The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House resumed on:
September 21, 2017.



Hansard -- Thur., Nov. 22, 2001








[Page 7523]

HALIFAX, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2001





Fifty-eighth General Assembly





Second Session





12:00 NOON





SPEAKER





Hon. Murray Scott





DEPUTY SPEAKERS





Mr. Brooke Taylor, Mr. Jerry Pye, Mr. David Wilson







MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We will begin the daily routine.



PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS



PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES




MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to bring the report of the
Law
Amendments Committee. As Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am
directed to
report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:



Bill No. 85 - Real Estate Trading Act.



and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, with
certain amendments.



MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole
House on
Bills.



7523







[Page 7524]

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.



HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, with your permission, I would like to make an
introduction
prior to tabling this report. Mr. Speaker, I direct the attention of the House to east gallery
where
there are a number of members of the Health Research Foundation: Krista Connell, who is
the
Executive Director; Colleen Clattenburg, who is the Executive Assistant; Dr. Ingrid Sketris,
who
is from the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation; and Dr. Tom Larder, who is on
the
Board of Directors of the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation. I would ask all members
to
give them a warm welcome. (Applause)



Mr. Speaker, in addition to the warm welcome, I extend our thanks to those members
because,
due to their efforts, I am pleased to be able to table the first Annual Report of the Nova
Scotia
Health Research Foundation.



MR. SPEAKER: The document is tabled.



STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS



GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION




MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.



RESOLUTION NO. 2718





HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a
future day I
shall move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas on November 21, 2000, the member for Preston contacted my office and the
Protocol
Office to suggest that an Order of Nova Scotia be created; and



Whereas during the spring 2001 sitting, the House passed Bill No. 10 to officially
establish the
Order of Nova Scotia; and



Whereas yesterday, November 21, 2001, one year to the day that the member for
Preston made
the suggestion, the Province of Nova Scotia unveiled the insignia and selection process for
the
Order of Nova Scotia;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate and thank the member for
Preston for his
key role in bringing to the attention of government the value of recognizing outstanding
Nova
Scotians through the Order of Nova Scotia. (Applause)







[Page 7525]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable Minister of Transportation and Public Works.



RESOLUTION NO. 2719





HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day
I shall move
the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas yesterday, the Premier and the Minister of Tourism and Culture unveiled
the Order of
Nova Scotia; and



Whereas many public servants from across government worked tirelessly on making
the Order of
Nova Scotia a reality; and



Whereas one such employee was Chris Cairns, a graphic designer from
Communications Nova
Scotia, who designed the insignia for the Order of Nova Scotia approved by Her Majesty,
Queen
Elizabeth II;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Chris Cairns of
Communications Nova Scotia for using his considerable talents to provide the Order of Nova
Scotia with a visual identity that is second to none.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.







[Page 7526]

The motion is carried.



The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture.



RESOLUTION NO. 2720





HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future
day I shall
move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Lunenburg County Historical Society preserves and presents heritage
for the benefit
of the people of LaHave, other Nova Scotians, and visitors from across Canada and the
world,
through the Fort Point Museum, a national historic site; and



Whereas the society has struck a renaissance committee to develop a business plan
in
consultation with the local community and with tourism and heritage agencies for the
purpose of
helping the museum reach its full potential; and



Whereas the Department of Tourism and Culture is pleased to support, through its
Strategic
Development Initiative, this endeavour which will lead the museum toward a more

community-oriented and economically sustainable situation;



[12:15 p.m.]



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House join me in congratulating the
initiative of
the Lunenburg County Historical Society in mapping out a plan for the continued success of
Fort
Point Museum as a partner in the heritage sector of the province.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable Minister of Transportation and Public Works.







[Page 7527]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask for an introduction of
the people
who are in your gallery. I would like to introduce these members who are responsible for the
design and the putting in place of the Order of Nova Scotia. I would ask them to stand,
please,
and receive the warm welcome of the House: Chris Cairns, Geoff Kerson, Susan Lucy, Pat
Johnson Webb, Paul Chenard, Brian Murray, Andrew Barss and Daniel Mombourquette. I
would
ask the House to give them a warm welcome. (Applause)



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Education.



RESOLUTION NO. 2721





HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall
move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Sunday, November 25th is the International Day to End Violence Against
Women and
marks the beginning of a period known as 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence;
and



Whereas from 1989 to 2000, an average of five women in Nova Scotia died violently
each year,
many murdered by spouses or intimate partners. In 2001 to date, we know of no murders of
women but one violent death of an infant girl; and



Whereas we hope that the reduction in deaths this year signifies a lasting change, yet
we know
that only a continuing commitment and vigilance against violence will make this a lasting
change;



Therefore be it resolved that all members support the movement to end violence
against women
through personal commitment, organizational support and community action, and that we
make
our commitment known by wearing a purple ribbon during these 16 days of action on gender
violence.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.







[Page 7528]

The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture.



RESOLUTION NO. 2722





HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future
day I shall
move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas last evening Donald Sobey, President of the Sobeys Art Foundation,
announced the
Sobey Art Award at a reception in the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia; and



Whereas the Sobeys Art Foundation will award $50,000 to an outstanding Canadian
artist
younger than 40, and $15,000 as a second prize, while the host gallery will receive $10,000
to
purchase contemporary Canadian art; and



Whereas last evening Sobeys Inc. donated an Ivan Eyre painting to AGNS;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House join me in thanking and
congratulating
Sobeys for this significant award and for supporting Canadian artists.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable Minister of Health.



RESOLUTION NO. 2723





HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall
move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Town of Kentville has introduced a bylaw that will restrict where people
can smoke
in the town as of April 1, 2002; and



Whereas that bylaw passed first reading this week; and







[Page 7529]

Whereas Nova Scotia has the highest smoking rates in all of Canada;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Town of
Kentville on
this important initiative for the health of their citizens and encourage the town to pass this
resolution.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



INTRODUCTION OF BILLS



NOTICES OF MOTION




MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.



RESOLUTION NO. 2724





MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas coal mining has been a major factor in the history of Cape Breton since the
early 18th
Century, and in the past century Cape Breton coal fired the economic engine of Nova Scotia;
and



Whereas the phrase, there's blood on the coal, really understates the price paid by the
over 1,200
Cape Breton coal miners who died to bring this black gold to the surface so that Nova
Scotians
might prosper; and



Whereas today marks the end of the tragic but heroic traditions of coal mining in
Cape Breton as
the last shift and last ton of coal comes out of the Prince Mine;







[Page 7530]

Therefore be it resolved that this House observe a moment of silence for the over
1,200 Cape
Breton coal miners who gave their lives so that Nova Scotia homes might have heat and our
industries have fuel.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



I would ask the honourable members to stand for a moment of silence for deceased
coal miners
in Cape Breton.



[One minute of silence was observed.]



MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. Please be seated.



The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.



RESOLUTION NO. 2725




MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas family physicians play a vital role in the lives of residents of rural
communities; and



Whereas for the past 30 years Queens County has been the beneficiary of the talents
of Dr. David
Large; and



Whereas Dr. Large has tended to his patients both out of his office at the Queens
General Hospital
and has as well served as Chief of Staff for the Queens General Hospital;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature extend their sincere
thanks to Dr. David
Large for his many years of kind and compassionate caring and wish him and his wife,
Marilyn, all
the best in his retirement.







[Page 7531]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Preston.



RESOLUTION NO. 2726




MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas for 80 years the Nova Scotia Home for Coloured Children, the oldest co-ed
residential
facility in Nova Scotia, has been an important part of the local community; and



Whereas while the home's original mandate was to provide for needy children in the
Black
community, its doors are open to help all at-risk children regardless of their racial origin,
religious
affiliation or ethnic background; and



Whereas for eight decades the Nova Scotia Home for Coloured Children has relied
on the generosity
of the public through donations to its annual appeal, which happens to be the oldest
continuous
charitable telethon in North America;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House pledge their support to the
Nova Scotia
Home for Coloured Children and please make a generous donation to the 70th Annual
Christmas
Broadcast for Funds airing Sunday, December 9th live, from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on
Eastlink Cable
10, so that the home may continue to provide help and assistance to children in need.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?







[Page 7532]

It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.



RESOLUTION NO. 2727




MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall
move the adoption
of the following resolution:



Whereas the 1997 fall session was described as "a frustrating three weeks. It's been
designed to
make the government look as good as possible, but nothing happened in this session."; and




Whereas those are the words of one John Hamm, Progressive Conservative Leader;
and



Whereas the Liberals discovered the true benefit of a short, do-little session when
they lost half their
seats in the subsequent general election, starting the slide into third place;



Therefore be it resolved that the 15 sitting days of this 2001 fall session have been
as uneventful and
even shorter than the infamous 1997 session that failed so miserably to save the timid
Liberals from
an electoral review.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



I hear several Noes.



The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Lunenburg West.



RESOLUTION NO. 2728




MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:







[Page 7533]

Whereas the Alternate School Program has a proven record of providing education
for students who
have lost hope in the public school system; and



Whereas the Nova Scotia Community College's new Transition Program allows
students to obtain
needed high school credits through the college; and



Whereas the co-location of the Alternate School and Transition Programs at the Nova
Scotia
Community College, Lunenburg Campus in Bridgewater promises new incentives for high
school
students to stay in school;



Therefore be it resolved that this House extend best wishes to the Alternate School
and its Director,
Richard Hurlburt; Transition Program Coordinator, Marsha Nauss; and the Nova Scotia
Community
College's Lunenburg Campus for success in their new co-location.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Cape Breton North.



RESOLUTION NO. 2729





MR. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall
move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas a dynamic New Waterford icon, D.A. (Duncan Angus) MacKinnon passed
away on
Saturday, November 3rd, at the age of 73, leaving behind a legacy of community service and
pride
to friends and family; and



Whereas D.A. MacKinnon was in his 59th year of barbering, he was a lifelong
member of the
Progressive Conservative Party, the Knights of Columbus, the Mount Carmel Parish, and a
member
of the Nova Scotia Mental Health Association, as well as being renowned as an avid bridge
player,
organizer and teacher; and







[Page 7534]

Whereas D.A.'s passing leaves a void impossible to fill, yet what remains is a history
of fond
memories, contributions and accomplishments to his beloved community of New Waterford;




Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend their sympathy to
D.A.'s family,
especially Billie, Dan Willie, Spike and Theresa, and remember the decades of service he
contributed
to New Waterford to make it a better place to call home.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Halifax Needham.



RESOLUTION NO. 2730





MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future
day I shall
move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Maritime School of Social Work was incorporated by a special Act of
the Nova Scotia
Legislature 60 years ago on April 15, 1941; and



Whereas among the purposes and objectives of the school are to give instructions and
training to
social workers and students of social work, and to promote and advance social welfare
education;
and



Whereas the Maritime School of Social Work will celebrate 60 years of social work
education at its
annual general meeting, where a panel of faculty and practitioners will lead a discussion
examining
the future of social work;



Therefore be it resolved that members of the Nova Scotia Legislature extend
congratulations and best
wishes to the Maritime School of Social Work faculty, alumni, students and staff as they
celebrate
the occasion of their 60th Anniversary.







[Page 7535]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.



RESOLUTION NO. 2731





MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Michael Campbell of 135 Daley Road, New Victoria, is 75 years old and
will be 76 years
old in two months, in January 2002; and



Whereas Michael Campbell still plays competitive hockey three and four times per
week and is a
strong leader on the ice, breaking up plays and feeding the puck with well-placed forward
passes;
and



Whereas Michael Campbell played 80 games in the 2000-01 season and played either
the entire
game or almost the entire game in each of these;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Michael Campbell on his
outstanding athletic
achievement and demonstration that just because one gets older, there is no reason to believe
that
they cannot also get better.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.







[Page 7536]

The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Kings West.



RESOLUTION NO. 2732





MR. JON CAREY: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the member for Halifax Bedford Basin,
I hereby give
notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas in mid-October the concrete started pouring to set the foundation for the
long-awaited
school in the Mainland North community; and



Whereas this project remains a priority of all governments involved and is expected
to be open in
January 2003; and



Whereas after long hours and much hard work, the plans have come together for this
new school and
the School Steering Team is confident in a successful completion;



Therefore be it resolved that members congratulate all the people who remained
dedicated to this
project and worked so hard to ensure the plan would become a reality.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.



[12:30 p.m.]



RESOLUTION NO. 2733





MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:







[Page 7537]

Whereas Ocean View Manor has been an integral part of the communities of Eastern
Passage and
Cow Bay since it was opened in 1967; and



[12:30 p.m.]



Whereas Ocean View Manor has always had an excellent reputation as a first-rate,
long-term care
facility and has served the residents of the former Halifax County, and more recently Halifax
Regional Municipality, with distinction; and



Whereas in order to maintain its reputation as in innovative long-term care facility,
Ocean View
Manor is planning to expand to include a special-care unit for patients with Alzheimer's and
dementia;



Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize the valued service provided by
Ocean View
Manor, and support its efforts in bringing the first special-care unit to the Halifax Regional
Municipality.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.



RESOLUTION NO. 2734




MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas we were never persuaded that if the NDP formed the federal Government
of Canada that
Svend Robinson or any of their other MPs were appropriate choices for Minister of Defence;
and



Whereas to read Mark Parent's column in this morning's Daily News it seems that he
is more NDP-lined than even Svend, with reference to Afghanistan and elsewhere; and







[Page 7538]

Whereas with the NDP looking for recruits, they should take a long look at the MLA
for Kings
North, for he looks, sounds, and acts like a socialist;



Therefore be it resolved that the growth problems of the NDP could be effectively
addressed and the
quality of representation they deliver improved with the member for Kings North, who could
be
placed prominently in their lineup.



I don't know to request waiver of notice on that one or not.



SOME HON. MEMBERS: Agreed.



MR. MACEWAN: Some say no.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Was there a request for waiver?



MR. MACEWAN: Yes.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



I hear several Noes.



The notice is tabled.



The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture.



RESOLUTION NO. 2735




HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future
day I shall
move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas lessened employment declines in October have helped to keep the Cape
Breton region's
unemployment rate falling for the sixth straight month; and



Whereas the unemployment rate in that region now stands at just above 14 per cent,
one of the
lowest in the area in recent times; and



Whereas employment levels in the year 2001 for the Cape Breton region are the
highest in over 10
years;







[Page 7539]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House acknowledge the positive
progress being made
in increasing employment levels in the Cape Breton region, while recognizing that we have
to do
more work to maximize employment in Cape Breton and throughout the province.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Dartmouth North.



RESOLUTION NO. 2736




MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move
the adoption
of the following resolution:



Whereas Campaign 2000 is a non-partisan, cross-Canada coalition of over 85
national, provincial,
and community partner organizations committed to working together to end child/family
poverty in
Canada; and



Whereas on November 26, 2001, Campaign 2000, in partnership with PhotoSensitive,
professional
photographers who volunteer their time for social causes, will simultaneously open the
national
photo exhibit, A National Disgrace . . . . Child Poverty in Canada; and



Whereas this photo exhibit shows at the Captain William Spry Centre in Spryfield,
bringing the
everyday struggles of low-income families to the public's attention;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of the Legislative Assembly commend
Campaign 2000
and PhotoSensitive for their efforts to raise public and government awareness of the plight
of
children and families living in poverty, and wish them a successful showing of A National
Disgrace
. . . . Child Poverty in Canada.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.







[Page 7540]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Richmond.



RESOLUTION NO. 2737




MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my colleague, the honourable
member for
Dartmouth East, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the
following
resolution:



Whereas paramedics are skilled basic and advanced-life-support practitioners,
providing medical
assistance in often times highly stressful situations; and



Whereas the College of Paramedics honour the professionalism exhibited in
paramedicine by naming
an outstanding individual Paramedic of the Year; and



Whereas Craig Desjardins, an advanced care paramedic from Pictou, has been
awarded this honoured
distinction;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate Mr. Craig
Desjardins of
Pictou, Nova Scotia, on being named Paramedic of the Year.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.









[Page 7541]

The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Kings North.



RESOLUTION NO. 2738




MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall
move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Valley region continued at record high monthly employment levels for
the area during
the month of October; and



Whereas the region's unemployment rate of 6.6 per cent is one of the lowest rates ever
seen in the
area; and



Whereas over 3,000 more people are employed this year than last year in the Valley
region;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House acknowledge the positive
progress made in
increasing employment levels in the Valley region while realizing that we have more work
to do to
maximize employment in the Annapolis Valley and throughout the province.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Halifax Needham.



MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, with your permission I would like
to make an
introduction before I do my resolution.



Mr. Speaker, in our west gallery today we are joined by members of the board and
the staff of
Bryony House. I would like to introduce them: Cathy Love, who is the Director at Bryony
House;
Anne Clarke, Rebecca Crowell and Daivi Kattilakoski, who are on the staff;



[Page 7542]

and Sandra Nimno, who is co-chairman of the board, along with Pamela Harrison, who is
past-chairman of the board and who now works with the Transition House Association of
Nova Scotia,
as well as Mina - it is hard for me to see - a few more members of the staff are now joining
us. So
I would ask the women from Bryony House and the Halifax Transition House Association
to stand
and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.



RESOLUTION NO. 2739





MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future
day I shall
move the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Bryony House has for 23 years provided a refuge for abused women and
their children and
a variety of programs and services to make these women and children safe; and



Whereas Bryony House provides temporary shelter, outreach services and public
education on the
issue of women abuse; and



Whereas the board, staff and volunteers of Bryony House have provided invaluable
safety and
support to the many abused women and children who have passed through its doors over
these years;



Therefore be it resolved that this House thank the board, staff and volunteers of
Bryony House for
their 23 years of continuous care and support on behalf of abused women and children.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.









[Page 7543]

RESOLUTION NO. 2740





MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of my colleague, the honourable
member for
Dartmouth East, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the
following
resolution:



Whereas on November 30, 2001, Marjorie O'Reilly, Provincial Director of the Terry
Fox
Foundation, will retire; and



Whereas Marjorie has dedicated 17 years to the Nova Scotia Terry Fox Foundation
office; and



Whereas during her tenure, Marjorie has been instrumental in increasing Nova
Scotia's contribution
to cancer research from $387,000 to $846,273 last year;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature extend their thanks and
best wishes to
Mrs. Marjorie O'Reilly, her husband Jim and her family, for her many years of dedicated
service to
supporting cancer research and the Terry Fox Foundation office.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury.



RESOLUTION NO. 2741





MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day
I shall move
the adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the northeastern region of the province saw employment levels continue to
hold in October
at their relatively high summer levels; and







[Page 7544]

Whereas this leaves the region's October employment levels on par with the monthly
highs
experienced during the pipeline construction boom of 1999-2000; and



Whereas employment is holding strong and is hitting record-high levels in the
northeastern region
of this province;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge the positive
progress made in
increasing employment levels in the northeastern region while realizing that we have more
work to
do to maximize employment in that region and throughout the province.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.



RESOLUTION NO. 2742





MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas 200,000 Canadians face being homeless annually, a number which will
surely increase in
the economic slowdown the nation faces; and



Whereas homelessness was declared to be a national crisis by the Canadian Big City
Mayors Group
in 1999 who then called for a nation-wide initiative on affordable housing and changes to
National
Housing Policy; and



Whereas the Community Action on Homelessness Group has, in the past several
years, been pressing
for provincial and municipal action in addressing homelessness in Nova Scotia, most recently
having
held workshops in September called "Through the Community Lens: Community Action on
Homelessness Update, Lessons Learned and Next Steps";







[Page 7545]

Therefore be it resolved that this House acknowledge the seriousness of the problem
of homelessness
in Nova Scotia by observing the National Housing Strategy Day of Action on Thursday,
November
22, 2001.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



I hear a No.



The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Glace Bay.



RESOLUTION NO. 2743





MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall
move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas on his election Web site, the MLA for Yarmouth promises to fight to
complete all 100-Series Highways which includes Highway No. 103 through Barrington; and




Whereas the MLA for Yarmouth has sat silently in this session saying nothing about
roads, cuts to
the Yarmouth Hospital, the Yarmouth Airport or the ferry terminal; and



Whereas yesterday the Minister of Transportation and Public Works essentially said
the promises
from the Yarmouth MLA are worthless;



Therefore be it resolved that this government immediately reveal its plan for Highway
No. 103 now
instead of waiting until the day before they drop the writ.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



I hear several Noes.



The notice is tabled.







[Page 7546]

The honourable member for Shelburne.



RESOLUTION NO. 2744





MR. CECIL O'DONNELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the southern region saw an increase in employment through October when
compared to last
year's corresponding monthly levels; and



Whereas this increase helped to lower the region's unemployment rate down to 9 per
cent; and



Whereas gains in the spring meant an increase in approximately 1,000 more
employed people in the
southern region than last year;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House acknowledge the positive
progress made in
increasing employment levels in the southern region while realizing that we have more work
to do
to maximize employment in that region and throughout the province.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Hants East.



RESOLUTION NO. 2745





MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day
I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas this country has largely been founded and shaped by people moving here
to begin a new
life; and







[Page 7547]

Whereas on May 24th of this year, 29 people were sworn in as new Canadians at the
RCMP
headquarters in Halifax; and



Whereas Mrs. Leena Ribahi, at that time, took the Oath of Citizenship to become
Shubenacadie's
newest citizen;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate and
welcome Mrs. Leena
Ribahi of Shubenacadie and the others who, on May 24th, chose to become Canadians.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable member for Lunenburg West.



RESOLUTION NO. 2746





MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Minister of Transportation and Public Works recently received petitions
from the
people of Lunenburg West last year on the condition of Highway No. 208 stating that it is
in need
of serious repair; and



Whereas the people of Lunenburg West have waited long enough for safe highways;
and



Whereas the Tories obviously forgot the blue book promise of non-partisan road
priority lists;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House remind the Minister of
Transportation and
Public Works of the blue book promise to repair roads based on needs, not political stripe,
to ensure
that the people of Lunenburg West have safer highways.







[Page 7548]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



I hear a No.



The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Preston.



RESOLUTION NO. 2747





MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas all members of this House have, through 2001, taken the opportunity to
offer special
recognition to volunteers in their communities as this was declared the International Year of
the
Volunteer; and



Whereas while 2001 draws to a close, December 5th will see the launch of Resolve
to Be Involved,
a month-long campaign by Volunteer Canada, the National Volunteering Initiative and the
Volunteer
Resource Centre, to usher in the new public awareness program, I WILL, Volunteer, 2002;
and



[12:45 p.m.]



Whereas this is a wonderful idea to utilize the momentum of 2001 and its
international designation
to encourage volunteers to rededicate themselves to their good works again in 2002;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge this effort of
Volunteer Canada,
and the National Volunteering Initiative, and the Volunteer Resource Centre, and join in the
call to
all our incredible Nova Scotian volunteers to once again offer their time and talent to those
causes
that rely so heavily upon their goodwill to carry out their good work.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.









[Page 7549]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.



RESOLUTION NO. 2748





MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I
shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Little Brook Volunteer Fire Department is holding its annual banquet
on Saturday,
November 24, 2001; and



Whereas at that banquet four members will be honoured for long service; and



Whereas Roland Boudreau will be recognized for 20 years, André LeBlanc
for 22 years, Carl Deveau
for 24 years and Wilson Comeau for 36 years;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Roland
Boudreau, André
LeBlanc, Carl Deveau, Wilson Comeau and all members of the Little Brook Volunteer Fire
Department for their outstanding and dedicated service to the citizens of Clare.



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.









[Page 7550]

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Public Works.



RESOLUTION NO. 2749





HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day
I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Hockey Night in Canada, with a viewership of 1 million-plus on Saturday
evenings, is
celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation; and




Whereas once again, on January 5th of the new year, the CBC will host a new
program entitled,
Hockey Day in Canada, featuring, for the first three hours, stories about hockey from every
corner
of this country, before concluding the day with an NHL triple-header featuring all six
Canadian NHL
franchises; and



Whereas Windsor, the "Birthplace of Hockey," has been chosen as the host of this
year's show, with
the town featuring an event described as the world's longest hockey game, plus a live version
of the
ever-popular Coach's Corner with Ron MacLean and Don Cherry, who will both be in
Windsor on
January 5th;



Therefore be it resolved that MLAs commend organizers in Windsor of this
prestigious event and
thank the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation for recognizing Windsor, Nova Scotia as the
"Birthplace of Hockey."



Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.



Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I have a point of order. I am rising on a
point of order, so
is this the proper time?



MR. SPEAKER: It sure is.







[Page 7551]

MR. BOUDREAU: Thank you, sir. Mr. Speaker, I rise and bring to the attention of
you and all
members of this House that on November 6th I asked the Premier a question in regard to
details of
the spending restriction order that he has issued, and in regard to his EA, his expenses. That
exchange between the Premier and myself occurred on November 6th here in Question
Period. Now
16 days later, which is today, I have not received that information. I rise to ask if the Premier
is
prepared to submit that information and table it in this House today before the end of
business today
in this House.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. That is not a point of order. But if the honourable
Premier would like
to respond to the request.



THE PREMIER: Yes, I assume that's the question about the change of ticket
(Interruptions)



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I'm not so sure this shouldn't be for Question Period.
(Laughter) We
will mark this down as the first question for the honourable member for Cape Breton The
Lakes.
However, for clarification, the honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.



MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, just to assist the Premier, I will table the document,
the question
that I asked on that particular day. That may help him.



MR. SPEAKER: Maybe the honourable Premier could review that and respond.



MR. BOUDREAU: Yes, but why I stand is that I would prefer to receive a
commitment from the
Premier to table that information today in the House . . .



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. It's not a question - it's not a point of order.



AN HON. MEMBER: It is a question.



MR. SPEAKER: It's a question but it's not a point of order. (Interruptions)



Order, please.



ORDERS OF THE DAY



ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS




MR. SPEAKER: Question Period will begin at 12:50 p.m. and end at 1:50 p.m.



The honourable member for Halifax Needham.







[Page 7552]

COMMUN. SERV.: BRYONY HOUSE - ASSISTANCE





MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I don't have to stand here and tell
this House of the
extremely vital and excellent service provided by Bryony House, because everyone in this
House
knows the importance of metro's only emergency shelter for abused women and children and
their
record of exemplary service but, Mr. Speaker, you may not be aware that Bryony House is
in a
serious deficit position. The board of Bryony House has written to the Minister of
Community
Services informing him of the situation and requesting immediate assistance.



To date, Mr. Speaker, there has been no response. So I want to ask the Minister of
Community
Services, you know that the demand for this service increases every year and you know that
this
service could literally mean life or death for women in need of a safe place, so why haven't
you
responded to the board's letter?



HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member is quite right, we
have had
correspondence from the board of Bryony House. We are reviewing that and we will be
working with
the board to try to achieve all of our objectives.



MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I would like to table that letter from
Bryony House
to the minister. This is not the first time I've had to stand in my place and ask this minister
questions
about transition houses in Nova Scotia. Bryony House has been underfunded by the
Department of
Community Services for many years and they've been subsidizing their inadequate
government
funding through fundraising and private donations. However, this year those reserve funds
are
exhausted. They've made cuts to maintenance, office facilities, electricity, food, household
supplies,
even soap and toilet paper. They've cut women's support groups and the next cuts they'll have
to
make will be staff reductions.



So, Mr. Speaker, my question to the minister is, will you commit today to
immediately provide
Bryony House with the funds they so desperately need to serve abused women and children
in this
province?



MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, the commitment I can give the honourable member
is that we will
work with Bryony House as we work with all the transition houses and women's centres
across the
province, to provide the services that people need throughout this whole province.



MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I've never had all that much success
getting a
straight answer from the Minister of Community Services so I would take my last question
to the
Premier. Earlier in the week the Premier had an article in The Chronicle-Herald, which I will
table,
in which he talked about better protection for Nova Scotians as being the underlying theme
of many
bills during this session, but these are just words on a



[Page 7553]

page without the resources to enforce the implementation intended if we're going to provide
true
protection to victims of family violence.



So, Mr. Premier, will you direct your Minister of Community Services to loosen the
financial noose
imposed on Bryony House so the board and staff can get on with protecting abused women
and
children?



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Community Services.




MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, to the honourable member, as I indicated before, we
will work with
all of the transition houses and women's centres to try to provide all those services
throughout the
province.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.



JUSTICE - JAIL (BURNSIDE): DELAY - COSTS




MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice.
When this Tory
Government made the blatant political decision to move the new correctional centre from
Bedford
to Burnside, this minister said he hoped the decision would be "cost neutral". Well, Nova
Scotian
taxpayers soon learned cost neutral meant they were already stuck with a bill for $1.2 million
for the
change in sites. The costs to taxpayers keep right on coming. This government closed three
county
jails to get ready for the new centre that was supposed to open in June, but delays meant that
the
Burnside jail was not fully operational until late last month. Through a freedom of
information
request, our caucus has learned that Nova Scotian taxpayers paid over $660,000 in rent from
July
to October for an empty jail. My question to the Minister of Justice is, does the minister
consider
paying for an empty jail a prudent use of taxpayers' dollars?



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: The honourable gentleman who just asked that question
should be
ashamed of himself because the honourable gentleman who asked that question was part of
a
government that created the P3 contract that is in question. We've all seen the great success
that
honourable gentleman's P3 contracts have brought to Nova Scotia.



MR. GAUDET: If the Minister of Justice wants to talk about the past, we're certainly
ready on this
side of the House to talk about the past. I am sure the Minister of Justice and all members of
that side
would love to hear the stories about what the John Buchanan and Donnie Cameron Tory
Government
left to Nova Scotians. Let's talk about the past, if they're so willing.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Let's talk about the here and now.







[Page 7554]

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I am willing. Delays in opening the Burnside jail meant
that inmates
had to be transferred to other facilities to prevent overcrowding. The cost of sending 46
inmates to
other facilities throughout P.E.I., New Brunswick and Nova Scotia . . .



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I would ask the honourable members to give this
member the respect
the last one was given with the question, please.



MR. GAUDET: Delays in opening the Burnside jail meant inmates had to be
transferred to other
facilities to prevent overcrowding. The cost of sending 46 inmates to other facilities
throughout
P.E.I., New Brunswick and Nova Scotia is over $130,000, and this doesn't even include the
cost of
sending individuals to psychiatric facilities in places like Quebec. The Minister of
Community
Services has been referred to as the $1.2 million man. Now he's the $2 million man and the
price
is still climbing. My question to the Minister of Justice is, why did your government spend
$2
million to elect the member for Bedford-Fall River?



MR. BAKER: Quite simply, those cost items are under discussion pursuant to the
terms of the
contract that his government negotiated with the developer. And I would ask the honourable
member
why that honourable member spent so much time putting a facility in a community where it
didn't
belong when it should have gone to Burnside.



[1:00 p.m.]



MR. GAUDET: It's this Tory Justice Minister, it's this Tory Government that closed
these county
jails in Nova Scotia. It's that bunch over there that (Interruptions) My last question is for the
Premier.
The Minister of Justice has said his government was committed to getting the best deal for
the
taxpayers of Nova Scotia in choosing a new site for the jail. This government's legacy is one
of
mismanagement and it lacks vision for the future of this province. They blame the previous
Liberal
Government, they blame the federal government, they blame health care workers and even
the
tragedy of September 11th for their poor record. My question to the Premier is, how can you
tell Nova
Scotians to be frugal and live within their means when your government has thrown away
millions
of dollars to buy just one seat for your Party?



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the government has been having a great deal of
difficulty in dealing
with a number of contracts, particularly the P3 contracts that were put in place by that
member and
his government. Those contracts have not worked in the interests of the people of Nova
Scotia and
we have been dealing with that fallout ever since we became government. Because of that
and
because we saw the fallacy in doing business that way, we have not been signing P3 contracts
and
we will not be signing P3 contracts. It is very unfortunate that government decided that they
would
go down the P3 route.







[Page 7555]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.



NAT. RES.: COAL MINING (C.B.) - FUTURE




MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Natural
Resources. Today
is a dark day in the history of Cape Breton. The last ton of coal is being mined at Prince
Mine, due
to the horrendous mistakes and errors by the federal Liberal Government. The last ton of coal
comes
up, as I have said, today. I want to ask this minister what you will do to secure the future of
the coal
mining resource in Cape Breton?



HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, in response to the question, we are in
discussions with the
federal government and the intention will be that the coal leases for the Devco operations
will be
returned to the Province of Nova Scotia, in due course.



MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, that is of little comfort to a lot of people, so I am
going to change my
focus over to the Premier. Because of this provincial government's inaction, they are
allowing the
federal government, the federal Liberals, to flood and seal that mine, which will make it
virtually
useless to any private operator that may want to reopen that mine. It will be useless. So I
want to ask
you, Mr. Premier, why are you allowing the federal Liberal Government to scuttle coal
mining in
Cape Breton?



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister responsible.



MR. FAGE: Mr. Speaker, as the honourable member knows the federal government
is the employer,
not the Province of Nova Scotia. What we have been doing is working with the federal
government
to ensure that proper environmental and remediation takes place on their surface ownership
and
when the time is right, we will receive the leases back and work with the people of Cape
Breton and
private enterprise to see what options are there.



MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, the time is now. If this government sits idly by and
allows the federal
government to seal and flood that mine, there will be no private operators to look at it. That
is the
reality. We are asking this provincial government to be proactive once when it comes to the
economy
of Cape Breton. So I am asking the Premier again, why won't you stand up to your federal
counterparts and make sure that the Prince Mine is secured for private operation in the
future? Do
it now, Mr. Premier.



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister responsible.



MR. FAGE: Mr. Speaker, as I have said to the honourable member, the coal mining
history is over
200 years long in Nova Scotia and it is a very proud history, and there will be opportunities,
I
believe, for the coal industry in the future. This province's involvement is with the leases, and
we
will be working with other opportunities in the future.







[Page 7556]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.



JUSTICE: JAIL - SITE




MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, the financial fumbling by this government
surrounding the
new East Coast Forensic Psychiatric Hospital and Central Nova Scotia Correctional Facility
continues. This government has had a history of blaming everyone else for their problems
rather than
accepting their own faults, and I want to see how they are going to be able to blame this one
on the
previous government.



Mr. Speaker, the Premier, on October 19, 1999 said, "Mr. Speaker, the reason the jail
was moved
is because it was originally to have been built in the wrong place. It is now going to be built
in the
right place." He also said, "the decision of this government to relocate the jail was a decision
that
was made and it has resulted in the jail being in a much better situation than the one proposed
by the
previous government." He also said, ". . . I believe that the right decision was made . . . I
believe it
is the right site." and in fact, the Minister of Justice also said the, ". . . property was properly
zoned
. . ." My question to the Minister of Justice is, do you, today, stand by those exact comments
made
by the Premier and yourself in regard to the new site for the jail?



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, this is almost too easy, and I have always
learned that even
from the honourable member you should begin to smell something when it looks too easy.
I will tell
the honourable member that what went on with respect to the siting of that correctional
centre was
one of the best decisions that we have ever made. The reason that is, is we decided to put it
in a
community that wanted it, as opposed to in a community that didn't want it. Also, we didn't
have
to build a $5 million interchange, which that government would have had to do if they had
put it in
Bedford.



MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, like everything else this government does, we now see
just how much
thinking went into where to put the new site of the jail. Miller Composting is located in the
Burnside
Industrial Park under the terms of guidelines set by the Department of Environment and
Labour.
These guidelines set out the minimum distance between a composting facility and an
institutional
building as 500 metres. The 500 metre buffer zone means that the minister's wonderful new
jail is
too close to the composting facility. In fact, the Department of Justice has sent written
complaints
to Miller Composting about the odours from the plant, even though Miller Composting is
meeting
the guidelines. The minister has said, "We have a duty to ensure the safety of correctional
officers."
My question to the minister is, will you admit that in your haste to make this great political
decision,
that you actually put the jail in the wrong place?



AN HON. MEMBER: The best decision you have ever made.







[Page 7557]

MR. BAKER: Absolutely, Mr. Speaker, and to be very honest, I don't know if the
problem is that
the jail is too close to Miller Composting or that Miller Composting is too close to the jail,
but it is
a rhetorical question because, to be perfectly honest, there are many Nova Scotians who don't
live
as well as the people who are in that correctional centre. (Interruptions) I am not ashamed
about that
correctional centre. (Interruptions)



AN HON. MEMBER: Something stinks about that deal, Mike. Something stinks out
there.



ANOTHER HON. MEMBER: Yeah, there's a smell.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.



AN HON. MEMBER: It's the last day of school.



MR. SPEAKER: Grading day. (Laughter)



The honourable member for Richmond on his final supplementary.



MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, with all due respect, based on an answer like that I can
tell you what
should be close to a composting facility and it is the Minister of Justice with that type of
answer.
(Interruptions) The fact is, Miller Composting was well established prior to the jail being
built, so
you went and built the jail next to a composting facility contrary to your own guidelines.
Great job,
minister, we are real proud of you.



Mr. Speaker, my final supplementary is to the Premier of this province. On October
19, 1999, the
Premier told the House that the reason the jail was being moved to Bedford is, ". . . because
it was
originally to have been built in the wrong place. It is now going to be built in the right place."
We
know that his government has built the jail too close to a composting facility, which is
creating
serious problems for staff, inmates and patients at the facility, and even though the minister
cares
nothing about patients or the inmates there, I am hoping the Premier will. My question to the
Premier
is, is this what you meant when you said that you were choosing the right place for the new
jail?



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I believe the jail was built in the right location.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.



EDUC.: LEGAL FEES - CENTRALIZATION




MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education.
Our office has
obtained a document from the Department of Education outlining the legal



[Page 7558]

fees for the various school boards from 1998 to 2000. It adds up to $3.3 million spent on
lawyers by
the school boards over the last three years. I think that most of us would understand that large
organizations are going to have legal fees, but the question is, how do we keep those fees
down so
that more money can go in the classroom? The minister wants to centralize legal services into
her
department, but we know that her department has created such fiascos as Knowledge House
and the
P3 contracts, so no one is absolutely sure that they know how to keep costs down as well. So
my
question to the minister is, what information does she have that proves that centralizing legal
fees
in her department will reduce legal fees for the school boards?



HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, this is one of the areas that we are looking into
so that we can
be sure of the facts before we move to centralize legal services, but this would be part of a
centralization involving many government departments, not just Education and not just
school
boards. We are looking to see if we could do something more cost-efficient through the
Department
of Justice, not through my department, which the honourable member obviously does not
trust.



MR. DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, the document shows that only two school boards have
actually spent
more on legal fees in 2000 than they did in 1998. One of those boards is the Strait Regional
School
Board - and we can only imagine why that might be the case - but the other board is the
Southwest
Regional School Board, which is controlled directly out of the minister's office. It has had
a 17 per
cent increase in legal fees since her department has taken direct control of the board; it has
gone up
to $148,000 a year. So my question to the minister is, can she explain why she should be
given
control over the board's legal fees and legal services, when the board she currently has
control over
has seen a 17 per cent increase in its legal services since she has taken it over?



MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I believe I stated in my response to the first question
that we are
looking at centralizing legal services through the Department of Justice, not through my
department.



MR. DEVEAUX: Well, the other side of this coin, Mr. Speaker, is that some boards
have actually
done very well in reducing their legal fees. The Halifax Regional School Board has cut its
legal bill
in half since 1998; overall, the legal bills in the various boards have gone down 35 per cent
since
1998. So my question is, if the Minister of Education can't control legal fee spending in her
own
department and with the Southwest Regional School Board and other boards doing a good
job of
controlling their legal expenses, why should this provincial government centralize legal
services in
their hands, whether it be Justice or Education or any other department?









[Page 7559]

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite knows the answer to that
question. We are
looking at a way to take legal fees down and we are looking for ways to not duplicate legal
services
in the various school boards. If we can learn some lessons from some of the boards, that is
fine, but
the object is to have more money in the classroom and less money in the hands of lawyers.




MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.



EDUC.: SCH. CONST. - ASSURE




MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of
Education. On June 21,
2000, the minister announced that the government would build the 17 new schools approved
by the
previous government. Parents, teachers, students and grandparents, are concerned that these
schools
may not be built given the current Education budget approved by the Finance Minister. My
question
is, could the minister assure this House that all of those schools will be built according to
schedule?



MR. JOHN HOLM: The answer is no.



HON. JANE PURVES: Well, the member for Sackville-Cobequid had an answer
there for me, but
I think I will come up with my own. (Laughter) Mr. Speaker, there was one school that we
did
change our mind on in Isle Madame, but yes, we are committed to building the schools that
we have
said we would build.



[1:15 p.m.]



MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, when the P3 process was put on hold by this
government, the
Rankin School (Interruptions)



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes
has the floor
on his first supplementary.



MR. BOUDREAU: It is kind of surprising, Mr. Speaker, that they are not interested
in new schools
for the children in this province. When the P3 process was put on hold by this government,
the
Rankin School in Iona was reviewed and it is scheduled to open in the year 2004, however,
construction is scheduled to begin early next year. Will the minister give her personal
assurance here
today that the Rankin School in Iona will commence construction next year as planned?



MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, yes, there are going to be new facilities for the Rankin
School in Iona.
To the best of my knowledge, those timelines are as expressed in the first place and
construction will
start next fall.







[Page 7560]

MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I do appreciate that reply from the minister.
However, our concern
in this caucus is schools for our children. My concern is not just with Rankin. Even though
some of
those schools are closing, there is still a need for good, quality buildings. Will the minister
advise
the parents, teachers and students, as well as the grandparents, at Rankin and across the
province,
that these schools will be built on schedule?



MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, people have to be, and I know they have learned to be,
very patient
about new schools, but a lot of new and/or renovated schools have opened across this
province and
the ones that we have promised have been opening as close to schedule as possible and will
continue
to do so.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.



ENVIRON. & LBR.: HOYT CASE (KINGS CO.) - DETAILS




MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of
Environment and
Labour. Sandra Hoyt of Blomidon, Kings County is a former Tory who will not be voting
Tory in
the next election because this Minister of Environment keeps giving her very real concerns
the brush-off. Her neighbour, a non-resident, violated provincial laws by blocking off a
stream, which crosses
the Hoyt's farm and provides a critical source of water for their cattle. Now, Mrs. Hoyt tells
me that
a DOE inspector was at her farm inspecting the septic system installation and actually
observed the
illegal actions of her neighbour but failed to take action then and there when the damage
could have
been avoided. Can the minister explain how something like this could have taken place?



HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member opposite for his
question. I am,
indeed, familiar with this case. I would say that it is important that in this province we follow
due
process. I understand that the member's professional career before this was that of law, so he
would
appreciate that one should use the justice system when you're pursuing matters of a legal
concern.
That was done.



MR. EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, let me tell you and let me tell that minister that Mrs.
Hoyt is so mad
she's ready to spit nails. It hardly seems necessary to point out that access to a supply of water
is
essential to any farming operation, especially in light of the drought conditions Valley
farmers have
faced in recent years. Now, it has taken the minister's department two years to take action and
get
this matter into the courts and, even then, this case was a procedural mess-up. When is the
minister
going to follow the lead of other provinces and hire prosecutors who specialize in
environmental
matters to ensure that our laws are effectively enforced and prosecuted?



MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, that is a good question. In fact, I think the Minister of
Justice would like
to address that question.







[Page 7561]

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, the Public Prosecution Service of Nova
Scotia is
responsible for prosecuting provincial offences. As I have indicated before in the House, the
department and the Public Prosecution Service is constantly reviewing the matter to
determine if
there's a better way to prosecute these kinds of offences and we will be continuing to review
the
matter to determine how they should be prosecuted.



MR. EPSTEIN: Well, that particular point has been under review for years with no
progress. The
Minister of Environment and Labour will know that there have been problems in the
Kentville office
at the same time his government has been slashing the budget in his department and laying
off
essential field service staff who could ensure our environmental laws are obeyed in the
interests of
ordinary Nova Scotians, like Mrs. Hoyt. Would the minister guarantee here, today, there will
be no
reductions in front-line staff in the Kentville office so long as he is the minister?



MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I want to tell the member I appreciate his question and
it gives me a
chance to point out again that the reductions in the Department of Environment's budget has
not cost
this department a single inspector and I would also like to inform the member opposite that
a
ministerial order was issued to address this problem. It was difficult because the neighbour
was hard
to serve and lives out of the country, but we finally caught up with him and as a result of that,
there
has been an agreement put in place to remove the dam and to compensate the Hoyts.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.



SYSCO: SITE - PLANS




MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask a question to the Minister
of
Transportation and Public Works relative to the Sydney Steel site. Members may not be
aware that
the Department of Transportation and Public Works has owned and managed, I suppose, all
of that
site that was not actually involved in producing steel in the last number of years, so that
continues
to be the case. We had an incident there yesterday of a tank being unearthed somehow and
sending
a spew of calcium, or something, over the neighbourhood. I would like to ask the minister
briefly
if he could outline to the House what the plans are of his government for the Sydney Steel
site in
Sydney? What are you going to do with it?



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, the Sydney Steel site reclamation is
underway at the
present time as the honourable member is aware. Insofar as yesterday's incident, I have
received no
report on it. I just hope the honourable member is correct in that it was calcium chloride
because
calcium chloride is benign.









[Page 7562]

MR. MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I have two copies here from the electronic issue of
today's Cape
Breton Post, one for the table and one for the minister. Now he will be briefed on that. It is
very
brief. I would like to ask the minister if he could comment in more detail perhaps on the
plans of this
government for the Sysco dock that's lying down there? It's a multi-million dollar facility,
it's
operational, is in a very strategic location, what do you plan to do with the dock might I ask?




MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I think that question could probably be best answered
by the Minister
of Economic Development.



HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I would like to clarify in the previous
question, there was
nothing in the dust that would harm people. In fact, the Department of Environment was
aware,
we've all followed that, but in terms of the actual wharf, we've been very clear on what we
wanted
to do with that as we move forward. We listened to what the people in Cape Breton were
saying
about that being a very valuable piece of infrastructure. We are currently negotiating to
ensure that,
as we go forward, that will have a solution that will not continue to rely on taxpayers' dollars
and
will, in fact, be a stimulus for the economy there as we move forward.



MR. MACEWAN: There is only one final supplementary left, and there is so much
one could ask
on this subject it would take all afternoon. Let me ask the Minister of Transportation and
Public
Works; I have more faith in him, Mr. Speaker. (Interruptions) I would like to ask him if he
could
outline to the House what environmental remediation work is planned for the Sydney Steel
site. I'm
not talking about the coke ovens; I mean the actual lower plant, from the overpass down to
the
harbour. What environmental remediation work is planned for that site? Can 14 Sydney
steelworkers
- who have been trained as environmental remediators but are not certified - somehow,
perhaps, be
put to work there?



MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, this is a divided responsibility in many respects.
Again, the Minister
of Economic Development is handling the remediation of the primary Sysco site, and I would
pass
the question on to the honourable minister.



MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, as we move forward with demolition to remove the site
and cleanup
the site, a number of people have been employed. You have to recognize that it's not a
particularly
labour-intensive operation. A number of former steelworkers are working there, as are a
number of
the Trades Council people.









[Page 7563]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.



SERV. N.S. & MUN. REL.: NSPI - SUBSIDIES




MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, my question today is for the Minister of
Service Nova Scotia
and Municipal Relations. The Mayor of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality has spoken
out
against the cosy tax arrangements between NSPI and the province. In short, NSPI does not
pay full
taxes on the assessed value of its property. The mayor claims it costs the Cape Breton
Regional
Municipality $5 million annually, money a beleaguered municipality like CBRM could
surely use.
I want to ask this minister, does he think that the Cape Breton Regional Municipality should
subsidize power rates for the rest of Nova Scotia at the expense of services for its own people
in
CBRM?



HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member
for raising the
question because he obviously raises an issue that is long standing in this province, the
question of
taxation around what was a former government-owned commission to now a
privately-owned
corporation. Of course there is a lot of history that goes with that. I can say to the honourable
member that it is a matter which we consider appropriate to address, and we are in
discussions with
municipal units, as well as NSPI.



MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I realize that these negotiations are going on with the
UNSM on fiscal
exchange, and it's no secret the UNSM, not just the CBRM, wants NSPI to pay property
taxes based
on assessment within each municipality. We're now asking a private, for-profit company to
be
subsidized by the ratepayers in CBRM, which is wrong. Has the minister proposed any
reasonable
alternative to the UNSM that would allow the NSPI to pay taxes directly to municipalities
instead
of these in-lieu payments?



MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, as I indicated, we have had discussions with the
UNSM, and we
also have had discussions, ongoing discussions, with Nova Scotia Power. I just want to point
out to
the honourable member, and to members of the House, that it's really a question that has a
tremendous economic impact on the province vis-à-vis power rates. It's a question
of how this is to
occur, and it's not something that is going to take place suddenly. I appreciate the honourable
member raising the question, discussions are ongoing.



[1:30 p.m.]



MR. CORBETT: The minister cries wolf when he talks about assessment going up
or electricity rates
going up because they're regulated. Well, he may have deregulated the supplier, it's still
deregulated
through URB. That's a red herring. If he truly believes that regulation won't work and URB
just
rubber stamps NSPI's claim for rate increases, why won't you take the subsidy away from
NSPI and
stop paying that subsidy and don't download it on municipalities that are cash-strapped, like
CBRM?







[Page 7564]

MR. MACISAAC: The honourable member knows that the fact that rates are
regulated is of no
guarantee that the rates will remain low. Gasoline prices on Prince Edward Island are
regulated;
gasoline prices on Prince Edward Island are still higher than they are in Nova Scotia because
they're
regulated. That is not a solution to this particular question. We will find a solution to it. It
will be
realistic and it will be one that the Nova Scotia economy can adjust to over time.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.



FIN.: DHAs - BUDGET BALANCING




MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance.
The minister will
attest to the Public Accounts book that pointed out very clearly that this minister had tons of
money
to be able to balance the budget, but he didn't. The reality of what this book shows to all
Nova
Scotians is not that he didn't have enough money, but the reality is that this minister couldn't
control
expenditures. In the budget of 2001, the minister talked about the district health authorities
and he
stated, and I will repeat, "We will take significant steps designed to make these organizations
more
accountable for the tax dollars they spend . . . for the results they achieve." My question to
the
minister is, will you give us your assurance that the district health authorities will be in
balance this
year with the budget you approved this year, 2001?



HON. NEIL LEBLANC: I can say one thing for a certainty, they'll be in better
balance than the
regional health boards that that minister and his government had in place.



MR. DOWNE: In his budget address - and I will table this - the minister promised
to make the
district health authorities more accountable for the tax dollars they spend and the results that
they
achieve. Maybe the rhetoric this minister wants to give is great on an election campaign, but
it
doesn't answer the question in the House. Maybe the reality is this minister is afraid to
answer the
question. My question to the minister is straightforward, what steps is this minister going to
take to
make himself aware of the financial state of the district health authorities and ensure that they
come
in on budget as he committed?



MR. LEBLANC: I have to say in all honesty that the district health authorities are
much more
accountable than regional health boards. I think that everyone in this House, if you look at
it
seriously, would know that regional health boards were much too big, did not have control
of their
budgets, did not understand what was going on. If you talked with specific hospitals, they
didn't
know what their budget specifically was, departments didn't know what their budgets were.
Someone was supposedly in charge - no one was in charge. The fact of the matter is because
of that
they had huge deficits which that government basically allowed them to accumulate over a
period
of time whereby they could hide it. The facts speak the truth. Regional health boards did not
work.







[Page 7565]

MR. DOWNE: It is very apparent that, number one, either this minister doesn't know
what's going
on at the district health authorities or, number two, he's afraid to answer the question in the
House
of Assembly. The minister thought that the DHAs had enough money last spring when he
personally
approved their budget. What can the minister do to assure this House that the DHAs will
come in
on budget without cuts in services?



MR. LEBLANC: Mr. Speaker, in regard to DHAs, they have pressures and we have
said that before.
I gave an update the other day and I mentioned that they were having pressures. Obviously,
Nova
Scotians are looking for health care. The same member of that same Party is asking us to
spend more
money every day in this House on the DHAs. We will be giving a financial update very
shortly and
at that point in time, people will know that there are some over-expenditures in DHAs. There
have
also been some savings within the Department of Health and overall we are trying our best
to
manage health care expenses. But DHAs are much better than regional health boards because
they
are closer to the people, something that I believe in.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.



ENVIRON. & LBR.: MARK-LYN CONST. - SITE
IMPROVEMENTS





MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I have some questions for the Minister of
Environment and
Labour about Baltzer Bog. This sorry mess is all too typical of how Tory and Liberal
Governments
have approached environmental issues over the years. The basic problem with this so-called
composting operation is that a full-scale environmental assessment ought to have been
ordered in
the first place, but that was the Liberal mess. The current government is compounding the
problem.
The Business Development Corporation put up $169,000 to get the Mark-Lyn company out
of the
Kentville Industrial Park and to do site improvements. Will the minister tell us just what site
improvements exactly the company has made in exchange for this largesse?



HON. DAVID MORSE: I want to thank the honourable member for his question and
I want to assure
him that there is no composting operation at Baltzer Bog and in fact the owner of Mark-Lyn
Construction signed a petition that I drafted at the request of a public meeting agreeing that
he would
not apply to have a composting operation at Baltzer Bog and I hope that reassures the
member.



MR. EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I noticed that my question wasn't even remotely
answered. The
relocation of the composting operation to Baltzer Bog was a fundamentally terrible choice.
It should
never have been allowed. Now after a lot of delays and dithering, the company was required
to do
site remediation, but this was done using inappropriate materials. Local residents, who have
been
monitoring all of this, were not believed when they made reports to the minister's department
and
they have had to do their own investigation



[Page 7566]

all along. Will the minister tell us the current state of play? Are charges going to be laid
against the
operator?



MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I would refer back to my first answer and again assure
the member
opposite that not only is there no composting operation at Baltzer Bog, but in fact there was
never
going to be one.



MR. EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, the problem here and why we are concerned about it
is threat to
groundwater. The minister will know that the various regulations administered by his
department
are a mess. The Activities Designation Regulations and the Environmental Assessment
Regulations
are all written to favour activities such as the removal of aggregate, removal of top soil and
peat
moss, without providing adequate protection for underlying water resources and safe water
is
absolutely fundamental. I want to know, is the minister going to make improvements to these
regulations so that the safety of our water supply is not put in question by shady operators
sheltered
under the minister's inadequate rules?



MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I regret the member opposite making a reference, to
anybody that
operates a business, in that manner in the province, but anyway, I would point out that at
least he is
a little bit closer to what is actually going on at this former bog site. About 20 years ago, this
bog site
was drained and used for agriculture. Since that time, based on expert opinions, it is no
longer a bog
site. It is used for a topsoil removal operation. There have been concerns brought forward
and, as a
result of that, a citizens liaison committee was put in place to give the community a voice in
what's
going on and there were some changes in the terms and conditions of their approval.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.



PREMIERS CONF. (B.C.): CHIEF OF STAFF -

TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS





MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, the NDP seems to be unusually unruly today.
Maybe they
should be out with Alexa planning the future of their new Party. The old one doesn't work.
(Interruptions)



Mr. Speaker, on two separate occasions the Premier was asked to provide the reasons
why his Chief
of Staff booked an extra ticket to go to B.C. at considerable costs to the taxpayers of this
province.
The second ticket meant that instead of the original stopover of an hour in Toronto, the Chief
of Staff
now got to arrive early evening and stay overnight and the extra ticket was booked the day
she
departed at considerable expense. However, there was no hotel receipt for Toronto for the
stay there
that was filed.







[Page 7567]

Mr. Speaker, I can think of no urgent government business that would have required
the Chief of
Staff to change her ticket in order to arrive in Toronto early evening and since no hotel
expense was
filed, my question to the Premier is, Mr. Premier, did your Chief of Staff change her flight
at
taxpayers' expense for personal business?



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite did ask that question on a
previous occasion,
allowing me to do a little research. My Chief of Staff, when in Victoria, became aware that
she had
to attend to government business in Toronto, meaning she had to purchase a ticket to
Toronto. If she
had gone ahead and altered her current ticket, the total cost to the province for that ticket
would have
been $4,800. By buying a new ticket, she was able to purchase that ticket for $1,000 and we
received
a credit for the unused part of the first ticket which can be used for further travel. The total
saving,
because of the quick thinking of staff, to the taxpayers was $2,500.



MR. WILSON: Mr. Speaker, first of all, I would ask that the Premier table any
documents that he's
referring to, or that have been delivered to him recently and that he's reading from at this
moment.
He should table them right now and he hasn't answered my question. The Premier has
promised to
reveal the urgent nature of the meeting that caused taxpayers to be stuck with an expense of
an
unused airline ticket and I want to know, is the Premier unwilling to answer this question
because
his Chief of Staff was there on personal business? I want to know the answer now.



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, if the member opposite wouldn't read his question, he
could have
rephrased the question because I gave him part of the information in my previous answer, but
what
I can assure the member opposite is that the nature of the travel to Toronto was government
business
and it had to do with the Campaign for Fairness.



MR. WILSON: Mr. Speaker, that certainly was money well spent on a Campaign for
Fairness, but
I would like to see documentation on that and I want to know - while the Premier of this
province
is telling Nova Scotians tighten your belts - why his staff is going around playing Who Wants
to be
a Millionaire? That would be funny except for the fact the Premier is scared to answer the
questions
that are put to him. (Interruptions)



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.



MR. WILSON: Mr. Speaker, the paper trail in this case does not lie - an extra plane
ticket, arriving
too late in the day for a meeting, without a hotel bill. My question is, will the Premier finally
admit
that his Chief of Staff has gotten busted for using taxpayers' money like water, and will he
act
accordingly?









[Page 7568]

[1:45 p.m.]



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, it is difficult to know exactly what the member
opposite is asking.
But it would appear in his preamble that the member opposite fails to realize that Nova
Scotia has
a deal with Ottawa that goes back to the mid-1980's, that was actually endorsed by three
Prime
Ministers of Canada, that assured that Nova Scotians would become the principal
beneficiaries.
Now, I think Nova Scotians have a right to know, does that member and does that caucus
support
the legitimate claim of Nova Scotians to get what is coming to them by way of royalties or
does he
support his federal counterparts in Ottawa? (Interruptions)



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.



The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.



EDUC.: BLAC - RECOMMENDATIONS




MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education.
Back in 1995,
the Black Learners Advisory Council, which was set up after incidents at Cole Harbour
District High
School in 1989, made 45 recommendations to the government on how to address racism
towards
African-Canadians in our education system. Since that time, only seven of those 45
recommendations have been fully implemented. So my question to the Minister of Education
is, why
is the minister unwilling or unable to implement necessary changes to prevent racism in our
education system?



HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, the recommendations of the BLAC report we
take very
seriously, as did the previous government. I would like to point out that in spite of the fact
that not
all the recommendations have been fully implemented, or even partially implemented, the
most
important of them have been implemented. That includes a department within the
Department of
Education; it includes an advisory council; and last year, we went with fully-elected Black
members
of school boards in Nova Scotia. So I would suggest that even though our world is not
perfect, we
have things here in Nova Scotia in our education system that no other province in Canada
has in
order to help our Black population.



MR. DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, while the BLAC has been replaced with the Council
on African
Canadian Education, also known as CACE, that organization recently reviewed the
recommendations and this is the report. They had serious concerns with how the
recommendations
are being implemented by the minister and the Department of Education. So my question to
the
Minister of Education is, will the minister commit today to implementing the remainder of
the
recommendations as set down by the Black Learners Advisory Council?







[Page 7569]

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, we are working with CACE to prioritize what we may
do for this
coming year. But I have to tell this House and, certainly, I have told the Council on African
Canadian
Education that they have to prioritize as well because a number of those recommendations
are
extremely expensive to report. We have many competing demands on the department and the
government, and certainly not all of them are going to be done at once. That is not possible
to be fair
to all Nova Scotians.



MR. DEVEAUX: My next question is to the Minister of Education, Mr. Speaker.
CACE is also
requesting an Afrocentric Learning Centre created to allow African-Canadian communities
in Nova
Scotia to have a centre from which to continue to improve our education system for all Nova
Scotians. So my question to the minister is, will the minister commit today that her
government is
supportive of the Afrocentric Learning Centre and that there will be sufficient funding in the
next
budget to ensure that the centre will be created in the next fiscal year?



MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, we have committed funding every year since we have
been in office
to help create the Afrocentric Learning Institute. Certainly, I make no commitments about
next year's
budget right now for the Afrocentric Learning Institute or for any other institution in the
education
system.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Victoria.



You have about five seconds for a quick snapper.



MR. KENNETH MACASKILL: Thank you for recognizing me, Mr. Speaker.
(Laughter)



MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, and I would recognize the honourable member for
Victoria anywhere.



MR. DAVID WILSON: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. As per the procedure and
custom of this
House, I have asked for a document to be tabled that the Premier was reading from in reply
to one
of my questions during Question Period. I would respectfully ask that you order the Premier
to table
that document, Mr. Speaker. (Interruptions)



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I'm not about to order anyone in the House to do
anything. However,
I would remind the Premier that any documents that members have read from in this House
are
tabled as a matter of procedure.



THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I would be pleased to table the document. (Applause)








[Page 7570]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West on a very important
introduction to
the House of Assembly.



MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure to introduce an individual
in the west
gallery who needs no introduction to many people who have been in this House for a number
of
years. This individual, when I was first elected I remember him coming around the hallways,
coming
up and talking to me, the odd time reciting some poetry that was very interesting to listen to.
This
individual was, I understand, sick over the summer and was not able to get around. I was
happy to
see, just yesterday, that he was up and around and back at the House.



I would ask the members of this House to give a warm welcome to the individual in
the west gallery,
welcome him back, Mr. Joe Murray, who lived outside Parrsboro, he is a former RCMP, a
runner,
a poet, and all-round great Nova Scotian. Let's give him a warm welcome back to the
Legislative
Assembly. (Applause)



MR. SPEAKER: We certainly welcome Joe, and hope that his health is improving.
Welcome to the
House today, Joe.



GOVERNMENT BUSINESS



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, it is a very fitting day to have Joe back
with us.



Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third
Reading.



PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 92.



Bill No. 92 - Fatality Investigations Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Justice, I
would ask for the
unanimous consent of the House to refer the bill back to the Committee of the Whole House
on Bills.







[Page 7571]

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair
and the House
resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



[The motion is carried.]



[1:53 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Speaker Mr.
Brooke Taylor
in the Chair.]



[2:28 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray
Scott, resumed
the Chair.]



MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills
reports:



THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bills:



Bill No. 85 - Real Estate Trading Act.



Bill No. 94 - Halifax Regional Municipality Marketing Levy Act.




and the chairman has been instructed to recommend these bills to the favourable
consideration of
the House, each without amendment;



and



Bill No. 92 - Fatality Investigations Act.



and the chairman has been instructed to recommend this bill to the favourable consideration
of the
House, with certain amendments.



MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read for a third time on a future day.



The honourable Government House Leader.







[Page 7572]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that those bills be now read for a
third time this
day.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of
business, Public Bills
for Third Reading.



PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 79.



Bill No. 79 - Domestic Violence Intervention Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I will be very brief. I want to thank all the
members of the
Official Opposition and the Liberal Party for their support with respect to this bill. I believe
that as
a result of the presentations we received at the Law Amendments Committee and the
intervention
by all members, the bill is a better bill today. This bill will now provide that intervention
orders may
be made in many situations, with respect to interim custody of children. I believe it is a good
bill.



[2:30 p.m.]



I wanted to repeat my commitment that I made in the Law Amendments Committee,
which was that
there will be an implementation committee formed with respect to this bill and that the
implementation committee will include many stakeholders, including THANS, which for
honourable
members' information, is the Transition House Association of Nova Scotia. They are
obviously very
interested in the subject matter of this bill and have much to add to the subject from their
diverse
experience in the area. With that, I will close and say that I believe that this will make the
lives of
many Nova Scotians much better in the future. Thank you.









[Page 7573]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.



MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I will speak for a couple of minutes on Bill
No. 79 as well.
Bill No. 79, from the start, was seen as good legislation. We had an opportunity in this House
to pass
legislation that would ensure that women, or anyone, but particularly women, who are in
abusive
relationships have an opportunity for emergency orders, not only to protect themselves from
a person
who was committing that violence, but also with regard to setting their matters in place,
whether it
by financial matters, who owns the home, possession of a vehicle, custody of the children.
These are
all things that we hoped this legislation would deal with.



There was an opportunity in the Law Amendments Committee to hear from the
Transition House
Association of Nova Scotia and from Dal Legal Aid, they made some very good comments.
They
also commented that they hadn't been consulted. I thought that the Law Amendments
Committee
again proved that it was a good opportunity to hear from those who maybe the government
didn't
consult with, to learn that there are ways that we can do things differently.



In particular, a couple of issues came up through THANS and through Dal Legal Aid
that I think this
government had agreed to make changes based on their recommendations. One is that now
this
legislation can involve emergency custody orders for children. I think that's a very important
change
in the legislation. As was said by THANS and Dal Legal Aid at the Law Amendments
Committee,
what's the use of having possession of the house for 30 days, what's the use of having
possession
of the car, what's the use of having emergency orders to ensure that someone cannot come
near you
when the custody of the children was in dispute and was an issue?



Now those women who are in abusive relationships and incidents occur and this
legislation is used,
will have an opportunity to get emergency custody orders as well. That's good for them; that's
good
for Nova Scotia. I'm glad to see that this government, having listened to THANS, having
listened
to Dal Legal Aid, having listened to concerns that our caucus had brought up after the Law
Amendments Committee recognized that it was important to do this, is going ahead with it.




The second change, Mr. Speaker, was the removal of any reference to the director,
I believe, of child
protection through the Department of Community Services. There was some dispute as to
why that
person needed to be involved in this legislation. That has now been removed. I think that's
a good
thing. There's recognition that if there are standing orders from the court with regard to child
custody
prior to this legislation being utilized in any particular case, that will not be affected. Again,
I think
that's something everyone can agree on. If there are orders pending with regard to custody,
they
should remain in place until they can be addressed in a court that actually made those orders.








[Page 7574]

There was an issue with regard to notification. The legislation, originally when it
came past second
reading, stated that the orders issued by a Justice of the Peace would not be enforced until
the
respondent, in many cases the man, would have been notified. There are issues around
whether
someone could try to avoid service of the order. The legislation has again been changed to
say that
the order comes into effect immediately upon the Justice of the Peace issuing the order.
That's good.
A woman who may be in a rental unit, a woman who may have a car in a parking lot, for
example,
and wants possession of it, these things can be done without having to serve this on the
respondent.



Mr. Speaker, there were other things that we wanted, an implementation plan and an
implementation
committee. We're glad to see that the minister committed in third reading that the
implementation
committee will include members from the Transition House Association of Nova Scotia. We
would
like to see more community representatives, but we can take this, at least, as a stepping-off
point
with regard to this legislation. We would have also liked to have seen it applied to more than
just
conjugal relationships but to other relationships in a familial or domestic situation; maybe
another
day we can deal with that.



What we have done with the emergency custody order, with the order coming into
force upon being
issued by a Justice of the Peace, we have tried to fine-tune this legislation to ensure that
women who
are in abusive relationships have real opportunity for protection of them and their children.
I think
the province is better off because of that.



This legislation is good legislation. We're glad to see the government listened at the
Law
Amendments Committee. We're glad that THANS and the Dal Legal Aid came forward; they
have
made this legislation better. I think our Party will have no problem supporting that on third
reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.



MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise on third reading to
speak a few
moments on the Domestic Violence Intervention Act. We have indicated our support for this
bill at
second reading, in Committee of the Whole House on Bills, and at the Law Amendments
Committee. I am pleased that the minister did bring in some changes to better reflect some
of the
language in the legislation with the intention of the bill. Certainly it is the hope of all
members of
this House that as elected officials we can do everything possible to enact laws that are going
to try
to curb and, hopefully, one day put an end to domestic violence.



It's a social issue which, unfortunately, affects all of our ridings, many of our
constituents, and it is
a problem that certainly needs to be addressed in the big picture of how we run government
and
social policy that we enact, but certainly what we've done with this bill is enable the
procedure
which, hopefully, will allow certain protection orders to be put



[Page 7575]

in place as efficiently as possible and as quickly as possible and that, hopefully, will avoid
some of
the unfortunate tragedies that have occurred as a result of domestic violence. Certainly this
bill is not
the solution that's going to end domestic violence, I could only wish that we were being
asked to
vote on such a bill that would be able to do so, but it is our belief, our caucus's belief, that
it is a
serious attempt to put in legislation that will, hopefully, make a dent in this, but at the same
time,
I think it is a call not only to government but to all members of the House to work together
to try to
enact proper social policy which will try to address the problems of domestic violence.



I know certainly the Minister of Justice was quite big on talking about counselling
through the
Victim Services' surcharge through the court system. It's good that he recognizes the need for
counselling in that circumstance. It is our sincere hope that the government will recognize
that
domestic violence is a reality. It takes place every day in this province and it certainly is
something
that needs to be looked at in the big picture, but Bill No. 79 is good legislation. It's an
important step
towards that and we certainly look to seeing, once the legislation is actually put in place,
possible
amendments or changes to it that will make it even stronger legislation.



With that, Mr. Speaker, our caucus certainly will be giving its support to Bill No. 79
on third reading
and certainly hope that the minister will enact the legislation as quickly as possible.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.



MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I would like to take a moment to
briefly speak to
Bill No. 79, An Act to Prevent the Continuation of Domestic Violence. As my colleague, the
member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage, has said, this is a good bill and our caucus will
be
supporting it. I want to pay tribute to the work of the honourable member for Cole
Harbour-Eastern
Passage who worked very hard after the interventions of various women's organizations at
the Law
Amendments Committee to ensure that their concerns were taken to the Minister of Justice
and
would be reflected in an amended bill, a better piece of legislation for victims of domestic
abuse. He
worked very hard. He heard what they had to say and I certainly appreciate his work and
having him
as my colleague.



Mr. Speaker, as we heard at the Law Amendments Committee from those who work
on the front
lines, shelter workers, and lawyers in the Legal Aid system, this is a piece of legislation that
will, if
implemented carefully with good lines of communication, make some difference in the kinds
of
horrendous situations that have unfortunately at times resulted in death for women in our
province.
It's important that the Transition House Association and other groups, in fact, be part of
implementing this legislation.







[Page 7576]

Earlier today, Mr. Speaker, we talked about the need for resources to back up
legislation like this,
the resources that transition houses require to provide emergency shelter, resources that the
Legal
Aid services in this province require to represent women through the court process. It's a very
complicated and intimidating process and one that people cannot go through on their own
without
representation. I would say to the government that we will continue to press this government
to
provide adequate resources to implement legislation like this.



Mr. Speaker, we all are aware, I think, in this House that at the root of violence
against women is
inequality. Inequality is embedded in our society, in our cultural practices, in our economic
system,
in our laws and in our justice system. I think, unfortunately, in many respects this
government has
done little to address the underlying inequality in our society; if anything, in some ways,
public
policy from this government has actually contributed to a growing inequality. So, while we
support
this legislation, it certainly will be the position of this caucus that we would want greater
attention
from this government to improving the status of women in our society and dealing with their
vulnerability, financially as well as physically. With that, Mr. Speaker, I would like to take
my place.
Thank you.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East.



MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I would like to make a few brief comments
on this bill,
Bill No. 79. I want to say that there are few days in this House of Assembly when I wish I
were a
lawyer. There are few days when I am anywhere that I wish I were a lawyer. I want to say
that in my
office I don't have cause to deal personally with issues around abuse to women. It's a very
seldom
thing, but I want to say I did have one case come before me. When that happened I wished
that I
were a lawyer. I want to say that what made this more difficult for me was that it was a
person who
I knew. If my memory is correct, in trying to deal with that issue and try to make it a better
situation
for that individual, it was around the accessibility to money. I think that one of the things
dealt with
in this piece of legislation is access to the bank account. I think that's a good thing.



We try to deal through the Department of Community Services - and if my memory
is correct and
maybe the minister will correct me after I sit down, but it seemed to me that there was
limited help
for this individual for the reason that somehow she hadn't been flagged earlier. In other
words, if she
had come to the department prior to leaving the abusive situation they would have provided
more
help to her, which I thought was a ridiculous approach. So if I am wrong I would certainly
appreciate
the minister correcting me.



If this piece of legislation will help, and I think it will, then I applaud the government
in doing that.
The honourable member for Richmond made the statement that it would be great to have a
piece of
legislation that would ensure that abuse happens no more. I would



[Page 7577]

agree thatif that was the bill we were dealing with today, all members of this House would
vote yes
and support and encourage that.



Just as the government enacts endangered species legislation but allows for the
continuation of clear
cutting, this government will bring in Bill No. 79, which we see as progressive, but yet will
not give
funds for transition houses. I want to say that even today in Question Period, the responses
of the
Minister of Community Services to my colleague, the honourable member for Halifax
Needham, that
would indicate that there is still a long distance that we have to go in order to get full support
for
women in abusive situations. But I applaud the government for its initiative and I applaud
my
colleagues for their help in educating me. I would say that certainly this legislation is long
overdue
and hopefully, in the future, we can bring in legislation that will even improve this. Thank
you.



[2:45 p.m.]



MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the minister it will be to close debate.



The honourable Minister of Justice.



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, it is truly my pleasure to rise and close
debate on this bill.
I think all the honourable members who have risen to speak on the bill, whether it's second
reading
or third reading, recognize that this is an important piece of legislation which will do a great
deal to
help, in particular, women who are often the victims of abuse, in dealing with those most
difficult
hours after that abuse has occurred and ensuring that they are protected and that their families
are
protected. That is what it is really about, to try to give some comfort to people who very
much need
that comfort at a difficult time in their lives. With that, I would move third reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 79. Is the House ready
for the Question?
Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



Ordered that this bill do pass. Order that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that
the bill be
engrossed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 92.



Bill No. 92 - Fatality Investigations Act.







[Page 7578]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, again, I think this is a very good bill, a bill
which has
modernized the Nova Scotia law with respect to conducting fatal investigations. As the
Chief
Medical Examiner said during the bill briefing here when the bill was introduced, this bill
updates
the law in Nova Scotia. It builds on the experiences that we received in Nova Scotia as a
result of
the tragic affair of Swissair and a number of the other very difficult cases we have had to deal
with
in Nova Scotia, not least of which, as he referred to, was the Comeau case. It makes it clear
that he
has the power to investigate fatalities and provide the families and Nova Scotians with the
information they request.



Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleagues in the other Parties for their co-operation
with respect
to the bill, and the honourable member for Richmond and Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage for
their
intervention. The change, as I said, that was made in Committee of the Whole House on Bills
clearly
reflects what the intent was. In any event, I think it clarifies the matter and I believe the bill
is a good
bill and deserves the support of the House. With that, I would move third reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.



MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I briefly just want to say that with the
amendment that came
back to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills, it does de-politicize the process. It was
something, as I said, at the Committee of the Whole House on Bills, but I think it is
important to put
it on the record that it does de-politicize the process. I don't think any Minister of Justice or
Attorney
General wants to be in the position to have to make those difficult decisions. I am glad to see
the
legislation was amended to ensure that where the Chief Medical Officer recommends a
fatality
investigation, that that is something that the Attorney General or Minister of Justice must do,
shall
do. I am glad to see that that de-politicizes the process so we can ensure that when we have
these
inquiries, there will be no perception as to why they are being held. Thank you.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.



MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, it is a pleasure to rise to say a few words on
Bill No. 92, the
Fatality Investigations Act. First, I want to, on the record, thank both the Justice Critic for
the NDP
caucus, the honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage and the Minister of Justice
for
accepting our amendment on the bill and bringing the bill back to the Committee of the
Whole
House on Bills so that we could deal with it. Our concern was that the role of the Justice
Minister
may have been compromised in the fact that the legislation was allowing only the Minister
of Justice
to be able to make the decision as to whether an inquiry should be held. We were certainly
concerned, for political reasons, that



[Page 7579]

a minister somewhere down the road may make a decision not to hold an inquiry in order to
avoid
any potential political embarrassment.



Again, I offer the example that if there should unfortunately be a fatality in one of our
health
institutions and it was discovered that it was as a result of a doctor shortage or nursing
shortage or
funding shortage, the minister of the day may not want to hold an inquiry for fear of
embarrassment
to his government and fellow colleague. We certainly never wanted to see that happen.



I know that the minister indicated that the whole intent of the legislation was to make
sure that if the
Chief Medical Examiner recommended an inquiry, it would be held. The unfortunate thing
was the
legislation, the way it was worded, said that if the Chief Medical Examiner recommends an
inquiry
be held the minister may hold such an inquiry. Again, that left it to the discretion of the
minister,
who is an elected official, to determine whether it should be held or not.



With the change that took place in the Committee of the Whole, the legislation now
clearly states
that where the Chief Medical Examiner recommends to the minister, under Section 26, that
a fatality
inquiry be held, the minister shall order that an inquiry be held. Clearly, now there is no
doubt, there
is no option there; if the Chief Medical Examiner recommends it, it will take place.



We think that's stronger legislation and we think it's more reflective of where we
wanted to go with
this bill. Keep in mind, Mr. Speaker, that Nova Scotia I believe may be the only one, but
certainly
it was the first jurisdiction to have an independent judiciary. We have a Director of Public
Prosecutions here, where decisions are made by an independent person, not by an elected
official,
as to whether prosecutions should take place or not. We're proud of the fact that we have that
here
in Nova Scotia. The fact is we want to make sure this legislation was along those same lines,
that
there be an independent judiciary here, and where an inquiry is recommended it will be held.




With that, we've certainly indicated our support. We're pleased that the government
and the NDP
supported our resolution, which we believe will make for stronger legislation. We certainly
will be
giving our support to Bill No. 92 on third reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.



DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I'll be very brief. I know the minister is anxious
to get out, there
are some people with cameras outside. He must be very popular, they are waiting for him and
wondering where he is, so I really wouldn't want to be responsible for holding him up.







[Page 7580]

Mr. Speaker, I just want to make a brief follow-up on Bill No. 92, an Act Respecting
the
Investigation of Fatalities. The member of our Liberal caucus, the member for Richmond,
has
complimented the government and the minister for accepting our amendment, which we
thought was
an important issue relative to the ordering of an inquiry. Just briefly, in closing I want to
mention and
make a plea to the government and to the minister, particularly as it's relative to Clause 3, the
Governor in Council shall appoint a Chief Medical Examiner who must be a pathologist with
training or experience in forensic pathology.



Mr. Speaker, I have not used the other opportunities to address this bill on this
particular matter, but
I think we have seen very clearly the importance of the training of this Chief Medical
Examiner. At
the time of introduction, Dr. Vernon Bowes was here in the audience. I didn't get a chance
to speak
to him, but I have worked with him over the years, and I know him to be a very competent,
qualified
pathologist in these matters. It may not always be thus, and I think the role of the Chief
Medical
Examiner must be held at the highest possible level.



We saw that in the person of Dr. John Butt, when he was involved and called upon
in so many
capacities, not only in the health matters of the pathology aspect of the Swissair but also in
the legal
implications of so many actions that had to be taken by the Chief Medical Examiner at that
time, to
say nothing about the importance that Dr. John Butt played in communicating this disaster
around
the world, really, and giving a true picture and perspective of some of the challenges of the
Chief
Medical Examiner's Office.



I missed my other opportunities and didn't address this particular concern, but I would
say to the
minister and to the government that the Chief Medical Examiner must be more than just a
pathologist. The other, with training or experience in forensic pathology, that is a key area
and that
should not be diminished. That should not mean a couple of weeks course here or there,
attending
a conference or that sort of thing. That part of it is crucial, and I just hope that this
government is not
in any way diminishing the qualifications needed for the Chief Medical Examiner's office.
This is
very important and as time goes on and new techniques, new technology, DNA testing and
all the
science that is brought to bear, this particular office needs to have great commitment that that
person,
the Chief Medical Examiner, should be fully qualified, not only as a pathologist, but as a
forensic
pathologist. That, in its own right, is a specialty and not to be taken lightly. Thank you.



MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the minister it will be to close debate.



The honourable Minister of Justice.









[Page 7581]

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I thank all the members of the other Parties
in the House
for their support of this bill. It's been said before, but I believe that it's a much better bill and
it's a
good bill that will help modernize the law in Nova Scotia. With that, I close debate.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 92. Is the House ready
for the question?
Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



Ordered that the bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered
that the bill be
engrossed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 93.



Bill No. 93 - Youth Justice Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: The purpose of this bill is quite simple. The federal
government is
bringing forward changes to the Young Offenders Act to change the process for criminal
process
with respect to young offenders. There is similar legislation, being the Young Persons
Summary
Proceedings Act, provincially which mirrors the federal legislation with respect to municipal
and
provincial offenses. The purpose of this legislation is simply to continue to mirror the federal
legislation for ease of administration by police officers and other justice officials. With that,
Mr.
Speaker, I move third reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.



MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I am glad to have a couple of minutes to
speak on this
legislation. I spoke at a fair bit of length at second reading. I am not necessarily sure that my
concerns have been addressed, but because this legislation mirrors the federal - what used
to be
known as the Young Offenders Act - it has a different name now, Youth Criminal Justice Act
or
what have you - our caucus won't stand in the way.



Our concerns around the issues of community and victim involvement and
extrajudicial sanctions,
our concerns around minimum sentencing, are still things that we would like to see
eventually
addressed. If we're mirroring federal legislation, then I guess this is something that we must
take up
at the federal level as well. But, for purposes of this legislation, I would hope that in the
implementation of the legislation, we guarantee and



[Page 7582]

ensure that victims and community members have certain ability to be part of any sentencing
circles,
restorative justice, extrajudicial sanctions - whatever you want to call it - to ensure that where
we
use alternatives to the courts for youth, even if it be for quasi-criminal offenses, we ensure
that
victims and communities are involved in that process. Having said that, given that this
legislation
mirrors that of the federal government, we won't be standing in the way of it at third reading.
Thank
you.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.



MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, it's a pleasure to rise and say a few words on
Bill No. 93,
the Youth Justice Act. It's refreshing to see this government finally doing something useful
and
rather than criticizing the federal government for all of their problems, bringing forward
legislation
which actually follows the lead of the federal Liberal government in Ottawa. It's good to see
that the
government is finally doing something positive rather than continually blaming the federal
government for all of their self-created problems.



This is a bill which we have raised some concerns about. It's interesting to see the
government was
elected on this get tough on justice mandate. The Minister of Justice certainly came in saying
he was
going to get a grip on all these justice issues. It's interesting to see that he's mirrored exactly
what
Ottawa has done. So any original thought or any of these get tough measures - he mentioned
we're
going to take action on those offenders who are under the age of 12. Ironically, that's not
dealt with
in this bill at all. So it's very interesting to see how this government has moved from that get
tough
stance.



[3:00 p.m.]



Mr. Speaker, we have raised some concerns and they continue to be there, especially
as to the actual
qualifications of who will get to be a youth court justice and what exactly are the
qualifications of
this that are not designated in the bill. We don't know at all what they are going to expect as
to be
knowledge, experience, qualifications or training; none of that is outlined right here and we
certainly
raise some concerns with that.



One of the other major concerns, and I know that my colleague, the member for
Dartmouth East,
being a medical professional and also in his experience as a previous Minister of Justice, is
extremely concerned about the language about the transfer of youth inmates under this
legislation.
Without going into the clauses, the legislation basically says they will do their best to make
sure that
youth inmates are not mixed in with adult inmates.



Mr. Speaker, our position is that the legislation should say youth inmates will not be
mixed in with
adult inmates, that's it, period. The idea and the notion that this government is going to bring
in this
sort of legislation and then allow young offenders to be mixed in an



[Page 7583]

adult population kind of defeats the whole purpose of restorative justice in trying to keep
people out
of the mainstream justice system. We certainly hope that the minister will make sure that
there is
adequate facilities in this province to deal with young offenders and to provide them with all
possible
rehabilitation and that we do not see young offenders being housed in adult correctional
institutions.



Mr. Speaker, one of the other points which we raised, which we are still concerned,
is that under the
bill the police will be required to provide written notice to parents of young offenders
charged with
provincial offenses, but they will not be required to do so for those aged 16 and 17 charged
with
Motor Vehicle Act offenses. Instead, it says that they may give notice under the Act. Well,
you
know, we just dealt with this with another piece of legislation, the Fatality Investigations Act,
as to
the use of the word "may" compared to "shall" and this is another example of where we
would have
liked to have seen the language actually say "shall" give written notices rather than "may",
because
certainly anything that can be done to give notice to parents to make sure that they are aware
of any
sort of difficulties that their children may have been involved in with the law is something
that we
fully support.



Mr. Speaker, with that, one of the last concerns that we did raise is with the actual
maintenance of
records under this bill and the records of young people. It certainly doesn't point out where
these
records are going to be kept or how they are going to be treated under the legislation. We
certainly
hope that the minister will keep this in mind when he's dealing with the regulations aspect
and
certainly the aspect of privacy and, in the whole hopes of rehabilitation and a new start, that
the
records of young offenders not be used as a detriment against them in the future when it is
felt that
they have shown retribution and certainly have been rehabilitated through the system.



With that, Mr. Speaker, as has been said, this does mirror in many ways the federal
legislation which
we fully support, and other than the concerns that we have raised which the minister certainly
has
the ability to address in due course, we will certainly be giving our support for third reading
of Bill
No. 93.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East.



MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I will be brief on this bill as well. This is
probably another
one of those I wish I was a lawyer bills for me. I want to say to the minister that it's probably
prudent
on his part to try to mirror federal legislation in this regard. (Interruption) For the honourable
member for Richmond, I will agree there probably are a few good federal Liberals. I probably
should
acknowledge, for the member, that the federal Minister of Justice grew up in Hants East, in
Noel
Shore.










[Page 7584]

Mr. Speaker, I want to say that probably if there is any group of individuals who
actually deal with
the effects of young offenders more than the victims do it is probably teachers in our schools.
Certainly, for young offenders, their entry point into the justice system starts upon being
caught,
since there is such a various array of conditions that bring them to that point. In other words
we can
think of individuals who have made one mistake in their life and have been caught or we can
think
of individuals who were a long time getting caught making a number of infractions to the
law. So
you have to realize that everybody who comes to that entry point comes with a slightly
different
education to the point of breaking the law.



I certainly would like to see the community and the victims have some say in this
system and
hopefully extra judicial sanctions, if appropriate, would include the community and the
victims.
Something else I would like to see, Mr. Speaker, is that there are certainly enough resources
to
ensure counselling for young offenders. I can think of individuals in the local community
around
where I live who have been known to the judiciary or the justice system for a long period of
time.
There are some punitive measures taken against them and they are returned back to the street
and
continue the process of cost to the community and society.



Mr. Speaker, I think that initially there never was the remedial approach, there never
was enough
resources for rehabilitation of these individuals. Time and effort put into counselling and
ensuring
that whatever the source that caused them to go down this road was efficiently extinguished
and to
get them on the right track. I would say that this is something that leads young offenders to
be older
offenders. I think that it would be dollars well spent if the government would ensure that
effort was
put into trying to rehabilitate young offenders at a very early age as soon as they hit this entry
point
into the justice system and see that those safety nets, that help protect and prevent other
young people
from going down this road, that are not in place for them, in their particular situation, that
they are
shored-up and somebody is there to try to catch them when they fall and prevent them from
re-entering the system.



Certainly, I don't see that in this piece of legislation. I would like to see the
government address this,
either through the Department of Justice or the Department of Community Services or a
combination
of both, but I would say, along with my colleagues, I would be supportive of this moving
forward
and it looks as though it can help and I would hope that it does. Thank you.



MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the minister it will be to close debate.



The honourable Minister of Justice.







[Page 7585]

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable members for their
interventions
with respect to the bill and with that, I will close debate.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 93. Is the House ready
for the question?
Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



Ordered that this bill do pass. Order that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that
the bill be
engrossed.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of
business, Private
Members' Public Bills for Third Reading.



PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 95.



Bill No. 95 - German Settlers Day Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.



HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, much good can be said about this bill and
much has been
said already in second reading. In the interest of time, I won't take the time to mention it all,
but I
do think there is one thing that does deserve mention, and that was referred to by the
honourable
member for Halifax Needham the other day, which was, of course, the Little Dutch Church,
which
was really the first Lutheran Church in North America because it was formed by the German
settlers
who came to Halifax in 1750, and then went on to Lunenburg. That subsequently became an
Anglican Church, as it is today.



Mr. Speaker, the reason I mention that is because of St. John's Church in Lunenburg,
the Anglican
Church that so sadly burned on November 1st. That church was originally founded as a
Church of
England but also was the joint place of worship with the Presbyterians and the Lutherans. So
there
is a tradition of ecumenical worship in Lunenburg, which was continued from the very early
days
of the Little Dutch Church in Halifax, and then to Lunenburg.







[Page 7586]

Mr. Speaker, I thought that in the interest of acknowledging the importance of the St.
John's
Anglican Church to Lunenburg and to the German heritage of Nova Scotians that that should
be
mentioned. With that, I move third reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 95. Is the House ready
for the question?
Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered
that the bill be
engrossed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of
business, Public Bills
for Third Reading.



PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 80.



Bill No. 80 - House of Assembly Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to move third reading of Bill
No. 80, House
of Assembly Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 80. Would all those in
favour of the
motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered
that the bill be
engrossed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 85.







[Page 7587]

Bill No. 85 - Real Estate Trading Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal
Relations.



HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I move that this bill be now read for a
third time. I want
to thank members of the House for accommodating the amendments to this bill and passing
it
through as we have.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 85. Would all those in
favour of the
motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



[Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered
that the bill be
engrossed.]



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of
business, Private and
Local Bills for Third Reading.



PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR THIRD READING



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 94.



Bill No. 94 - Halifax Regional Municipality Marketing Levy Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.



MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to rise to start debate in third
reading. I would
just like to speak for a couple of quick minutes on the Private and Local Bills Committee in
regard
to representations that were made for the one hour in that committee. There were
representations
from HRM, from citizens Mr. Wayne Anstey, Tourism and Culture Director, Mr. Lew
Rogers; for
the Hotel Association of Nova Scotia, Mr. Paul Stackhouse; from the Greater Halifax
Conventions
and Meeting Bureau, Mr. Nicholas Carson; and from the Tourism Industry Association of
Nova
Scotia, Mr. Carl Webb; and from the Innkeepers Guild of Nova Scotia, Mr. David
MacDonald.







[Page 7588]

Various concerns and questions were raised by various committee members. I can
assure you that
all those concerns were raised and discussed thoroughly by members. One of the things
discussed
was a concern about students and accommodations. That was clarified in regard to the rules
in the
Act. Also, I just wanted to raise some of the important issues that were brought to our
attention in
committee.



Other Canadian-North American destinations have increasing Tourism budgets, and
this marketing
levy would help the HRM become more competitive. Currently, in Tourism in HRM,
$850,000 is
spent. In other jurisdictions, for example, St. John's, Newfoundland, it is $1.2 million;
Quebec City
is $9 million; Montreal is $16 million; Toronto is $8.5 million, Ottawa is $4 million, Calgary
is $5.8
million, Edmonton is $1.35 million, Banff and Vancouver, $10 million.



Mr. Speaker, our rate of 1.5 per cent is very small in regard to the other ones that are
charging 3 per
cent to 5 per cent. I just wanted to wrap up by saying that, in conclusion, this market levy
is going
to make available funds for marketing, creating this Destination Marketing Organization,
which will
make HRM a place to come to enjoy.



[3:15 p.m.]



Mr. Speaker, with that I would like to move third reading.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.



MR. MANNING MACDONALD: I rise to speak for a few moments on this
particular bill. As you
know, Mr. Speaker, in the Committee of the Whole House on Bills our Party moved an
amendment
to this bill and, of course, as you also know, in the Committee of the Whole House the
proceedings
are not transcribed as carefully as they are when you're in the Chair, Mr. Speaker, for the
benefit of
those who may have missed the amendment before, I want to read into the record the
amendment.
It simply states that it is an amendment to the Halifax Regional Municipality Marketing Levy
Act
as proposed by the MLA for Cape Breton The Lakes, Mr. Brian Boudreau, and the
amendment
would read as follows:



"After Subsection 3(3)(c) add the following (d) a person who provides documentation
indicating that
they are accommodating a room as a result of (i) receiving medical treatment at a hospital
or local
health care centre; or (ii) seeking specialist medical advice."



That was the amendment and to our complete disbelief, Mr. Speaker, the government
voted against
that amendment. Now, if the purpose of this bill is to strengthen the tourism sector in Halifax
and
provide some additional funding for that sector to enable that sector to do its work in HRM,
then
that's great. We don't have any difficulty with that, but we fail to see where that would apply
to
people who live outside of HRM who have to come to HRM



[Page 7589]

for medical treatment. I refer, of course, to people from Yarmouth, people from Annapolis,
people
from Digby, people from Pictou County, people from Cape Breton, people from
Guysborough,
citizens of Nova Scotia who have to come to Halifax for medical treatment sometimes on a
regular
basis and while they are here, they have to occupy a hotel room.



Now, why this government wouldn't allow an amendment to alleviate those Nova
Scotians from
having to pay that tax is beyond me. The only reason I can see for that is that the amendment
came
from the member for Cape Breton The Lakes and the government didn't want to be put in the
position of accepting an amendment from another Party other than their own. I believe that
this bill
standing on its own with that amendment would have been a better bill. It would have been
a much
better bill. It would have told Nova Scotians who have to come up here for medical treatment
that
we don't want to pick your pockets any more than you have to pay and people who come
from my
area and people who come from Yarmouth, or people who come from Shelburne, or people
who
come from North Sydney, or people who come from all of those areas have to pay at the
present time
a high hotel or motel rate in Halifax because of the fact that hotel rooms are traditionally
more
expensive in this area.



I don't have a problem with that when it comes to tourism, when it comes to people
coming here to
vacation, or people coming here to conventions. I think in that respect this bill is good for
HRM, but
to turn around and put people who have to come up here for medical care in the same
category is
wrong, Mr. Speaker. It is wrong and I am surprised that the government turned thumbs down
on that
particular amendment that came before this House today. I would like somebody in the
government
to give me a rationale why that happened, why the government could not accept this
amendment.



AN HON. MEMBER: Ask the Premier, he's the boss.



MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Maybe the Premier could go out there and tell the
reporters who
are waiting for an answer on this question why they're going to tax some rural Nova Scotians
an
extra percentage of their room rate to come to HRM for medical treatment, why they're going
to
lump them in with the tourist people and the conventioneers. I believe that this bill perhaps
will be
a bill that will spread throughout the province to other municipalities, particularly the Cape
Breton
Regional Municipality, and perhaps down in the Yarmouth area as a future way of generating
revenue, but I would hope that the same thing would not apply in these other bills, that
people who
have to go to those areas for medical treatment would have to pay a premium on hotel rates
to stay
there. I am thinking about the regional hospital in Cape Breton and also the medical facilities
in the
Yarmouth area. It is not fair that those people who have to come here to seek medical advice
or
medical treatment should pay this premium.







[Page 7590]

You know, Mr. Speaker, it is not too late for the member for Preston, who introduced
this bill, to get
on his feet and say that he is prepared to give consideration to this amendment again. It is not
too late
for the member for Preston to agree that perhaps the government acted in haste in not
accepting this
amendment. What difference does it make to the people who put the amendment here? They
didn't
have that revenue before. They are going to get sufficient revenue from the tourist sector,
from the
conventioneers who come here. Why are they looking for additional revenue from people
who have
to come up here for medical treatment?



In the closing of this debate sometime later today or perhaps tomorrow morning, I
would hope that
the member for Preston will explain why he voted against this amendment, to give me the
rationale
why the people from the tourist and convention business in this area would not go along with
this
amendment proposed by the member for Cape Breton The Lakes. Is it again the people from
this area
beating up on the poor areas of this province? Well, you people were the ones who voted
against this
amendment. I hit a nerve, Mr. Speaker. Bingo, that is exactly what is going on here.
(Interruptions)



I would ask the member for Sackville-Beaver Bank to go down to Sydney and tell
those cancer
patients who have to come up here that they have to pay a premium in a hotel to get cancer
treatment
in Halifax. If he thinks that is funny, if he thinks that is too bad for them, then shame on that
member
over there. The Premier would do well to tell those people to muzzle themselves over there
because
they get him in trouble every time you turn around with useless interventions over there from
the
backbenches, whenever they get a chance. You go down there and tell the people in Cape
Breton
who have to come up here for cancer treatment that they have to pay a premium to stay in a
hotel
room here. You tell them that, Mr. Barnet, you tell them that. You only live across the street
from
the cancer centre. We have people who live 250 miles from it.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I would ask the honourable member to direct his
comments to the
Chair, please.



MR. MANNING MACDONALD: We would hope that maybe some of the
backbenchers who voted
against this would get up. Maybe the members from rural Nova Scotia on the Tory benches
will go
back and tell their people why they are going to have to pay more for a hotel room here in
Halifax
to get medical treatment.



Mr. Speaker, this happens all too often, that a good bill is turned into something that
we can't
support because of foolish play on behalf of the government not to support a reasonably
sound, or
very sound recommendation here. I would like, before this day is over or tomorrow morning,
whenever we finish debate on this third reading, that somebody on the government benches
would
tell me why it is appropriate for the people of Guysborough or the people of Yarmouth or the
people
of North Sydney or the people of Digby who come up



[Page 7591]

here for medical treatment to have to pay a premium in the hotels here. If somebody can
convince
me that is a good idea, then I will be prepared to listen. But I haven't heard anybody convince
me
of that yet. All they say over there is that, oh, it is sour grapes again from the members for
Cape
Breton.



Well, we come from Cape Breton and there are a lot of people who have to come up
here for medical
treatment and it is at a very heavy expense and this is another added expense. I am sure that
the
member for Yarmouth has people in his constituency who would have to come up here and
stay for
nights and weeks. I am sure that they are not willing, or they don't want, to pay this expense
themselves either. I am sure that, well, Shelburne - you can go all down through rural Nova
Scotia -
Musquodoboit Valley. Of course, their member is too busy fooling around with other things
these
days to worry about that, perhaps.



I want to tell this House that - maybe he thinks this is a joke too. Everything else is
a joke to him;
maybe this is a joke as well. He's laughing over there, anyway.



I want to say to you with these few remarks, Mr. Speaker, I am really upset that this
government
would take this amendment and disregard it - callous disregard for the people outside of
HRM who
have to come to this city for medical purposes. Unless this is changed, I am not going to be
supporting this bill. Thank you.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.



MR. JOHN HOLM: I welcome the opportunity to speak for a few minutes on the
piece of legislation
that is before us. First of all, I want to indicate that we will be supporting the bill; however,
in saying
that, I also want to say that I think that it's still not too late for the government to be willing
to make
an amendment. Do an amendment, it has been done already. It might take a 10 minute recess
for us
to be able to resolve the issue and make this piece of legislation a little bit better and, in truth,
much
fairer for people of this province.



When I say that, I say in all honesty that I wish the Liberal caucus had made the
proposed
amendment available to members of this House, as is the tradition, before the last minute.
I don't
know what the government's decision not to support the amendment is based on. We, like
the
government, were forced to make a snap decision because we didn't see the amendment
before it was
introduced. We like to try to share amendments with all other caucuses in advance so that we
can
try to win support on behalf of the amendment that we are advancing.



That having been said - and I am taking the Liberals on good faith that they really do
want to get an
amendment through because I and our caucus members looked at the intent of the
amendment and
we felt that it was fair - that those who were coming, who were forced to come - and let's
face it,
metro is the area with so many medical services. You have to



[Page 7592]

come here to get those services, you can't get them in other places. So we are taking it that
the
Liberals advance this in good faith and that they want to - and correctly so - spare those who
are
forced to come here for medical treatment or appointments, to be spared from that additional
tax. I
think that is infinitely fair.



The government members can only speak for themselves on what the rationale was
for rejecting the
amendment. Possibly they didn't like the wording. I am not a legal eagle. I am not a lawyer;
I am
not trained in crafting the legislation in the proper legal terms and I'm not sorry that I am not.
However, we do have within the employment of the government - and probably the
Legislative
Counsel is here in the Chamber - legal expertise that can take the words and craft them
quickly into
the proper legalese.



We know what the intent of the amendment is, and if the government members - and
I say this
through you, Mr. Speaker, with respect to the Premier and to his colleagues - if you are in
support
of the principle in the amendment that was rejected, which we in our caucus voted
unanimously in
support of because we support the principle, if the government is in support of the principle
of the
amendment, I say through you to the Premier, signal to your Government House Leader that
you
would like to have a brief recess. Surely to heavens it wouldn't take more than 10 or 15
minutes.



The Clerks at the Table could help with the wording if the wording is not correct for
the legalese.
If, for example, we have to redefine the word documentation, because in the amendment it
says, a
person who provides documentation indicating - well, what kind of documentation? Are you
saying
documentation from a doctor. If that has to be defined, if that has to be clarified what kind
of
documentation is needed, rather than simply a letter from a neighbor, if it's that simple, surely
to
heavens, if the will is there to do it right then, obviously, we can resolve that.



[3:30 p.m.]



Now, I could move a recess, Mr. Speaker, that is not going to accomplish anything.
I am actually
continuing to talk a little bit longer than I had intended simply because I would like to give
some
government members, particularly the Premier, an opportunity to think for a moment or two
about
the fairness of this and to have a chance to maybe signal some of his colleagues that he
would like
to have a look at it, because it can be done. The amount of tax dollars that would be lost to
HRM if
that is done - you know, this bill, of course, isn't even going to go forward until we can get
the
clarification from Ottawa and get the exemption.



So, Mr. Speaker, the amount of change, the amount of dollars that HRM would lose
from collecting
that tax from those who would be coming here to receive the medical treatment is extremely
small
by comparison. But, honestly, if somebody from Shelburne - and I will say Shelburne - if
somebody
from Kings North or Victoria has to come here, they



[Page 7593]

have the expense of the travel, they will have the expense of the meals, upon which they are
paying
tax by the way, and they will then have the expense of the accommodations. If somebody is
healthy,
they can often drive from Cape Breton to Halifax and back the same day. If somebody is ill
and
receiving treatment, they may be required to be here for a number of days and, in addition
to that,
they may not be in the physical condition to do such a drive and return in one day. The added
costs
they would have to bear, while the amount that they would spend would be peanuts to HRM,
to
them, in their situation, it could be quite extreme.



Just on the basis of fairness, Mr. Premier, if you believe that it is inappropriate to
have those who
are ill, be taxed additionally to help promote tourism in Halifax and surrounding area - and
that
means my community as well - if you think that it is wrong to have that tax imposed, I ask
you,
please. I am not going to try to hold this up. Our caucus isn't going to be trying to hold this
legislation up for long periods of time. That is not our intent. We can't stop this bill from
passing.
It's on your shoulders. Here's an opportunity. I don't like the way it was presented, I am not
pretending I do. I don't like the fact that it only came in at the last minute at Committee of
the Whole
House on Bills and that we hadn't seen it earlier. I am not saying I like that process, but I do
like the
idea.



AN HON. MEMBER: Well, why didn't you think about it?



MR. HOLM: Well, it was just said, why didn't I think about? Well, Mr. Speaker,
that's why we are
here. We believe in listening. Yes, as the Premier says.



Mr. Speaker, I confess and I say quite proudly that we are quite able to listen to good
ideas that come
from other caucuses, and this is a good idea; it's a good proposal. That's why I'm saying,
through
you, Mr. Speaker, to the Premier, I hope you will. If you want to get this through and through
in a
hurry, if you support the principle that it's unfair to charge additional tax to those who have
to come
for this, let's take a 10 minute recess.



I urge you, Mr. Premier, to make that motion, and I know the Clerks at the Table are
extremely
capable. They have the ability to craft the amendment, word it slightly differently if that's a
problem,
to accomplish the same ends in a hurry, or Legislative Counsel who, I am sure, is no more
than a
short call away. He might actually be out in the Members' Lounge, as he often is. It will take
no time
to get the wordsmiths to do their work so that we can accomplish, collectively, what I hope
all
members of this House believe would be a fair thing to do.



Mr. Speaker, with that I will take my seat and wait for the Premier, in hopes that he
will be willing
to get to his feet to urge that there is an adjournment so that this matter can be resolved in a
way that
would be satisfactory to all members in this House and, more importantly, in a fair way for
those
people who don't live in the close vicinity of our major medical facilities here in HRM.
(Applause)







[Page 7594]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.



MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I too want to stand in regard to requesting
a recess for all
of us to have an opportunity to take another look at the amendment that was brought forward
by our
member from Cape Breton. I want to say I had an opportunity to meet with the
representatives who
helped draft this legislation and worked on it. I believe these individuals worked very hard
- I know
they worked very hard and are sincere in trying to bring forward a piece of legislation
through a
private member that would benefit the area. In principle, I think they're right on. I think it has
great
merits.



The comment I remember in the meeting was we hope we've covered all the bases,
I hope we've
covered off all the issues, we're trying to and it's very difficult. As the Premier said here
today,
sometimes that's why we're in this Legislature. Ideas come up, suggestions come up from all
Parties
that are beneficial to a piece of legislation. That is why this particular amendment to the
legislation
is really not against the legislation, it is really an opportunity to help strengthen the
legislation.



I can't imagine the HRM, when they are out there to promote Nova Scotia and
promote the HRM
and the industry together, for tourism and economic opportunity and all that, I don't imagine
they
would be held up on the issue of the fact that the odd time there is somebody coming to
Halifax from
far distances in Nova Scotia, to have some provision inside that bill to help accommodate
those
individuals who are sick and need to stay at a hotel to attend to their physical requirements
at the
hospital; they need overnight accommodations. The individuals I met appeared to be very
compassionate and caring about the community. I would think that would be one of the
pluses to the
beauty of how Halifax really is. I think Halifax, the HRM area, is a beautiful community. It
has a lot
of compassion and excitement and entertainment.



I would like to see that the House would stop for a moment and realize that this is a
legitimate
request. It might be the wording, maybe somebody wants to just play with it a little bit here
to get
it worded properly, but the intent of what this amendment is, I can't honestly think of why
anybody
in this House would be against the intent of what this measure is all about. It doesn't take
away from
the motion of the Private Member's Bill. It doesn't take away from the concept of an
opportunity for
this community to start raising funds so that it can go after major events for this community
in
tourism. It doesn't stop the opportunity for those facilities to be able to build a fund to market
HRM.
It doesn't stop all that. It doesn't stop all the great initiatives that can come from this piece
of
legislation. That's why I personally think the legislation is the right idea.



I am sure that those people who were involved in that legislation had maybe given
some thought, or
if that issue had come up earlier, maybe they would have reconsidered that particular point
of how
to address the circumstance where individuals who travel long



[Page 7595]

distances to Halifax, who need medical attention, to have some caveats within the legislation
to
allow for help for those individuals.



I know that one of the issues was the issue of cascading tax. They were concerned
about that. They
don't want to cause a problem; they're trying to make this work, and we shouldn't lose sight
of what
they're trying to do. You are the government. You have the power. You have the votes. And
why I
am standing here today is to echo and support the comments from the member for
Sackville-Cobequid about the issue of fairness. I would say a recess would be in order. If the
Premier was
willing to support that, I don't think it's asking an awful lot. I believe that, if anything, it
strengthens
the legislation in the fact that it shows the commitment of what this is all about, and that is
showing
the world that HRM is a great community and a great area.



By gosh, I know they need the money, like any other city, to get out and promote.
This is why this
legislation is important, but having this caveat is not going to change a great deal of the
funding
capability of that body. In fact, if I read the legislation correctly, they have the provision of
going
from 1.5 per cent to 2 per cent. So if there is a big issue, they can move it to 2 per cent. All
we're
requesting - and I want to say that my colleague, the member for Cape Breton The Lakes,
brought
this issue up in our caucus. It made us stop and think. We, as a caucus, stopped - my gosh,
that's a
good idea. This is an important idea and an important suggestion.



I am sure that all of you here today, given a chance to think about it, probably deep
down inside say
yes, this is probably a good suggestion for the right reasons, the right values and the right
principles.
That is why I ask the presenter of this Private Member's Bill - and I know the member cares
about
the community, and I know deep down inside he's a compassionate individual for the people.
I know
that. I ask him to ask his colleagues to maybe take a minute and reconsider how he can
redraft this
so that we can make sure that the member for Cape Breton The Lakes' suggestion is not cast
out
simply because he's for Cape Breton The Lakes, but because he is part of this Legislative
Assembly,
that we would want to support - as the Premier would say, that is why we're here today, to
grow and
do things that are right and that can come in this Legislature by all members.



With those few words, Mr. Speaker, I again echo the member for Sackville-Cobequid
in requesting
a short recess so that we can find a resolve to this issue. Let's not throw the baby out with the
bathwater, as that old farm expression goes. Let's make sure we bring the opportunities of
this
legislation forward so HRM can compete with Ontario and Toronto and Montreal and other
areas
and do a good job in marketing this area because it's going to help all of Nova Scotia. At the
same
time, let us have a little compassion for those individuals who are forced to come to HRM
for
medical reasons, who live far enough away that they cannot commute, to be able to have
some
benefit by the fact that those particular levied fees



[Page 7596]

or taxes are not imposed on them. I think that the recess - and I so move that we have a recess
for
a short term to resolve this issue.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.



Order, please.



SOME HON. MEMBERS: Motion for recess.



MR. SPEAKER: I believe the motion is out of order. The motion to recess would be
out of order at
this point.



The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.



The honourable member for Preston.



MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Before I close debate (Interruptions)



[3:45 p.m.]



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. (Interruptions)



MR. HENDSBEE: You know the rules. If I am recognized a second time, it is to
close debate.



AN HON. MEMBER: We know the rules. Do you know them?



ANOTHER HON. MEMBER: No.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.



AN HON. MEMBER: He enforces the rules, not you, Hendsbee.



MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Here we go on a personal tone again. Mr. Speaker,
I want to take
a few moments to bring the House up to date. As we are well aware of course, I live in a very
fast
growing area that over the years has attracted motels and hotels and tourist business. I will
be very
open with the member opposite, the member for Preston. He knows that I have been lobbied
on this
issue. He knows that I have been consulted and asked my opinions on this. In fact, I took the
opportunity when suddenly, bang, it dropped on our desk and this amendment arrives.







[Page 7597]

So I took the opportunity, as I should do, and I went out to the phone and I called
876-2301, one of
the best tourist destinations on the Bay Road. I spoke to one of the owners and operators of
the
hotel/motel along that road - the Stardust Motel. I said to them, look. I have been aware of
this
legislation and it is something that I am supporting. I have met with Lou Rogers. I have met
with Mr.
Barkhouse - I have got the name wrong - Mr. Stackhouse, right? Excuse me. I have been so
involved
with Lunenburg in the last number of weeks, all I can get is Barkhouse. I had the opportunity
to ask
this particular gentleman, if there is a situation that comes forward, and let's take the example
that
somebody from the community of New Waterford comes to your door and says, I am here
for a week
and I have a medical reason for being here, will you help him out? His response was, Mr.
Estabrooks, send them out. Get them off the peninsula. Get them out here.



I am saying to the people in that situation, I understand why this amendment is here
and there is a
way and a time to do things. The way and time to do things is in committee. It is to be
brought
forward in a thoughtful manner, but suddenly, here it is. It is brought forward. Now let me
tell you,
I want to tell you about Swissair.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.



MR. MICHEL SAMSON: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. With all due respect to
the member for
Timberlea-Prospect, we do have a Private and Local Bills Committee where amendments can
come
forward, but amendments, in actuality, are debated here on the floor of this House through
Committee of the Whole House, which took place this afternoon, as is regular for the
Committee of
the Whole House process, and then we allowed it to go to third reading. But that process has
taken
place. To continue to cast aspersions that this was a surprise dropped on here and is against
the Rules
of this House, we bring amendments in to the Committee of the Whole House. They are dealt
with
there and we go from there. There was no surprise here and I would hope that the member
would
know that can be dealt with in Committee of the Whole House on Bills and that is the regular
process. In fact, I am sure he is aware that even on third reading, an amendment can even be
brought
forward if necessary in this case.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Before I recognize the honourable member for
Timberlea-Prospect,
from what I heard from both members, I believe the honourable member was actually
alluding to the
process, not casting aspersion on any member, not the way I heard his comments anyway.
I agree,
but again, it is not a point of order. It is a disagreement on the process, I guess, between two
members.



MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hope members of the House know that on
occasion, there have
been amendments accepted and I am very well aware of the fact that legislation has been
brought
forward in the past. I, on one occasion, I want the member for Shelburne to know there is
always the
one, that there is the opportunity to bring forth



[Page 7598]

amendments. The way the amendments are brought forward is the idea of process. It is a
matter of
consultation, whether it is with the lobby group involved, with the minister or, in this case,
the
private member who is bringing the legislation forward.



So I have a situation on my hands because I know what is going on when it comes
to the politics of
this particular amendment. But, Mr. Speaker, I know what is right when it comes to, for
example,
the call that I have made. I know that I have spoken to these gentlemen and ladies who are
in our
lobby, are here in your gallery today, and I am aware of

the fact that exceptions are always made for various reasons. However, the consequences are
real
important, and I want to talk about the Swissair disaster.



What's the relevance, you could say, Mr. Speaker? Let's look at the situation that
people came from
all over the world and suddenly they were in the community that I and the member for
Chester-St.
Margaret's are fortunate enough to represent. Now, if there was an opportunity for these
people to
gouge and take advantage of, there it would have been. The result was that they showed
unbelievable
flexibility and that is, after all, their mandate in the business that they are in, to make sure
that they
have their customers and they will make those adjustments. I have thought about this and I
know
how things work in this caucus. I know how I am voting, I am voting in favour of the Private
Member's Bill, I am voting in favour of it. The opportunity is still here to include and take
a recess
to see if this can be included as, I suppose we could say a friendly amendment, but obviously
the
government is not taking that opportunity. Let's be clear on the fact that the capital district,
as a
tourist destination, will benefit from this, and any other municipal jurisdiction that wants to
bring
forth this sort of legislation can.



Let me tell you, as an example, Mr. Speaker, I am a regular attender at the Vince
Ryan tournament
in Cape Breton, a wonderful place to go, a tremendous place to go. We are there, of course,
celebrating oldtimer's hockey and the spirit and example of a wonderful volunteer in the
Cape
Breton community. Under no circumstances would I be offended . . .



MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, as a point of order, I think we're getting off
the title of the
bill.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. (Interruption) It is, but I hear quite a few stories from
all sides of the
House, so it would be kind of ironic to say that this would be something -anyway, I would
ask the
honourable member to bring his comments around to third reading of Bill No. 94, please.




MR. ESTABROOKS: You know the private member opposite, obviously with his
municipal
experience, is aware, as are other members aware who represent areas in the HRM, of the
importance
of bringing forth legislation which, at times, will help our areas. It is to that member's credit
that he
has taken the initiative to do this. I know, as a member who



[Page 7599]

serves a provincial area that's represented by the HRM, what the advantages will be to
tourism here.
It is very clear that this money is going to be used, this 1.5 per cent - and I hear it can go as
far as 2
per cent on the bill - that this 1.5 per cent would be used to turn back into the tourist
association so
that there would be a promotion there, Mr. Speaker, so that the people who come to this
district, we
would be aware of the fact this is a destination, a destination in the hotel business.



The good member for Halifax Fairview and I met and we listened to the points of
view that were
brought forward on the example of why this would be a positive piece of legislation. We
caucused
that legislation, we talked about this legislation. We now are in a situation where we will
support,
or I certainly will support this legislation. It's not in any way a reflection on other areas in this
province. I know for a fact that if an MLA wants a Private Member's Bill brought forward
and he
or she is from another municipality, they could take the initiative and do the very same thing
as the
member for Preston. The member for Preston has done his homework. The member for
Preston has
met with the stakeholders, whether it's Carl Webb from TIANS, whether it's Judith Cabrita,
whether
it's the people here in your gallery today, Mr. Speaker, the homework has been done.



It's unfortunate, that because of the timing, we are discussing a relevant matter that
at times could
have been dealt with at another time. I take the members at their best suggestion that a recess
would
be appropriate. That's not going to happen, Mr. Speaker, and I think what's best for the
capital
district, I think what's best for the tourism operators, I think what's best for the Stardust
Motel on
the St. Margarets Bay Road, that this piece of legislation be allowed to go ahead, be voted
on and
it will be supported by the member for Timberlea-Prospect.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.



MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, just in starting out I rise in agreement that,
number one, we
should be taking a recess at this point to reconsider what has happened here. Indeed, it's in
the hands
of the Premier to do that right now, which would be very easily done.



Before I continue, I must say to the member for Timberlea-Prospect that perhaps he
made the wrong
phone call, perhaps that phone call should not have been made to a person who owns a
popular inn
but perhaps it should have been made to many former Cape Bretoners who are now a part
of his
constituency, who are going to have to phone home and tell their mothers and fathers and
grandmothers and grandfathers that they are going to have to pay a tax for being sick now,
to come
up to Halifax to get treated. Maybe those are the phone calls that that member should be
making,
because that's exactly what's happening.







[Page 7600]

Of course, as I may remind everyone at this point, at some point the picket fence is
going to start to
feel kind of sore to the NDP once they finally decide to get off that fence once and for all.
How can
you be in support of it but support a motion and stand up and go on like they've been doing
so far?
(Interruptions) They're speaking out of both sides of their mouths, that's what's happening
there. We
don't need any apologies right now. This has been done before in this House. This has been
done
during this session.



The fact of the matter is that amendments have moved during the process with very
little notice twice
this session. This has happened and those amendments have been accepted.



AN HON. MEMBER: It happened today



MR. WILSON: It happened today, as a matter of fact. That's all part of the process.
This was no
surprise. I'm absolutely amazed that members of the NDP would say, well, it's a big surprise,
we
didn't have time to think about it. Perhaps, it's because they didn't think of it. Perhaps because
they
didn't think of it they are not going to stand up and support what's going on here today at this
time.



Certainly we are all mature enough as elected members and representatives of our
constituents to
recognize a good idea when it's put forth. This has been a very good idea that came from the
member
for Cape Breton The Lakes and placed before the Liberal caucus in the form of an
amendment, at
the proper time, following the proper procedure, placed before this House of Assembly. How
can
you say that's a surprise?



Mr. Speaker, if that's the case, then any amendment that comes before this House
would be
classified as a surprise. I am sure that no one is going to share their amendments, when they
come
out of caucus, with us as a Liberal caucus. I wouldn't expect the NDP caucus to do that, and
I don't
expect the Tory caucus to do that.



Mr. Speaker, having said that, let's get back to the amendment itself. It's an
amendment - from time
to time in this House, as unbelievable, and I'm sure even the member for Kings North would
agree
with me here, from time to time in this House, there are things that make common sense that
come
forth in this House. Let me give you an example, and again it's an example of a Private
Member's
Bill. I proposed one myself to change the name of my riding from Cape Breton East to the
name
Glace Bay. Nothing that had any kind of significance or importance of the one we're talking
about
today, in dealing with people's medical problems and people's lives, but just a simple name
change.
The members opposite, the members to my right said that made common sense. It made
sense. And
it happened in this House. It can happen.









[Page 7601]

This is another example where we can take the time, take a recess, and again it's in
the hands of the
Premier to take that recess right now and call for that recess, and rethink exactly what's
happening
here. What you are talking about here is, in some cases, terminally ill people who are
travelling to
Halifax on a regular basis to receive, perhaps, cancer treatment or whatever treatment is
available.
It's only available in this area. (Interruption)



Mr. Speaker, I can't for the life of me understand why a member of the NDP would
sit in their seat
and heckle me over the fact that I'm trying to defend the rights of terminally ill people in
Cape
Breton when they're being taxed as sick people by that government. I can't understand how
the NDP
can come out of the gates, the member for Dartmouth North is sitting there heckling me
because I'm
standing in my place on behalf of the sick people in my riding and on behalf of the people
of Cape
Breton.



[4:00 p.m.]



You know, Mr. Speaker, not only Cape Breton, but people from both ends of this
province are going
to be taxed by this levy. That's what's going to happen and I sincerely hope that this is not a
case of
the central area of this province, and that being the Halifax Regional Municipality, forgetting
that
there are other parts of this province that exist. I hope that's not the case because if it is, then
I would
say to every other member in this House who is not a representative of that central core, of
that metro
area, that now is the time that you should be standing up to speak on behalf of your
constituents, on
behalf of the people who aren't lucky enough to be based in the Halifax Regional
Municipality and
won't have to pay that extra levy, who don't have to travel for four and a half hours, five
hours, six
hours, to get to the treatment that they require in this province.



We all know, as I've said before in the Committee of the Whole House earlier, the
Halifax Regional
Municipality is known as the area where you're going to receive the best treatment that you
can
possibly receive in this province. No one is arguing that. Indeed, it's used across the Atlantic
Provinces as that kind of central treatment for medical reasons and we know that. No one is
arguing
here that this levy isn't necessary in terms of what it's required for and what the member for
Preston
is proposing, or who he is proposing it on behalf of. We're not arguing with that. We're
simply
saying, very simply saying that by doing this, the unfortunate, the disabled, the sick, the
elderly in
this province are now being forced (Interruption)



Mr. Speaker, again the member for Dartmouth North hollers in his seat and will not
stand up and
defend the rights of the people in this province who just don't happen to be located in his
riding. As
I said, the elderly, the disabled, the sick, are all going to face another tax. This is nothing
more than
a tax on the sick of this province and it is shameful. It's despicable that this is happening right
now.
All that's required at this juncture in time is a recess to rethink. The members on the
government side
know that this matter can be fixed



[Page 7602]

rather easily and rather quickly just by giving it some second thought because the majority
of
members on that government side have constituents who are going to be adversely affected
by this
legislation.



It is not a matter of saying, well, there is compassionate leave at this hotel or
compassionate -
whatever they call it - at that hotel in Halifax. The fact of the matter is it may not be, that's
not the
case. That's not enshrined in legislation that an innkeeper or hotel manager has to be
compassionate.
I have run into instances where that is not the case, not only in Halifax but in other parts of
the
province. We cannot take that for granted. That's why we are asking that this amendment
become
enshrined in a piece of legislation before this House of Assembly.



Mr. Speaker, that is what we do as a living in this House. We ensure that what we are
talking about
here becomes law, it becomes legislation so that there will be no dispute. There will no room
left to
argue at a hotel desk in the middle of the night, am I getting a discount or not because I have
to take
cancer treatments for the next nine weeks in Halifax. That will be part of this bill. That's all
we're
asking.



Mr. Speaker, it has been a session that some have quibbled about and some have said
we haven't
accomplished much during this session although the government and the Premier would
probably
tell you otherwise, but this is the one chance. We have passed some good legislation here,
I will be
the first to admit it, but this is the one chance to right a wrong which is about to occur and
that wrong
is not the bill itself. That wrong is that we have the chance to make an amendment to make
that bill
even better, even better than it possibly could, and if that's not the reason that we're all put
here for,
I don't know what is.



We are sent here to represent our constituents and to take a look at such things as this
bill and pieces
of legislation and to try to make them better. This is not political. This has absolutely nothing
to do
with politics because if it did, I would only be talking about one part of this province. I am
not. I am
talking about Yarmouth. I am talking about Shelburne. I am talking about members who
represent
other parts of this province who are going to have to travel even further than people in
ridings in
Cape Breton. It is going to affect them, as well. I think the members opposite know that there
are
people in their constituency.



Mr. Speaker, Heaven forbid, that anybody would be stricken with a fatal disease and
would have to
travel to Halifax and then on top of that, on top of the hotel bill, on top of the expenses, on
top of
the gas, on top of all the travel expenses that are there as well, on top of the personal anguish
that
they are going through at the moment, that they would be taxed again when they arrive at the
hotel.
It is not necessary. It does not have to happen at this point in time. Very simply put, this
amendment,
if accepted - what would happen here is a simple recess and the Premier would say, let's take
however much time it takes. If possible, let's do



[Page 7603]

it. At this point in time, again, I would request that the House recess to reconsider this
amendment.



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The only way the House could consider a recess was
if there was
unanimous consent of the House.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I was suggesting that with the consent of
the House, we
recess until 4:30 p.m.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



[4:07 p.m. The House recessed.]



[4:38 p.m. The House reconvened.]



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 94 be referred back
to the Committee
of the Whole House for amendment.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair
and that the
House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



The motion is carried.



[4:39 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Acting Deputy
Chairman Mr.
William Dooks in the Chair.]







[Page 7604]

[4:40 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray
Scott, resumed
the Chair.]



MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills
reports:



THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bill:



Bill No. 94 - Halifax Regional Municipality Marketing Levy Act.



and the chairman has been instructed to recommend this bill to the favourable consideration
of the
House, with a certain amendment.



MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read for a third time. When shall it be read?




SOME HON. MEMBERS: Now.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of
business, Private and
Local Bills for Third Reading.



PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR THIRD READING



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 94.



Bill No. 94 - Halifax Regional Municipality Marketing Levy Act.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.



MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to rise again to move third
reading of Bill No.
94.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.



MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I will just rise briefly for the record just to
explain what has
taken place. Clearly, the concern that was being raised here, very simply, was that we were
in support
of this legislation in its purpose and its intent to help the tourism industry be able to put in
a levy in
order to assist and promote the marketing here, which in the end is going to benefit this
province
and all Nova Scotians. The concern was our fear that putting a levy on hotel rooms may have
a
negative effect on those Nova Scotians, wherever



[Page 7605]

they may reside, who would have to come to Halifax to seek medical treatment and stay in
a hotel
and may have been charged with this levy. The intention was to try to put an exemption in
the bill
to make sure that those who are here, and their families, for medical purposes would not be
faced
with this levy.



Mr. Speaker, in the bill, on Page 2, Clause 3(8), it says that, "The Council may, in the
manner
prescribed by law, pass any by-laws that are necessary to implement a levy and, without
limiting the
generality of the foregoing, may pass a by-law to provide for . . ." We've now added the
clause, as
has been read into the record, which says that, "A by-law made pursuant to subsection (8) .
. .",
therefore if a bylaw is made to implement the levy, that it, ". . . shall include an exemption
for
persons, and their families, accommodated while receiving medical treatment at a hospital
or a
provincial health care centre or seeking specialist medical advice including, without
restricting the
generality of the foregoing, the manner of showing entitlement to the exemption."



Mr. Speaker, this clearly reflects the concern that was raised. I believe, rather than
leaving it to the
Halifax Regional Municipality or any other municipal unit to put this in on their own, we as
a
provincial Legislature have said this is a requirement and this has to be done. I want to take
this
opportunity, on behalf of our caucus, certainly, to thank the member for Cape Breton The
Lakes who
brought this forward at our caucus, which brought it forward today in the regular course.




Legislation has been going through this House at a fairly rapid speed, to say the least,
but if there are
any concerns that members have about legislation, this is the place to do it. We have seen
now, on
three occasions, that this government has been willing to go back to Committee of the Whole
House
at third reading stage to make necessary changes to the legislation. I think the government
should
be commended for that. I think what they have done here today has made for better
legislation. It has
avoided prolonged debate. I think this, in the end, is going to benefit Nova Scotians. I am
pleased
that the NDP caucus also supported this motion, and that at the end it is the government that
made
the decision to allow this amendment to go forward.



[4:45 p.m.]



Certainly, on behalf of our caucus, I want to give our thanks. I think we have made
better legislation
here while respecting the intent of the bill. I certainly, again, would be remiss if I did not
commend
the member for Preston who brought forward this legislation to start off with and I am sure
who gave
his consent to allow this amendment to take place. So with that, Mr. Speaker, I certainly will
be
supporting this. I believe my colleague has a few words to say. Thank you.









[Page 7606]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.



MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise because I will certainly be
somewhat brief this
time. I had thought that this particular bill was going to be long and drawn out and I want to
say to
the government, thank you for preventing that from happening because in fact you brought
in the
amendments that are even stronger than the amendments that had been brought in by the
previous
government, the Liberal Party, simply because it includes family members as well, and I
think the
government ought to be acknowledged for that. I think that is the extent of it.



So, Mr. Speaker, I want to say to you that the people in the public gallery who are
here watching the
debate must be growing tired as well waiting for the outcome of this decision. I want to tell
you that
I support - after serving 11 years on the Dartmouth Tourism and Convention Bureau, and
fully
understanding the benefits that tourism brings to this municipality - I can tell you very well,
and to
the members of the government that I will be supporting the amendment, I will be supporting
the
bill, and I think that we can move on from here. But I really want to say that we want to give
credit
where credit is due. At this particular time, it pleases me to stand in this Legislature and
thank the
government for the amendment that they have brought forward.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.



MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I rise because I think it is important to say
a couple of
things. I agree with some of the comments from the honourable member for Dartmouth
North and
other comments I don't agree with. However, I am on my feet today to recognize the effort
put into
this bill. For four or five years many organizations here in Halifax contributed a great deal
of time -
volunteer time, I might add - in putting forward the reference to bring this bill in and to try
to make
it as good as possible. I think it is very important to recognize that perhaps the Halifax area
is at a
little disadvantage - a large disadvantage - when we talk about the other centres. We do
believe that
this is a good bill for this area and that hopefully the Halifax community will benefit as well
as Nova
Scotia as a whole. So we are very pleased to see that the government is moving this
amendment and
we do accept that.



I personally, Mr. Speaker, want to stress the fact that I did not bring this amendment
forward to
mislead other members of this House or for any other reason; the rules are set down and I
followed
those rules. Being a newer member of this House, I want to assure you, sir, and all members
that
there was no intention to mislead anything, or any tricks or anything like that. I reviewed the
bill and
focused on the bill and we came forward with the amendment. I do want to recognize all the
government members and I think it is one example where the municipal experience in that
backbench has come forward and they recognize that this would be wrong to tax the sick. I
do want
to stress my thank you to the Premier and his



[Page 7607]

government for recognizing this issue to be one that is very important to many Nova Scotians
throughout our province, whether they be in urban or rural areas outside the Halifax area.




So, Mr. Speaker, in closing, I want to also thank the honourable member for Preston
for bringing
forth this bill. It is obvious that his time and effort went into the bill as well, and I think that
should
be recognized. I take my place with a great deal of gratitude. For the people who are sick and
disadvantaged in this province, I want to say thank you very much to the government.



MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the member it will be to close debate.



The honourable member for Preston.



MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I now do rise to close debate on Bill No.
94. We are a
government that is sympathetic and listens. Even with this late amendment, we took the time
to
consider it and make a last minute adjustment. I want to make sure it is known for the
record, this
particular bill, as amended, now affects 44 of the 153 properties in HRM that provide
accomodations. There were 109 other facilities that were not affected by the legislation,
where
accommodations could be sought.



Also, this legislation allows the municipality to put in bylaws, where they could put
bylaw rules in,
could exempt 25 or 30. That could take another five or nine facilities off the list that
presently could
be affected by this particular bill. That would be done by the bylaws.



I am disappointed that certain members of the House would not take the opportunity
to allow for an
opportuntiy for compassionate waiver to be developed by the industry. The hospitality
industry is
here to serve and I am sure they would have taken the considerations that were raised by
members
of this House into consideration while developing the bylaws. I would hope that when they
do
consider the bylaws, they take into consideration, if possible, other situations that may occur.
We've
seen Swissair Flight 111 and we saw September 11th, those disastrous situations have a
particular
crisis and perhaps they may have an opportunity to discuss those issues in bylaws.



With that Mr. Speaker, I am hoping that this municipality will move forward and get
the bylaw
forward to the satisfaction, and that we'll have the waiver and GST in the very near future.
With that,
I would like to close debate. (Applause)



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 94.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.







[Page 7608]

Ordered the bill do pass. Ordered the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the
bill be engrossed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, do we have any approximation of when
Her Honour will
be here? (Interruption) Ten minutes?



Mr. Speaker, I move that the House recess until 5:05 p.m.



MR. SPEAKER: The House will recess until 5:05 p.m.



[4:53 p.m. The House recessed.]



[5:05 p.m. The House reconvened.]



MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.



ACTING SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor is without.




MR. SPEAKER: Let Her Honour be admitted.



[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]



[The Lieutenant Governor, the Honourable Myra Freeman, preceded by her escort,
and by Mr. Peter
Theriault, Acting Sergeant-at-Arms, bearing the Mace, entered the House of Assembly
Chamber.
The Lieutenant Governor then took her seat on the Throne.



The Acting Sergeant-at-Arms then departed and re-entered the Chamber followed by
the Speaker,
the Honourable Murray Scott; and the Chief Clerk of the House, Roderick MacArthur, Q.C.;
and
Assistant Clerk, Arthur Fordham, Q.C.



The Speaker, with the Acting Sergeant-at-Arms on his right and the Clerk on his left,
took up his
position at the foot of the Speaker's Table.]



ACTING SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: It is the wish of Her Honour that the ladies and
gentlemen be
seated.




MR. SPEAKER: May it please Your Honour, the General Assembly of the Province
has, in its
present session, passed certain bills to which, in the name and on behalf of the General
Assembly,
I respectfully request Your Honour's Assent.







[Page 7609]

THE CLERK:



Bill No. 7 - Lobbyists' Registration Act.



Bill No. 22 - Liens Act.



Bill No. 23 - Enforcement of Canadian Judgments and Decrees Act.



Bill No. 29 - Elections Act.



Bill No. 71 - Izaak Walton Killam Health Centre Act.



Bill No. 73 - Agriculture and Marketing Act.



Bill No. 74 - Costs and Fees Act.



Bill No. 75 - Revenue Act.



Bill No. 76 - Consumer Protection Act.



Bill No. 77 - Motor Vehicle Act and Public Highways Act.



Bill No. 78 - Conservation Easements Act.



Bill No. 79 - Domestic Violence Intervention Act.



Bill No. 80 - House of Assembly Act.



Bill No. 82 - Municipal Law Amendment (2001) Act.



Bill No. 84 - Vital Statistics Act.



Bill No. 85 - Real Estate Trading Act.



Bill No. 86 - Pharmacy Act.



Bill No. 88 - Underground Hydrocarbons Storage Act.



Bill No. 89 - Wildlife Act.



Bill No. 90 - Co-operative Associations Act.







[Page 7610]

Bill No. 92 - Fatality Investigations Act.



Bill No. 93 - Youth Justice Act.



Bill No. 94 - Halifax Regional Municipality Marketing Levy Act.



Bill No. 95 - German Settlers Day Act.




[5:15 p.m.]



THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR:



In Her Majesty's name, I Assent to these Bills.



[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]



[The Lieutenant Governor left the Chamber.]



ACTING SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: His Honour, the Speaker.



[The Speaker took the Chair.]



MR. SPEAKER: Honourable members, I would ask that you now join me in the
singing of the
national anthem, as was agreed to by an all-Party committee. I think it very befitting at this
time of
year, especially with our national troops in other parts of the world. So, if you would join me
in the
singing of the national anthem, please.



[The national anthem was sung by the members.]



MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, please be seated.



No doubt there will be a request for the legislative members to travel the province.
(Laughter)



The honourable Premier.



HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I move that this General Assembly
be adjourned,
to meet again at the call of the Speaker.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.







[Page 7611]

We are adjourned until the call of the Speaker.



[The House rose at 5:18 p.m.]







[Page 7612]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)



(Tabled on November 21, 2001)



RESOLUTION NO. 2711





By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas Yarmouth teenager Indriati Hood recently placed first in the senior category
of the northeast
area Wesleyan Church poetry competition held October 18th and 19th at Houghton College
in New
York, which included categories for poetry and literature, singing, acting, and dance; and




Whereas Miss Hood competed against the seven other 16 to 18 year olds entered in
her category,
winning a trophy and $600 US scholarship to a Wesleyan college or university; and



Whereas Miss Hood's courses in school are mostly science-related and she is
considering a career
in medicine or physiotherapy after graduation;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Miss Indriati Hood
for her recent
artistic accomplishment and wish her continued success in all of her future studies and
artistic
endeavours.



RESOLUTION NO. 2712




By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Fidelis House Society held a very successful silent auction and roast beef
supper
fundraiser on October 11th at the Rodd Grand Hotel; and



Whereas the Fidelis House Society in Kentville provides lodging and support for
patients of the
Valley Regional Hospital; and



Whereas items for the silent auction came from a total of 31 local organizations,
businesses, and
individuals, in addition to 20 monetary gifts;







[Page 7613]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House thank the organizers of the
Fidelis House
fundraiser, including Shirley Hubbard and Tammy O'Connell, as well as those who attended
the
event or donated a gift, for their great generosity and dedication in helping to provide lodging
and
support for patients in their community.



RESOLUTION NO. 2713




By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas National 4-H Week was held from October 31st to November 4th; and



Whereas 4-H member and Grade 12 student, Dianna Murphy, of Yarmouth was one
of six Nova
Scotia members who won a travel award in the amount of $1,650; and



Whereas 4-H volunteer leaders continually strive to improve their skills and
knowledge for training
tomorrow's 4-H leaders, a goal worked on by the participants at the national conference in
Toronto;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Dianna Murphy
on her recent
award and her work with 4-H, and wish her well with her future plans which include the
desire to
attend the Nova Scotia Agricultural College, and veterinary college, as well as continue with
her
work in 4-H.



RESOLUTION NO. 2714




By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Yarmouth County Historical Society President Barb Smith recently
unveiled a plaque
to honour the efforts of two key volunteers with the museum; and



Whereas Peter and Mary Eldridge were honoured for their tremendous efforts in
realizing the
museum's expansion fundraising goals; and



Whereas this hard-working couple headed the museum's expansion fundraising
committee, ensuring
the funds needed for this vital cultural project were realized;







[Page 7614]

Therefore be it resolved that especially as this is the International Year of the
Volunteer, all members
of this House applaud the fundraising efforts of Peter and Mary Eldridge and thank them for
giving
so generously of their time so that the community of Yarmouth might have a vital, improved
cultural
resource.



RESOLUTION NO. 2715




By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas on Saturday, the CNIB fundraiser was held at the Grand Hotel and included
music, food,
entertainment, and an auction; and



Whereas CNIB Big Band Swingtime Canteen with Auction was a success, thus
ensuring necessary
funds go to support this very important institute; and



Whereas the CNIB came up with the idea to replace its door-to-door campaign, and
included items
from local artisans for the auction;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the CNIB for this
initiative and
thank its co-chairs, Gayle D'Eon and Bob MacConnell, and their volunteers, for assembling
what
proved to be a successful fundraiser, and wish the institute best wishes in its continued work
in the
community and beyond.



RESOLUTION NO. 2716




By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas gospel singer, Shirley Durling, organized again this year a benefit concert
for the physically
and mentally challenged; and



Whereas Ms. Durling, concert director and participating singer, changed sites for the
event from
TH'YARC to the Yarmouth Wesleyan Church to offer a different venue for its audience; and




Whereas this year's proceeds from the concert, which featured talent from both inside
and outside
the Yarmouth area, will be directed to the local Special Olympics organization;







[Page 7615]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate and thank all
participants, but most
especially Shirley Durling, for raising her voice and her energy to organize, direct, and
participate
in an event which not only offers an evening of music and song to the community but also
raises
funds for such a worthwhile cause.



RESOLUTION NO. 2717




By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas on November 1st, the Lions Club held its annual speak-out competition,
organized by Al
Mohe, a Vice-Principal, Yarmouth Consolidated Memorial High School; and



Whereas this year's contestants ranged from Grades 9 through Grade 12 and wrote
and presented a
four-to-six minute speech, finishing with a question and answer session, two minutes in
length, of
questions by judges on their topic; and



Whereas the three top contestants were Kyle Hill, Samantha Rideout, and Sarah
Maynard of
Yarmouth Consolidated;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the Lions Club and
all contestants,
commend the top three performers, and wish Kyle Hill luck as he proceeds to the zone level
speak-out.





















[Page 7616]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)



(Tabled on November 22, 2001)



RESOLUTION NO. 2750





By: Mr. Jerry Pye (Dartmouth North)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas in November 1989, the House of Commons declared, by way of an all-Party
resolution that
"This house seeks to achieve the goal of eliminating poverty among Canadian children by
year
2000"; and



Whereas Campaign 2000's Child Poverty in Canada Report Card states that child
poverty has
increased 43 per cent between 1989 and 2000; and



Whereas this government recently cut assistance levels that will only deepen the
grinding poverty
faced by children of single-parent families;



Therefore be it resolved that in the spirit of eliminating child poverty in Nova Scotia,
this House
calls upon the Minister of Community Services to introduce realistic levels of assistance for
single-parent families.



RESOLUTION NO. 2751




By: Hon. Murray Scott (The Speaker)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Shore Drive Community Development Association was formed to
encourage economic
development, discuss community issues and encourage tourism in the area; and



Whereas on October 24, 2001, the board held its inaugural meeting and elected its
first Board of
Directors: Chairman, Terry Shaw; Vice-Chairman, Andrew Wagstaff; Treasurer, Sharon
Benjamin;
Secretary, Debbie White; Roberta Dowe; Irene Taylor; Jim Townsend; Wayne Tibbets; Brian
Fillmore; and Michael Fuller; and







[Page 7617]

Whereas it is thanks to the community that the board, which will hopefully contribute
greatly to the
area through the development of positive initiatives, was formed;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House commend this community
initiative,
congratulate the executive for giving of their time and abilities to make this happen and wish
them
luck with their deliberations.



RESOLUTION NO. 2752




By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal was created in the spirit of the
1988 Nobel
Peace Prize, recognizing the collective efforts of our peackekeepers in the cause of peace;
and



Whereas this medal, which recognizes the extraordinary efforts and leadership role
of Canadian
Peacekeepers who, to defend the ideal peace cherished by themselves and others, have served
Canada in theaters of war during the past 53 years; and



Whereas among those recently honoured was Robert Rushton, for his services in the
interest of world
peace;



Therefore be it resolved that all members commend Robert Rushton and acknowledge
the honour
of receiving the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal and the efforts made in the interest
of peace,
which have made all Canadians so proud.



RESOLUTION NO. 2753




By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the closure of Devco is the end of a chapter of Cape Breton's history, a
history which is at
the core of who Cape Bretoners are and where they come from; and



Whereas but we are at the start of a new chapter and this is the time to seize new
opportunities and
a time for Cape Breton to send a message to the rest of the world that it has a skilled
workforce and
can compete in the international marketplace; and







[Page 7618]

Whereas although there is no "quick fix" for Cape Breton, we can find a place in the
new economy
for our youth and a way to bridge the employment gap for others so that people can have the
dignity
of putting in an honest day's work for an honest day's pay; and



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House look on today as the start of
a new chapter
in the life of Cape Bretoners and agree to send a message, loud and clear, to the federal
government
to address the important issues at hand.



RESOLUTION NO. 2754




By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the strength and success of Nova Scotia depends on the strength of our
communities and
that, in turn, relies on the dedication of hard-working individuals; and



Whereas Dr. John Burke's involvement with the Progressive Conservative Party spans
30 active and
committed years; and



Whereas during this time, he has served as the member of the Legislative Assembly
for Cape Breton
South, and dedicated years of time and support for public and community service;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Dr. John Burke
for his long-standing commitment to the Progressive Conservative Party and his sincere
dedication to the
betterment of his province, community and Cape Breton.



RESOLUTION NO. 2755




By: Mr. Donald Downe (Lunenburg West)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the American Bus Association has selected the Lunenburg Folk Harbour
Festival as one
of its top 100 events in North America; and



Whereas the Lunenburg Folk Harbour Festival was the only southwestern Nova
Scotian event to be
selected for this year's list, published recently as a 20 page supplement to Destinations
magazine;
and







[Page 7619]

Whereas festival organizers and the South Shore Tourist Association are working
together to
promote motorcoach visits, which can contribute as much as $11,000 U.S. each day to a
community's economy;



Therefore be it resolved that this House extend its congratulations to President Barb
Kehoe and other
members of the Lunenburg Folk Harbour Society for their achievement in earning
international
recognition for a world-class event.



RESOLUTION NO. 2756




By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Mr. Roger Keating of Halifax Needham was a coach for tennis in the 2001
Canada Summer
Games; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Mr. Keating has helped to
promote excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. Keating for his dedication
to sport and
leadership demonstrated by many long hours of coaching.



RESOLUTION NO. 2757




By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas Family Help is a distance treatment service being developed to provide
up-to-date primary
care, mental health treatment for families with significant problems who are currently not
seen in
mental health services; and



Whereas Family Help will treat families who require help with specific, significant
problems and
are referred by family physicians; and







[Page 7620]

Whereas in August 2001, HRDC awarded Cathy Thurston, Director of Cumberland
Mental Health
Services and co-investigator of Family Help a $250,000 grant to design and pilot a
web-based
version of Family Help;



Therefore be it resolved that the House congratulate Cathy Thurston on receiving an
HRDC grant
for the development of a web-based Family Help, and wish the principal investigators and
staff of
Family Help every success as they hold the Family Help launch today in Truro.



RESOLUTION NO. 2758




By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas Marjorie O'Reilly, long time Provincial Director of the Terry Fox
Foundation, will retire
on November 30th; and



Whereas during Ms. O'Reilly's 17 years of service, Nova Scotia has led the country
in per capita
fundraising for cancer research not only last year, but for many other years; and



Whereas Terry Fox would be so proud of the accomplishments of Ms. O'Reilly and
the corps of
dedicated volunteers who have accomplished so much in his name over these many years;




Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Marjorie O'Reilly, Executive
Director of the
Nova Scotia office of the Terry Fox Foundation, for her years of service to finding a cure for
cancer
and wish her a happy and productive retirement.



RESOLUTION NO. 2759




By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and







[Page 7621]

Whereas Mr. Dan Ota of Halifax Needham was a coach for volleyball in the 2001
Canada Summer
Games; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Mr. Ota has helped to promote
excellence in sport, sport
development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. Ota for his dedication to
sport and
leadership demonstrated by many long hours of coaching.



RESOLUTION NO. 2760




By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Ms. Allison Walker of Halifax Needham was a coach for volleyball in the
2001 Canada
Summer Games; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Ms. Walker has helped to
promote excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Ms. Walker for his dedication
to sport and
leadership demonstrated by many long hours of coaching.



RESOLUTION NO. 2761




By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Mr. Jarrett McKay of Halifax Needham was a coach for diving in the 2001
Canada Summer
Games; and







[Page 7622]

Whereas through hard work and dedication, Mr. McKay has helped to
promote excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. McKay for his dedication
to sport and
leadership demonstrated by many long hours of coaching.



RESOLUTION NO. 2762





By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Ms. Erin Boyd of Halifax Needham was a manager for cycling in the 2001
Canada Summer
Games; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Ms. Boyd has helped to promote
excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Ms. Boyd for her dedication and
leadership.



RESOLUTION NO. 2763





By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Mr. Phillipe Caron of Halifax Needham participated in the 2001 Canada
Summer Games
for swimming; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Mr. Caron has helped to promote
excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;







[Page 7623]

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. Caron for his recent athletic
success, and
for his dedication to sport demonstrated by many long hours of training and practice.



RESOLUTION NO. 2764





By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Ms. Pamela Rogers of Halifax Needham participated in the 2001 Canada
Summer Games;
and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Ms. Rogers has helped to promote
excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Ms. Rogers for her recent
athletic success, and
for her dedication to sport demonstrated by many long hours of training.



RESOLUTION NO. 2765





By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Mr. Brent Cooper of Halifax Needham won the bronze medal for men's
basketball at the
2001 Canada Summer Games; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Mr. Cooper has helped to promote
excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;







[Page 7624]

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. Cooper for his recent
athletic success, a
fine reward for his dedication to sport demonstrated by many long hours of practice and
training.



RESOLUTION NO. 2766





By: Ms. Maureen MacDonald (Halifax Needham)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canada Games have been held at two year intervals since 1967, allowing
approximately
45,000 young Canadians to participate in the games and allowing another 180,000 to engage
in
tryouts and qualifying events; and



Whereas Mr. David Burton of Halifax Needham participated in the 2001 Canada
Summer Games
for rugby; and



Whereas through hard work and dedication, Mr. Burton has helped to promote
excellence in sport,
sport development and healthy, active lifestyles;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. Burton for his recent
athletic success, and
for his dedication to sport demonstrated by many long hours of training and practice.



RESOLUTION NO. 2767





By: Mr. Robert Chisholm (Halifax Atlantic)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the staff of the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission outlet in Spryfield raised
more than $2,500
last year for the Children's Wish Foundation, an organization dedicated to granting wishes
to
children who are facing high-risk, life-threatening diseases; and



Whereas many businesses and organizations in the community have contributed to
the Children's
Wish Foundation's fundraising projects this year; and



Whereas fundraising efforts are continuing with the sale of Children's Wish Cards at
the Spryfield
outlet of the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission;







[Page 7625]

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the local businesses and
organizations in
Spryfield, and especially the Spryfield outlet of the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission, for
their
continued support of the Children's Wish Foundation.



RESOLUTION NO. 2768





By: Mr. Robert Chisholm (Halifax Atlantic)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Captain William Spry Community Centre in Spryfield has for many
years offered a
vibrant local community resource and meeting place; and



Whereas the facility houses the constituency office of the Halifax Atlantic MLA, the
local library,
and the Lions Wave Pool, as well as other community organizations; and



Whereas Joan McDonnell, as Facility Manager, has contributed greatly to the
establishment of this
community centre;



Therefore be it resolved that we wish Joan McDonnell good luck in her new position
as Regional
Coordinator with Parks and Recreation and welcome Peggy Allen of Herring Cove as the
new
Facility Manager for the Captain William Spry Community Centre.



RESOLUTION NO. 2769





By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas immigrants have contributed significantly to the growth and cultural
diversity of Nova
Scotia and current demographic trends indicate that there is minimal population growth in
Nova
Scotia without immigration; and



Whereas Nova Scotia is embarking on a new economy which is knowledge-based and
needs more
skilled workers and entrepreneurs and the province wants to position itself in the global
economy
as a key player; and



Whereas the encouragement of increased immigration to Nova Scotia is a positive
step toward these
goals;







[Page 7626]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House acknowledge the significant
contributions to
Nova Scotia and all of Canada thanks to those who immigrate to our country and support
continued
work to attract, retain, and integrate immigrants to Nova Scotia.



RESOLUTION NO. 2770





By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas Samantha Rideout, Yarmouth Consolidated Memorial High School, Maggie
Arenburg,
Yarmouth Junior High School, Tracie d'Entremont, Ecole Wedgeport, and Michelle Surette,
Ecole
Jean-Marie, Saulnierville, were the southwestern regional winners of the N.S. Recycles Day
School
Contest, part of National Waste Reduction Week in October; and



Whereas these four youth should not only be proud of excelling in the contest, but
also of being part
of a movement to change attitudes about recycling in Nova Scotia; and



Whereas 3,000 students representing 120 schools from across the province entered
the contest with
prizes awarded to winners from each of seven geographic regions;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the four
southwestern Nova Scotia
winners and thank them for caring about an issue as important to their future as recycling.




RESOLUTION NO. 2771





By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas Halloween in Yarmouth is a lot safer for our youth thanks to students and
teacher, Ken
Langille, of Yarmouth Consolidated Memorial High School; and



Whereas the program has become so successful, with acts of vandalism reduced
significantly, the
numbers of students needed to patrol the community is kept to about 40 - those enrolled in
Mr.
Langille's law enforcement course; and







[Page 7627]

Whereas the Grade 12 program not only encourages students to assist law
enforcement and to help
on Halloween night, it also gives students first aid, workplace hazardous materials safety
training
and a raft of other training certificates as required aspects of the course;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate both Mr. Langille
and students of
his Grade 12 law enforcement course for making Halloween safe and fun for the young
people of
the community, just as it is supposed to be, and commend the school for offering the course
to
encourage the appreciation of law enforcement.



RESOLUTION NO. 2772





By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Nova Scotia Department of Environment and Labour, Office of the Fire
Marshal,
recently recognized The Vanguard for its outstanding contribution to fire safety; and



Whereas the award was presented to editor, Fred Hatfield, by Yarmouth Fire Chief
Ken Kelly on
November 1, 2001; and



Whereas for a quarter century, the paper has hosted Firefighters' Corner, originated
by the late
Assistant Deputy Chief Paul Cleveland and followed by the now Deputy Fire Marshal,
Harold
Pothier, with support from the editor and his newsroom staff;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Fred Hatfield of the
Yarmouth
Vanguard on the receipt of the Media Award and thank him and those who have assisted in
composing the information shared from the pages of The Vanguard who have supported local
fire
departments, the fire service, following up on fires, fire prevention and other events with
which each
department became involved.



RESOLUTION NO. 2773





By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:







[Page 7628]

Whereas the annual Yarmouth Fire Department banquet was recently held where
service awards
were presented to those who have given tremendous support to the department; and



Whereas five year awards went to Gayna Jacquard and Gwen Lake; 15 year awards
to mother and
daughter, Shirley Deveau and Lisa McKay; a 33 year recognition went to Della Robicheau;
a 10 year
award was given to volunteer Gordie Grant; the 25 year award and 25 year Nova Scotia
medal went
to Rev. Bill Newell; and the 20 year federal service went to retired firefighter Bruce Trask;
and



Whereas after 19 years, Terry Muise was retired from the active volunteer list and
was presented
with a watch by President Duane Cleveland and a veteran's certificate from the town; Bruce
Hopkins
received a special presentation after 50 years as a board member and curator; and CJLS
radio's Ray
Zinck was awarded a certificate of appreciation for the station's continued support;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate all recipients on
their years of
devoted service to the fire department and thank them for their service to their community.




RESOLUTION NO. 2774





By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas promoting the values and benefits of recreation to young people is important
for developing
healthy lifestyles and opening doors for a broader look at the world; and



Whereas the International Children's Games is a sporting event which promotes top
athletic
competition for promising young athletes and provides an important cultural experience,
thereby
building peace through sport; and



Whereas these games are between municipalities, not nations, and Szombathely,
Hungary, was this
year's host and the Annapolis Valley Team - one of only three ever to attend from Canada
- sent 15
athletes, aged 12 to 15, to compete and meet people from all over the world.









[Page 7629]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud the Annapolis Valley
International
Children's Games Society for providing this athletic and cultural opportunity, congratulate
the
athletes on their motivation and love of sport and wish the society success as it works toward
hosting
these international games.



RESOLUTION NO. 2775




By: Hon. Gordon Balser (Minister of Economic Development)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas Chris Hersey of Digby was selected as the only Digby player in the Western
Valley AAA
Atom Team; and



Whereas he has worked hard to develop his skills through his participation in the
local minor hockey
program; and



Whereas we all know the sacrifices that parents and grandparents must make in
supporting their
children in minor athletics;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate this young
athlete, his parents,
Mark and Donna Hersey, and grandparents, Frank and Jean Marshall, for their commitment
to this
sport.



RESOLUTION NO. 2776




By: Hon. Gordon Balser (Minister of Economic Development)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas on September 22nd five members of the Tuscan Lodge #111 celebrated 50
years of
membership; and



Whereas these individuals have all, each in their own way, played a significant role
in bettering the
lives of the people in their communities, as demonstrated by the number of individuals who
attended
this 50 year Jewel presentation; and



Whereas Ron Kinney, Willard Kinney, Scott Kinney, Sherman Prime and Arthur Rice
all joined the
Lodge on the same day, July 18, 1951;







[Page 7630]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House applaud the long-term
contribution of these
community leaders and congratulate them on this prestigious recognition.



RESOLUTION NO. 2777




By: Hon. Gordon Balser (Minister of Economic Development)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas on September 26, 2001, Arthur Millard Rice was recognized by the Tuscan
Lodge #111
for 50 years of service; and



Whereas Mr. Rice has long been a community leader, serving on municipal council,
with the Board
of Trade and with the fire department; and



Whereas Mr. Rice has actively participated in the development of the economy of this
area, having
been in business for 49 years prior to his retirement in 2000;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House join with the community, his
wife,
Geraldine, his four children, nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren in expressing
our
appreciation for his many contributions and congratulating him on this achievement.



RESOLUTION NO. 2778




By: Hon. Gordon Balser (Minister of Economic Development)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre has over the years provided training for
personnel from
over 130 countries; and



Whereas this centre, located on the former CFB Cornwallis site, has gained an
international
reputation for developing new policies and strategies necessary for securing peace in many
troubled
countries; and



Whereas this facility, through this international outreach, has brought great credit to
Nova Scotia and
Canada;







[Page 7631]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House pay tribute to the dedicated
and professional
staff of the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre for their important contribution to international
peacekeeping and to the many military and civilian personnel from Canada and all over the
world
who have participated in the Centre's peacekeeping education, training and research
programs.



RESOLUTION NO. 2779




By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas delegates from 52 national sections of the International Council of Folklore
Festivals and
Traditional Arts Organizations present at its 31st World Congress held in Porto, Portugal,
in view of
the increasing violence in the world and especially the events of September 11th and their
aftermath,
committed to take additional steps to promote a world of peace and understanding; and



Whereas the CIOFF World Conference agreed that acts of violence and their effects
on every aspect
of life are increasing worldwide, the sorrow for lives lost is shared by all, and that as the
basic quality
of life is being threatened there is a basic need for people to live in peace; and



Whereas the group also agreed that preserving and respecting cultural diversity, with
its existing
languages, religions, traditions and customs which are also expressed through traditional arts,
music,
song and dance, is of utmost importance, and the creative abilities of individuals and
communities
should be encouraged and cherished, and that human life and dignity in all its aspects should
be
respected and protected, and equality amongst all human beings should be recognized and
promoted;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House acknowledge the CIOFF call to
the Director
General of UNESCO and members of the World Congress to join them in their noble pursuit
of
world peace and understanding.



RESOLUTION NO. 2780




By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:







[Page 7632]

Whereas eight Mi'kmaq from six Mi'kmaq communities, Pictou Landing, Afton,
Chapel Island,
Membertou, Millbrook and Abegweit, have now become certified mentors through the highly
successful Mentor Certificate Pilot Program funded by the Department of Fisheries and
Oceans; and



Whereas the participants in the program, Jerome Basque, George Smith, Michael
Francis, Thomas
Beadle, Tim Sock, High Francis Fred Sylliboy and Keith Julien, Jr., will now teach 24
trainees from
Bear River, Afton, Pictou Landing, Millbrook, Eskasoni and Glooscap about the safety and
conservation issues surrounding the fishing industry; and



Whereas Pictou Landing community Elder Raymond Francis stressed the importance
of safety and
conservation to the newly trained fishers;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate all of the
participants in the Mentor
Certificate Pilot Program for their dedication to their community, to mentoring and
community
education, and to safe and sustainable fishing.



RESOLUTION NO. 2781




By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the French River-Telford Women's Institute recently celebrated its 44th
Anniversary, when
Jean Patterson was made a life member of the branch and received her life pin; and



Whereas the branch, established in 1947 by the late Jesse Kinley, has long served the
community,
with members contributing countless volunteer hours and giving financial support to the sick,
seniors
and students; and



Whereas the occasion was also bittersweet with the group meeting for the last time,
disbanding
because of declining membership;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly salute the French
River-Telford
Women's Institute, its past and present members, and acknowledge their valued service
which
people in French River and Telford will not forget.









[Page 7633]

RESOLUTION NO. 2782




By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the member for Halifax Needham continually attempts to relay false
information on the
issue of nursing numbers here in Nova Scotia; and



Whereas for the member for Halifax Needham's information, all 280 of the nursing
educational seats
in the province were filled last year, with 82 third-year nursing students completing 10-week
work
terms in various parts of the province; and



Whereas last year 76 per cent of all new nursing graduates from Nova Scotia
remained here in Nova
Scotia;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly admonish the
fear-mongering
tactics of this member and ensure she is aware that there are more nurses working in this
province
since 1999 and that this government will continue to work to retain and recruit nurses to our
province
to provide a premium level of care for those in need.



RESOLUTION NO. 2783




By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas since the doors of the Keshen Goodman Library opened in July, the library
has circulated
hundreds of thousands of items; and



Whereas already the region's third-largest, the new library carries approximately
100,000 volumes,
45 computer workstations, and meeting rooms for the community's use; and



Whereas the Keshen Goodman Library also has a computer training centre, which has
been a huge
success, and has full attendance at many computer classes;



Therefore be it resolved that all members applaud the opening of the Keshen
Goodman Library and
the contributions it will make in the community.







[Page 7634]

RESOLUTION NO. 2784




By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the King of Donair men's senior soccer team won the Canadian Senior
Men's
Championship; and



Whereas the team played in the national championships this fall in Otobiko; and



Whereas the team's success is a win for all soccer lovers in metro;



Therefore be it resolved that all members congratulate the King of Donair team and
Manager,
Mourad Farid, on this success.



RESOLUTION NO. 2785




By: Mr. William Estabrooks (Timberlea-Prospect)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas according to a Department of Transportation and Public Works traffic count
report, 2,070
vehicles daily used the Prospect Bay Road during the week of August 9th to August 16th;
and



Whereas these statistics indicate growing use of the Prospect Bay Road; and



Whereas this road is part of the popular Lighthouse tourist route and a busy commuter
highway for
local residents;



Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Transportation and Public Works make
improvements
to the Prospect Bay Road based on Department of Transportation and Public Works statistics
which
indicate its growing use by tourists and commuters.









[Page 7635]

RESOLUTION NO. 2786




By: Mr. Frank Corbett (Cape Breton Centre)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas truckers spend their days and nights on the road in all weather conditions;
and



Whereas Cecil Mackie of Gardiner Mines was just doing his job on March 23, 2001,
when he came
upon an overturned car; and



Whereas Cecil not only stayed with the occupants of the car until the ambulance
arrived, he also
waited with them until the tow truck arrived and drove them to their destination afterwards;




Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize the selfless actions of Cecil Mackie
which
garnered him the 2001 Good Samaritan Award from the Atlantic Provinces Trucking
Association.



RESOLUTION NO. 2787





By: Mr. William Estabrooks (Timberlea-Prospect)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas according to a Department of Transportation and Public Works traffic count
report, 2,080
vehicles daily used the Terence Bay Road during the week of August 9th to 16th; and



Whereas these statistics indicate growing use of the Terence Bay Road; and



Whereas this road is part of the popular Lighthouse Tourist Route and a busy
commuter highway for
local residents;



Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Transportation and Public Works make
improvements
to the Terence Bay Road based on these DOT statistics which indicate growing use of this
highway
for tourist and commuter purposes.









[Page 7636]

RESOLUTION NO. 2788





By: Mr. William Estabrooks (Timberlea-Prospect)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas according to a Department of Transportation and Public Works traffic count
report, 2,970
vehicles daily used the Prospect Road through the community of Shad Bay during the week
of
August 9th to 16th; and



Whereas these statistics indicate growing use of Route 333 from Shad Bay through
to West Dover;
and



Whereas this road is part of the popular Lighthouse Tourist Route and a busy
commuter highway for
local residents;



Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Transportation and Public Works make
improvements
to Highway 333 from Shad Bay to West Dover based on these DOT statistics which indicate
growing
use of this highway for tourist and commuter purposes.



RESOLUTION NO. 2789





By: Mr. Howard Epstein (Halifax Chebucto)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canadian National Site Licensing Project is a $50 million on-line
database of mainly
scientific journals and research sources; and



Whereas the project will save money for 64 participating university libraries across
Canada,
including Halifax's Dalhousie, Mount Saint Vincent, Saint Mary's Universities and Nova
Scotia
College of Art and Design; and



Whereas the service provides access to over 750 journals which universities wouldn't
otherwise be
able to afford;



Therefore be it resolved that the project's steering committee be commended for its
cost-sharing
initiative with other universities in enabling access to costly journals.









[Page 7637]

RESOLUTION NO. 2790





By: Mr. Howard Epstein (Halifax Chebucto)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Canadian National Site Licensing Project is a $50 million on-line
database of mainly
scientific journals and research sources; and



Whereas the project will save money for 64 participating university libraries across
Canada,
including Halifax's Dalhousie, Mount Saint Vincent, Saint Mary's Universities and Nova
Scotia
College of Art and Design; and



Whereas the service provides access to over 750 journals which universities wouldn't
otherwise be
able to afford;



Therefore be it resolved that the steering committee for the Canadian National Site
Licensing project
be commended for its cost-sharing initiative with universities in enabling access to costly
journals.



RESOLUTION NO. 2791





By: Mr. Kevin Deveaux (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design has a long history of working
with and helping
those in the community; and



Whereas since 1994 NSCAD has produced the Hungry Bowl, an annual event to raise
money for,
among others, Adsum House, Hope Cottage and Phoenix House; and



Whereas the event involves a choice of delicious soup from local restaurants and a
selection of
handmade bowls from students at NSCAD;



Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize the efforts of the Nova Scotia
College of Art and
Design and its students for the eighth Hungry Bowl and wish them all the best for this year's
event.









[Page 7638]

RESOLUTION NO. 2792





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Ms. Mary Sheppard of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Ms.
Sheppard for choosing
to be an important part of her community with her unpaid time.



RESOLUTION NO. 2793





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mr. Ron Tynes of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mr. Ron
Tynes of Hants
East for his example of giving freely of his time to his community.









[Page 7639]

RESOLUTION NO. 2794





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mr. Ralph Willis, Jr. of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a
certificate;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mr. Ralph
Willis, Jr. of
Hants East for his unselfish sharing of his talents and time with his community.



RESOLUTION NO. 2795





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Ms. Elsie Upshaw of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Ms. Elsie
Upshaw of
Hants East for her lifelong contribution of her unpaid time and talents to her community.










[Page 7640]

RESOLUTION NO. 2796





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Ms. Leona Oliver of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Ms. Leona
Oliver of Hants
East for pitching in so often to help her community that she became an example of that which
is fine
and good.



RESOLUTION NO. 2797





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Ms. Norma Byard of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Ms. Norma
Byard of Hants
East for achieving a level of volunteerism above and beyond merely 'just doing her part'.









[Page 7641]

RESOLUTION NO. 2798





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mrs. Irene Wotherspoon of Belnan was honoured with a pin and a
certificate;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mrs. Irene
Wotherspoon
of Belnan for her countless hours of hard work behind the health care scene that benefits
Hants East
in many positive ways.



RESOLUTION NO. 2799





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mr. Al Wallace of Elmsdale was honoured with a pin and a certificate;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mr.
Wallace for his
commitment to the concept of volunteerism, which has led to so much positive benefit to his
community.









[Page 7642]

RESOLUTION NO. 2800





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Ms. Dot Buchanan of Enfield was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Ms. Dot
Buchanan for her
long and multitudinous contributions to the improvement and enjoyment of her community.




RESOLUTION NO. 2801





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mr. Paul Bolivar of Enfield was honoured with a pin and a certificate;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mr. Paul
Bolivar for his
outstanding example of volunteering without expectation of reward or remuneration.









[Page 7643]

RESOLUTION NO. 2802





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Ms. Lorna Johnson of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Ms. Lorna
Johnson for her
outstanding example of volunteering without expectation of reward or remuneration.



RESOLUTION NO. 2803





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the Atlantic Canada Entrepreneur of the Year Award, alas, can be presented
to only one of
several very deserving nominees; and



Whereas Bud Weatherhead of Rainbow Farms in Upper Rawdon was nominated as
a finalist in this
year's program, sponsored by Ernst & Young; and



Whereas four businesses from Hants County were short-listed as finalists for the
Atlantic Canada
Entrepreneur of the Year Award;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Bud Weatherhead
of Rainbow
Farms in Upper Rawdon on being nominated for Entrepreneur of the Year and salute the
spirit of
entrepreneurship in Hants County.









[Page 7644]

RESOLUTION NO. 2804





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mr. Jim Hnatiuk of Lantz was honoured with a pin and a certificate;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mr.
Hnatiuk of Lantz for
his wonderful example of volunteer effort on behalf of his community.



RESOLUTION NO. 2805





By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas this year has been declared by the United Nations the International Year of
the Volunteer;
and



Whereas the Colchester/East Hants Seniors Council joined forces with the
Cumberland Seniors
Council to strike special pewter pins and certificates for presentation to a number of worthy
recipients; and



Whereas Mrs. Hilda Ray of Hants East was honoured with a pin and a certificate;




Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Mrs. Ray
for volunteering
her time and noteworthy talents for the betterment of her community.









[Page 7645]

RESOLUTION NO. 2806





By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas the White Ribbon Campaign is an effort by men to help put an end to
violence against
women; and



Whereas wearing the white ribbon symbolizes a personal pledge to not commit,
condone or remain
silent about violence against women; and



Whereas the 10th Anniversary of the White Ribbon Campaign takes place from
November 25th until
December 6th;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House recognize White Ribbon Days
and encourage
all Nova Scotians to work to end violence against women.



RESOLUTION NO. 2807





By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas an unparalleled workshop recently took place for the first time at the
Salvation Army Hall
in Westville; and



Whereas the workshop challenged individuals as well as organizations to examine
the roles they play
in their respective communities; and



Whereas the Community Capacity Building workshop involved non-profit groups and
local
politicians;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly acknowledge the
work of dedicated
organizers such as Glenn MacLeod and Major Carson Durdle in being able to put on a
workshop of
this magnitude which, down the road, can only lead to improvements in the way of life for
local
communities.









[Page 7646]

RESOLUTION NO. 2808





By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas an educational program has been established between students at the
Victoria Middle
School in Westville and the New Glasgow/Westville Police service; and



Whereas the program is one of drug safety designed to show students the benefits of
staying away
from illegal drugs; and



Whereas the New Glasgow/Westville Police Department donated more than 160
books to students
at the Victoria Middle School to promote and encourage the benefits of staying away from
or getting
involved in the dealing, selling or taking of illicit narcotics;



Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly salute the
students and teaching
staff at the Victoria Middle School in Westville, as well as the New Glasgow/Westville
community
policing initiative for their participation in this worthwhile initiative.



RESOLUTION NO. 2809





By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)



I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following
resolution:



Whereas more than 20 cross-country teams recently competed in a high school event
in Halifax,
which saw 85 runners from across the province participate; and



Whereas the Westville High School team settled for second place and silver medals
in the senior
boys' division; and



Whereas silver medalists from Westville High were Mike Campbell, Mike Currie,
Jeff Olmstead,
Ryan Deagle, Matt Rutledge and Travis Gaudet;



Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly commend the
Westville High
School Senior Boys' Division cross-country running team for winning silver in Halifax and
wish
them every success with the rest of their school year.