The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD 06-3

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Cecil Clarke

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Annual subscriptions available from the Office of the Speaker.

Second Session

MONDAY, MAY 8, 2006

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Educ.: Tuition Fees - Reduce, Mr. W. Estabrooks 100
TPW: Baseline Rd. (Cape St. Mary) - Gov't. [N.S.] Road List, Mr. W. Gaudet 101
TPW: Porters Lake/Preston - Community Transit, Mr. K. Colwell 101
Comm. Serv.: Income Assistance - Index, Mr. G. Steele 101
Nat. Res.: Terence Bay Wilderness Area - Trails Access, Mr. W. Estabrooks 102
Educ.: Tuition Fees - Reduce, Ms. D. Whalen 102
Fin.: VLTs - Abolish, Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 102
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 66, Battle of the Atl.: Veterans - Salute, Hon. R. Russell 103
Vote - Affirmative 103
Res. 67, World Red Cross & Red Crescent Day (05/08/06) - Recognize,
Hon. C. d'Entremont 103
Vote - Affirmative 104
Res. 68, Gibson, Larry - Jerome Award, Hon. B. Barnet 104
Vote - Affirmative 105
Res. 69, Drinking Water Wk. (05/08-05/13/06) - Proclaim,
Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson (by Hon. A. MacIsaac) 105
Vote - Affirmative 105
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 28, Public Service Act., Hon. R. Russell 106
No. 29, Crystal Methamphetamine Ingredients Regulation Act,
Mr. K. Deveaux 106
No. 30, Day Care Act, Mr. Manning MacDonald 106
No. 31, Licensed Practical Nurses Act, Hon. C. d'Entremont 106
No. 32, Emergency Responders Insurance Protection Act, Mr. D. Dexter 106
No. 33, Employment Support and Income Assistance Act,
Mr. Manning MacDonald 106
No. 34, Registered Nurses Act, Hon. C. d'Entremont 106
No. 35, Whistleblowers Act, Mr. F. Corbett 106
No. 36, Education Act, Ms. D. Whalen 106
No. 37, Public Utilities Act, Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson 107
No. 38, Gas Distribution Act/Public Utilities Act, Mr. H. Epstein 107
No. 39, Environment Act, Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson 107
No. 40, Health Insurance Protection Act, Ms. Michele Raymond 107
No. 41, Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord
Implementation (Nova Scotia) Act 107
No. 42, Day Care Act, Ms. M. More 107
No. 43, Provincial Finance Act, Mr. G. Steele 107
No. 44, Consumer Reporting Act, Mr. W. Estabrooks 107
No. 45, Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act,
Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 107
No. 46, Housing Act, Mr. G. Gosse 107
No. 47, Motor Vehicle Act, Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 107
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 70, East. Passage Educ. Ctr. - Wrestling Championship,
Mr. K. Deveaux 108
Vote - Affirmative 108
Res. 71, HMCS Acadia - Anniv. (50th), Mr. Manning MacDonald 109
Vote - Affirmative 110
Res. 72, Hants - Kings Bus. Dev. Ctr. - Support, Mr. M. Parent 110
Vote - Affirmative 111
Res. 73, Tingley, Melanie - Entrepreneurship, Mr. J. MacDonell 111
Vote - Affirmative 111
Res. 74, On-Line Petitions: Comm. on Assembly Matters - Refer,
Ms. D. Whalen 112
Res. 75, Bower, Gladys E. - Birthday (108th), Mr. C. O'Donnell 112
Vote - Affirmative 113
Res. 76, TCH: Artistic/Cultural Communities - Support, Ms. J. Massey 113
Res. 77, Gray, Rev. Glenn/New Beginnings Ministries - Land Purchase,
Mr. K. Colwell 114
Vote - Affirmative 115
Res. 78, Hicks, Jamie - Pugwash Archery Club,
Mr. E. Fage (by Mr. J. DeWolfe) 115
Vote - Affirmative 116
Res. 79, Lindsay, John, Sr.: Death of - Tribute, Mr. H. Epstein 116
Vote - Affirmative 116
Res. 80, Nat'l. Nurses Wk. (05/06-05/12/06) - Recognize,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 116
Vote - Affirmative 117
Res. 81, Cansport/Adamski, Lee - Congrats., Mr. G. Hines 117
Vote - Affirmative 118
Res. 82, Environ. & Lbr. - Williams Lake Dam,
Ms. M. Raymond 118
Res. 83, Highland Manor - Anniv. (20th), Mr. Gerald Sampson 119
Vote - Affirmative 119
Res. 84, Dykstra, Andrea - Aboriginal Achievement Award,
Mr. J. DeWolfe 120
Vote - Affirmative 120
Res. 85, Croft, Clary - Dart. Heritage Museum, Ms. M. More 120
Vote - Affirmative 121
Res. 86, Nat'l. Emergency Preparedness Wk. (05/07-05/13/06),
Mr. H. Theriault 121
Vote - Affirmative 122
Res. 87, Shelburne/Barrington C of Cs - Recognition, Mr. C. O'Donnell 122
Vote - Affirmative 123
Res. 88, Nat. Res. - Fishing Licence Fees, Mr. W. Estabrooks 123
Res. 89, Clare Acadiens Midget AA Hockey Team - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Gaudet 123
Vote - Affirmative 124
Res. 90, Surette, Winnie: CIBC - Anniv. (40th), Mr. C. d'Entremont 124
Vote - Affirmative 125
Res. 91, Transport de Clare - Applaud, Mr. J. Pye 125
Vote - Affirmative 126
Res. 92, Cushing, Bob - Kings Co. Vol. of Yr., Mr. L. Glavine 126
Vote - Affirmative 126
Res. 93, Wheelock, John & Judy - Truro Heritage Award,
Hon. J. Muir 127
Vote - Affirmative 127
Res. 94, Bravo Conf. - Prince Andrew HS, Ms. J. Massey 127
Vote - Affirmative 128
Res. 95, Toth, Elizabeth "Nana" - Birthday (102nd),
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 128
Vote - Affirmative 129
Res. 96, N. American Waterfowl Mgt. Plan - Anniv. (20th),
Hon. B. Taylor 129
Vote - Affirmative 130
Res. 97, Beacon House - Mortgage Payoff,
Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 130
Vote - Affirmative 131
Res. 98, Sanders, Sherman - Heroism, Mr. K. Colwell 131
Vote - Affirmative 131
Res. 99, Col. Reg. Hosp. Fdn.: Truro/Col. Mun. - Contributions,
Hon. B. Taylor 132
Vote - Affirmative 132
Res. 100, McKenzie, Fabian - Coaching Award, Mr. G. Gosse 132
Vote - Affirmative 133
Res. 101, Johnson, Tristan - Boxing Achievements, Mr. H. Theriault 133
Vote - Affirmative 134
Res. 102, Wizard of Oz: Astral Dr. Elem. Sch. - Production,
Mr. K. Deveaux 134
Vote - Affirmative 134
Res. 103, Wong's Bras d'Or House Rest. - Anniv. (41st),
Mr. Gerald Sampson 135
Vote - Affirmative 135
Res. 104, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche/Semo Tseyang Ripa: Marriage -
Congrats., Mr. H. Epstein 135
Vote - Affirmative 136
Res. 105, Noise Pollution Control - UNSM, Ms. D. Whalen 136
Res. 106, Dart. Curling Club Team - Performance, Ms. M. More 137
Vote - Affirmative 137
Res. 107, Atl. Lottery Corp. - Anniv. (30th), Mr. W. Gaudet 137
Vote - Affirmative 138
Res. 108, Med. Lab. Techs - Thank,
Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 138
Vote - Affirmative 139
Res. 109, Gov't. (N.S.) - Pedestrian Safety, Mr. L. Glavine 139
Vote - Affirmative 140
Res. 110, Residents' Soc. for Safe & Healthy Neighbourhood -
Winterfest, Mr. J. Pye 140
Vote - Affirmative 140
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
Mr. Michel Samson 141
Mr. G. Gosse 159
Adjourned debate 170
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., May 9th at 1:00 p.m. 171
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 111, Thompson, George: Lawrencetown Vol. FS - Contribution,
Mr. S. McNeil 172
Res. 112, Garner, Erin - Valley Waste Resource Award,
Mr. S. McNeil 172
Res. 113, Redmond, Arlene - AVRSB Award, Mr. S. McNeil 173
Res. 114, Dal. Engineering Students -
Cdn. Nat'l. Concrete Canoe Championship, Hon. B. Barnet 173
Res. 115, Morgan, Kathleen: Death of - Tribute, Mr. L. Glavine 174
Res. 116, Canning Area Parents for Real Employment - Contributions,
Mr. L. Glavine 174
Res. 117, Holland, Emily - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 175
Res. 118, Verstichelen, Nicole - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 175
Res. 119, Dort, Jessica - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 176
Res. 120, Calder, Sarah - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 176
Res. 121, Cameron, Hillary - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 177
Res. 122, Hankinson, Abbie - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 177
Res. 123, Reagh, Hailey - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 178
Res. 124, Blinn, Brittany - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 178
Res. 125, Odegard, Cassie - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 179
Res. 126, Burgess, Alana - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 179
Res. 127, Walsh, Stacey - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 180
Res. 128, Charest, Max - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 180
Res. 129, Naugler, Coach Bruce - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 181
Res. 130, Byrne, Coach Bob - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 181
Res. 131, Blinn, Coach Leann - Trampoline/Tumbling Championships,
Mr. L. Glavine 182

[Page 99]

HALIFAX, MONDAY, MAY 8, 2006

Fifty-ninth General Assembly

Second Session

7:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Cecil Clarke

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. James DeWolfe, Mr. Charles Parker, Mr. Keith Colwell

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable Liberal House Leader.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I rise tonight on a point of privilege. My rights and privileges as a member of this House, and the rights of all members of this House have been interfered with and disregarded by this current Cabinet. In the eyes of this Cabinet, the will of the Legislature and its democratically-elected members are irrelevant. One hundred and twenty-seven bills have been passed since this government took over in 2003, and 23 bills have not been proclaimed. This amounts to one out of every five bills. I will table these bills to the House - 23 bills that have not been proclaimed by this Cabinet.

Mr. Speaker, an example of a bill passed unanimously in this House by all three Parties is the Cape Breton Marketing Levy Act, passed on November 3, 2005. It received Royal Assent on December 8th and it was supposed to come into effect on April 1, 2006. In regard to that, the bill was supported by the Premier of this province, who was the then Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage at the time the bill was presented to the House. Again, I remember that this bill passed unanimously.

99

[Page 100]

You, yourself, Mr. Speaker, sent a letter to the Chief Legislative Counsel of the province asking for documentation to be prepared back in January to be presented to Cabinet so the bill could be proclaimed. That was in your role as the member for Cape Breton North and, also, you were a member of the Executive Council at the time.

Mr. Speaker, the people of this province expect that when a bill has received a favourable vote from its elected members that the bill will become law. It is through the will of the Legislature that bills should become law, not by a decision of 15 people sitting around a table. It begs the question, what do we need the Legislature for?

Mr. Speaker, I ask that you rule on this matter immediately, and upon your approval, proceed directly to my subsequent motion. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I would suggest that the honourable member opposite hasn't done his homework very well, because as far back as I can remember, and I think for as long as this House has been in existence, there have been bills brought forward that have gone through the third reading process but have not been proclaimed. I would suggest that probably every government that follows the British tradition of parliamentary government would have the same experience.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. What the Government House Leader is saying wasn't right then, in the past, and it's not right today. If this Legislature approves a bill unanimously, that bill should become law.

MR. SPEAKER: Well, if I can count on the memory of the last time that my predecessor in this Chair had to do a ruling on the point that was brought forward, there was a statement with regard to that. I will go back and confer to the Speaker's ruling and report back as soon as possible to all members of the House on the point raised by the Liberal House Leader. We will now commence the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to introduce a petition entitled Reduce Tuition Fees signed by various Nova Scotians of various ages; 275 signatures are on this petition and I have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Clare.

[Page 101]

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition with approximately 220 names. The operative clause reads:

"We the residents of Cape St. Mary and surrounding communities in Clare, hereby, petition the Department of Transportation and Public Works, Province of Nova Scotia to have the Baseline Road in Cape St. Mary reinstated on the provincial government maintained road list."

I have affixed my name to this petition.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Preston.

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I, too, have a petition with 372 names and I have affixed my name to the petition as well. The petition reads:

"This petition has been started to endeavour to have the Community Transit improved by increasing the number of trips it makes to this Porters Lake/Preston area as well as providing the service to the area on weekends."

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition which was started by Mr. Ronald McNeil of my constituency and circulated chiefly at an organization known as Connections Clubhouse in Halifax. The petition reads as follows:

"We, the undersigned, who are persons with disabilities living in Halifax, hereby petition the Nova Scotia Government to index the Income Assistance (formerly both Community Support for Adults and Family Benefits) to take into account the rising cost of living."

The petition has 65 signatures and as required by the rules, I, too, have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

[Page 102]

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition from 730 residents of the Terence Bay-Prospect area concerned about the proper amount of community input into the final decision of restricting access to the Terence Bay Wilderness Area, and I have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition today which is entitled Reduce Tuition Fees. The petition calls for a reduction in tuition fees, in fact a freeze on tuition fees, and the introduction of needs-based grants. It includes 433 signatures and I have included my own as well.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition concerning video lottery terminals in the province. The operative clause reads:

"It is the intention of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul to insist our provincial government abolish all video lottery terminals in the Province of Nova Scotia immediately."

The petition is signed by 340 residents of Glace Bay and surrounding area and I have affixed my signature to it as well.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Deputy Premier.

[Page 103]

RESOLUTION NO. 66

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sunday, Nova Scotians saluted the Veterans of the Battle of the Atlantic, the longest running battle of World War II; and

Whereas the losses incurred during the Battle of the Atlantic were significant - one in 10 lost their lives, a higher percentage than any other branch of the military; and

Whereas this battle was crucial in ensuring the safety of the Atlantic supply route during World War II thanks to the strong character of our Merchant Mariners, the Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal Canadian Air Force, Maritime Air Command and all others who worked to assist their efforts;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House salute these veterans who aided in turning the tide of the Second World War through what were extremely precarious conditions in both the sea and the air, and remember the many brave souls who did not return.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

[7:15 p.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 67

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today is World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day, with this year's theme emphasizing the millions of volunteers who serve the society, to help bring universal attendance to those in need; and

[Page 104]

Whereas today the Canadian Red Cross will sign, or has signed, an historic memorandum of understanding with the federal Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada; and

Whereas this historic agreement highlights the commitment to enhance the protection and assistance that the organization offers to Canadians in need and the disaster service assistance that is ready to help the Government of Canada during a crisis;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day, and in doing so, support the initiatives undertaken by this vital international organization and honour the volunteers who each day, fulfill the fundamental principles held by the Red Cross, worldwide.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of African Nova Scotian Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 68

HON. BARRY BARNET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Saturday, April 29th, Herring Cove resident Larry Gibson received the Harry Jerome Award for business. The Harry Jerome Award recognizes the outstanding achievements of African Canadians; and

Whereas Mr. Gibson is the President of Install-A-Floor Limited, a Nova Scotia-based flooring enterprise that employs close to 200 people and has revenues of over $30 million. His companies include Burnside Floors Plus, Floors Plus More and Perry Lake Developments; and

Whereas Mr. Gibson's company has also been named as one of the Progress Magazine's top 101 companies in Atlantic Canada and he has been called one of the best-kept secrets in the African Nova Scotian business community;

[Page 105]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in congratulating Larry Gibson on winning the Harry Jerome Award for business.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Public Works.

RESOLUTION NO. 69

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the honourable Minister of Environment and Labour, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas water follows a natural cycle and is a basic need required by every living creature; and

Whereas Nova Scotians require a safe and dependable water supply, for now and the future because our health, comfort and standard of living depend upon it; and

Whereas we have called upon every Nova Scotian to protect source waters from pollution, to practise conservation and to become involved in local water issues;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House do hereby proclaim May 8 to 13, 2006, as Safe Drinking Water Week.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 106]

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 28 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 376 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Service Act. (Hon. Ronald Russell)

Bill No. 29 - Entitled an Act to Stop the Spread of Crystal Methamphetamine in Nova Scotia. (Mr. Kevin Deveaux)

Bill No. 30 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 120 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Day Care Act. (Mr. Manning MacDonald)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

MR. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. If you indulge me for a moment I have a number of introductions to do before I introduce my Act. Today being the start of National Nursing Week, we're introducing a couple of bills. I'd like to give attention to the presence of Linda Hamilton - I'll ask them to stand as I mention some of their names - the Executive Director of the College of Registered Nurses in Nova Scotia; Edith Menzies, the President of the college and Mary Ellen Gurnham, President Elect. I'd also like to welcome Ann Mann, the Executive Director of the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia as well as Agnes MacDonald, Board Chair of the college and Albert MacIntyre, Deputy Registrar of the college. They have done a great deal of work in the preparation of these bills.

Bill No. 31 - Entitled an Act Respecting Licensed Practical Nurses. (Hon. Christopher d'Entremont)

Bill No. 32 - Entitled an Act to Provide Insurance Protection for Emergency Responders. (Mr. Darrell Dexter)

Bill No. 33 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 27 of the Acts of 2000. The Employment Support and Income Assistance Act. (Mr. Manning MacDonald)

Bill No. 34 - Entitled an Act Respecting the Practice of Registered Nurses. (Hon. Christopher d'Entremont)

Bill No. 35 - Entitled an Act to Protect Civil Servants who Disclose Government Wrongdoing. (Mr. Frank Corbett)

Bill No. 36 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 1 of the Acts of 1995-96. The Education Act. (Ms. Diana Whalen)

[Page 107]

Bill No. 37 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 380 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Utilities Act. (Hon. Carolyn Bolivar-Getson.)

Bill No. 38 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 4 of the Acts of 1997. The Gas Distribution Act; and Chapter 380 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Utilities Act. (Mr. Howard Epstein.)

Bill No. 39 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 1 of the Acts of 1994-95. The Environment Act. (Hon. Carolyn Bolivar-Getson.)

Bill No. 40 - Entitled an Act Respecting the Protection and Portability of Health Insurance. (Ms. Michele Raymond.)

Bill No. 41 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 3 of the Acts of 1987. The Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Resources Accord Implementation (Nova Scotia) Act. (Hon. Carolyn Bolivar-Getson.)

Bill No. 42 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 120 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Day Care Act. (Ms. Marilyn More.)

Bill No. 43 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 365 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Provincial Finance Act. (Mr. Graham Steele)

[7:30 p.m.]

Bill No. 44 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 93 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Consumer Reporting Act. (Mr. William Estabrooks)

Bill No. 45 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 5 of the Acts of 1993. The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. (Mr. David Wilson, Sackville-Cobequid)

Bill No. 46 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 211 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Housing Act. (Mr. Gordon Gosse)

Bill No. 47 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 293 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Motor Vehicle Act. (Mr. David Wilson, Sackville-Cobequid)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

[Page 108]

RESOLUTION NO. 70

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Eastern Passage Education Centre has a strong tradition of excellent wrestling teams, both boys and girls; and

Whereas at the 2006 Provincial Wrestling Championship, held on March 3rd and 4th, Eastern Passage Education Centre had 19 wrestlers competing at junior and intermediate levels; and

Whereas Eastern Passage Education Centre won five gold medals, six silver medals and three bronze medals;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate the Eastern Passage Education Centre wrestling team on continuing their winning ways at the provincial championship, and in particular Coach Derek Bridgehouse, volunteers Chris Harrison, Freddie Harrison, Christa Raymond, Cory Zwicker, Donald Ebsary, Doug and Carol Larivee, and Tammy Jakeman for all their efforts.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you permit me an introduction before I carry on with the resolution?

MR. SPEAKER: By all means.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

[Page 109]

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, today in the gallery we have with us a number of prominent people involved in the sea cadet movement in Nova Scotia, particularly their connection is the HMCS Acadia reunion, which will be taking place this Summer at Cornwallis. We have Lieutenant Commander Marie Bourinot, who is a former cadet, Commanding Officer from 2000 to 2003, and currently working at the Regional Cadet Support Unit; we have Chief Petty Officer Barry Gerrard, a former cadet and currently coxswain of HMCS Acadia; we have Ray Boudreau, who served at HMCS Acadia for 15 years and is presently chairman of the reunion committee this year. We have Lieutenant (N) Valeria Wadjalak, who was officer in charge of the local headquarter program and former Trag Officer at Acadia. Also, we have Chief Petty Officer David Foster, Coxswain for the Regional Cadet Program.

Mr. Speaker, I'd also like to say that I am proud to be a former cadet at HMCS Acadia and also a commissioned officer at that base, so it's a real pleasure for me to have the opportunity to introduce them today and wish them smooth sailing. I'd like to give the members of the Legislature a chance to welcome you here this evening.(Applause)

RESOLUTION NO. 71

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas HMCS Acadia, a sea cadet Summer training establishment, has provided training to Canadian young men and women every summer since 1956; and

Whereas the Summer of 2006 will mark the 50th Anniversary of the commissioning of HMCS Acadia to be marked by a celebration August 4th, 5th, and 6th in Cornwallis, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas over the past 50 summers, an estimated 35,000 Canadians - young men and women - have trained at Acadia, learning skills such as sailing, navigation, communications, first aid, instructional technique and music. It has been, and continues to be a life experience for those who have served. It carries them forward by giving them attributes such as pride, discipline, self-esteem and teamwork. Some have even gone on to serve in our regular forces, in courtrooms, in the coast guard, and even the provincial Legislature and Parliament;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House thank the volunteers and representatives from all levels of our Armed Forces for their dedication over the past 50 years and wish them all smooth sailing at their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 110]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

I, too, would like to welcome our special guests to the gallery today and all visitors to the House.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 72

MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Hants-Kings Business Development Centre, one of 13 community business development corporations in the province, presented its annual report to Kentville Town Council recently; and

Whereas the fiscal year prior was a very successful one for the organization as a delivery agent in the region for some of the programs developed through government initiatives established by Service Canada and ACOA; and

Whereas it also offers business training and consultation services to its clients with over $10 million in outstanding loans in the region and reports that that figure will continue to grow;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House support the continued success of the centre and acknowledge the importance it and others like it hold in the overall economic well-being of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 111]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 73

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas entrepreneurs create their own opportunities; and

Whereas young women are proving to be very adept at starting their own businesses; and

Whereas Ms. Melanie Tingley of Lantz, a single mom, has boldly pushed into the field of frozen fresh, natural baby food with her Baby's Harvest brand, now featured in several prominent retail outlets throughout the province;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Melanie Tingley for her entrepreneurial spirit and wish her success in the field of business.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favor of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Before I do my resolution I would like to make an introduction, as well. I'd like to draw the attention of the members to the west gallery where we're joined today by members of the 1st Rockingham Pathfinders and the 2nd Bedford Pathfinders.They're joined by a few third-

[Page 112]

year Guides. They're here today with their leaders Louise Ellis and Janet McLeod, as well as some parents who have come to join them. I would ask that our guests rise and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

RESOLUTION NO. 74

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas members of the Legislature are often contacted by individual Nova Scotians, as well as organizations, to table a petition in this House on their behalf; and

Whereas technology has evolved to allow groups to establish on-line petitions and collect names electronically in support of their causes; and

Whereas a petition linked to a Web site is a convenient way for groups to reach more people and raise awareness of their cause, allowing more people to offer their support;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House agree in principle that on-line petitions are acceptable and refer this to the Committee on Assembly Matters for further study and the drafting of any necessary rule changes.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Shelburne.

RESOLUTION NO. 75

MR. CECIL O'DONNELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas another special birthday is being celebrated today, May 8th, in Upper Ohio when Gladys E. Bower turns the incredibly young age of 108; and

[Page 113]

Whereas small birthday celebrations are scheduled today from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. in the home where Gladys still resides and makes her own meals daily; and

Whereas Gladys is still a keen observer of current affairs and up for a talk with residents of the community;

Therefore be it resolved that all MLAs in the Legislature take this moment and extend hearty birthday congratulations to Gladys E. Bower of Upper Ohio, Shelburne County.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East

RESOLUTION NO. 76

MS. JOAN MASSEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia's funding for culture has dropped significantly since the year 2000, dropping from 7th to 9th place for government expenditure on culture per capita and ranking lower than all other Atlantic Canadian provinces; and

Whereas this year the Grou Tyme Festival, an important festival recognizing and showcasing Acadian culture, has been cancelled due to lack of funding, negatively impacting Acadian artists and musicians in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the absence of the former Nova Scotia Arts Council, Nova Scotia's arm's-length agency for arts development and investments, has negatively impacted Nova Scotia's artistic and cultural communities;

[Page 114]

Therefore be it resolved that this Legislative Assembly recognize the importance and need of more government support for our province's artistic and cultural communities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, on a point of clarification, simply that the funding for the Grou Tyme was the federal government withdrawing their support. This government supports lots of these things. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: It's not a point of order, it is a point.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 77

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas under the spiritual leadership of Reverend Glenn Gray, New Beginnings Ministries was officially founded on Easter Sunday, April 12, 1998 with 40 members; and

Whereas since November 2003, over 200 members of New Beginnings Ministries have rented the facility of the Ross Road School; and

Whereas under the direction of Reverend Glenn Gray, and a spiritual leadership team (board of directors), the church was able to purchase land for the purpose of construction of their own facility at 26 Cherry Brook Road in Westphal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Reverend Glenn Gray and the members of the New Beginnings Ministries for purchasing land for construction and wish them well, all the best, in their new place of worship.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 115]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 78

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the member for Cumberland North, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas if you are talking about size of a new business, the Pugwash Archery Club is as small as they get; and

Whereas despite the size, Pugwash Archery Club owner Jamie Hicks, a Level 1 Coach with the Archer Association of Nova Scotia, operates from both his home and the Cyrus Eaton Public School where shooting sessions are held twice a week; and

Whereas Mr. Hicks has received considerable assistance from organizations such as Traditional Archers, Archers Association of Nova Scotia and Canada Games coach, Ricky Comeau, of Saulnierville;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud the initiatives and hard work put forward by the Pugwash Archery Club owner, Jamie Hicks, and his fiancee, Kelly, and wish them every success as they work to expand their businesses while providing recreational opportunities desired by their community.

[7:45 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 116]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 79

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas John Lindsay Sr. passed away on May 5, 2006; and

Whereas Mr. Lindsay was a leading Nova Scotian entrepreneur and public-minded citizen; and

Whereas the life work of Mr. Lindsay is being carried on by his son, John Lindsay Jr., who is in turn earning the respect of Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that this House extend its sympathies to the family of John Lindsay Sr. for its loss and note its thanks for all of Mr. Lindsay's good work.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

RESOLUTION NO. 80

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 117]

Whereas the important role nurses play in the delivery of health care cannot be overestimated and our facilities rely on their training, experience and caring nature every day; and

Whereas Nurses Week is one of the nation's largest health care events, recognizing nurses from coast to coast and educating the public about the significant work they perform; and

Whereas Nurses Week provides a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the spirit of nursing and acknowledge the tireless efforts of these vital health professionals;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly recognize May 6th to May 12th as National Nurses Week and applaud the contribution made by nurses in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

RESOLUTION NO. 81

MR. GARY HINES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the proposed three-rink complex planned for Duke Street, Bedford, has secured private funding; and

Whereas the company behind the project, Cansport, also announced that no public funding will be sought for the completion of the complex; and

Whereas work has already begun at the site of Rocky Lake Drive and an official opening has been slated for this Fall;

[Page 118]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Cansport and its president, Lee Adamski of Waverley, for the commitment to the endeavour and ultimately the surrounding communities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

RESOLUTION NO. 82

MS. MICHELE RAYMOND: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Williams Lake in Halifax was first dammed in the 1820s and since then has powered a variety of industries, including a flour mill, sawmill, ice house and sugar refinery, and now supplies water to several downstream users including the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron and the Saraguay Club; and

Whereas the Williams Lake Conservation Company is a volunteer group which has for 38 years monitored water quality in the lake and has held the licence for the historic dam, which has decayed in the past 175 years, requiring reconstruction or removal at the expense of the company; and

Whereas Williams Lake has many beloved swimming spots, being bordered on one side by pristine wilderness and on the other by lakeside houses, a school and a public beach used by people from all over Halifax;

Therefore be it resolved that this House request the Minister of Environment and Labour either to waive the requirement for engineering a new Williams Lake dam to 21st Century specifications or else to secure funding for this high level of reconstruction.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 119]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 83

MR. GERALD SAMPSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Highland Manor in Neils Harbour, Victoria County, Nova Scotia, was opened in 1986 as a home for seniors requiring long-term care; and

Whereas Highland Manor has successfully created a solid reputation for providing excellent care for its residents; and

Whereas, yesterday, on May 7, 2006, the 20th Anniversary of Highland Manor was celebrated;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate the board of directors, management, and especially the staff for their dedication, direction and personal caring for all residents as they celebrate their 20th Anniversary.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

[Page 120]

RESOLUTION NO. 84

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Andrea Dykstra is the 2006 recipient of the Special Youth Award, presented to her at this year's National Aboriginal Achievement Awards; and

Whereas fresh from completing her Bachelor of Science from St. Francis Xavier University, Andrea is a champion for the environment, working as an Aboriginal Affairs Advisor for Environment Canada, Atlantic Region; and

Whereas Andrea has a long list of achievements for such a young person, her ambition and dedication to the environment and her community are admirable;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Andrea Dykstra on her recent award, and thank her for her commitment to the environment and her community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 85

MS. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Clary Croft has contributed his time, talents and expertise to preserve our Nova Scotian heritage and culture, especially showcasing the songs and folk tales of this province; and

[Page 121]

Whereas his work as a board member and volunteer with the Dartmouth Heritage Museum Society included leadership roles with several program and fundraising initiatives; and

Whereas he most recently conceived, planned, organized and performed at the very successful Victorian Dinner fundraiser held December 2005;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate and thank Clary Croft for his outstanding service to the Dartmouth Heritage Museum and Nova Scotian heritage and culture.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 86

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas each year thousands of Canadian families face emergency situations that could change their lives forever; and

Whereas National Emergency Preparedness Week is an annual national event that takes place during the first full week of May, which this year falls on May 7th to May 13th; and

Whereas preparing an emergency plan helps families feel less disoriented and better organized in case of a disaster;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize National Emergency Preparedness Week, and encourage Nova Scotians to prepare a plan that could help protect their families in the event of an emergency.

[Page 122]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Shelburne.

RESOLUTION NO. 87

MR. CECIL O'DONNELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Shelburne and Area Chamber of Commerce came into existence in 1989 and presently boasts a membership of 70; and

Whereas the Barrington and Area Chamber of Commerce was formed 16 years ago in 1990 and presently has 90 registered members; and

Whereas Atlantic Business Magazine recently named the Shelburne and Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Barrington and Area Chamber of Commerce as the 18th and 19th leading chambers of commerce in Atlantic Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Shelburne and Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Barrington and Area Chamber of Commerce for their diligent and prosperous work in promoting the excellent business opportunities which exist in the local area.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 123]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 88

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley has in the past supported free fishing licences for seniors; and

Whereas seniors in our province have to pay a $5.75 fee for a fishing licence; and

Whereas the member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley now keeps a seat warm at the Cabinet Table as the Minister of Natural Resources;

Therefore be it resolved that the member for the beautiful Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley, the Minister of Natural Resources, stand by his previous convictions that seniors in this province should not be required to pay for fishing licences.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 89

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Clare Acadiens Midget AA team participated in the 2005-06 Hockey Midget AA Provincial Championship Tournament in Lantz from March 24 to March 26, 2006; and

[Page 124]

Whereas the team played against the Sydney Steelers in the championship game; and

Whereas three of the Clare players picked up individual honours in addition to the team's win;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Clare Acadiens Midget AA hockey team, as well as Colin LeBlanc, Renel Deveau and Cory Deveau, on their tremendous performance, and their coaches for winning the Nova Scotia Midget AA Provincial Hockey Championship Tournament.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 90

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 31, 2006, a very special celebration took place at the Yarmouth Branch of CIBC; and

Whereas CIBC Associate Vice-President, Joe Griffin, and Branch Manager, Marius Gerber, recognized a very dedicated employee for 40 years of service; and

Whereas Winnie Surette was surprised by co-workers with a celebration to mark her 40th Anniversary at the bank on April 1st, and gifts from the branch and CIBC southern Nova Scotia region, as well as a celebration in her honour at Rudder's. Having spent all but one year- where she worked at CIBC in Halifax- at the Yarmouth Branch, she has seen many changes in the downtown and many co-workers and businesses alike come and go, and she has dedicated most of her life to helping not only her customers and her family, but spent countless hours of volunteering in the community;

[Page 125]

Therefore be it resolved that all members join me in congratulating and thanking Winnie Surette for her years of dedicated service to her employer, friends and community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

RESOLUTION NO. 91

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Le Transport de Clare celebrated its 10th Anniversary on Saturday, April 15, 2006; and

Whereas Le Transport's wheelchair-accessible vans log approximately 110,000 kilometres annually, with priority given to persons with disabilities, seniors and the disadvantaged while providing a desperately needed service in rural Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Le Transport de Clare is mostly run by volunteers and depends on donations and community support for its long-term sustainability, enabling them to help residents enjoy the benefits of social, educational, employment and recreational opportunities, as well as the medical services;

Therefore be it resolved that this House applaud the success of Le Transport de Clare in providing a vital transportation service in rural Nova Scotia and wish them great success in the years to come and hoping that, "Long may they run".

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 126]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 92

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers are the backbone of any community, and without the commitment made by these individuals it would be impossible for many projects and organizations to function; and

Whereas on May 2nd, Kingston's Village Commission recognized Bob Cushing as their choice for Kings County Volunteer of the Year, recognizing the tremendous contributions he has made over the years to his community; and

Whereas Mr. Cushing has generously given his time and efforts to various organizations including, Meals on Wheels and Argus Mesonic Lodge #33, the Kingston United Church and the food bank, to name a few of the organizations he continues to serve;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House recognize the commitment and dedication Bob Cushing has made to improving the lives of others and wish him every success in future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 127]

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 93

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas John and Judy Wheelock of Truro received the 2006 Heritage Award from the Truro Heritage Advisory Committee for restoring their 43 Queen Street, Truro, property; and

Whereas the physical improvement, especially reconstruction of the original verandah and the attractive paint colors helped restore the home to its former glory; and

Whereas the house, built by T.G. McMullen for his family of 10 children, is one of Truro's grandest examples of the Queen Anne style of Victorian architecture;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate John and Judy Wheelock on winning the 2006 Heritage Award of the Truro Heritage Advisory Committee, and thank them for their outstanding contribution to the preservation of Truro's heritage.

[8:00 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favor of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 94

MS. JOAN MASSEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 128]

Whereas on Wednesday, October 12th, 2005, Prince Andrew High School had the opportunity to host the first Building Relationships and Valuing Others, or Bravo conference, the largest high school conference in Nova Scotia with 1250 students, parents, 100 staff members, and 200 guest presenters; and

Whereas the Bravo event gave the participating students a chance to explore human diversity and personal excellence while providing them with a number of professional sessions to choose from, supporting good decision making, careers, diversity, and social responsibility; and

Whereas the organizers of the Bravo conference were able to secure presentations from such influential professionals including Stanford University Professor Dr. Mary Bacon, Farley Flex, as well as a player from the NBA, among others;

Therefore be it resolved that this Legislative Assembly extend its congratulations to the organizers and participants of Bravo.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favor of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

RESOLUTION NO. 95

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mrs. Elizabeth Toth celebrated her 102nd birthday Monday, March 27th, 2006; and

Whereas Mrs. Toth moved to Cape Breton from her home in Hungary some 76 years ago and lived on Beacon Street in Glace Bay for over 30 years, Mrs. Toth is affectionately known by the nickname " Nana"and has resided at the Victoria Haven Nursing Home since 2001; and

[Page 129]

Whereas Mrs. Toth is very active for her age, attends church regularly, is not impressed with the casino, loves spicy foods, especially KFC, and never eats white bread;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend their congratulations to Mrs. Elizabeth " Nana''Toth on celebrating her 102nd birthday and wish her all the best in the years ahead.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favor of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

RESOLUTION NO. 96

HON. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this year marks the 20th Anniversary of the North American Waterfowl Management Plan, a unique partnership of government and non-government organizations; and

Whereas wetlands not only provide habitat to our wildlife but also provide many other benefits such as improving water quality and quantity, and reducing damage due to flooding; and

Whereas with our partners we have invested nearly $20 million in wetland and waterfowl conservation during this last 20 years, acquiring nearly 40,000 acres of wetland and adjoining upland habitat for wildlife;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the individuals and organizations that have delivered the North American Waterfowl Management Plan in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 130]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favor of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

RESOLUTION NO. 97

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Beacon House Interfaith Society was founded in May of 1986 in response to the need for a food bank; and

Whereas the food and clothing bank serves over 500 clients on a monthly basis in the areas surrounding Beaver Bank, Bedford, Fall River, and Sackville; and

Whereas effective May 17th, 2006, the new Beacon House location on Cobequid Road in Lower Sackville will be mortgage free;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Beacon House in Lower Sackville with achieving the goal of becoming mortgage free and thank all volunteers, church groups, community organizations, and residents who have contributed to this goal and for their support of Beacon House.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favor of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 131]

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 98

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas elderly East Preston couple, Hazel, 82, and Harold Brooks, 85, were awakened by their neighbour banging frantically on their door on February 20, 2006; and

Whereas Sherman Sanders alerted the Brooks family of their house in flames around 5:00 a.m.; and

Whereas Sherman Sanders saved the lives of Hazel and Harold Brooks from the fire which started in the insulation around the pipe leading from their wood stove into the side wall of their home;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly commend Sherman Sanders for his quick actions in alerting the fire department and saving the lives of Hazel and Harold Brooks.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I'm glad that the NDP acknowledges that seniors now only pay a conservation fee, not the licence.

RESOLUTION NO. 99

[Page 132]

HON. BROOKE TAYLOR: I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the construction of the new Colchester Regional Hospital is tremendous news for thousands and thousands of individuals; and

Whereas the $104 million facility is slated for completion in 2010; and

Whereas the Towns of Stewiacke and Truro, and the Municipality of Colchester have stepped forward in recent months with substantial contributions to the Colchester Regional Hospital Foundation of $225,000 from Stewiacke, $3.3 million from Truro, and $7 million from the Municipality of Colchester;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the dedication and effort being put forth by these municipal units and the Colchester Regional Hospital Foundation, which is raising $25 million of the $104 million cost.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 100

MR. GORDON GOSSE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Thursday, March 2, 2006, Cape Breton University Capers Women's Basketball Coach Fabian McKenzie was selected the 2006 Atlantic University Sport's Women's Basketball Coach of the Year for the second time; and

Whereas on Thursday, March 9, 2006, Fabian MacKenzie also netted the Peter Ennis Award as the CIS Coach of the Year; and

[Page 133]

Whereas Coach Fabian McKenzie piloted the Capers to a record of 16 wins and four losses, their second AUS title in three years;

Therefore be it resolved that Members of the Legislative Assembly acknowledge the coaching exploits and dedication to the women's basketball team by Fabian McKenzie, putting the Capers on the basketball map for years to come.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 101

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas boxing is a sport with deep roots in our province and can teach youth discipline and hard work while becoming physically fit; and

Whereas several professional and amateur boxers in Nova Scotia compete on a world-class level; and

Whereas on April 13, 2006, Tristan Johnson of Digby, Nova Scotia won a unanimous decision over his opponent, Jason Snyder at the Halifax Multipurpose Centre;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly acknowledge the achievements of Tristan Johnson, and wish him well as he pursues his professional career in the ring.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 134]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 102

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Astral Drive Elementary School has been presenting an annual play for the past number of years in which the students perform and do all the backstage work; and

Whereas on May 4, 2006, Astral Drive Elementary School presented "The Wizard of Oz" to the students, teachers, parents and community members; and

Whereas the production included 65 performers and 30 crew from the student body, and was well received by all who saw the performance;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the students, teachers and parents who helped make "The Wizard of Oz" production at Astral Drive Elementary School a great success in 2006.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria The Lakes.

[Page 135]

RESOLUTION NO. 103

MR. GERALD SAMPSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Wong's Bras d'Or House restaurant is located in Baddeck, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Wong's has been serving the travelling public and residents of Baddeck, and Cape Breton, excellent quality and choice of cuisine for over 40 years; and

Whereas this year, upon opening today on May 8, 2006, will mark their 41st anniversary serving their patrons;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Wong's Bras d'Or House restaurant and dine there when travelling through Baddeck.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 104

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia has been home to a vibrant Buddhist community for almost 30 years; and

Whereas the spiritual leader of the Shambhala community, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche, will celebrate his marriage to Semo Tseyang Ripa, in Halifax in a wedding festival known as the Blossoming of the Sun from June 8th to June 10th; and

Whereas the Shambhalian sangha here is hosting this celebratory event with ceremonies and receptions at the Citadel and elsewhere in the city;

[Page 136]

Therefore be it resolved that this House offer its congratulations and very best wishes to Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche and Semo Tseyang Ripa on the occasion of their marriage.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 105

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a new trend has emerged in recent years whereby drivers modify their car and motorcycle mufflers to satisfy a fashion rather than a mechanical need; and

Whereas these new devices do not muffle or control noise but, in fact, amplify the level of noise the vehicle causes; and

Whereas the UNSM passed a resolution condemning modified mufflers and calling on the government to pass legislation that sets limits to motor vehicle noise and safeguards our quality of life;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly support the UNSM and move forward with legislation to control unnecessary noise pollution caused by modified car and motorcycle mufflers.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

[Page 137]

The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 106

MS. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the curling team representing the Dartmouth Curling Club won the 2006 Nova Scotia Senior Men's Curling Championship; and

Whereas the Nova Scotian champions tied for 4th place at the National Championships in Summerside, P.E.I., March 25th to April 1st; and

Whereas the team characterized strong talent, experience and sportsmanship in all its games;

Therefore be it resolved the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Dartmouth Curling Club Team skip Don MacIntosh; mate Peter MacPhee; second Mike Curry and lead Peter Neily for representing Nova Scotia at the 2006 Senior Men's National Curling Championship and thank them for their strong performance.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 107

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this year marks the 30th Anniversary of the Atlantic Lottery Corporation; and

[Page 138]

Whereas over the past three decades, millions of dollars in profit has been returned to the region throughout Atlantic Canada to help fund essential programs and services such as health care and education; and

Whereas this organization has provided support to community groups and offered a chance to everyone in Atlantic Canada to win money and dream of great financial security;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the Atlantic Lottery Corporation for 30 years of achievement and continue our support for this exceptional business.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

RESOLUTION NO. 108

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas medical laboratory technologists are an essential part of our health care system, offering critical access to diagnostic tools for patients; and

Whereas we recently celebrated National Medical Laboratory Technologist Week - held the last week of April; and

Whereas medical laboratory technologists are in short supply in Nova Scotia and around the world;

Therefore be it resolved that this House extend its thanks to all medical laboratory technologists on their valuable contribution to health care in this province and

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encourage more young people to get more information about this worthwhile career option.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

[8:15 p.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 109

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas over the last six years, just in Halifax Regional Municipality alone, there have been eight deaths and over 500 injuries which occurred at crosswalks; and

Whereas something ordinary like crossing a highway at a busy intersection, or even a highway not used frequently, has turned into a dangerous and difficult task for many pedestrians; and

Whereas Madison Turner, a Grade 12 student from Auburn Drive High School, has created a voice for many people to speak out and now call upon the elected officials of this province to recognize this critical issue;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly call upon government to investigate the serious matter regarding public safety with the intention of preventing more injuries and fatalities on our streets.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 140]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

RESOLUTION NO. 110

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Residents' Society for a Safe and Healthy Neighbourhood promotes the well-being of the neighbourhood and its residents; and

Whereas on a gorgeous, sunny Saturday in March, at Victoria Park, the society held its first Winterfest; and

Whereas the Winterfest was a huge success with many fun-filled events including ice fishing for beautifully handcrafted and painted folk art fish; teams competing in balloon decorated wheelbarrow races; artistic face painting; dynamic street hockey games; and closing with a chili/pot luck dinner;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly congratulate the Residents' Society for a Safe and Healthy Neighbourhood for organizing their first Winterfest that involved tremendous community support.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 141]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader in the House for the Liberal Party.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, it's certainly a pleasure for me on behalf of our caucus and on behalf of our leader, Francis MacKenzie, to have the opportunity to reply to the Speech from the Throne that was presented on Thursday of last week. Of course, a Speech from the Throne is intended to outline the government's plans for the coming session. It is something we have not seen since 2003 and something we might not see until after the next election. Over the last number of years we have lost the tradition of having Throne Speeches on a frequent basis and I believe it's a tradition that, hopefully, we'll be bringing back to this province.

Mr. Speaker, I want to take the opportunity to thank Her Honour, the Lieutenant Governor for once again presenting the Speech from the Throne. As I have said before, Her Honour has been a great ambassador for the people of Nova Scotia. She has been a great representative for elected members of this House and I can certainly say that she has been a great friend to the Acadian community in her efforts, especially during the Acadian Congress, to be able to address the Acadian people in Nova Scotia in French after having taken some weeks of training at Université Sainte-Anne in the riding of Clare.

Mr. Speaker, as contained in the Speech from the Throne, since we last had a Speech from the Throne we have lost a number of good Nova Scotians, including the Honourable Robert Lorne Stanfield, the Honourable Terence Donahoe, Senator Calvin Ruck, Shirley Elliott, Charles Keating, Lieutenant Chris Saunders, Dr. David Rippey, Corporal Paul James Davis, Rear Admiral Desmond Piers, Robert Shaw, Private Braun Woodfield, Captain Derek Nichols, Sherman Zwicker, Sandy Cameron and Sister Peggy Butts.

Mr. Speaker, our caucus was also deeply saddened by the loss of Sheelagh Nolan. We offer our heartfelt condolences to our former Leader, Danny Graham, and his young children on her untimely passing. We also lost those who serve in our military including as I mentioned Corporal Paul James Davis who was a son of a long-time member and active participant in the Nova Scotia Liberal Party, Mr. Jim Davis, and to him we

[Page 142]

continue to send our condolences. Of course, Sandy Cameron, former leader of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party and a great public servant was taken away from us far too soon as well as Sister Peggy Butts, a Liberal Senator who was a great educator during her many years.

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of our Leader, Frances MacKenzie, and our caucus, I want to congratulate the MLA for Inverness on winning the Tory Leadership convention and becoming the new Premier of our province as a result. I also want to congratulate the new and returning members of Cabinet; having had the privilege of serving in Cabinet for a short period of time, I'm certainly well aware of how much of an honour and privilege and a task it is to become a minister. Unfortunately my time in Cabinet was not very long and I'm not sure for some of the new members if they will share that same fate or not- I guess time will shortly reveal whether they will have a different history in Cabinet than the opportunity I had.

Mr. Speaker, I also want to take this opportunity to recognize some of the MLAs here in the Legislature who will not be re-offering in the next election. We have the member for Dartmouth North- notice he was the first I mentioned of the members who will not be returning but it struck a chord with me when he made his announcement. As well the former Premier, the member for Pictou Centre, the member for Bedford, the member for Colchester North, the member for Shelburne, and the member for Pictou East. I would be remiss if I also did not recognize the member for Hants West who will not be re-offering although I remember him telling us the last session that he wouldn't be coming back. I'm reminded of that rhyme - the cat came back - when it comes to the Government House Leader but I believe it's safe to say the fact that he was back here was, I believe, a recognition by the Premier of his institutional knowledge of this House and the important role he would play in the new government under him so it's a pleasure to see him back here. We've already given our tributes but again it will be a loss to this House and to our province that he will not be re-offering in the next election. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, allow me to congratulate you on your new role as Speaker of this House of Assembly. Having been elected Speaker in a minority Parliament, I believe, speaks volumes of your experience as a member and a minister and the certain impartiality that you will bring to the role of Speaker. I can tell you as the President of L'Assemblée Parlementaire de la Francophonie, I look forward to continuing the positive relationship we had with your predecessor with you as the new Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned, the Legislature should have Throne Speeches more often so that government can attempt to articulate a plan so that the Opposition and Nova Scotians may have an opportunity to air their concerns to the executive. One thing we members sometimes forget is that the Legislature is an equal branch of government on equal terms with the executive and the judiciary - that fact is often lost on this government. Of course, in this case, it is the Progressive Conservative Party that elected

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this Premier, not Nova Scotians. Back in January, Nova Scotia Tories thought they were getting a young energetic new face on government. While they believed he would carry on the work of his predecessor, the member for Pictou Centre, they also saw promise in new youthful leadership. Many of us, especially some of the younger members here in this Assembly, had hoped that by having a young Premier that he would appeal and work towards trying to attract some of the young Nova Scotians who have turned away and tuned out from politics and government here in Nova Scotia, that he would find new ways of somehow bringing them back to be part of the process, allowing them to take an interest again in the future of this province, of getting involved, whether it's running for office, working on campaigns, policy workshops, and of sensing that they now had a place in Nova Scotia politics, that somehow politics were going to be done differently in this province under the new Premier, from what we had seen in the past.

Mr. Speaker, I'm afraid that instead we appear to have been caught in a time warp. Instead of electing a younger version of the last Premier, it appears that the new Premier got mistaken with the Johns involved, and we appear to be having a Premier who is more impressed with the legacy of John Buchanan than of John Hamm. Instead of carrying on the appearance of a fiscally prudent agenda, we have a Premier who has been spending some $5 million a day. Instead of an honest approach to gasoline prices, we get a John Buchanan-style promise to regulate prices of gas followed by hearings into gasoline prices.

Mr. Speaker, gas regulation in Nova Scotia came to an end in 1991. At that time, Nova Scotia had the highest gasoline prices in the country. The question Nova Scotians need to ask themselves is, do we want to go back to 1991, and do we want to have the highest gas prices in the country again? Nova Scotians have made it clear, yes, they want stability, yes, they would like predictability, but the most important message they've said is we want to pay less for gas. The government, through the Minister of Finance and through the Premier, have been clear, once they finally did their flip-flop on the issue of regulation, they have said quite clearly to Nova Scotians, you will not pay less for gas under regulation. You will pay more. What kind of a solution is that for Nova Scotians at the pumps?

We all recall how we got here. Last Fall the government undertook a study to see if gas regulation was good for Nova Scotians. At the time, the Premier, the new Premier who was in Cabinet, and most of the Cabinet Ministers came out unanimously in saying that regulation would not work in Nova Scotia. We spent I don't know how many thousands of dollars - over $100,000 - on that report, a good report, and then they had all these reasons why regulation wasn't right for Nova Scotians.

At the time, the Liberal caucus said we agree. Competition is what's best. It has its ups and downs, but overall, compared to other jurisdictions with regulation, competition has been in the best interest of Nova Scotians. One Party that is still stuck

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in the 1950s, as usual, said they were all for regulation, regulate everything, government intervention in all aspects of Nova Scotians' lives. So the NDP were again there to say that they wanted regulation, once again, to take more money out of the pockets of Nova Scotians.

Lo and behold, here we find ourselves closer to an election, government is doing polling, the poll was asking people how they would vote, and the next question was, gas regulation, and the next question was about Stora. I'll get back to that issue a little later. On regulation, obviously the polling told them something that caused concern going into an election.

So all of a sudden all of these ministers who told us why regulation would be bad for Nova Scotia last September, October, November, December, January, February, March - in April and May, a complete reversal. Regulation is now good for Nova Scotia, regulation is the answer. Mr. Speaker, that is not a new way of doing politics, that is the old style of politics. That is the old style of politics. That is telling Nova Scotians what they want to hear because you think that is how they will possibly vote for you, knowing all along that regulation is not in the best interests of Nova Scotia. Just look at the price today at the pumps compared to P.E.I. Already it is showing that regulation would not help Nova Scotia, yet the government was clever enough to say we can't let Nova Scotians see that they will pay more under regulation, so rather than implement it in May or June, let's wait until July, because heaven forbid that they get to see what this plan would be like before being asked to go to the polls. Then again, maybe the Premier will surprise me and he'll wait until after July to go to the polls. I'm not sure when he will call the election. Maybe the Government House Leader knows more than I do on that subject, but if that's the case, time will tell.

But in July, once regulation comes in, Nova Scotians will see that they are going to be paying more. Now the government will say, well, that's what you told us you wanted. We gave you regulation and yes, we told you you were going to pay more and you are paying more, but again the Minister of Finance will stand and say, we're not reaping any extra revenue because of high prices. Now, right away, we still hear the lines. I predicted it and already it is coming true. That is their line. They're not taking in more revenue because consumption is down. So what do they show us to back that up? They show us the motive fuel revenues, and they say that that's down. Why don't they show us the HST revenues on gas, because I bet you those haven't gone down? Those have gone up. So they're not losing any money. They will tell Nova Scotians they're losing money. Yes consumption may be reduced, but because of the HST that's a percentage on the total price, more HST revenue is coming into this province and Nova Scotians know that this government is reaping a windfall on high gas prices, and regulation will bring more high gas prices and the government will once again be reaping those benefits.

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Mr. Speaker, only one Party in this province has suggested actually giving Nova Scotians a break at the pumps, and that has been the Liberal Party that has announced its plan. We brought forward a plan that is thoughtful, that can be done and does not require added bureaucracy such as what regulation would bring. So it's interesting, on one end we hear the government say that they are going to appoint - I don't know what they call it in the Throne Speech - basically the red tape task force two. There is a new name to it, but it's to eliminate more red tape. Now we thought the task force the first time did that. I think we referred to them as, the boys of Summer, who had gone out that year on the red tape task force, but they're going to do it again. So on one end they're going to cut red tape, yet they're going to regulate gas and create a new bureaucracy and more bureaucracy under regulation - more red tape.

Now, Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotians have made it clear. They expect relief at the pumps, and there is a way to provide them with relief and government can do it. Government can lower the motive fuel tax. In fact, our proposal would basically be to reverse the tax increase that the Tories brought in, in 1999, when they campaigned saying they would not increase taxes, yet they came in and they brought in the two cent a litre motive fuel tax increase. What's 2 cents a litre, for the average consumer? They may not think it's much at first glance, but for this government, it's meant an additional $20 million to $25 million from the pockets of Nova Scotians that have been put in there. Now the Minister of - what's he minister of now? He used to be Minister of Service Nova Scotia. He said he would save all the gas stations and they've closed (Interruption) he is what, Health Promotion now? He said it went into roads (Interruption) Health Promotion and Protection, yes. If he protects Nova Scotians like he protected independent gas retailers, after he stood in this House, God help Nova Scotians, because those retailers will remember when he stood in this House and told the Opposition, vote for the government bill and we'll save those gas stations. Well, he'll come say that to Mr. Marchand in Louisdale, whose service station is closed today because of your government's inaction on that issue, because of falsely believing the commitments made by that minister here in this House and how they've been mislead. How many other Mr. Marchands are all around this province who had the misfortune of believing this government?

Mr. Speaker, that is just one example of where this government has made it clear under the new Premier that they are not interested in providing a new style of government, they have gone back to the old style of government, and I assure you, Nova Scotians will have the opportunity to judge on that.

Mr. Speaker, one of the arguments that has been made- Mr. Graham Conrad has made it himself on behalf of the independent retailers-is that regulation will protect small independent services stations. Unfortunately, that is not the case. This government knows it is not the case because they commissioned the report that told them, in September, that in P.E.I., under regulation, there has been the same percentage of closures of small,

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independent, rural gas stations in P.E.I. as what took place here in Nova Scotia under competition.

They know it will not protect small gas stations, because this is a government that has abandoned rural Nova Scotia and has allowed rural depopulation to take place at an alarming rate. No matter whether we have regulation or not, when a service station no longer has a community around it to purchase their gas, they will not stay open.

That is the reality and it's a false promise to say that regulation is going to protect those small retailers. Government taking an interest in the survival of rural Nova Scotia is what will protect small, independent retailers in our province.

The plan itself that has been proposed by the government, they say is a Nova Scotia plan. First they say it will bring stability, while in some jurisdictions that stability under regulation means a price is set for a month. This government has said, we'll review it every two weeks - so the stability and predictability is a two week window. What does that do for Nova Scotians? At the end, it's going to mean higher prices.

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned before, the government's own report has actually shown them regulation would not work and that's why the Cabinet made the decision against regulation in September. What has changed? What was in that report that they agreed with back in September that they don't agree with anymore? They have yet to answer that question.

I have to tell you, Mr. Speaker, when I keep hearing in the media the Premier saying, we'll be the only ones left unregulated. So what? That means we have competition that nobody else has. They have yet to say why that is a bad thing. If it is, then tell us. Why is it bad because we're the only ones that are not regulated? They haven't gone that far. Every clip with the Premier, he'll only make that statement, then he stops. Justify it. Why is it a bad thing to have competition?

Instead, there's regulation in P.E.I., Newfoundland and Labrador and now the Tory Government in New Brunswick has a new-found affection for regulation, ironically another government on the eve of an election, ready to get thrown out of office by the people in New Brunswick, following a path this government is copying. I would present to you that this government may suffer the same fate as the government of Bernard Lord in New Brunswick. (Applause)

The studies have shown that under regulation, big oil benefits and not the consumer. How ironic it is to watch both the Tories, with the support of the NDP, for regulation that will actually put more money in the pockets of Esso, Irving and Shell - not more money into the pockets of the Nova Scotians who have sent us here to this Assembly.

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As I mentioned, there's great confusion in the government ranks with regard to regulation. For example, in the Throne Speech, it said, "We will remove uncertainty at the pumps by providing more stability in the retail gas industry, in an environment that ensures flexibility and timely response to radical price shifts. We will implement our Better Regulation Initiative to eliminate over-regulation, duplication, and unnecessary paperwork."

Mr. Speaker, this is the most ridiculous passage from the government document. On the one hand, they're saying they will provide price stability and on the other hand they will be flexible and ensure timely price changes. What is this going to do for Nova Scotians? What is this going to do for our tourism industry in trying to attract people to our province when every two weeks the price of gas will change under their plan of regulation? Again, I bring to you, when they say they want to put an end to unnecessary paperwork and regulation, they say they want to add more regulation on gas prices.

It is true this government has been getting a large surplus. Each year they underestimate how much revenue they will have and each year at budget time they come back to tell us what great prudent fiscal managers they have been. We, in our Party, realize that Nova Scotia is faced with huge financial problems that have come as a result of the irresponsible spending by the Buchanan Administration. Every Premier since that time has been dealing with the fiscal crisis that has resulted in a $3.4 billion road deficit, the highest tuition in the country and a health care crisis. Despite even a large surplus, Nova Scotians are being held hostage by a $12.4 billion debt. We have the second highest per capita debt in the country. Only Newfoundland is worse off than that.

Mr. Speaker, this is a government that came in in 1999 and, as I've said many times before, the Premier at the time, the Leader, the member for Pictou Centre, said that he would not add one cent to the debt and that he would not leave a legacy where his grandchildren would be paying for his spending. We know today that this government since 1999 has added approximately $3 billion to the overall debt of this province. A government that said it would not add one cent, that they would live within their means, cleverly found a way through the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, GAAP as it is referred to, to somehow be able to say they have a balanced budget, yet increase the debt at the same time. Suddenly road construction, school construction and hospital construction no longer need to be added on the books for the fiscal year, it can go directly to the debt. Wasn't that a clever way?

HON. JAMES MUIR: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. I can't believe that I heard the honourable member for Richmond say that he didn't believe in more road construction, more hospital construction and more school construction in this province.

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SOME HON. MEMBERS: That's what he just said.

MR. SPEAKER: It is not a point of order.

The honourable member for Richmond.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, with statements like that, the honourable member would do best to be spending more time in his riding because the Liberal candidate who's going to be running against him, with those kind of statements, the honourable member would do best to be careful of what he says in this House.

Mr. Speaker, the governments before this administration, road work, hospital construction, school construction went on the books and that's why at the end of the day, when they report now that there were deficits, they were being shown on (Interruption)

HON. JAMES MUIR: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. I think the honourable member is perhaps erroneous in his statement because I don't think that P3 construction costs were fully entered on the books of this province.

AN HON. MEMBER: No, they weren't. (Interruptions)

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I assure the honourable Minister of Education, I will show him the same respect when he will stand in this House to speak during the session. They know that the rules were changed so that road construction, school construction or hospital construction, capital expenditures would now go on the debt, no longer go on the books. So they can show a balanced budget when at the end of the day they've added to the debt. So here we are $12.4 billion.

Mr. Speaker, when I say we're being held hostage, we are being held hostage because this province will not move ahead as long as we are still spending almost $1 billion a year to service that debt, a debt that the former Premier said would not grow under his administration, which has now grown by almost $3 billion and the Minister of Health doesn't have an answer for that, nor does the Government House Leader, because that was a fundamental promise made to Nova Scotians. It was made to try to get votes and at the end they have not been able to keep it and it is the Premier's grandchildren that are referred to who will be paying for it for years to come because of the fact that they have increased the total debt of this province.

Mr. Speaker, at the same time, last session we continually raised the issue of health care. The NDP doesn't want to talk about health care. They don't even want to raise it as an issue about where we find ourselves as a province in trying to afford our health care. The NDP is spend, spend, spend, without one look at how we're going to

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be able to afford this. Last session we were the one Party that said health care is in a crisis in Nova Scotia. We were the only one. (Interruptions) The Premier at the time refused to acknowledge that there was a crisis. He said health care was going to be fine. There was going to be no problem with health care.

Yet on the flip side, Mr. Speaker, this was the Premier, under his government that sent a report to Nova Scotians saying that if health care was to continue on its current course, it would consume the entire budget of Nova Scotia by the year 2025. Now, that was sent last summer. By the Fall the Premier stood in his place and he corrected himself, I was wrong he said. Based on the increase in spending that health care received in last Spring's budget, he said the new figures are that health care will consume the entire provincial budget by the year 2020 - we're five years ahead of schedule.

Now, Mr. Speaker, we continue to press the Premier to address the issue of health care, to find ways to make sure that health care would be sustainable and affordable for the long term in this province. Not once during the session did the Premier say he agreed, yet as soon as the session was over, when the Premier was asked, what are your priorities now, the first thing he said was to deal with the crisis in health care in Nova Scotia - the first time he mentioned it.

[8:45 p.m.]

I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, I won't say that the Premier, now member for Pictou Centre, did not do good things for our province during his time or did he try, but I can tell you his legacy for health care will not be put down as one of the victories that he has had, because at the end of the day he walked in with a system that was in trouble, he said he could save it, instead he left that system in a mess.

Services are there in many ways but at the end of the day, fiscally, our province, with our population, can no longer afford health care at the rate it is going. What we will wait for in this budget is just how much health care has increased this year. How much more money will the government pump into health care? Where is the plan? Knowing that the former Premier told us by 2020 health care will consume the entire provincial budget if something doesn't change, so where in the Throne Speech was the plan to say here's how we're going to keep health care affordable, sustainable, accessible, but it's going to be protected for the long-term future? We're going to turn around the figure that says that health care will consume the entire budget by 2020 - not a mention of it in the Throne Speech. No plan from the Minister of Health. How much more money are we going to put into health care and hope the problem goes away?

Again, Mr. Speaker, the government doesn't want to deal with this issue, the NDP doesn't want to talk about this issue, but our Party realizes that Nova Scotians have worked long and hard for the health care that we have here in our province. They have

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fought for it, they have sacrificed for it, and they deserve to have it for the long- term future. Right now, until we start addressing this problem, that health care system may not be there for our parents, for our families, for our children, if we do not do something to bring it under control and find a way to make it manageable into the future.

I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, after - what? - seven years of this government, unfortunately we still have no plan. If you think health care is working in this province without any problems I would urge the current Minister of Health and the former Minister of Health to once again visit the Strait Richmond Hospital where again we find ourselves with repeated closures of the emergency room at that facility and yet, after seven years of waiting, the government still hasn't presented any sort of new plan or new proposal for addressing that issue.

Mr. Speaker, the years of neglect that have been caused by not dealing with this debt has resulted in significant underfunding in our province for programs that mean so much to Nova Scotians. Rather than dealing with the problems being faced in health, education, and in other areas of importance to Nova Scotians, this government has decided to try to spend their way into the next election, throwing money wherever they think they can without once telling us what their plan is for the future of this province. A new Premier, who had the innovative idea of trying to have our cities and our province wireless so that we could have Internet connection in all of our communities - other than that new innovative idea the rest has been spend, spend, and throw money, hoping that Nova Scotians will re-elect their government.

We simply need to look at our child care system. We have a hopelessly underfunded system that has yet to be repaired and now that the Premier's federal cousins have abandoned child care, we are no further ahead. Mr. Speaker, in listening to a resolution earlier tonight by the member for Dartmouth East which talked about the cuts in funding to the Grou Tyme, hoping the festival would come back, the Minister of Health stood in his place and said don't blame this province, blame the federal government for the cancellation of Grou Tyme. Even he hasn't changed his mindset to realize it's their federal Party that's in Ottawa now, yet they're still in the mindset of trying to blame the federal government for all of their problems - they're not going to get away with that anymore, because it's their own federal cousins who are now in Ottawa. It is those federal cousins who cut the child care deal that had been signed with the Province of Nova Scotia.

Today we have the Minister of Community Services who makes his announcement of how many more child care spaces the government will make available, only to realize, as pointed out by the media, that it is less than half of what would have been available to Nova Scotians under the former Liberal Government's plan. That is the type of administration we have in Ottawa, and that is the type of government we have here in this province.

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Mr. Speaker, the child care system in our province is in desperate need of support, and yet the government, again, tries to announce half-measures in the hope that child care providers will accept this half-measure. I can tell you, knowing the child care administrators I have in Richmond, they know what plan they were supposed to be given, they know what they expected, and they now know what a failure this has been, with the announcement today by the government.

Mr. Speaker, let us look at education. Let us look at the university situation we find here in our province. We realize that the Nova Scotia Government per student, full-time equivalent transfer to colleges and universities was $5,010, almost half of the $10,011 Canadian average, and the least of all provinces in this country. Average undergraduate tuition fees at Nova Scotia universities are the highest in Canada at $6,281 per year.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. The honourable member knows that on a per capita basis, in support of higher education in this province, we stand fourth in the country.

MR. SPEAKER: That is not a point of order.

The honourable member for Richmond.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, let's see if the Minister of Education will argue with this statement. A recent study has concluded that post-secondary education in Nova Scotia is the least affordable of all provinces and states in North America. That is the legacy of the Tory Party here in Nova Scotia when it comes to universities, higher education, students and the future of this province. Yet the Minister of Education has the unmitigated gall to stand up in this House to try to somehow question the figures, his own figures, that show what a terrible disappointment this government has been. Who would know better the importance of education, higher education, than a former principal of the Teachers College?

Yet that is what we are left with now in Nova Scotia, a Tory Minister who will stand in his place and try to justify the failures of his government, knowing the importance higher education has for the future of the Province of Nova Scotia. What a shame, Mr. Speaker, on that member and on this government.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I believe the honourable member happened to be a member of the government that shut down the Nova Scotia Teachers College. I know there are members of his own caucus who think it was a big mistake, as I do. Secondly, just to refresh his memory, he was also a member of the government that cut the grants to higher education here in Nova Scotia.

[Page 152]

MR. SPEAKER: That wasn't a point or order.

Order. Order.

The honourable member for Richmond has the floor.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I'm unsure if the term "pathetic" is parliamentary but that is about the only term I can think of when I hear that kind of answer from the Minister of Education, because you could have reopened the Teachers College if that was such a high priority for you, sir. You had seven years, seven long years, and to stand here and try to criticize a former government (Interruptions)

Mr. Speaker, let him talk about the Buchanan days if he wants to talk about previous administrations. Let him justify the spending that took place then. Then again, when you're under pressure come election time and the future of your seat isn't looking so good, I can appreciate what kind of pressure the member is under. He's displaying it for all Nova Scotians to see tonight with his continual interruptions. Allow me to continue.

As I mentioned, tuition is the highest in the country here in Nova Scotia. We are proud of the amount of universities we have, the exceptional higher-learning facilities we have in our province. What a shame to see that we have the highest tuition, and that Nova Scotians and other students are turning away from our province because we are no longer affordable under that cost. Mr. Speaker, the average tuition in Nova Scotia is $2,000 greater than the Canadian average. User fees account for a higher proportion of university operating budgets than in any other province. Nova Scotia has 2.9 per cent of Canada's population, 5 per cent of Canada's students, 5.6 per cent of Canada's full-time faculty, but only 2.8 per cent of Canada's research funding.

Mr. Speaker, it's important that this government in their Throne Speech tell us that they want to bring tuition rates in Nova Scotia in line with the rest of the country within four years yet they have not given us a plan as to how they are going to achieve that. Does it mean they are just going to put more money into universities? Does it mean they are going to provide more assistance to students directly? No indication, just a blanket statement of - we hope to bring tuition in line within the next four years. Mr. Speaker, this government should have learned by now that students will not accept this at face value. They will expect a plan to see how this is going to work. When I hear the Minister of Education talk about previous administrations it's funny how he didn't talk about his government's cut to the loan remission program which they cut in half. Somehow he has seemed to have forgotten about that but something tells me he will be reminded on the election trail by a candidate in his riding that will remind university students exactly what this minister did while he was in government under the Conservative Party here in Nova Scotia.

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Mr. Speaker, studies have shown that Nova Scotia spends the lowest per capita on services to its citizens. We are the second lowest in health on a per capita on services to its citizens. We are the second lowest in health on a per capita basis of spending in the country. We are the lowest in spending per pupil in education. Yet, in Nova Scotia, I'm sad to say that 34,711 adults aged 25 to 54 have less than a grade nine education. That is the continuing legacy that this government has left in Nova Scotia. Rather than deal with illiteracy which is especially prevalent in many of our communities making it difficult for people. . .

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I understand that he's up on his feet extemporaneously but the fact is that the population of Nova Scotia is the best educated in the country in terms of post-secondary training.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. It wasn't a point of order. We'll continue, we're having a wonderful time here this evening.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, that is one more example of how this government has turned its back on the most vulnerable of Nova Scotians. For a Minister of Education to recite the figure that 34,700 Nova Scotians have less than a grade nine education and for him to stand and say that Nova Scotia is the best educated population, shame on the minister. It's again an example of the Tory arrogance towards those most unfortunate in Nova Scotia, those people who have managed to get through life without having more than a grade nine education, many who cannot read or write and yet when that's brought to the minister's attention, that's the type of arrogant response we receive to such a pressing problem. Notice government didn't create illiteracy but they certainly didn't do much to help it. Many of our communities and many of our citizens continue to suffer. With a figure such as 34,000, we all have work to do as legislators, as parliamentarians to help address that figure and make sure that those people are given an opportunity to have the upgrading skills necessary to make sure they are equal players in Nova Scotia's society. To hear the Minister of Education dismiss that, shame on him I say.

Mr. Speaker, let us go back as well and remember in 1999 the Party that told us they were going to get tough on crime. The Blue Book and the Minister of Justice told us that this government was going to crack down and make Nova Scotia a safer place. Well, today, Halifax, the largest city here in Nova Scotia, has the highest violent crime rate of any city in Canada and Nova Scotia has the second highest rate of any province. Nova Scotia's rate of 157 incidents per 1,000 population ranked amongst the highest for violent victimization, this from a government that was going to get tough on crime, this from a government that when home invasions became a serious issue, rather than deal with the problem of youth in our province breaking into people's homes, they instead

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made a video for seniors showing them how to lock their windows and lock their doors. What a way to deal with the problem - almost the same way as the Minister of Education deals with illiteracy in this province. Get up and say that we're the best educated and forget about the 34,000 who have less than a Grade 9 education.

[9:00 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, violent crime rates are highest in Alberta and Nova Scotia. Residents of the western provinces generally reported higher rates of victimization with one exception: Nova Scotia's rate of 157 incidents per 1,000 population ranked among the highest for violent victimization and was similar to the rate of 160 recorded for Alberta. Halifax appeared to contribute to Nova Scotia's high rate of violent victimization. It was the central metropolitan area with the highest rate of violent incidents for every 1,000 of population. Residents in the Halifax Regional Municipality and throughout Nova Scotia deserve to have safe communities. They deserve to have a government that takes the issue of crime and vandalism seriously, that follows it up with action and not just talk. Yet one simply has to look under the Justice reforms in the Blue Book to see the many lists of measures that were going to be brought in by the Tory Government to address crime in this province and to see that few, if any, of those promises have been kept.

Mr. Speaker, this government continues to talk about the rate of job growth here in this province, but we realize that in 2005, according to Statistics Canada, job growth was an anemic 0.2 per cent in the last year. We need to make sure that we have a government that is working towards keeping our economy strong and attracting new employers and employees to this province.

Now, Mr. Speaker, there's a way of being able to do that and there's a way of being able to make secret deals and hope that Nova Scotians don't notice. While this government has claimed that it was a clean government and that it didn't have any scandals, who would have thought on the way out the door the former Premier, now member for Pictou Centre, had to have a minister resign over a controversial loan given to a company in his riding. Nova Scotians were left with a minister, who had done business dealings for 27 years, tell Nova Scotians he had simply forgotten to tell his Cabinet colleagues that he did business with this gentleman before offering up to a $250,000 grant, what this government calls a non-forgivable, no-interest loan. Back home we call that a grant but, obviously, the government has found a new way to try to dress that up.

Mr. Speaker, to this day the government continues to hide behind the facts of what took place in this matter. We had the spectacle of the former Minister of Economic Development sitting in the Public Accounts Committee refusing to answer questions, citing Cabinet confidentiality, solicitor/client advice, everything he could think of rather

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than be accountable to Nova Scotians, only to watch him walk out those doors, get in front of the media, they asked him the same questions he refused to answer here and for the most part he gave them an answer. That's the type of government we have here. They've hidden behind the information. They've shown a lack of respect for a committee and yet they walk out in front of the media and they answer the questions they refused to answer here.

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday it will be interesting because the Industrial Expansion Fund will be up for discussion - a fund that this government has managed to use day in and day out for the last few years to be able to give money to companies that somehow didn't meet the smell test of Nova Scotia Business Incorporated, the arm's - length agency set up to give out government money with an independent board of directors.

The government, the Premier who said at the time that he would take the politics and the bureaucracy out of government money to business, yet when we had him here in front of the Public Accounts Committee and when I put the question to him, when he tried to justify that even with NSBI we still need the Industrial Expansion Fund, Cabinet still needs the ability to give money to organizations, to businesses, and we need to keep having that involvement. He went so far as to say, we still need to keep the politics and bureaucracy and the system of giving out government money.

What hypocrisy, after having given speech after speech of saying he would take the politics and bureaucracy out of giving government money. Here he is now, 7 years later, telling us it's necessary to keep that there. Not only did we have a Minister of Economic Development resign - we're still not quite sure why he resigned, because the government won't tell us that, won't tell us what happened at Cabinet or how it took place.

Then we have the famous situation with Magic Valley. Mr. Speaker, we now know as a result of our Party's probing and the Opposition's probing of this issue, the gentleman who owns Magic Valley approached the government saying he needed $3.7 million to turn the operation around and make it profitable. Government bureaucrats laughed, they said it was a dream, a fantasy this gentleman had. It wasn't sustainable, the business plan - they pretty much laughed at it.

Yet, somehow, knowing the Premier who had lobbied for this while in Opposition, knowing he had continued to show a personal interest in this file even though it's not in his riding, knowing the personal friendship between the Premier and the owner of this operation, somehow Cabinet walked out and said, we're going to offer a $350,000, non-repayable, no interest loan again. A grant or, as it has been referred to, a gift.

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Nova Scotians were outraged when they found out the true details of what took place. Yet, to this day we still don't have all the details because the government continues to hide behind solicitor/client privilege, behind Cabinet confidentiality. Even though we have legal opinions from the Chief Legislative Counsel which tells us the government's arguments don't hold any water and that legislative tradition says the committee has the power to get that information and then make a determination whether it meets the test of Cabinet confidentiality or public interest immunity or solicitor/client privilege.

Yet the government continues to stonewall and continues to hide behind that. I would tell you, Mr. Speaker, that Potatogate - as it has been referred to - and Magic Valley will haunt the Progressive Conservative Government during the next election campaign. Nova Scotians will not forget the flagrant abuse of their dollars that took place with Magic Valley. I could speak just on that for the remainder of my time, but, again, allow me to refer to some of the other matters we heard about in the Throne Speech.

Even before the Throne Speech, attending the Halifax Chamber of Commerce luncheon last week, we had the Minister of Finance announce that the Tory Government, if re-elected, will increase the basic personal exemption starting in 2007. Well, our Party has been talking about this issue since 2000 when we were talking about bracket creep, where the federal government was de-indexing the personal income tax brackets and the provincial government wasn't passing on the savings. I can tell you, trying to explain bracket creep back then was impossible, trying to explain it today hasn't gotten much easier. Nova Scotians, especially Nova Scotia businesses, because of the lobbying efforts from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business has made them aware that Nova Scotia has the lowest basic personal exemption in the country.

P.E.I. has a higher rate than we do. Newfoundland and Labrador has a higher rate than we do. Yet the government has kept that low because it has brought in additional revenue. I wouldn't say they've been reaping a windfall because the ministers will stand and say that's not true, although all Nova Scotians know that that is the case.

So, the question became, why 2007? Why not 2006? Here we were, if I'm not mistaken, this would have been May 2nd, we had the Minister of Finance tell the press we couldn't do it for 2006 because we would have had to let Revenue Canada know of these changes by the month of April. So mere weeks before he's announcing this, he's telling us a few weeks later, he missed the deadline.

Now, doesn't this bring us all back to 2003, the election campaign that Summer where the government said, we're going to give you a 10 per cent tax cut, but we didn't let Revenue Canada know in time so we can't give it to you on this year's taxes. Instead, we'll send you out a cheque - the famous $155 cheque. Again the government missed a deadline with Revenue Canada. Doesn't that have a familiar ring to it?

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Nova Scotians got fooled into believing they would get a 10 per cent tax cut. Only one Party stood and said we could not afford that tax cut. The NDP said it would be political suicide to oppose that tax cut. Knowing our province couldn't afford it, knowing it would sacrifice many social programs, knowing the risk it would put our finances in, their Leader did not have the fortitude to stand in his place and to oppose that tax cut.

We opposed that tax cut. Maybe we paid a price for opposing that tax cut, but we stood up for the best interests of Nova Scotians, because at the end of the day the government had to reverse that tax cut. They had to go through the embarrassment of reversing that tax cut because they knew it wasn't sustainable, and they knew it wasn't something that Nova Scotians could afford at the time. So here we find ourselves all over again, with the Tory Party telling us that if you elect us we are going to give you a tax cut by raising the basic personal exemption. Mr. Speaker, as I said to the media then, and as I say now, Nova Scotians were fooled once by this government, by the Tory Party, I certainly hope they will not allow themselves to be fooled again by the false promises that the government is promising to make on the issue of the basic personal exemption.

Mr. Speaker, it's interesting because the NDP has been silent on this issue, knowing that the government, the Tory Party, had proposed a tax cut they had to rescind, and now they're proposing other tax cuts, again, knowing that they've given themselves enough time to rescind this tax cut because they have until 2007, it's interesting, again, to see what this government is going to do and whether the NDP will continue to be silent on that issue.

Tomorrow, we wait to see what the budget will bring here in Nova Scotia. As usual, the government has pretty much given Nova Scotians a good indication of what will be contained in the budget. There may be a few surprises, but for the most part we see that the government is going to bring, tomorrow, more gifts, promises of tax cuts, and spending in every area imaginable to try once again to have Nova Scotians vote for them, having their votes purchased with their own money ; hopefully Nova Scotians will have learned from what the Tories did the last time.

There was an opportunity. Many provinces have said that minority government has been good for the people and that it has worked. Mr. Speaker, minority government in Nova Scotia had great opportunities, but I would submit to you it had few successes. The government continued to govern as if they had a majority, and as long as they threw a few crumbs towards the NDP they knew they would be complacent in their support for the government. We had opportunities to make minority government work . Our Party pushed the government to address Nova Scotians' concerns, but at the end of the day we were the lone voice in this House as the NDP made it clear that they were prepared to be have their support pretty much purchased with a few promises.

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Mr. Speaker, if we look back through history, we had the NDP tell the government, if you allow long-term care to no longer be able to claw back assets, to pay for seniors' long-term care, we'll vote for your budget, and they did. Now we have the NDP saying if the HST is taken off of home heating oil, they'll vote for the budget again. Where are the issues on health care? Where is the support for education? Where is the support for roads? Where is the support for Nova Scotia's most needy?

They have proven themselves to be a one-to-two-trick pony, and their tricks are over. When the Throne Speech was given, the Leader of the NDP announced that the government had stolen his ideas of regulation, and the only issue that was left is the issue of removing the HST on oil. The relevance that is left for the NDP here in this province is questionable and we'll see, following the next election, just how much Nova Scotians still feel the need to send members of that Party here to this Legislature.

Mr. Speaker, it's interesting, because I sat here and I listened to the Leader of the Opposition give his reply and I can tell you, the members of our caucus certainly showed respect during his reply regardless of some of his comments. We certainly showed some respect to him. It's quite interesting, the spectacle that we are getting from the Official Opposition here this evening, when a member is trying to give his reply here in the Legislature. So I think that, again, says more about just how these points are hitting home, than anything else.

[9:15 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, we realize that this government is the same government that has overseen the decline of our tourism industry. They have seen almost the complete demise of our offshore industry, and they have overseen the depopulation of our rural communities at an alarming rate. What is worse, we need change. Even change from a new Premier, because that Premier has shown us that he is taking us back into the 1980s, rather than moving us forward by trying again to buy his way back into power with Nova Scotians' own money.

Mr. Speaker, allow me, being that this will probably be my only opportunity not only as Leader in the House for the Liberal Party, but as the MLA for Richmond, to be able to reply to the Speech from the Throne during this session. I want to take the opportunity. On March 24, 1998, myself and a few members of this House, along with you, Mr. [Deputy] Speaker, celebrated our 8th Anniversary as members of this Legislature. Three elections later, our constituents have seen fit to return us back to this House to continue to represent them. I can tell you, it's still a great honour for me to stand in my place to speak as the MLA for Richmond County. During eight years we have had many challenges but, at the same time, we have had numerous successes.

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I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, as we approach a possible campaign, I look forward again of going to see the people of Richmond County to ask for their continued support, to be able to talk to them about issues such as health care. To talk to them about how often I've raised the issue of the Strait-Richmond Hospital here in this House. To talk to them about how often I raised the issue of the Richmond Villa, in this House, now to know, as we speak, a new Richmond Villa is being constructed in Richmond County, in St. Peters, as promised. I'm pleased the former Minister of Health and the former, former Minister of Health, I know, were supportive of that. It took a little bit to get there, a little longer, but it's under construction and I look forward to the opening that is going to take place in August or September of this year.

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to the debate that comes forward. I believe that our Party is going to show Nova Scotians that we can present a plan that better meets the needs of all Nova Scotians, allows them and their families to be able to thrive, allows our students to afford education, allows our seniors to live in comfort, allows our province to prosper. I believe Nova Scotians will see that the Liberal plan allows them to do that, and I look forward to debating that in the next days and weeks ahead. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

MR. GORDON GOSSE: Mr. Speaker, it's a pleasure to rise tonight and speak on the Throne Speech. The first item I would like to address is my government's firm and full commitment. Firm commitment. Commitment to what? Almost seven years of government, what have they been committed to? Not too much. Health care - supporting families, threatening communities, building brighter futures, and I'll go with a text out of that page, and the quality of our air and water are just a few.

Could you imagine the quality of air and water in the strip mine in Boularderie Island in Point Aconi? Could you imagine the water table when they're finished gutting that beautiful part of Cape Breton Island? Can you imagine that, Mr. Speaker? The devastation of strip mining, the scar it would leave. Portable water will be nowhere for the people who live over there. That's the full commitment. Strengthening our communities.

I'll give you another sentence out of that, Mr. Speaker. It is why we'll provide more Nova Scotians with affordable housing. The same government that cut 50 per cent of the housing budget in 2003, and now they're going to commit to more affordable housing. How many units did that government build in Cape Breton? None. Not one unit was built in Cape Breton Island and they're committed to affordable housing? Shame. Not one unit.

They spent all of their money on rent subsidies and giving private developers money to build units. By the way, in 10 years' time, those units will be turned over to

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private development and they can do whatever they want to do with them. So where's the affordable housing program when business people are getting rich on private developments? The poorest of the poor, the seniors, people with disabilities, have nowhere to live - that's why we have such a high homeless rate in the Province of Nova Scotia because of the irresponsibility of the people across from me.

Increasing funding is also mentioned in the budget for seniors in low income housing repairs. What I would like to know, Mr. Speaker, is when people come into your office as an MLA and ask you for a grant application for repairs - a senior citizen couple living on a meager income of $23,000 per year - can't qualify for that grant. They do not qualify because they are $100 over. Mr. Speaker, I tabled a bill tonight to hopefully deal with some of those problems but I don't think we're going to be around long enough to debate that bill. It's a good bill but we're not going to be around long enough to debate it.

Raise the shelter allowance for income assistant recipients. The shelter allowance? It's pretty difficult - they're going to raise the shelter allowance, they're going to give them $190 to live on a month, $190 for food to live on for a month and they're going to raise their shelter allowance. I'd like to see a member of the government live off $190 a month for food - I'd like to see somebody in that Party do it.

Mr. Speaker, there was another thing, communities the backbone of Nova Scotia - communities the backbone of Nova Scotia? They're going to create a minister responsible for volunteerism. They've created such a need for volunteerism, because of all the government cutbacks. Every non-profit organization in this province is cut to the bone. No wonder we have so many people volunteering because these are services that were once provided that are no longer provided by this government. They have no jobs so they have lots of time to volunteer.

Talk about it, I mean Cape Breton Island has become a suburb of Fort McMurray- that's all we are is a suburb of Fort McMurray - that's all we became down there and it's a shame. Why? Because Sydney Steel - who will remember the famous postcard from 1999? Who will remember the postcard? We will close Sydney Steel and open more hospital beds. Well, I'd like to see somebody stand up over there, the Health Minister and tell me how many hospitals he opened after he closed Sydney Steel and the unfair things that they've done to the former workers who are still left on the site. They bring outside workers in from Quebec to do jobs that these guys are capable of doing. How much money has Ernst & Young made off the backs of the people in Cape Breton? How much money? Stand up in their place and tell us how much money they've made - Ernst & Young, millions of dollars to companies like that - off the backs of steel workers.

They talk about having a youth attendant centre. Is that going to be like a report card once a month? How are they going to do that? The underlying problem here is not

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to do with youth attendant centre, it's providing people who live in poverty, domestic violence and addictions. Go to the underlying causes which we have young people in trouble in this province today. By the lack of funding for Boys and Girls Clubs and youth centres to provide constructive programming to young people so they won't be out on the streets committing crime - that's the problem. These organizations are living from grant to grant, there's no money out there for core funding to provide programs for young people - constructive programs so our young people can grow up to be good productive citizens in society. Let's deal with the underlying problems.

They have to get on their knees and beg every year. As an executive director of a youth centre, to stand in this Legislature and say that I've written to three separate Community Services Ministers looking for core funding to help staff a facility to provide those programs that will keep young people out of trouble. Each and every time you're told you have to go see the regional officer. Go see the regional director for Community Services. It's a shame when they talk about youth attendance and youth crime. Here they are the other day, the Minister of Justice stood up in this Legislature and introduced all kinds of bills to deal with justice. Deal with the underlying problem, provide the proper funding for organizations to do constructive things with young people today. Don't undermine them.

There's a policy in Community Services when they're between the ages of 16 and 18, where do these young people sit? They live from chesterfield to chesterfield or home to home because of this government. When you go to Community Services and you say a young person 17 years of age has nowhere to live, it's like going through a 900-page document to find out where this young person can go. The caseworker says, no, we have to try the grandmother, the great aunt, the great uncle, the next door neighbour to find them a place to live instead of providing a safe environment, no way they'll do this because of that age group.

These 16- to 18-year olds have nowhere. This government has failed miserably. They're talking about falling between the cracks? Mr. Speaker, they're falling between the cracks each and every day we sit in this Legislature. As elected officials, that's not fair. It's not fair to members of society, to young people or to communities. Building safer communities, that is one way of building a safer community - keeping young people happy and busy; busy hands are happy hands - productive young people in society.

I'll go on to the next issue of the Throne Speech, Learning . . . the gateway to success, "My government will also support the diverse needs of our students and will take further actions to implement the recommendations of the Black Learners Advisory Committee." Anybody here remember that? I think the BLAC report was introduced in December 1994. One of the first documents I was handed when I came into this Legislature was the report of the BLAC Implementation Review Committee in September 2003.

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What has been implemented? Nothing. Who has been in government? What has been implemented? Now they're saying we're going to create an Office of African Nova Scotian - an outreach office on Cape Breton Island. Let's see if this government will step up to the plate and the Minister of Transportation and Public Works will put that office in the community of Whitney Pier, the largest Black community outside of metro. Let's see them step up to the plate and put that office where that office belongs. (Applause) Let's not play politics with it - put it where it belongs, implementing the BLAC report.

How many of those recommendations - 48 recommendations - somebody over there stand up and tell me how many of them they implemented. How many did they implement in this Legislature? Shameful. And they talk about learning - gateways to success. It must be an election coming. I can't wait to knock on my community's doors and tell them how many of those recommendations they implemented. I'll start off in the community I love and tell the people this is what this government has done - nothing.

I'll give you another part, Promoting good health . . . protecting public health. Unfortunately, Nova Scotia has among the highest chronic disease and disability rates in the country. They've told us for years and years in Cape Breton, you smoke too many cigarettes, you drink too much rum and you eat too much bologna. That's what's wrong with the people in Nova Scotia. You know what I mean? That's the truth, Mr. Speaker. It has nothing to do with this government's environmental record.

I touched on strip mining a little earlier, let's move on to putting an incinerator in my riding to burn PCBs and PAHs. Everybody in Cape Breton told them when they had the JAG report that they didn't want the incineration of PCBs and PAHs in their community. Where are we at today? This government and JAG made those recommendations and the people of the community do not want to burn PCBs and PAHs. Do the right thing here.

The government should say, let's burn that in Inverness. I say we take the mobile incinerator, we put it up in Inverness and we burn it up there. It's a good Cape Breton Premier, I think the best thing he could do is take that mobile incinerator and burn those PCBs and PAHs in his riding. That would be great for everybody, that's a good way to show leadership in Cape Breton Island to get more votes. Take the bull by the horns in this matter and take it up there.

Let's go on. When I sat in this Legislature and I brought a rag in here one day full of coal dust, the Page refused to pick it up because he didn't know what was on the rag. If I didn't get a phone call this morning to the MLA, there's coal dust all over the neighbourhood again, Mr. Speaker, so you say to the Department of Environment, coal dust, it must be coming from the roads. It must be coming from somewhere else. It's not coming from Sysco - oh, Sysco's not there anymore. That's right, they shut it down.

[Page 163]

It's coming from Provincial Energy Ventures. It's coming from Logi-Tech, it's coming from whatever. They don't know where it's coming from. It's falling out of the sky I guess, Mr. Speaker, and here are these people being exposed. Let's go talk about our sticking lead in the soil in the community, I mean arsenic and lead. I think a former Speaker of this Legislature years back, a fellow who represented Cape Breton Nova, said a spoonful of arsenic now and then wouldn't hurt anybody and I think that was years ago.

AN HON. MEMBER: He must have been a Liberal, was he? (Interruptions)

[9:30 p.m.]

MR. GOSSE: So here it is, Mr. Speaker, we have the soil full of arsenic and lead and what has this government done to deal with this? Well, let's talk about the PCBs, the strip mining, the coal dust. Now, let's go to another issue - asbestos in public housing in my riding. They knew about this report since October 25, 2005 and what did this government agency do? They told nobody. They put new chimneys in 93 units in the Terraces in Ashby and the Pier. They went through the chimneys, new chimneys through the ceilings, through the attics and new roofs.

Mr. Speaker, all that vermiculite contains asbestos - they won't admit over there - it contains asbestos. They have bulk samples back and they know from the report that it's over the Health Canada limit of asbestos. As I talked about earlier, about PAHs and PCBs, they're not too sure if they cause cancer, but I'm going to tell you there's one substance known to mankind that causes cancer 100 per cent and that's asbestos - 100 per cent it causes cancer and the people in these units were exposed to that when these units were under construction.

The Acting Medical Director, Dr. Roberts, sent them a letter, Mr. Speaker, and said to them, you know, you're at low risk only if it's disturbed. The Minister of Community Services flies into Cape Breton and, by the way, didn't tell anybody. Every reporter in Cape Breton was wondering where the minister was. Did you know that the MLA for Cape Breton Nova didn't know he was in town? He got called. So he calls the Cabinet office to find out, oh, he's in meetings. So he comes in and he flies back out of town and when the reporters finally get hold of him, he's landing at the Halifax Airport and he says, well, you know, we got a couple of bulk samples back that are 1.6 per cent.

Well, that's over the allowable limit for asbestos in Canada. So when they did the construction on these units and all that dust and vermiculite was in the air, these people were exposed to a human carcinogenic and the shame on this part of it is that it takes years and years for it to develop into mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis, cancer of the lining of the lung. This is what happens. This doesn't happen right away. This

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happens years and years down the road. This is what they call a bystander part of the asbestos.

Bystander means, Mr. Speaker, in Libby, Montana where this asbestos was mined, the workers were coming home and they had it on their clothes. The women were washing their clothes. Years down the road the women die of cancer. Workers in Ontario, working at asbestos plants, coming home - there was an article two weeks ago, I think it was in the Toronto Star and the article said a 16-year-old does not reach his birthday. He dies of mesothelioma. His father worked in an asbestos plant.

What is this government going to do about the people who were exposed to asbestos, Mr. Speaker? All they keep saying is that they are only at risk if it was disturbed. Does anybody over there get the fact that these people lived in these homes and that when they were cutting holes through the ceilings, the asbestos was pouring down, and the people living there were cleaning it up, vacuuming to clean it up, sweeping it up, and what do they keep saying - only at a low risk if you disturb it. Well, what do you have to do to disturb it? What do you have to do to disturb it? It fell down and they swept it up. A lady says to me last week, she said to her MLA, they came in and I asked them if they did a test of my living room. I said, no, no, how about testing the furnace room where the stuff is falling down. Oh, no, we were told to test it here. They were told to test it there. Don't test it where it's at, but test it there.

Who made this all up and here they are, Mr. Speaker, and let me say that this all happened on October 25th and they didn't notify anybody, you know, they didn't tell anybody until I brought it out publicly on Friday, April 7th, until I advised the media what was going on with this issue. They said we're going to get two of our members of Community Services, we're going to go in and we're going to investigate. They're going to investigate. So they appoint this Mr. David Ryan out of Halifax Community Services and lo and behold they appoint Mr. Cyril LeBlanc who is the regional director now for Community Services. So people are at a community meeting, Mr. LeBlanc is sitting there not saying anything and I say, well as of April 1st he was the regional director, what was his job before April 1st? He was the director for housing for Cape Breton Island. So he is doing the investigation. Could you imagine if I had misconduct as an MLA and Darrell Dexter appointed me to investigate myself. The fox in charge of the henhouse again, Mr. Speaker.

These are people who were exposed to asbestos, a very serious issue, and I don't hear anything from the Minister of Community Services, the Minister of Environment and Labour, or anybody over there advising those people of the health issue. This is the way that says, promoting good health and protecting public health. We don't have a doctor anymore. Dr. Badenhorst was the regional doctor there, and he left on Thursday before all of this happened. So now we have an acting regional medical officer under Dr. Jeff Scott. Ann Roberts is actually the acting medical officer of health for Cape Breton

[Page 165]

Island, because we don't have one right now. In a time of need, when people were exposed to one of the most dangerous human carcinogenics known to mankind, 100 per cent sure that causes cancer, nothing else, 100 per cent caused cancer; not now, maybe 10 years, maybe 15 years but causes cancer. So that's promoting good health and protecting public health in this Throne Speech, that's good health.

Mr. Speaker, they talk about, in the next issue of the Throne Speech, "Meeting Nova Scotia's health -care needs". That's a lovely title. When they can take a senior citizen who is looking for nursing home care and put her 100 kilometres away - I have a lady in my community, of African-Nova Scotian descent and they put her in Richmond, the Richmond Villa. It's within the limit of 100 kilometres - that's meeting Nova Scotia health care needs. They take another lady who lives in Cheticamp and put her in Sydney. Now she cannot receive the services in her own language - 100 kilometres away, and how can she receive the services she needs in her own language of French? She can't. Again, that's meeting Nova Scotia's health care needs. I guess it was Gaelic that meets their needs.

Mr. Speaker, "Shaping the future of Continuing Care" - ship them 100 kilometres away because they just have too many beds. What they have to do is rely on getting these people out of the hospitals and creating more long-term beds in the Province of Nova Scotia. We need long-term beds for our aging population in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, "Building optimism, better business climate". Well, I'm not going to go there because a member in the other Party just talked about the optimism and building a better business climate with Magic Valley and the Potatogate incident. I'm not going to go with building a better business climate there, I'm just going to leave that up to the next member from the Liberal Party to deal with that.

Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia resources, the next heading in the Throne Speech. "Nova Scotia's resource industries. . . adapting to change". "My government believes a prosperous future depends on careful management of our natural resources" - bring out the strip mining, Mr. Speaker, bring it out, 160 feet down. I mean, we're going to look after the management of our natural resources. We have a Donkin Mine there to go back to coal mining underground, the proper way to mine coal. Let's get it done, why tear up beautiful PointAconi in Boularderie Island? That is very good for tourism, I can just see an eco-tourist down a 160 foot hole in the middle of Cape Breton Island. Can you imagine? Would you take a canoe down to that water? I'll go on to the minerals, you imagine the wildlife around there. I remember touring that site one day with my Leader, Mr. Dexter, and the member for Dartmouth East, the member for Hants East, the member for Dartmouth North, and the member for Cape Breton Centre, and we saw two deer there, two beautiful deer down in Point Aconi. There were the deer over on one side and there was this pile of - I don't know if it was slag, I would call it slag because I'm a former steelworker - tailings or trailings of the mine, and this pool of water, I've never

[Page 166]

seen a colour like that before. I think I saw it a long time ago when I was a young fellow. I used to look in the telescope to look at the moon, and it kind of looked like that. It was really weird, a big hole like that, a moonscape. That's what the stripmining did to that part of the Island.

This government believes a prosperous future also depends on careful management of our natural resources. Imagine. How many fish were in that water, Mr. Speaker? How many fish would be living in that water? What about the lobster fishermen? What about the agriculture? What about all those other things that are going to happen there? To create how many jobs? How many jobs and economic benefits is this project going to bring to Cape Breton Island? How many jobs?

Mr. Speaker, again I talked about the opening of a satellite office. Let's see if this government will do the right thing and open an Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs satellite office in the community of Whitney Pier, where it belongs, where it should be, with easy access. Let's not go to the downtown area where people will have to walk or take a bus, too far away from the community. Let's do the proper thing here.

Our environment, our energy, our people and our products - that's a lovely heading, Mr. Speaker. That is just beautiful. I'm looking at Towards a Sustainable Environment. Could you imagine the Government of Nova Scotia offering ecosystem tours of the beautiful Bouladerie Island and Bird Island? Could you imagine after what is going to happen over there an ecosystem tour? I cannot understand how this government can actually say that stripmining (Interruption) I guess in a sense you could call it environmental prejudice. In what other part of this province would you have coal dust, arsenic and lead in the soil, incineration of PCBs, asbestos, vermiculite asbestos in attics of public housing? Where else would that happen? Would that happen anywhere else?

I'm glad that we have a new Cape Breton Premier, so he can tell the people of Cape Breton Island he's going to take that mobile incinerator and burn the PCBs and the PAHs in Inverness County where they belong. That will show leadership to the people of Cape Breton Island. That will show leadership, by doing those things. No burn. It would show leadership out there to do that.

Mr. Speaker, there are some good things I guess I could say in the budget, but I can't find too many. In my first Speech from the Throne, when I was first elected, there was never a mention of Cape Breton Island, but now we have a Cape Breton Premier, he mentioned it once. So I guess, myself, as a Cape Bretoner, I should be very happy with that aspect, that he mentioned it once. Once, he did, once. It was once, I'm telling you, once. That's a big improvement from the last Premier.

AN HON. MEMBER: What did he say?

[Page 167]

MR. GOSSE: He just said, once, that he was going to create an Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs in Cape Breton Island. That's it. That's what he's going to do for Cape Breton Island.

AN HON. MEMBER: What about housing?

MR. GOSSE: Housing - how many units of affordable housing did they build on Cape Breton Island?

AN HON. MEMBER: None.

MR. GOSSE: Not one. Not one. I'm glad to see affordable housing in this document, but how many times are the people of Nova Scotia and the people of Cape Breton Island going to get fooled by this? I'd like to see a minister stand up over there, in Community Services, and tell me how many people are living in the new affordable houses that they built in Cape Breton Island. He can show me here tomorrow, or in the next few days that we still have remaining here, how many tenants are living in new affordable housing units built in Cape Breton. How many? None. Not one, Mr. Speaker. It's a shame. Not one. Not one person.

They spent $37.3 million, and we still don't have a unit in Cape Breton. We got $18.9 million left in the affordable housing budget, and now they're going to say that we're going to build affordable housing, $18.9 million. Not one. I'm sure he's a Cape Breton Premier. I'm pretty sure.

AN HON. MEMBER: Does he sing Out on the Mira?

MR. GOSSE: No. I'm just staying - Mr. Speaker, I'm just trying to mention some things, you're supposed to stand up on the Reply to the Speech from the Throne and say positive things about your riding. I wish I could stand in my place here as a Member of the Legislative Assembly and say, look, I'm proud to have coal dust, I'm proud to have PCBs and PAHs, I'm proud to have asbestos, I'm proud to have arsenic and lead. Where else would this be tolerated in Canada? Where else in Nova Scotia would this be tolerated? Where would it be tolerated? Nowhere.

Can the people not see the environmental prejudice in which that community in Cape Breton Nova is under? What have they done to deal with any of those issues in the time that they've been in power, almost seven years? What have they done? That's why I'm here in this Legislature, elected by the people of Cape Breton Nova, to point these out, to tell the people. (Applause)

When I also read the Throne Speech, I see there's going to be a tax credit for children who play hockey. I have an 11-year-old boy, Daniel, who plays sports and a lot

[Page 168]

of kids in my neighbourhood - Tory, Brandon, Brett and Kenzie (Interruptions) Yes, he has a lot of friends. He plays hockey, baseball - I'm fortunate. What about the people who can't afford to pay for their children to play hockey, can't afford the equipment? They don't play and then we wonder - we go back to that issue about getting young people involved - when busy hands are happy hands. When you're marching, you're not fighting.

[9:45 p.m.]

When those kids are playing ball, soccer, sports of any kind, they learn camaraderie. I have many friends over sports of many years - a lot of children can learn a lesson by playing sports, by getting involved in sports. This Premier was a phys. ed. teacher who is now committed to bringing physical education back to high school. Physical education - I wonder whose idea that was?

I remember the cartoon back in the paper - maybe I'm not supposed to say this, but don't throw me out, Mr. Speaker. The cartoon was a picture of John Hamm and it had Mr. Hamm is retiring after implementing Darrell Dexter's policy. I'm sorry, it was the member for Pictou - at this time it was, so I'm just wondering if we're going to have that same caption with the new Premier implementing NDP policies. Compulsory phys. ed., gas regulations - imagine the possibility of doing the right thing by taking the HST off home heating. An NDP thing.

I did a press conference with the member for Sackville-Cobequid, with Peter Stoffer, the MP for Eastern Shore on December 5, 2004 in Ottawa, a joint press conference on the removal of HST from home heating. They said you couldn't do that. That government over there said it couldn't be done, it would be a miracle if it could be done now. Can you imagine they can stand up and say we can remove that? You know what I mean, Mr. Speaker?

Politics is strange - you end up fighting for people to get a new bridge in their riding - a $983,000 bridge in your riding. But people were still upset with this government because they had to drive 25 kilometres around and the gas prices went from 92 cents to $1.10 and the constituents were bringing in bills to me - who's going to pay for this gas? I guess it was 60 days or whatever, within a certain length of time and the gas that it cost them. I'll tell you, the bridge is beautiful. It'll be there long after I'm dead and gone and off this planet, I'll tell you that.

Mr. Speaker, they talk about doing the right thing, focusing on providing enough money for programming for young people. Do not make these non-profit organizations and people live from grant to grant in transition houses, boys and girls clubs. Volunteers. A minister of volunteerism, I nearly fell out of the chair when they announced that one in the Throne Speech the other day.

[Page 169]

AN HON. MEMBER: You near what? Say it again.

MR. GOSSE: I near fell off my chair in my place. I near fell off because volunteerism, a minister of volunteerism - I'm still shocked over that one, I guess I'll use that on the campaign too. The minister of volunteerism, that's a good one. And a minister of Gaelic - I wonder where that came from? A minister of Gaelic. I better not be too saucy on that one as my mother's a MacNeil and she would be quite upset with me, I guess, with my heritage.

Mr. Speaker, the Throne Speech, there are so many things this government could have done when they did the Throne Speech and addressed so many other issues. But there's no other riding where you'll see environmental prejudice in the Province of Nova Scotia. Environmental prejudice in the Province of Nova Scotia, environmental prejudice, Mr. Speaker, strip mining, asbestos, tar ponds, PCBs, PAHs. I just wonder, what other people in the Province of Nova Scotia, would put up with that? I'd like to see that being down in the beautiful Musquodoboit Valley, a PCB incinerator, or Bedford, or anything like that and see how many of the people over there - I would like to see them, how they would react, if we say we're going to put a mobile incinerator in Antigonish. I would like to see the people in Antigonish - God bless my Aunt Florence, when they're going to burn PCBs in her backyard, in Antigonish. It will never happen. The only place it is going to happen, is in Cape Breton Nova. Coal dust, asbestos, PCBs - a mobile incinerator, dioxins in the air. We've been poisoned for over 100 years in that community. When is this government going to stop the abuse of the people of Cape Breton Nova? When is it going to stop? (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, we all know in this Legislature, there's an election coming up very soon, and the candidate for that Party over there, works for Housing. So I would like to see him when he's knocking on the doors, looking for votes, telling them about the asbestos in their insulation, and they were at low risk because his friends in that government that he is going to run for, told him, you're at low risk only if it's disturbed. So let's see when he knocks on their doors and tells them - I'd like to see his campaign literature stating, Island housing. How many units? Now I found on the weekend their was an article, 20 more units. Wolfville, Middleton, and Antigonish. How many units are there going to be? When is the Minister of Community Services going to do an audit on Housing, to determine how safe these units are for people in the Province of Nova Scotia? They hid it. That department knew in October 25, 2005. Where did that report go? Somebody in that department knows where that report went. Let's see what kind of PR, or what kind of CRY they're going to do, and you know what the CRY is? It's cover your rear acronym, and that's what they're good at, and that is what that department is good at in Community Services (Interruptions) CYR.

Mr. Speaker, as I wrap this up for the evening ( Interruptions ) if that's the case, I'm going to keep going. That Minister of Community Services said in this Legislature

[Page 170]

over here one day, when I was sitting here and I remember him saying, Cape Breton will get its fair share of affordable housing. Does anybody in here remember that? Cape Breton will get its fair share. The fair share again? Zero. So maybe now that we have a Cape Breton Premier, he might build us a unit or two. That's fair.

Mr. Speaker, I'm going to move adjournment of debate at this time. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is to adjourn the debate. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move the House to now rise to meet again on the morrow at the hour of 1:00 p.m. The House will sit from 1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. Just to refresh everybody's memory, we will come into the House at 1:00 p.m., deal with the budget and the start of the response to the budget, then we will wind up and adjourn that debate and go into the daily routine followed by Question Period, and perhaps some Second Reading on the Justice Minister's bills, if time permits.

I move the House do now rise.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is to the House to adjourn until 1:00 p.m. tomorrow. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House is adjourned until tomorrow.

[The House rose at 9:54 p.m.]

[Page 171]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 111

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas George Thompson is a long-time resident of Lawrencetown, Annapolis County, and a committed community volunteer; and

Whereas George was recently honoured by his peers for serving the residents of the Lawrencetown area for 50 years in the area of volunteer fire service; and

Whereas volunteers with our volunteer fire departments put in a great deal of their own personal time to safeguard our families and neighbours;

Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize the significant contribution put forth by this dedicated individual, and wish Mr. George Thompson all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 112

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Valley Waste Resource honours students in Grades Primary to 12 in the Valley Region who submit winning entries in the Nova Scotia Recycles Contest; and

Whereas this contest helps to raise awareness about waste reduction and recycling in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the efforts of Erin Garner, a Grade 12 student at Annapolis West Education Centre, in motivating students to recycle and compost, won her a $1,000 scholarship from the Resource Recovery Fund Board;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate Erin on her award-winning essay, and wish her all the best in her future endeavours.

[Page 172]

RESOLUTION NO. 113

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas teachers serve as important role models to our children; and

Whereas the promotion of healthy choices and healthy lifestyles has become an important area of education; and

Whereas Arlene Redmond from Champlain Elementary School in Granville Ferry has spent her 34-year career in teaching, promoting active lifestyles and healthy eating habits in her students;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Arlene on being honoured during the Annapolis Valley Regional School Board Education Week for being proactive in the area of healthy living.

RESOLUTION NO. 114

By: Hon. Barry Barnet (Health Promotion and Protection)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas as the lead organization in government for water safety, the Department of Health Promotion and Protection, Sport and Recreation funds and/or consults with water safety/ice safety partners at all levels across Nova Scotia; and

Whereas an absolutely amazing feat transpired in late April as a group of Dalhousie engineering students attempted to get a 380-pound concrete canoe to float on Lake Banook; and

Whereas the canoe did float and was the hard work of 30 enterprising engineering students from Dalhousie University, who then turned around and participated in the 12th Annual Canadian National Concrete Canoe Competition in Sherbrooke, Quebec, the first week of May;

Therefore be it resolved that the team of engineering students from Dalhousie University, along with the Dean of Dalhousie Engineering, Josh Dean, be applauded by Members of this Legislative Assembly for their creative and diligent hard work in getting

[Page 173]

a 380-pound concrete canoe to successfully float on Lake Banook while having the exceptional ability to then take their creative genius and enter the Canadian National Concrete Canoe Championship.

RESOLUTION NO. 115

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kathleen Morgan, who passed away on January 22, 2006, was not only a loving mother to many children and grandchildren, but a second mother to many; and

Whereas she was dedicated to knitting finger puppets and sweaters for the Shriner's Hospital for Children; and

Whereas Kay loved life and all the people who came into her circle, she will long be remembered for her caring actions for her family, as well as church and volunteer communities;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House send condolences to the friends and family of Kathleen Morgan.

RESOLUTION NO. 116

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Canning Area Parents for Real Employment began with parents dreaming for not only their children but others in the community's future; and

Whereas in establishing an environment where individuals can go to meet their potential, this non-profit community development organization not only serves the clients it is designed to help, but also provides the opportunity for community to come together to improve the lives of so many; and

Whereas CAPRE established the first Summer jobs program in 1987 and has not looked back, with the help of volunteers as well as business mentors they have been able to help those in need develop entrepreneurial skills to create their own opportunities;

[Page 174]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House recognize the contributions CAPRE has made to the community and the unmeasurable improvements to their clients' lives.

RESOLUTION NO. 117

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Emily Holland from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Emily travelled from South Farmington to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May7th; and

Whereas Emily has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Emily Holland and wish her every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 118

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nicole Verstichelen from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Nicole travelled from South Farmington to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Nicole has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Nicole Vertischelen and wish her every success in the future.

[Page 175]

RESOLUTION NO. 119

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jessica Dort from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Jessica travelled from Nictaux to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Jessica has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Jessica Dort and wish her every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 120

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sarah Calder from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Sarah travelled from Port Williams to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May7th; and

Whereas Sarah has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Sarah Calder and wish her every success in the future.

[Page 176]

RESOLUTION NO. 121

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hillary Cameron from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Hillary travelled from Kentville to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Hillary has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Hillary Cameron and wish her every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 122

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Abbie Hankinson from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Abbie travelled from Middleton to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Abbie has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Abbie Hankinson and wish her every success in the future.

[Page 177]

RESOLUTION NO. 123

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hailey Reagh from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Hailey travelled from Middleton to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Hailey has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Hailey Reagh, and wish her every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 124

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brittany Blinn from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Brittany travelled from Greenwood to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Brittany has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Brittany Blinn and wish her every success in the future.

[Page 178]

RESOLUTION NO. 125

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cassie Odegard from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Cassie travelled from Coldbrook to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Cassie has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Cassie Odegard and wish her every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 126

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alana Burgess from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Alana travelled from Greenwood to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Alana has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Alana Burgess and wish her every success in the future.

[Page 179]

RESOLUTION NO. 127

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Stacey Walsh from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Stacey travelled from Berwick to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Stacey has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Stacey Walsh and wish her every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 128

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Max Charest from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Max travelled from Kingston to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Max has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Max Charest and wish him every success in the future.

[Page 180]

RESOLUTION NO. 129

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Coach Bruce Naugler from the Rainbow Riders Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Coach Bruce travelled from Kingston to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Coach Bruce has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Coach Bruce Naugler and wish him every success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 130

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Coach Bob Byrne from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Coach Bob travelled from Wilmont to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Coach Bob has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Coach Bob Byrne and wish him every success in the future.

[Page 181]

RESOLUTION NO. 131

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Coach Leann Blinn from the Annapolis Valley Gymnastics Academy Athletes will represent Nova Scotia at the Eastern Canadian Championships for Trampoline and Tumbling; and

Whereas Coach Leann travelled from Greenwood to this year's competition which was held in Hamilton, Ontario from May 4th to May 7th; and

Whereas Coach Leann has worked very hard to develop the skills necessary to compete at such an elite level, this commitment and dedication to the sport is to be commended;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Coach Leann Blinn and wish her every success in the future.