivery. The road down the reform route for health care in this province is as full of potholes as the rural roads that we talk about day after day in this province. It is a bumpy ride now to try to get treatment in this province. Young people cannot access the kind of treatment that they need for very serious emotional and behavioural problems.

[Page 6795]

The availability of mental health services across this province is abysmal. I take offence when members of this House get up to bring these matters to the attention of the government in the only effective forum we have, to bring these issues to the government's attention in a forum that absolutely determines that they have to listen, when they accuse members on the Opposition benches of fear-mongering. This budget that was introduced the other day is an absolute indication that what we have been saying is not fear-mongering, it is the absolute truth. (Applause)

Let's talk about ambulances, and when we discuss estimates, we will have an opportunity to look at the astronomical rise of the cost of that service here in the Province of Nova Scotia. Needless to say, it is enough to say here, it has now increased by 300 per cent. Yet, I hear stories. For example, because we have fewer ambulances than we once did, we have the story well documented when a routine five kilometre ambulance call in Pictou County was made by an ambulance that travelled all the way from Bedford to make that call; travelling 320 kilometres to and fro to make a five kilometre call in Pictou County. That is the kind of system that we have developed. Is it any wonder why this government needs a special provision, a special investment fund in Health to bail it out of the terrible chaos and destruction that it has created in the health care system in this province.

Let's talk about wellness. I remember in the early days of this government, in 1993 and even into 1994, the then Minister of Health talking about, we are going to start focusing on wellness. We are going to start looking after Nova Scotians in a way that they haven't been looked after before, and we are going to provide programs that make us healthier. I would say to you, when you see the statistics, we aren't getting healthier, and this government has no system or program of wellness. It has not addressed the problem in any way, shape or form. But it is distressing because the statistics are sobering. Nova Scotians aren't healthy and yet we have a government that loves to talk about wellness, but yet never has a program that, in fact, addresses a proper approach to improving the health care status of Nova Scotians.

What we have before us and what we are dealing with in the committee on estimates is a government that came to power realizing, as I did when I ran in 1993 - as all governments in this country are now realizing - that we have to start living within our means and, if we don't, catastrophic things are going to happen down the road. Putting off doing the things that are right, putting off doing good planning, putting off spending $1.56 billion of the taxpayers' money of this province without a plan that you can table in the Legislature of this province is simply not acceptable.

We have to know where we are going in health care. This government hasn't known where it wanted to go in health care for six years. All it knows is it wants to fix it, but we want to know, and the people of Nova Scotia want to know, how they are going to fix it because we know you don't know.

[Page 6796]

Is it any wonder that the people of Nova Scotia are dismayed with what they are hearing? They have been told, yes we must be fiscally responsible and live within our means, but that is not the message that has come out since Tuesday. The message somehow has changed, but there has been obfuscation in terms of trying to delude the people of Nova Scotia into thinking that by changing the name of borrowing you are somehow changing the effect of borrowing. Borrowing is borrowing. It would seem to me that any homeowner who has a loan at the bank, perhaps a small mortgage and owing several thousand dollars on two credit cards, is in fact not helping the family finances one bit by applying for a third credit card.

Mr. Speaker, my time is running down and I appreciate the opportunity to address the members of the Legislature. I look forward to continuing another day. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried.

[11:28 a.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Supply with Deputy Speaker Mr. Donald Chard in the Chair.]

[3:37 p.m. CWH on Supply rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Ronald Russell, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Supply reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and made some progress in considering Supply and asks leave to sit again.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[3:38 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Acting Deputy Speaker Mr. Darrell Dexter in the Chair.]

[Page 6797]

[3:39 p.m. The CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Ron Russell, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 105 - Fisheries and Coastal Resources Act.

and the Chairman has been instructed to recommend this bill to the favourable considerable consideration of the House, without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read for a third time on a future day.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 97.

Bill No. 97 - Business Efficiency (1999) Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I just want to stand at third reading and put on the record a couple of the amendments that were made to Bill No. 97, the Business Efficiency (1999) Act. At the Law Amendments Committee, it was recognized, one particular clause, all Parties, I think if we recall back to second reading, agreed with the intent of the Business Efficiency (1999) Act. In its title, I think, alone we understand that the intent is to create a more efficient operation of business in this province, eliminating some of the bureaucracy that businesses and individuals in this province must face.

There is a committee that was set up by the government a few years ago that helped produce recommendations, and I think all the members of the House have been very good at recognizing the work done by that committee and in moving this bill forward in a manner that ensured that we were recognizing their work.

[Page 6798]

There was one particular clause, I believe it is Clause 31 in the bill, that deals with marriage licences, and there were a few changes made at that time and I think it is important to put it on the record as to why. Particularly, Clause 31(2) dealt with the issue of when someone wanted to come forward to ask for a marriage licence. There was some concern that it was overly complicated, overly confusing, they had to provide one of several pieces of identification, they had to provide two pieces of signed identification; I do believe at first they had to provide either a baptismal certificate, a passport or some other form of proof of age, then they also had to provide two pieces of signed identification. What was of concern, first of all, was why do we need two pieces of signed identification when, in fact, all you need is one piece of signed identification, so an amendment was made to the bill, again making it more efficient, making the efficiency in the bill even greater.

Secondly, in Clause 31(1) of bill, there was a specific section in there around the issue of proof of a death certificate. I think it was moved by the Progressive Conservative caucus and the other Parties agreed, that in that particular clause there should be an exception to the rule. I think the classic example was someone who may have been married 50 years ago and maybe that person died fairly shortly after that, we could be talking about a death that was a long time ago; then the widow deciding to get remarried after many years and there not being a death certificate available to prove that the person is now a widow. It was felt that there should be an exception based on extraordinary or urgent circumstances that would allow for some bureaucrat or civil servant to have an opportunity to waive the requirements within that clause. That was also provided, again, I think that makes the system more efficient. I am glad to see those amendments. My Party will be voting in favour of this bill at third reading.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 97. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 98.

Bill No. 98 - Motor Vehicle Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

[Page 6799]

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, this bill was put forward by the Minister of Justice. Bill No. 98 makes some changes to the Motor Vehicle Act, somewhat omnibus but particularly dealing with some of the issues flowing from the changes we made to the Motor Vehicle Act last fall based on a bill put forward by the Progressive Conservative caucus.

I just wanted to take the opportunity again to voice our Party's support in general for this bill, and to note a couple of changes. I think there is one particular change that was made to Bill No. 98 at the Law Amendments Committee and putting on the record the rationale for the change.

Clause 5 of Bill No. 98 deals with an issue of when a police officer can provide, as I understood originally, a second breath test to a beginner-licensed or a newly-licensed driver who has been stopped and the police officer suspects they have alcohol in their system. Originally, just to back up for a second, newly-licensed or beginner-licensed drivers have, I do believe, a zero tolerance of alcohol in their system as the rule, any alcohol in their system means that they must stop driving immediately, and I believe their license is suspended.

However, that is a change that has happened in this province in the last few years, a good change, a change that our caucus supports, but unfortunately the systems that are used in the vehicles, and I guess to describe it, it is those little red boxes that police officers . . .

MR. FRANK CORBETT: The Alert.

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: . . . the Alert, the member for Cape Breton Centre tells me it is the proper name, the Alert, it is something that someone will blow into and it will either show a green light for pass, yellow light for borderline or red light for fail.

[3:45 p.m.]

Those devices are not very accurate and are based on a showing of, I think, .05 alcohol limit and, therefore, if a new driver or a beginner-licensed driver was to blow into that device, they would show as passing. Of course, they have passed according to the Criminal Code of Canada, but according to the Nova Scotia Motor Vehicle Act they could still be in violation because they may have some alcohol in their system. As the law stands now, the police officers were not able to ask then for those newly-licensed or beginner-licensed drivers to come down to a police station and take the more elaborate breathalyzer test which is much more detailed and can tell whether there is any alcohol in the system.

Having read Clause 5, having met with the Minister of Justice, having met with the lawyer who drafted Bill No. 98, there was clearly some confusion in Clause 5 as to whether or not a police officer had the right to ask for a second Alert test or have the right to ask, once someone passed the Alert test, to go to the police station for a full breathalyzer test. That has now been clarified in Clause 5. We now have a situation where it is clear the police

[Page 6800]

officer, if a newly-licensed or a beginner-licensed driver does pass the Alert test, he can then demand that newly-licensed or beginner-licensed driver go down to the police station for the full breathalyzer.

I think that clarifies the bill; I think that will clarify some confusion over the years, as this law is enforced. I think it is important that we have that clarification because, having worked in the system, I know that breathalyzers, alcohol, and drinking and driving is obviously a very great danger and menace to our society, but it is also one where there is a lot of litigation, and anything we can do to eliminate some of that litigation and make the system more clear and the laws more clear, it is better for everyone. Based on that change, our caucus is prepared to support this particular bill and we will be voting for it on third reading. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move third reading of Bill No.98.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 98. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that this bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, will you please call Bill No. 99.

Bill No. 99 - Direct Sellers' Regulation Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MS. YVONNE ATWELL: Mr. Speaker, I just want to go on record to talk a little bit about a concern our caucus had during first reading of Bill No. 99. We talked about commerce on the Internet, and that was not included in the new definition of direct sellers. In the old definition, commerce on the Internet was not defined in the old regulations; however, it was not excluded. The definition included any sales that were not done by a merchant retailer, so I guess we just want to flag that.

Our caucus believes that at some point commerce on the Internet will need to be regulated and will need to be part of direct sellers because that is happening right now and it is a concern. We live in a world of high technology, we live in a world where technology

[Page 6801]

is growing very rapidly and commerce on the Internet is happening right now and will continue. I just wanted to take a few minutes to flag that and to say that we believe, in a very short period of time, commerce on the Internet will have to be regulated and the government should be committed to that kind of change. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 99. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

I think the other committee has risen.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: There is only one bill left here.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 100.

Bill No. 100 - Commercial Arbitration Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 100 was also introduced by the Minister of Justice. As the Justice Critic for the NDP, I would just like to say a couple of words in third reading.

This particular bill, as was said at second reading, is a good piece of legislation. It will address the issue of commercial arbitration in this province. There has been a change made, at the Committee of the Whole House of Bills, dealing with the issue of bringing in the Condominium Act arbitration procedures under the Commercial Arbitration Act. I think, again, anything we can do to harmonize arbitration procedures in this province, anything we can do to ensure that the guidelines and the principles meet international standards, which is what this bill will do, is good for Nova Scotia, it is good for business and it is good for all Nova Scotians. So, our Party is in favour of this and we will be voting in favour of the bill on third reading.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move third reading of Bill No. 100.

[Page 6802]

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 100. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, you indicated a few moments ago that the Subcommittee on Supply has finished.

MR. SPEAKER: I believe so.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Can we check because I would like to call the Committee of the Whole House on Bills again.

MR. SPEAKER: Well, let's just have a quick look. They have one minute to go. So, if the honourable Government House Leader would perhaps inform the House of the hours for next week and the business.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: The hours for Monday, 3:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. and following the daily routine, we will going into Committee of the Whole House on Supply. Following that, we will be dealing with bills that are before the Committee of the Whole House on Bills, Bill No. 108, the Health Council Act and other bills that may come before the House if we have time.

I would ask you, Mr. Speaker, if it is inappropriate to adjourn now? I am not sure whether the committee is finished yet. (Interruption) Then I would suggest to you, Mr. Speaker, that on Tuesday of next week, we plan on sitting eight hours on days that there are Question Period. On days that there are no Question Period, we plan on sitting seven hours in order to get the required time in of both the Committee of the Whole House on Supply and the Subcommittee on Supply.

Mr. Speaker, I would move that we adjourn until 3:00 p.m. on Monday.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried.

We stand adjourned until 3:00 p.m. on Monday.

[The House rose at 3:53 p.m.]