The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House resumed on:
September 21, 2017.

HANSARD 03/04-64

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Murray Scott

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Annual subscriptions available from the Office of the Speaker.

First Session

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2004

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Health - Middleton: Long-Term Care Facility - Require, Mr. S. McNeil 5548
Health - River Hebert: CPR Van - Support, (by Mr. J. DeWolfe)
The Speaker 5548
Health - Inverness Consolidated Memorial Hospital: Dialysis Unit -
Establish, Hon. Rodney MacDonald 5548
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Private and Local Bills Committee, Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 5549
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Anl. Rept. of the Guysborough Antigonish Strait Health Authority,
Hon. A. MacIsaac 5549
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
MK Airlines Flight 1602 - Crash: Victims - Remember, The Premier 5549
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 2824, Retail Council (Can.) - Video Games:
Rating/Classification Prog. - Congrats., Hon. K. Morash 5550
Vote - Affirmative 5551
Res. 2825, Canyon, George: Musical Accomplishments - Congrats.,
The Premier 5551
Vote - Affirmative 5552
Res. 2826, N.S. Woodlot Owner of Yr. Award: Regional Recipients -
Congrats., Hon. R. Hurlburt 5552
Vote - Affirmative 5553
Res. 2827, Imperial Oil Dartmouth Refinery: Upgrade - Congrats.,
Hon. E. Fage 5553
Vote - Affirmative 5554
Res. 2828, Harnish, Vicki: Women of Excellence Award - Congrats.,
Hon. P. Christie 5554
Vote - Affirmative 5555
Res. 2829, Cdn. Prog. Club of Hfx. - Cornwallis/Phoenix Youth Progs.:
Work - Congrats., (by Hon. C. d'Entremont),
Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson 5555
Vote - Affirmative 5556
Res. 2830, Baillie, Jamie - N.S.: Service - Thank, The Premier 5556
Vote - Affirmative 5556
Res. 2831, Driscoll, David/Everett, Sandra - Educ. Systems:
Contributions - Thank, Hon. J. Muir 5557
Vote - Affirmative 5558
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 140, Highway Workers Collective Bargaining Act, Mr. C. Parker 5558
No. 141, Defibrillators Act, Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 5558
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 2832, Croft, Amy - Joints in Motion: Fundraising - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Dexter 5558
Vote - Affirmative 5559
Res. 2833, Lorraine, Ed - Atl. Agric. Hall of Fame: Induction -
Congrats., Mr. W. Gaudet 5559
Vote - Affirmative 5559
Res. 2834, Lbr. Standards: NDP/PC Deal (2003) - Remember,
Mr. R. MacKinnon 5560
Res. 2835, MK Airlines Crash - Rescue Vols.: Efforts - Recognize,
Mr. B. Taylor 5560
Vote - Affirmative 5561
Res. 2836, East. Passage Fast-Path Panthers Fastpitch Squirt Team/
Coaches: Medal - Congrats., Mr. K. Deveaux 5561
Vote - Affirmative 5562
Res. 2837, Citizens on Patrol: Contribution - Recognize, Ms. D. Whalen 5562
Vote - Affirmative 5563
Res. 2838, N. Colchester Rivers Restorations Proj.: Vols./Members -
Congrats., Mr. W. Langille 5563
Vote - Affirmative 5563
Res. 2839, Continuing Care Assistants: Wages/Conditions - Improve,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 5564
Res. 2840, Colley, Senior Deacon Albert: Com. Serv. - Thank,
Mr. K. Colwell 5564
Vote - Affirmative 5565
Res. 2841, Fougere, Patrick/Canso Lions Club: Acadia Seahawk Crew -
Remembrance, Mr. R. Chisholm 5565
Vote - Affirmative 5566
Res. 2842, St. John Ambulance 701 Pictou Co. - Members: Service -
Congrats., Mr. C. Parker 5566
Vote - Affirmative 5567
Res. 2843, MacNeil, Dr. Laurie: Clinical Teaching/Dev. Award -
Congrats., Mr. Michel Samson 5567
Vote - Affirmative 5567
Res. 2844, Lunenburg: Canada AM - Welcome, Hon. M. Baker 5567
Vote - Affirmative 5568
Res. 2845, Youth in Care Newsletter: Participants - Congrats.,
Ms. J. Massey 5568
Vote - Affirmative 5569
Res. 2846, Mar. Drilling Sch.: Success/Expansion - Congrats.,
Mr. Gerald Sampson 5569
Vote - Affirmative 5570
Res. 2847, Brydon, Beth: Scholarship - Congrats., Mr. M. Parent 5570
Vote - Affirmative 5570
Res. 2848, Matheson, Lloyd: UNSM Scroll - Congrats.,
Mr. J. MacDonell 5571
Vote - Affirmative 5571
Res. 2849, Public Libraries: Contribution - Acknowledge, Mr. L. Glavine 5571
Vote - Affirmative 5572
Res. 2850, Truro - Civic Hall: Opening - Congrats., Hon. J. Muir 5572
Vote - Affirmative 5573
Res. 2851, Educ. - Hfx. HS (Proposed): St. Pat's Auditorium -
Retain, Ms. M. Raymond 5573
Res. 2852, Trial of Joseph Howe - Digby Area Theatre Soc.: Prod. -
Congrats., Mr. H. Theriault 5574
Vote - Affirmative 5574
Res. 2853, Richmond MLA: Name Change - Advise, Hon. D. Morse 5575
Res. 2854, S. Shore Health - Step Into Fitness Prog.: Participation -
Congrats., Hon. M. Baker 5575
Vote - Affirmative 5576
Res. 2855, Campbell, Art - Sir John A. Macdonald HS Remembrance
Day Ceremonies: Gratitude - Offer, Mr. W. Estabrooks 5576
Vote - Affirmative 5577
Res. 2856, Harnish, Vicki - Cdn. Progress Club (Hfx.-Cornwallis):
Award - Congrats., Ms. D. Whalen 5577
Vote - Affirmative 5577
Res. 2857, Hendren, Christine - Timberlea: Fundraising Efforts -
Congrats., Mr. W. Estabrooks 5578
Vote - Affirmative 5578
Res. 2858, Late Debate (10/13/04): Com. Serv. Min. - Subject,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 5578
Res. 2859, Daigle, Mary - Dartmouth Boys & Girls Club:
Involvement (25 yrs.) - Thank, Mr. J. Pye 5579
Vote - Affirmative 5580
Res. 2860, Fairways Fore Health Care Charity Golf Tournament
(4th Anl.): Participants - Congrats., Mr. G. Gosse 5580
Vote - Affirmative 5580
Res. 2861, White, Curtis - Quebec Boxing Match: Success - Wish,
Mr. Gerald Sampson 5581
Vote - Affirmative 5581
Res. 2862, Women of Excellence Awards: Recipients - Congrats.,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 5581
Vote - Affirmative 5582
Res. 2863, Bourinot, Lloyd M.: Accomplishments - Congrats.,
Mr. H. Theriault 5582
Vote - Affirmative 5583
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 670, Prem. - Heating Oil: Assistance - Action, Mr. D. Dexter 5583
No. 671, Educ. - Univ. Debt Reduction Prog.: Disbursement - Details,
Mr. L. Glavine 5584
No. 672, Com. Serv. - Barrington St. Y: Com. Serv. Clients -
Usage Explain, Mr. D. Dexter 5585
No. 673, Health: In-Home Support Prog. - Lack Explain,
Mr. Michel Samson 5587
No. 674, Educ. - Tuition Rates: Increases - Assistance,
Mr. W. Estabrooks 5588
No. 675, TPW - Moore's Landing: Expropriation - Details,
Mr. R. MacKinnon 5590
No. 676, Health Prom.: Smoke-Free Place Act - Enforce,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 5591
No. 677, Health - Richmond Villa: Const. - Time Frame,
Mr. Michel Samson 5592
No. 678, Serv. N.S. & Mun. Rel. - Northwest Arm: Jurisdiction -
Details, Ms. M. Raymond 5593
No. 679, TPW - West Black Rock Rd.: Patching - Complaints,
Mr. C. Parker 5595
No. 680, Health - Middleton Nursing Home: Proposal -
Gov't. Response, Mr. S. McNeil 5596
No. 681, Com. Serv. - Rooming Houses: Conditions -
Min. Responsibility, Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 5597
No. 682, Health - Dental Fees: Adult/Child Rates - Fairness,
Mr. W. Gaudet 5598
No. 683, Prem. - Vol. Sector Infrastructure: Stabilization - Plans,
Ms. M. More 5599
No. 684, TCH: Marketing Budget/Tourism Decrease - Correlation,
Mr. S. McNeil 5601
No. 685, Health: Suicide Prevention Strategy - Time Frame,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 5602
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 134, Yarmouth Marketing and Promotions Levy Act 5602
Hon. R. Hurlburt 5602
Mr. J. Pye 5603
Mr. S. McNeil 5604
Mr. R. MacKinnon 5604
Hon. R. Hurlburt 5606
Vote - Affirmative 5606
PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 138, Trade Union Act 5607
Mr. W. Langille 5607
Mr. F. Corbett 5607
Mr. Manning MacDonald 5607
Mr. R. MacKinnon 5608
Mr. W. Dooks 5609
Vote - Affirmative 5609
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 2:20 P.M. 5609
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 2:21 P.M. 5609
CWH REPORTS 5609
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 95, Land Registration Act 5610
No. 96, House of Assembly Act 5610
No. 99, Vital Statistics Act 5610
No. 101, Public Service Act 5610
Hon. B. Barnet 5610
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 5610
Mr. K. Colwell 5611
Hon. B. Barnet 5612
Vote - Affirmative 5612
No. 102, Maintenance Enforcement Act 5613
No. 107, Prescription Monitoring Act 5613
No. 115, Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission Act 5613
HOUSE RECESSED AT 2:35 P.M. 5613
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 4:06 P.M. 5613
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. M. Baker 5614
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. M. Baker 5614
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 4:10 P.M. 5615
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 4:11 P.M. 5615
CWH REPORTS 5615
PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 116, Liquor Control Act 5616
Ms. J. Massey 5616
Vote - Affirmative 5617
No. 121, Motor Vehicle Act 5617
Ms. D. Whalen 5617
Vote - Affirmative 5618
HOUSE RECESSED AT 4:19 P.M. 5618
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 4:30 P.M. 5618
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Private and Local Bills Committee, Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 5619
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 2881, Bill No. 97 Hearings - IEB Referral, Hon. M. Baker 5619
Vote - Affirmative 5620
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 4:33 P.M. 5620
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 4:35 P.M. 5620
CWH REPORTS 5621
PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No.71, Theatre Nova Scotia Incorporation Act 5621
No. 85, Legion-Huston Property in Tatamagouche Act 5621
No. 108, Chester Yacht Club Act 5621
No. 127, Pictou Regional Development Commission Act 5621
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 111, French-language Services Act 5622
Hon. C. d'Entremont 5622
Mr. K. Deveaux 5622
Mr. Michel Samson 5623
Ms. J. Massey 5626
Ms. M. Raymond 5627
Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 5627
Hon. C. d'Entremont 5627
Vote - Affirmative 5628
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5):
Com. Infrastructure (N.s.): Vol Sector - Rebuild:
Ms. M. More 5629
Mr. Gerald Sampson 5631
Mr. L. Glavine 5633
Mr. M. Parent 5634
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Fri., Oct. 15th at 9:00 a.m. 5636
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 2864, Buckland, Brooke: Club Nationals Swimming Championships -
Congrats., Mr. S. McNeil 5637
Res. 2865, Family Matters: Anniv. (10th) - Congrats., Mr. S. McNeil 5637
Res. 2866, Nictaux & Dist. FD: Anniv. (50th) - Congrats., Mr. S. McNeil 5638
Res. 2867, Pelton, Jessica - Swim N.S. Prov. Meet: Medals - Congrats.,
Mr. S. McNeil 5638
Res. 2868, Theunissen, Andrew - Swim N.S. Prov. Meet: Medals -
Congrats., Mr. S. McNeil 5639
Res. 2869, Hannam, Robbie - Swim N.S. Prov. Meet: Medals -
Congrats., Mr. S. McNeil 5639
Res. 2870, Harris, A.J. - Swim N.S. Prov. Meet: Medals - Congrats.,
Mr. S. McNeil 5640
Res. 2871, Oxner, Devrie - Swim N.S. Prov. Meet: Medals - Congrats.,
Mr. S. McNeil 5640
Res. 2872, Empey, Paul & Shelley: Halloween Display Fundraiser -
Congrats., Mr. W. Dooks 5640
Res. 2873, Cobequid Wildlife Rehab Ctr.: Vols. - Commend,
Mr. B. Taylor 5641
Res. 2874, Hilden Fireside Group: Efforts - Congrats., Mr. B. Taylor 5641
Res. 2875, Mattinson, Jake/Fundy Area Soccer Club: Medal - Congrats.,
The Speaker 5642
Res. 2876, Springhill Knights of Columbus Council 4302: Fundraising -
Congrats., The Speaker 5642
Res. 2877, King St. Market (Parrsboro): Success - Wish, The Speaker 5643
Res. 2878, Ferguson, Alan: Marksman Challenge - Congrats.,
The Speaker 5643
Res. 2879, Deveaux, Danica - Sackville Music Fest: Achievement -
Congrats., The Speaker 5644
Res. 2880, Patriquin, Barry: Paralympic Achievements - Congrats.,
The Speaker 5644

[Page 5547]

HALIFAX, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2004

Fifty-ninth General Assembly

First Session

12:00 NOON

SPEAKER

Hon. Murray Scott

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. James DeWolfe, Ms. Joan Massey, Mr. Russell MacKinnon

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable member for Kings North.

MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I want to offer an apology. Last night, after a difficult afternoon with colleague, Gary Hines, and in the heat of debate, I didn't refer to the honourable member by his proper title on my way out of the Chamber during late debate. I offer an apology to the honourable member for not using his proper title.

I do also want to tell the House that Mr. Hines is doing well. They wanted to put him in the hospital yesterday. He, of course, knowing Gary, wanted to go home. They let him go home on the condition he come back in for further testing today. So I hope the apology is accepted.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for Kings North for his acknowledgment on what transpired yesterday. I know sometimes debates can get a little heated and emotional, and I certainly accept his apology.

5547

[Page 5548]

MR. SPEAKER: Before we begin the daily routine, the subject for this evening's late debate was submitted by the honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage:

Therefore be it resolved that this government work with the voluntary sector to rebuild Nova Scotia's community infrastructure.

This will be debated this evening at 6:00 p.m.

We will begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Annapolis.

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of the Middleton and Area Nursing Home Society. The operative clause is, "To: Premier John Hamm We need a long-term care and assisted living facility in Middleton now! Our community residents are forced to leave their family, friends and familiar surroundings in their final years. Using your ratio of beds to seniors seventy-five and over (75+), we should have 224 beds. WE HAVE NONE! We want action now!" There are 1,334 names on this petition and I have affixed mine.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of the honourable member for Cumberland South. It is signed by 1,046 constituents. The operative clause is, "Please support the River Hebert CPR van."

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage.

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition with over 3,000 signatures for a dialysis unit to be established at the Inverness Consolidated Memorial Hospital and, for purposes of tabling, I have affixed my signature to the petition.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

[Page 5549]

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Private and Local Bills, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 85 - Legion-Huston Property in Tatamagouche Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the Annual Report of the Guysborough Antigonish Strait Health Authority for the fiscal year 2003-2004. The title of the annual report is Working Together for a Healthy Community.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotians awoke early this morning to the sad news that a large cargo jet crashed, during takeoff, from the Halifax International Airport at approximately 3:40 a.m. While little is known about the reasons why MK Airlines Flight 1602 tragically crashed, what we do know is that today seven families are grieving the loss of their loved ones.

Our government is co-operating fully with Transport Canada, other federal agencies, and the Halifax International Airport Authority in the aftermath of this tragedy.

On behalf of the government and the people of Nova Scotia, I would like to extend my deepest sympathies to the crew's families, as they try to come to terms with their loss.

[Page 5550]

Mr. Speaker, following a response from each of the Opposition Parties, I would ask that we stand for a moment of silence to remember the victims of this tragic accident.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I just would, briefly, add my voice to those words that have already been said by the Premier. It is indeed a very sad event that transpired this morning. One can't really comprehend the sorrow that must be with those families today and, of course, we believe this is a very appropriate suggestion by the Premier.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of our Liberal caucus, I want to express our deepest sympathy to the families of these victims. Our thoughts and our prayers are with them at this difficult time.

To the individuals who are working on the scene of this tragic event, we offer our support and our prayers during this difficult time, as well.

M. l'presidenté, en nom de tout mes collègues en chambre je veux expreimer nos sympathies les plus sincère. Aux membres des familles de l'équipe àbord de l'avion. de cette événement tragique ce matin.

MR. SPEAKER: I would ask all members to rise for a moment of silence, please.

[One minute of silence was observed.]

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. Please be seated.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Environment and Labour.

RESOLUTION NO. 2824

HON. KERRY MORASH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this government is committed to protecting our children from excessive violence and certain sexual content in video games; and

[Page 5551]

Whereas the Retail Council of Canada is launching a new voluntary program today for its members which supports Nova Scotia's efforts to classify and display a rating on video game products; and

Whereas this program will complement Nova Scotia's legislation enforcing ratings for computer and video games;

Therefore be it resolved that we acknowledge and congratulate the Retail Council of Canada for their efforts to ensure that inappropriate video games do not end up in the hands of our children.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, before reading my resolution, I would like draw to the attention of the House two guests who are today with us in the Speaker's Gallery. One is someone who really needs no introduction, Mr. George Canyon, Pictou County's rising star. With George Canyon today is his associate, Chris Coote I would ask our two guests to rise and receive the welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 2825

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today this House welcomes to its historic halls Pictou County's rising star, George Canyon; and

[Page 5552]

Whereas it has been a phenomenal year for this Canadian country singing sensation who placed second in the American competition, "Nashville Star", won a Canadian Country Music Award and released his first major label CD; and

Whereas while all Nova Scotians are sad to have this Hopewell resident and his young family moving to Nashville, I know we all hope that his success to date is simply the tip of the iceberg of what's ahead;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature welcome George Canyon, offer our best wishes for the success of his CD "One Good Friend" and send our congratulations to him on breaking through a tough industry by plain hard work and perseverance.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[12:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We certainly welcome our special guest to the gallery today and wish him all the best in his future. Thank you. (Applause)

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

RESOLUTION NO. 2826

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Department of Natural Resources has been recognizing outstanding stewardship on private woodlots for the past 15 years through an annual presentation of the Nova Scotia Woodlot Owner of the Year Award; and

[Page 5553]

Whereas the intent of the award is to encourage sustainable woodlot management by landowners and to provide the public with an opportunity to see good forest management through field day activities; and

Whereas field days were held in central and eastern regions in September and the provincial and western region winner's field day will be held this Saturday, October 16th;

Therefore be it resolved that the member of the House congratulate provincial winner, James Bower of Yarmouth; central regional winner, Laurie, Mike and Steven Hanna of Lakelands, Cumberland County; and eastern region winner Earl Vickers of Portree, Inverness County for their good forest practices.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Economic Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 2827

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Imperial Oil Dartmouth refinery employs 220 Nova Scotians in well paying, rewarding and meaningful jobs; and

Whereas the Imperial Oil Dartmouth refinery has a long history of producing quality products, bringing diversity, strength and opportunity to the economy of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Imperial Oil has today shown full confidence in its Nova Scotia workers, its Nova Scotia facility and its ability to do business in Nova Scotia by announcing a further $100 million investment to upgrade the Dartmouth refinery;

[Page 5554]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the management and staff of the Imperial Oil Limited Dartmouth refinery on this important new investment which will contribute to the growth of Nova Scotia's energy sector, contribute to the growth of Nova Scotia's economy as well as maintain competition in the marketplace and again demonstrate that Nova Scotia is a good place to build and grow a business.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Finance.

RESOLUTION NO. 2828

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Progress Club of Halifax-Cornwallis last night held its annual Progress Women of Excellence awards dinner, where they honoured Nova Scotia women who influence, excel, inspire, lead and teach by example; and

Whereas one of the six award winners was Vicki Harnish, our Deputy Minister of Finance, who has achieved a great deal in her many leadership roles with the Government of Nova Scotia since 1974; and

Whereas members of this House should take every opportunity to recognize and thank our public servants, both men and women, who work every day and every year to ensure Nova Scotians get the programs and services they need;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Ms. Harnish on her award and recognize her as an example of excellence in public service.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 5555]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries.

RESOLUTION NO. 2829

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister responsible for the Advisory Council on the Status of Women, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Progress Club of Halifax-Cornwallis last night held its Women of Excellence awards ceremony, an event that has raised $300,000 over 15 years for Phoenix Youth programs; and

Whereas the purpose of the funds is to break the cycle of homelessness among 16- to 24-year-olds who live on the street by providing them with counselling, a drop-in centre, emergency and long-term housing, academic and employment programs, health services and follow-up; and

Whereas the winners of the Progress Women of Excellence Award include Andree Gracie for arts and culture; Vicki Harnish for communications and public affairs; Sarah Dennis for corporate management and professions; Joan Hicks for education and research; Tanya Shaw-Weeks for entrepreneur and innovator; and Lesley Barnes for health, sport and fitness;

Therefore be it resolved that this House applaud the work of the Canadian Progress Club of Halifax Cornwallis and Phoenix Youth programs, as well as the 18 nominees, all outstanding women whose achievements make Nova Scotia proud.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 5556]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 2830

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the job of the Chief of Staff for the Premier's Office is an unenviable job, often involving long hours and significant time away from family; and

Whereas for almost three years, Jamie Baillie has faithfully and effectively served not only the Office of the Premier but also, through his service, the people of our province; and

Whereas while we are sad to lose the talents of Mr. Baillie to his new position with Credit Union Atlantic, we know full well that he will fulfill his new role with the same enthusiasm and commitment he has shown the Office of the Premier;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House thank him for his service to his province and send our best wishes to Jamie, his wife Sandra, and daughters Alex and Hannah, as he takes on this new challenge. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Education.

[Page 5557]

HON. JAMES MUIR: Before reading my resolution, Mr. Speaker, I would like permission to do an introduction. In the east gallery today, I would like to introduce two long-standing metro area school board members, David Driscoll and Sandra Everett. They are accompanied by Bev Amiro, Principal of Harbour View School in Dartmouth, and Greg Hayward.

David Driscoll represents Halifax North End and has served as a school board member for 27 years. He also once chaired the Halifax District School Board. Sandra Everett represents Dartmouth Albro Lake and she has been a school board member for 20 years. She also chaired the Dartmouth District School Board at one time, and later the Halifax Regional School Board. She is also a past president of the Nova Scotia School Boards Association.

I would ask Mr. Driscoll and Ms. Everett, and their guests, to stand and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 2831

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas two long-standing school board members, David Driscoll, representing Halifax North End, and Sandra Everett, representing Dartmouth Albro Lake, are retiring from the Halifax Regional School Board after 27 years and 20 years respectively; and

Whereas David Driscoll once chaired the Halifax District School Board and Sandra Everett chaired the Dartmouth District School Board, and later the Halifax Regional School Board. Ms. Everett is also the past president of the Nova Scotia School Boards Association; and

Whereas both members made significant contributions to education, their school board, staff and students and will be missed by all;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House thank David Driscoll and Sandra Everett for their outstanding contributions to the education system which helped ensure Nova Scotian students are provided with a first-quality education.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 5558]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 140 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 1 of the Acts of 1997 (Second Session). The Highway Workers Collective Bargaining Act. (Mr. Charles Parker)

Bill No. 141 - Entitled an Act to Provide Access to Defibrillators. (Mr. David Wilson, Glace Bay)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 2832

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jan Moir of Voglers Cove must raise $5,700 to participate in the Arthritis Society's Joints in Motion Marathon in Lisbon, Portugal in December; and

Whereas Mill Village postmistress Amy Croft, who herself has juvenile rheumatoid arthritis agreed to help fundraise for the cause; and

Whereas Amy surpassed her goal of raising $500, and for the $640 she raised she had her head shaved;

Therefore be it resolved that this Legislature congratulate Amy Croft on her successful fundraising effort for the Joints in Motion arthritis fundraiser.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 5559]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 2833

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Atlantic Agricultural Hall of Fame recognizes those from the Atlantic Provinces who have made an outstanding contribution to the agricultural industry; and

Whereas on October 28, 2004 former Minister of Agriculture, Ed Lorraine, will be inducted into the Atlantic Agricultural Hall of Fame at a ceremony to be held in Truro; and

Whereas Ed Lorraine, a beef farmer, who cares deeply about the survival of family farms, is active in many agricultural organizations, including the Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition, is a former Warden of Colchester County, and served as a member of this Legislature for 14 years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend sincere congratulations to Ed Lorraine for the recognition and honour bestowed upon him.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

[Page 5560]

RESOLUTION NO. 2834

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas municipal policing organizations are on the precipice of obtaining legislative authority for binding arbitration; and

Whereas this issue is vital to peace, security and labour stability within various communities throughout Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Leader of the NDP has indicated that he will be seeking other amendments to the Trade Union Act before his Party supports binding arbitration for municipal policing in Nova Scotia - a power play position mirrored by Rick Clarke, President of the Federation of Labour;

Therefore be it resolved that the Leader of the NDP be mindful of his Party's disastrous deal with the Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative Government on labour standards in 2003.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, before I do this resolution I wonder if I could tell the House that Transport Canada and the RCMP have established a centre at the Halifax International Airport regarding the crash. If members are interested and want to drop by, the spokesperson for the RCMP is Joe Taplin. I have a resolution commending the volunteers for ground search and rescue and of course the RCMP for doing work up there.

[12:30 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 2835

MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas an airline tragedy which has claimed the lives of seven people struck Nova Scotia this morning; and

[Page 5561]

Whereas an MK Airlines 747 cargo jet, en route to Spain, crashed practically upon takeoff at the Halifax International Airport at 3:40 a.m., leaving debris scattered far and wide; and

Whereas the Halifax Regional Fire Service, with many volunteer firefighters, along with the Halifax Ground Search and Rescue, and other volunteers too numerous to mention, have been working to put the fire out while securing the crash site for Transportation Safety Board investigators;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs recognize the difficult work thrust upon so many dedicated people this morning, and extend our best wishes as they work through this tragedy.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 2836

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Eastern Passage has a long history of building strong baseball and fast-pitch teams, and even stronger players; and

Whereas the Eastern Passage Panthers Fast-pitch Squirt team finished the division playoffs with a bronze medal; and

Whereas the Eastern Passage Panthers went on to finish third at the Nova Scotia Provincial Championships in Stellarton;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Eastern Passage Fast-pitch Panthers and recognize coaches Calvin Dort, Willie Filshie, and Andre "Grumpy" Beaver for their support and commitment to the team.

[Page 5562]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 2837

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Citizens on Patrol are the eyes and ears of the Halifax Regional Police, and have been patrolling the streets of Districts 15, 16, 17 and 18 since November 2003; and

Whereas Citizens on Patrol volunteers have been a part of a year-long pilot project where they assist the regular members of the Halifax Regional Police in reducing crime by reporting criminal activity they observe on their patrol; and

Whereas since the patrols began, the Citizens on Patrol members have logged over 2,800 volunteer hours patrolling, having recovered nine stolen motor vehicles, reported numerous driving and youth complaints, and on one occasion informed a homeowner that he had a chimney fire that he was unaware of;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge the contributions of Citizens on Patrol, and wish them continued success for their upcoming membership drive and expansion of the program in Dartmouth.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 5563]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 2838

MR. WILLIAM LANGILLE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tatamagouche is one of the first communities in Colchester County to launch a river restoration project; and

Whereas the North Colchester Rivers Restoration Committee, over the past five years, has raised funds to place structures in the river called digger logs and wing deflectors to create deeper pools of water at cooler temperatures, producing ideal conditions for fish to spawn; and

Whereas the project coordinator, Jim Fraser, along with many volunteers have done this work to three rivers in North Colchester to date: the French River, Baileys Brook, and the Donaldson River;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the volunteers and members of the North Colchester Rivers Restoration Project on preserving and protecting these precious resources, and wish them continued success in their future projects.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

[Page 5564]

RESOLUTION NO. 2839

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas continuing care assistants provide the front-line home support care for thousands of Nova Scotians; and

Whereas CCAs continue to struggle with low wages, unpredictable schedules and challenging working conditions; and

Whereas CUPE Local 3885 has led the charge, fighting for improved conditions for CCAs in Queens County;

Therefore be it resolved that this government listen to all continuing care assistants and work toward improving wages and working conditions across the province to increase the stability and continuity desired by those who use home care services.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 2840

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Albert Colley of East Preston, a descendant of Nova Scotia Lieutenant Governor Sir John Wentworth (1792-1808), was crowned deacon of the East Preston United Baptist Church on November 12, 1962, and continues to this day in the role of senior deacon; and

Whereas Deacon Colley has held numerous other positions in the church, as well as the Laymen's Council of the African United Baptist Association of Nova Scotia and many other community clubs and organizations; and

[Page 5565]

Whereas Deacon Colley was honoured at a special recognition banquet on October 6, 2004, for 42 years of dedicated Christian service and leadership;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House honour Senior Deacon Albert Colley and thank him for the many years of service to his community and contribution to this province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Sheet Harbour.

RESOLUTION NO. 2841

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on December 3rd of this year, there will be a celebration of remembrance held for the 14 young men who lost their lives when the Acadia Seahawk trawler sank off Sable Island in 1964; and

Whereas with support from the Canso Lions Club, Canso resident Patrick Fougere is raising money to organize a day of remembrance for family members still living in the community; and

Whereas the celebrations will include a service, supper, a march of fishermen and community residents, and a token commemorating the 40th Anniversary of this disaster to be handed out to immediate family members;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House commend Pat Fougere and the Canso Lions Club for their efforts to preserve and protect the memory of these brave young men.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 5566]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 2842

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas St. John Ambulance 701 Pictou County has logged almost 10,000 hours of community service during the past four years at public events throughout the county; and

Whereas St. John Ambulance 701 Pictou County has provided invaluable medical aid at hockey and baseball games, United Way events, First Nations activities, as well as at dances and plays; and

Whereas St. John Ambulance 701 Pictou County also provided their important service to this year's Pictou Lobster Carnival, Johnny Miles road races, the Highland Games, the dragon boat races, as well as the Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition and the Pictou-North Colchester Exhibition;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate the 20 very active members of the St. John Ambulance 701 Pictou County for the important and dedicated service that they provide to the people of northern Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 5567]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 2843

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas congratulations go to Dr. Laurie MacNeil of Isle Madame for being the recipient of the 2003-04 Excellence in Clinical Teaching and Resident Development Award; and

Whereas Dr. Laurie MacNeil is a recognized physician, family man and a pillar of the Isle Madame community and is the recipient of this honour which is awarded annually by the Professional Association of Residents in the Maritime Provinces; and

Whereas Dr. MacNeil has been a dedicated health care professional who has provided extensive services to the community of Isle Madame and surrounding area;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Dr. Laurie MacNeil for receiving this year's Clinical Teaching and Resident Development Award and thank him and his family for their years of support to our community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 2844

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 5568]

Whereas the Town of Lunenburg waterfront has been chosen as the location for two national news broadcasts this year; and

Whereas the Lunenburg waterfront again has been chosen as a venue, this time for the popular morning news program Canada AM, which will broadcast live from the Fisheries Museum of the Atlantic on October 18th; and

Whereas the Town of Lunenburg is the first stop on the Good Morning Tour and is the only East Coast location of the cross-Canada tour;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly welcome Canada AM to the beautiful Town of Lunenburg and wish them well on their road trip across Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 2845

MS. JOAN MASSEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Youth in Care Newsletter Project is a program for youth in care that creates a newsletter called The Voice; and

Whereas it is a program which allows the youth involved to write, draw, interview others in care, talk and have fun; and

Whereas the project gives youth in care a voice to share with others what it is like to live in care and what can be done to make it better;

[Page 5569]

Therefore be it resolved that this government congratulate all those involved in The Voice for a job well done, and recognize that by reading The Voice we can all hear directly from youth in care and understand what they are going through.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 2846

MR. GERALD SAMPSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Maritime Drilling School of North Sydney has an excellent record of training personnel in the oil and gas industry; and

Whereas Maritime Drilling School has signed a 10-year contract with Pro Tec, who are a part of the Brainhunter group of companies, under the TrekLogic flagship of companies, to recruit and train people for the oil and gas industry; and

Whereas Maritime Drilling School will be a sectoral council for Pro Tec in the hiring, training and placing of oil personnel throughout Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Maritime Drilling School, a local Nova Scotia company, on their continued success and expansion in becoming a major player in the oil and gas industry and bringing in investors from across Canada and the U.S.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 5570]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 2847

MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Black Rock native Beth Brydon has been awarded a $50,000 scholarship to study in England to become a conductor, that is a specialized teacher who helps people with physical disabilities become more mobile and independent; and

Whereas after graduating from Central Kings High School, Beth Brydon has spent the last two years studying physiotherapy at Dalhousie University in Halifax; and

Whereas Beth Brydon is the first Nova Scotian to receive the Transamerica Life Canada Conductive Education Award;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Beth Brydon on her scholarship and send her best wishes in her future studies.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

[Page 5571]

RESOLUTION NO. 2848

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas serving the public as an elected official is not only an honourable goal for anyone, it is also the foundation of our political system; and

Whereas longevity at holding any elected position indicates at least a certain comfort felt by the voting constituency; and

Whereas Mr. Lloyd Matheson of Nine Mile River was recently awarded a Platinum Scroll of Recognition at a recent meeting of the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities, acknowledging 40 years of his involvement with municipal government;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Lloyd Matheson for his many years of public service to the institution of local government.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 2849

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Halifax public libraries are eagerly awaiting this year's Public Library Week, with new services and programs to showcase; and

[Page 5572]

Whereas the libraries have stepped up their campaign of accessibility, especially with the new catalogue found on the Web site, "Find it!" which grants people the convenience of being able to find a particular library item from their home computer and have it sent to the branch most convenient to them; and

Whereas there were over 127.4 million Canadian public library visits last year and Public Library Week begins on October 18th and run until October 24th;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge the contribution public libraries have made and encourage all citizens to participate in programs at their local library.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 2850

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on October 2nd the Town of Truro held the official opening for its new Civic Hall, located at 695 Prince Street; and

Whereas the new Civic Hall was constructed through the efforts of a $4.2 million millennium project to renovate one of Truro's historic structures originally constructed in 1884 as a Post Office and later housing the police station and the Boys and Girls Club; and

Whereas the new Civic Hall was a challenge to renovate due to its age, which resulted in rotten wall studs, a 1947 fire and deterioration from over 120 years of use;

[Page 5573]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Town of Truro on their new Civic Hall and its contribution to maintaining a working piece of history for Truro and for all of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

[12:45 p.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 2851

MS. MICHELE RAYMOND: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas many of the public buildings on the Halifax Commons were designed and built to the highest standards in the art deco style and several of those buildings, Queen Elizabeth High School, the Nova Scotia Community College at Bell Road, and St. Patrick's High School are soon to be demolished and replaced by newer structures; and

Whereas the auditorium of St. Patrick's High School is a fine example of art deco and a freestanding structure, seating more than 1,000; and

Whereas the new Halifax high school will lack an auditorium and the built heritage of the province can never be replaced once lost;

Therefore be it resolved that this House request the Department of Education to study the possibility of retaining the St. Patrick's auditorium for the new Halifax high school.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 5574]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 2852

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on October 8, 2004, the Digby Area Theatre Society presented, in association with the Joseph Howe Initiative, a recreation of Howe's defence speech titled "The Trial of Joseph Howe"; and

Whereas the event, presented as part of the 200th Birthday celebrations of Joseph Howe, featured Canadian actor, Michael Bawtree and was held in the fitting atmosphere of the Digby courthouse; and

Whereas the Digby Area Theatre Society continues to work to promote theatre in the community;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in congratulating the Digby Area Theatre Society on the presentation of the Joseph Howe speech recreation and wish the society the best in continuing to provide quality theatrical productions in the Digby area.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 5575]

The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 2853

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, as part of minority government it's good to work with other caucuses by times and I want to give some credit to the Liberal caucus in this case.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Saturday, October 2, 2004, was an especially nice day for one member of this House; and

Whereas on that date, Claudine Bardsley and Michel Samson were united in matrimony; and

Whereas oftentimes after a marriage one partner takes a new name;

Therefore be it resolved that the MLA for Richmond advise all members of this House, and his friends at his office, whether or not he has changed his name.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 2854

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas increasing the activity level of Nova Scotians is important to improving the overall health of our residents; and

[Page 5576]

Whereas the "Step into Fitness" program launched by the South Shore District Health Authority is aimed at increasing the activity levels of its employees; and

Whereas South Shore Health has provided pedometers to staff as a way to measure their activity and have encouraged staff to reach 10,000 steps per day;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate South Shore Health and its employees for participating in this innovative health promotion program.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 2855

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas schools across this province annually hold Remembrance Day ceremonies, recognizing Canada's historic contributions; and

Whereas Arthur Campbell has coordinated the Remembrance Day ceremonies at Sir John A. Macdonald High School throughout his noteworthy career as a teacher at that high school; and

Whereas Mr. Campbell has demonstrated his commitment to the young people of our community;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature offer its gratitude to Art Campbell, for his dedication in the organizing of Remembrance Day ceremonies at Sir John A. Macdonald High School.

[Page 5577]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 2856

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Progress Club of Halifax-Cornwallis held their Annual Awards Dinner on October 13, 2004; and

Whereas the dinner honours Nova Scotian women who have excelled in their communities and in their careers; and

Whereas Vicki Harnish, Deputy Minister of Finance, was awarded the Women of Excellence Award for her outstanding Public Service career;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House offer sincere congratulations to Ms. Harnish and wish her well in her challenging position as Deputy Minister of Finance.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 5578]

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 2857

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas countless community organizations count on volunteer fundraisers; and

Whereas Christine Hendren of Timberlea continues to coordinate fundraising activities for hockey teams and local schools; and

Whereas Christine has perfected the organization of community auctions to a fine art;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate and thank Christine Hendren for her fundraising efforts in the Timberlea community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

RESOLUTION NO. 2858

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas last night was further proof that this Premier has lost grasp of his own government members following the display put on by his Minister of Community Services in the late debate; and

[Page 5579]

Whereas rather than taking the time to talk about affordable housing, the concerns of the disabled, or his shameful $4 per month increase to those receiving social service benefits, the minister chose to attack the Leader of the Official Opposition by trivializing an important issue; and

Whereas while the minister showed great bravado at the beginning of the late debate, he appeared to lose intestinal fortitude by apparently withdrawing himself from the debate he had started, displaying for all Nova Scotians the strength and resolve of the Tory Cabinet;

Therefore be it resolved that last night's spectacle by the Minister of Community Services is a direct reflection of the Premier's control over his own Cabinet and yet a further reminder of the displeasure in the Tory Government from both within and outside of its ranks.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

RESOLUTION NO. 2859

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Dartmouth Boy and Girls Club has played an integral part in the lives of many of Dartmouth's children and youth by offering programs and services that meet their needs; and

Whereas Mary Daigle, past president and past volunteer, served the Dartmouth Boys and Girls Club for more than 25 years, beginning as a club volunteer; and

Whereas the National Boys and Girls Club recognized the valuable contribution made by Mary Daigle to the Dartmouth Boys and Girls Club by presenting her with the Bronze and Silver Keystone Award for her executive involvement;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature thank Mary Daigle for her more than 25 years of involvement with the Dartmouth Boys and Girls Club.

[Page 5580]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 2860

MR. GORDON GOSSE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on September 17, 2004, at the Lingan Golf and Country Club, the 4th Annual Fairways Fore Health Care Charity Golf Tournament was held; and

Whereas 144 golfers participated in this prestigious event; and

Whereas as a result of this event, the medical equipment fund at the Cape Breton Regional Hospital was the beneficiary of over $27,000;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislative Assembly congratulate all those involved in making the 4th Annual Fairways Fore Health Care Charity Golf Tournament an overwhelming success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 5581]

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 2861

MR. GERALD SAMPSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas boxer Curtis White won the Nova Scotia lightweight championship in the main event of an eight-bout card of boxing held at the Tommy Gordon Club, in Florence, on October 9th and is now heading for the Canadian championship in Quebec on January 5th; and

Whereas six other members of the Tommy Gordon Club of Florence were on the same card, including Michael Gerrow, Daniel Jessome, Steven Sullivan, Ryan Herridge, Jeff Snow and Justin Pentagrass; and

Whereas the Tommy Gordon Club of Florence is a large club of some renown with many members and a long waiting list;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate all the boxers and wish Curtis White every success in Quebec on January 5, 2005.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

RESOLUTION NO. 2862

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Progress Club of Halifax held their 15th annual Women of Excellence Awards dinner last evening, October 13, 2004; and

[Page 5582]

Whereas among the recipients were Sarah Dennis, Andree Gracie, Vicki Harnish, Lesley Barnes, Joan Brown Hicks and Tanya Shaw Weeks; and

Whereas these women exemplify vision, dedication, intelligence, perseverance and leadership;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the Nova Scotia Legislature extend their congratulations to these six Women of Excellence 2004: Sarah Dennis, Andree Gracie, Vicki Harnish, Lesley Barnes, Joan Brown Hicks and Tanya Shaw Weeks.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 2863

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on October 8, 2004, the community of Cornwallis recognized the contributions of a former commanding officer of HMCS Acadia, Lloyd M. Bourinot; and

Whereas the facility known locally as the Annapolis Boat Shed, located on the river in Annapolis Royal, was renamed the Lloyd M. Bourinot Sail Centre in his honour; and

Whereas Mr. Bourinot's hard work and dedication have been credited with the success, stability and camp facilities that the HMCS Acadia now enjoys;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Lloyd M. Bourinot on this accomplishment and wish him success in his future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 5583]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: Question Period will begin at 12:57 p.m. and end at 1:57 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM. - HEATING OIL: ASSISTANCE - ACTION

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question this afternoon is to the Premier. A few weeks ago I asked the Premier about providing some badly needed relief for Nova Scotians from skyrocketing heating costs and he said he would not prevent Nova Scotians, that he would prevent Nova Scotians from keeping warm this Winter. The reality is that a great many Nova Scotians will be forced to make choices this winter about whether to heat their home or to buy other necessities. In fact, last week the U.S. Energy Information Administration released a report that says heating oil prices in the northeastern United States are projected to be 29 per cent higher than last Winter, and that, of course, will be reflected in Atlantic Canada. They say if the temperatures are colder than projected, both prices and consumption will shoot up further. When it costs an average of $1,500 to heat a home with oil in Nova Scotia, that kind of increase will amount to about $435 in a family's heating bill. I'd like to ask the Premier what action will you take now - not in February - to help Nova Scotians deal with what is expected to be record-high heating costs?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, again the Leader of the Opposition brings an important issue to the attention of members of the House. I made a commitment to Nova Scotians through the Leader of the Opposition in Question Period earlier in this sitting and I stand by that commitment.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, the problem with the commitment that the Premier has made is that it lacks any specificity whatsoever. The price of a barrel of oil is now hovering around $54, and I think the trend is clear - it means the problem must be addressed one way or the other. Of course, one of the things the Premier could do is bring forward a greater

[Page 5584]

energy strategy to deal with home heat efficiency. Many Nova Scotians of low and moderate incomes would certainly be prepared, for example, to add more insulation or to take up other conservation measures in their homes if they had some help from the government. So my question for the Premier is, will you take action to help people improve their home heating efficiency?

[1:00 p.m.]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, that's a very useful suggestion that the Leader of the Opposition is making, and the government is moving in that direction.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, moving is good but glacial movement is not good enough. Every year this government brings in a rebate program, but all too often it's too little too late with far too few people who qualify. This government puts forward only a token effort to help even those people with a $50 rebate. That will buy about 80 litres of heating fuel. Nova Scotians know that you've already rejected our proposal to take the HST off of home heating fuel, so my question is, why isn't your government ready to bring forward a position now so that we know what kind of a comprehensive effort you have to help Nova Scotians deal with skyrocketing home heating costs?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, again, the issue that the Leader of the Opposition brings to the attention of the House is one that is, at present, being considered by government. Government will be in a position to announce its program in the not-too-distant future.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

EDUC. - UNIV. DEBT REDUCTION PROG.:

DISBURSEMENT - DETAILS

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education. Yesterday the minister did a fine job of explaining his program of university debt reduction to the Legislature, but failed to answer my question. So I'm going to try again with a different approach. The minister was present during a recent meeting, when one of his senior staff reported to student leaders that $4.8 million of the $5.1 million program would be approved and spent in future years. Unless the department's position changed, that means that only $300,000 of the $5.1 million was spent on debt reduction this year. During a media scrum yesterday, the minister stated that the money was not going to be used for another project, but would not confirm that all the money would be used for debt reduction this year. Now that the minister has consulted with his staff, my question is, how much of that $5.1 million will be given to students this year for debt reduction?

[Page 5585]

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, unfortunately, and I guess there's obvious reasons for that, the member opposite, although I certainly appreciate the interest of the question, he doesn't understand the program, he doesn't understand financing. That's the problem. To get that $5-plus million figure, under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, the government has to take a look at all of the students who are in the system who may be eligible for a rebate, and that money must be accounted for in the year in which it would be accumulated. That's where the $5.1 million came from. It was not intended that that money would be paid out all in one year, but the money has to be set aside or accounted for when students - for example, if students are in their first year, their second or their third year of a program and are eligible for that student debt reduction, then that money must be accounted for in the year of study, the fiscal year.

MR. GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, well, now it's perfectly clear. The minister either hasn't been paying attention to what is going on in his department, or his department has changed its policies since meeting with the students. My question is, will the minister instruct his staff to issue a press release today notifying students of his department's commitment to provide $5.1 million in debt reduction funding to students for the 2003-04 academic year?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, it would not be prudent to give money away that is not due.

MR. GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, my question is very simple. Student leaders are under the impression that the government is accruing $4.8 million of this funding, if this isn't true, why won't the minister issue a public commitment to spend the $5.1 million this year as was previously announced?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I thought I was clear in response to the first question. He still doesn't understand. If a student is in his or her first year of study and might four years from now be eligible for debt relief, that money has to be accounted for. I can see even the people in the Official Opposition are nodding their heads, and they understand that. But you can't give the money to that student until they complete their studies and apply for it.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

COM. SERV. - BARRINGTON ST. Y:

COM. SERV. CLIENTS - USAGE EXPLAIN

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable Leader of the Opposition has the floor.

[Page 5586]

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services. The YWCA on Barrington Street offers housing for women who, for a variety of reasons, have nowhere else to live. I'm not sure if the minister knows this, but half of the bed nights are used by Community Services clients for whom the YWCA receives a minimal fee. The Y fundraises to support the operation of these beds because the government refuses to accept the responsibility for the real cost, and now these beds are in jeopardy of closing. My question for the minister is, why does the minister expect the YWCA to continue to underwrite the lack of services provided by the Department of Community Services?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to assure the Leader of the Opposition that we have been working with the YWCA, we made adjustments to our financial arrangements with them, and we will continue to work with them.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I don't know what kind of adjustment the minister has made, there has been no increase in operational funding since 1997, there was an audit by the minister's department which determined that the YWCA's request for increased funding was both necessary and fair. If the shelter closes, the residents there will be homeless. They don't qualify for public housing, and some need supports to live successfully in their community. My question for the minister is this, when will his department confirm that it will pay its fair share for this housing program and keep these women from becoming homeless?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I can see why the Leader of the Official Opposition is concerned about this, he's been given bad information, there was a significant increase in funding last year.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, this is not true. The YWCA has specifically requested of this minister to understand the depth of the crisis that they are in, and he is ignoring it. In spite of the fact that they notified the minister of the looming crisis in August and complied with the audit this Fall, the YWCA has yet to have a response from the minister. The YWCA is an organization that works hard to provide this urgently needed housing, but it cannot continue to function without sufficient resources. My question to the minister is, will you commit to abide by the findings of the audit and pay for the services that his department uses at the YWCA?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I do appreciate the Leader of the Official Opposition bringing it up, the YWCA does provide a wonderful service in this community, it's an essential one, what the Leader of the Opposition may not be aware of, is that I actually personally went and met with the board of directors, I had an extensive tour, I arranged for that work to be done, and we are continuing to work with them, and perhaps if he had that information he would not have needed to ask the question today.

[Page 5587]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

HEALTH: IN-HOME SUPPORT PROG. - LACK EXPLAIN

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, for the past six years we have seen very little improvement to home care services in this province. In fact, the in-home support program that was a viable program prior to this government assuming power has been frozen since 2000, while this government undertook a quick review which has been going on for four years. The in-home support program provided a monthly sum of money to caregivers who chose to remain at home and care for a loved one rather than placing them in a long-term care facility. My question is, could the Minister of Health please explain why a government who promised to deliver the right care in the appropriate place at the appropriate cost still doesn't have an in-home support program for Nova Scotians?

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member would know of course that we have considerable challenges with respect to financing of health care in this province. However, despite those challenges, we've identified them at $175 million per annum and we'll be receiving approximately $60 million to $65 million this year from the federal government, so there is a considerable gap. But we are working with the Department of Community Services to develop an appropriate program for in-home support for citizens and we're working to bring that about in the near future.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Well, in the near future is what the former Minister of Health from Halifax Citadel used to say, what the former Minister of Health, who is now the Minister of Education, used to say and now, four years later, we hear the current Minister of Health once again saying, in the near future. Mr. Speaker, when this program was frozen, it froze any new applicants. But those who were in the system have remained in the system. So families are wondering, why does the government pay the family next door to keep their loved one at home, yet we're forced to put mom or dad or another loved one in a nursing home because this government for four years keeps telling us, in the near future there will be a new program.

Mr. Speaker, these families have been waiting now on the assurances of this minister and his predecessors, and this government has failed to address the concerns of those families. So I ask today, out of the priorities that have been set out by this government, can Nova Scotian families expect to see an in-home support program in the very near future rather than the four years that we've been waiting today?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, it is very clear that the longer we can keep people in their homes, then the better the quality of lifestyle that they lead and, of course, more efficient health delivery costs are achieved as a result of that. To embark upon such a program, it's appropriate that we work together with Community Services. It is, indeed, a

[Page 5588]

priority because it is the most effective way to deal with health care for our seniors and that is by keeping them in their homes as long as possible.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, it's clear that I don't need to convince the minister of the benefits of this program. I'm pleased to see that he agrees with it, as his predecessor did, as the predecessor before that did, but for four years a government that continues to tell us they understand a program that will save money, give efficiency, give better care, has continued to turn their back on families. What is happening is that Nova Scotians are being forced to put their loved ones into long-term care facilities because this government refuses to provide them with assistance to keep them at home. So, once again I ask the minister, will he give a personal commitment that there will be no more delays by his government but that Nova Scotians and Nova Scotian families can expect to see a new in-home support program before the end of this fiscal year?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member mentions four years. I can remind the honourable member and I'll remind the House that it took four years for us to get Ottawa to move to a reasonable agreement with respect to the funding of health care. (Interruptions) That now puts us in a position where we can deal realistically with the delivery of programs such as the one the honourable member is advocating on behalf of this afternoon.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

EDUC. - TUITION RATES: INCREASES - ASSISTANCE

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, my question, through you, is for the Minister of Education. This government has a sorry record when it comes to helping those in need. Let's look at the situation with the university students and their families as they become painfully aware of the difficulties of financing young men and women who attend our schools. You only have to look at the university where my daughter attends to realize that they have a food bank at NSCAD.

Four years afer eliminating the $10 million loan remission program, this government tries to make it up with a $5.1 million debt reduction program, a program that is only paying out $300,000 this year and supposedly accruing the rest. It is my understanding that approximately 1,700 students have been helped with this latest program. But, Mr. Speaker, that's barely half of the 3,200 students who got assistance during the last year of the loan remission program. Given this situation, Mr. Minister, how can you claim to be helping students and their families deal with skyrocketing tuition rates?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I'm not entirely sure that I fully understand the question. I think there were two or three there, but I do want to tell the people one of the things that we are sitting down with now with university people is to try to come up with a memorandum of understanding, which in return for some guaranteed funding on a three-year

[Page 5589]

basis and some return from the university people, we hope that there will be a more predictable way for students and families to assess costs of university education.

[1:15 p.m.]

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, predictability when it comes to these costs it's not rocket science, it's costly, and we as parents with children in university, young men and women in university, know it. Fortunately, Nova Scotians don't have to rely on this government to determine whether or not they're living up to their agreement. The Millennium Scholarship Foundation last year severely rapped, and justifiably rapped this government for failing to live up to the agreement they signed in the year 2000 not to decrease student assistance. Given that only half the number of students are receiving the debt reduction program today, that got loan remission in 2000, and the fact that only $300,000 has been paid out, will the minister table in this House before we adjourn today, confirmation that the Millennium Scholarship Foundation, that they agree that this province is in fact in compliance with the agreement that they have signed?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the Nova Scotia Government has introduced a debt reduction program, and I can say that a student who gets the full benefit of that program can have up to 45 per cent of the provincial loan reduced for a qualifying year, and together with the millennium program, a student can actually potentially qualify to have about 60 per cent of their provincial student loan reduced. The reason I read that, Mr. Speaker, is, as you see, it has something in it about the millennium program.

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, that's really reassuring to students like my daughter as we ask a question about a compliance commitment and I get a staid, rehearsed answer, written off a note sent to the minister. I know this minister likes to talk about memorandums of understanding and speaking from prepared notes, but as the experience with the Millennium Scholarship Program shows, this government only lives up to agreements when it suits them. So, Mr. Minister, how do you expect Nova Scotian parents, and how do you expect Nova Scotia university students to believe you now, when experience has shown that your government says one thing and does another when it comes to helping university kids?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, no government in recent history has invested more in higher education than this one. For example, for one reason or another the government back in 1993 had reduced funding.

AN HON. MEMBER: What government was that?

MR. MUIR: Well, I'm not even going to mention what government it was, simply to say it was not ours. Our contribution to education has gone up - high education, somewhere in the vicinity of 28 per cent during our term in office.

[Page 5590]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

TPW - MOORE'S LANDING: EXPROPRIATION - DETAILS

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transportation and Public Works. On May 23, 2003, Nova Scotia lost a landmark dating back to 1842 when Moore's Landing restaurant in Queensland was destroyed by fire. The owners, David Moore and his wife started this business in 1995, and from 1995 until the fire, 153 were employed on a seasonal part-time basis. Mr. Moore recently spent more than $40,000 just preparing to rebuild, but then the minister's department got in the way. The Department of Transportation and Public Works refused an $8 right-of-way permit, and then expropriated the land and offered $20,000 for this property. That property was assessed at over $300,000. My question to the minister is, why is his department attempting to destroy this important tourism business?

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, it's a very complicated situation, I'm sure as the honourable member is aware. The negotiations are still underway and I cannot comment any further than that.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, this government is supposed to be helping economic development and tourism industries throughout Nova Scotia, but it certainly wouldn't appear this way. For 2004, Mr. Moore had a contract with Carnival Cruise Lines to shuttle over 4,200 passengers to Peggys Cove and return for lobster suppers at Moore's Landing. Instead, Mr. Moore was refused a permit for an $8 right-of-way, and then was not allowed to rebuild. Even the member for Chester-St. Margaret's intervened with letters, and yet the Department of Transportation and Public Works still wouldn't intervene. My question to the minister is, will the minister intervene in this situation and allow Mr. Moore to rebuild and, failing that, why won't he at least be offered fair market value for the property?

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I don't quite know how to answer that question, because it isn't as simple as the honourable member is making out. There are negotiations underway, they've been underway for some considerable time, and I would hope that eventually we will have a happy ending to that particular predicament.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, it doesn't look like a happy ending for Mr. Moore. They're proposing to invest upwards of $1 million to reconstruct this particular business. By the way, this business and this property was there before the Department of Transportation and Public Works had a Highways Act, and it was there every minute of every day of every year since. More than 60 years, and that would more than meet the acid test for prescriptive rights. Mr. Moore wants to invest in the tourism industry and economic development for the province. My question, given the fact that the minister can't seem to do anything, my question to the Premier is, will the Premier personally intervene in this matter so that Moore's Landing will once again be allowed to be an active, successful tourism business in Nova Scotia?

[Page 5591]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I have no personal knowledge of the matter that the member brings to the attention of the House. I will discuss it with the minister to bring myself up to date.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH PROM.: SMOKE-FREE PLACES ACT - ENFORCE

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Health Promotion. During the strike at Aliant earlier this year, replacement workers were observed smoking inside their office buildings. The Provincial Tobacco Control Unit received numerous complaints, including a complaint from myself, requesting that inspectors investigate. I'll table the response I received in which I was told that Aliant is a federally-regulated workplace, and the provincial Smoke-Free Places Act does not apply and provincial inspectors have no jurisdiction. I want to ask the minister, why won't your government enforce your Act that provides no exemption whatsoever to federally-regulated employers?

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, the member raises a good point. I will certainly review the situation because, obviously, that situation would concern me as it does the member.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I don't know how many federally-regulated workplaces there are in our province, but I would think that there are quite a few. That's a lot of unprotected workers, if the Tobacco Control Unit isn't enforcing legislation in those work sites. I want to ask the minister, just who does he think is supposed to protect workers in these settings from second-hand smoke, if our legislation, in fact, is unenforceable there?

MR. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, as I told the member, she brings up a good point. I will review the situation. There have been over 9,000 inspections between January and June of this year. The inspectors do an excellent job across the province. We will take a look at this situation. It's a good point. If there is a flaw with respect to legislation, it deserves to be reviewed.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that the minister will in fact follow through on this. We know that smoke-free protection legislation is only as good as the enforcement that is behind it. There were more than a few weaknesses in the legislation the government brought forward. We know casinos were exempted, and now we're finding that there may be some other significant problems. I want to ask the minister, when will his government reopen the Smoke-Free Places Act to strengthen it and eliminate the failure to protect all workers in the Province of Nova Scotia?

[Page 5592]

MR. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, this government has taken stronger strides than any government previous to it with respect to the issue of tobacco-related products here in Nova Scotia. That was done under the leadership of the now Minister of Education, it was continued through the former Minister of Health and will continue as we move forward. The member brings up a good question, the legislation will continue to be reviewed.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

HEALTH - RICHMOND VILLA: CONST. - TIME FRAME

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, last Fall I asked the Minister of Health about the status of the construction for the new Richmond Villa, a long-term care facility to be built in St. Peters, Richmond County. At the time the minister indicated, "I had the opportunity to be in St. Peters on Saturday and when asked that question at a public gathering there, I did indeed confirm that it's our intention to proceed with construction in the Spring of 2004." It is now the Fall of 2004 and the ground has not been turned for a new Richmond Villa. While the community recently celebrated the end of the site selection process, the residents, staff and family members are looking for a specific time frame for the construction to begin. This facility, under this government's own plan, was slated to start construction in November 2002. My question to the Minister of Health is, could the minister please explain to the residents of Richmond County why construction of the new Richmond Villa has not yet begun?

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, in an earlier question, the honourable member made reference to a time frame and I can say to the honourable member with respect to the time frame in this issue, it is one in which I share his frustration. I want to say that it is our intention to be in a position to call tenders for the construction of the new facility in January 2005. That would result in an occupation in the Summer of 2006 of the new facility.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, this is clearly an issue that is very important to both myself and all the residents of our county. I have been asking the minister for the last two years when the community can expect a new Richmond Villa and every time there appears to be some complicated explanation as to why the delays continue. This is clearly not acceptable. The residents, the staff and family were told to expect construction in the Fall of 2002. I, along with the board members of the current villa and municipal reps, have met with the minister and his staff in a spirit of co-operation to get this project moving. My question to the minister is, what assurances can the minister give us today that his new time frame that he has established will actually be met?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, it is my sincere hope that there won't be any legal problems arise as a result of the property acquisition because I believe that is complete. I believe the design work is in hand to the point where tenders can be called. As I look at the

[Page 5593]

history of the project, look at the problems that came about in the past, I don't foresee any of those difficulties presenting themselves in the future. I'm not a person that never says never, but I'm extremely hopeful that the commitments I've made today are the commitments that will be met.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, there's approximately 9,000 people in Richmond County who are hoping that the minister's hope will actually become a reality in this case. This facility was slated for replacement over two years ago and ever since, each year with the delays in the construction, more money continues to be poured into making replacements in this facility, making renovations to the facility, knowing that it eventually is going to be destroyed. There's good money here that is being put into a facility that clearly should have been replaced and by now residents should be sitting in that new Richmond Villa. I close again in asking the minister, is he prepared today to give his personal assurance to the residents of Richmond County that the new construction time frame, now that the site selection process has ended, will, in fact, be met as he has set out here today?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I thought I had answered that and I will say again, it is my very sincere hope that I will never have to answer another question on Richmond Villa from the honourable member for Richmond because it is my belief that the tender in fact will be called in January and there will be an occupation in the Summer of 2006 and I look forward to accompanying the honourable member to the official opening.

[1:30 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

SERV. N.S. & MUN. REL. - NORTHWEST ARM:

JURISDICTION - DETAILS

MS. MICHELE RAYMOND: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations. The Northwest Arm is one of the reasons that Halifax was settled where it is. It's the back of the peninsula and in the last 250 years its shores have seen mills, prisons, pioneering industries, and some of the political events that really have shaped Canada. Still, it's only 3.5 miles long and 600 feet across in some places and it's in the heart of a growing city. Some recent landowners have taken to dumping fill in the Arm in order to increase the size of their properties. The federal government has jurisdiction over saltwater, but the Arm is now almost too small to be noticed. The Halifax Regional Municipality has been issuing building permits for construction on the infill and is now seeking sole jurisdiction over the Arm in order to issue permits and further other infilling activities.

Mr. Speaker, my question to the minister is, will you allow any municipality in the province to seek sole control over a saltwater resource of such national and provincial significance?

[Page 5594]

HON. BARRY BARNET: Mr. Speaker, I'm unaware of the request that the member speaks of and we would have to consider that request as it comes forward. Without seeing the request from the municipality, it's difficult for me to respond to it.

MS. RAYMOND: Thank you very much for that. My next question though is for the Minister of Environment and Labour. Some parts of the Northwest Arm were granted to private landowners a long time before there was a Canada and that means the federal government has no jurisdiction over these so-called pre-Confederation water lots. The province though has the responsibility of ensuring protection of the environment in the province and it has the ability to file a statement of provincial interest in environmental matters. If every owner of dry land is subject to environmental regulations, one would expect that so should the owners of seabed be subject.

Mr. Speaker, my question through you is, why is the province not stepping in to ensure that there is protection for all these parts of the province?

HON. KERRY MORASH: Mr. Speaker, I think it's worthwhile pointing out that certainly there are rules and regulations that have to be followed with any kind of infilling. However, any infilling that would go into the saltwater would be the responsibility of DFO and they would be definitely and directly involved in that and make the final determination as to whether the infilling could take place.

MS. RAYMOND: Mr. Speaker, it's not just the Northwest Arm, but Ketch Harbour, Herring Cove, Eastern Passage and elsewhere that this is happening. These aren't just wharves, but permanent changes to the shoreline that obliterate historic resources and life in the intertidal zone. Every square inch of this province is included in a municipality and a lot of those municipalities include miles of saltwater coastlines and harbours, many of which also include pre-Confederation water lots claimed as private ownership.

My question to the Minister of Service Nova Scotia is, what will you do to end the jurisdictional void that is threatening Nova Scotia's coastline?

MR. BARNET: Mr. Speaker, as I said in my first answer, I am unaware of any circumstances where the municipalities have brought this to my attention or to the attention of our department. I will say to the member opposite that we will take them into consideration seriously. We understand the concerns of abutting neighbours and citizens and we will reflect that in the decision that we make.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Pictou West.

[Page 5595]

TPW - WEST BLACK ROCK RD.: PATCHING - COMPLAINTS

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Transportation and Public Works. On September 23rd, I brought the issue of the West Black Rock Road to the attention of the minister and to this House. The West Black Rock Road had a gravel patch worked on by a private contractor as part of a contract that cost more than $146,000. The material used was poor-quality splintered stone, and soon after the work was completed, complaints started pouring in. At that time, the department's own workers were asked to go out and cover up the contractor's work. They knew it was a temporary cosmetic fix that came out of the taxpayers' pockets. Well, just as the highway workers have said, this cover-up isn't working. My question is, how many complaints has this minister's department received regarding the West Black Rock Road and tire damage?

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, material that's used under contract has to meet the Department of Transportation and Public Works' specifications. In the particular case of the West Black Rock Road, the material was class "m" stone, and that was what was placed on the road.

MR. PARKER: Mr. Speaker, we have reports of many complaints coming in about the condition of this road. We've heard of at least 80 tires being punctured, and people who have sent in claims for tire damage are now receiving rejections on their claims, with the department claiming there is no evidence for any liability on the department's behalf. I want to table one of those letters. In this case, it seems that the government has not only contracted out the job, it seems now to be contracting out the accountability. These are innocent drivers, these vehicles are being damaged, and it's taking money right out of their pockets. My question is, when is this government going to take responsibility for its failed policy of contracting out?

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, the policy of contracts under RIM work or capital construction is working very well, thank you. I would advise the honourable member that we have taken remedial action on the road.

MR. PARKER: Mr. Speaker, over 80 complaints of tire damage, and if the minister doesn't believe that, I suggest he might want to call Shay Tire in Berwick or Good Year Tire in Kentville, or call some of the people who are getting damage to their vehicles, call up the highway workers who have had to cover up this job and others like it. Contracting out isn't working for Nova Scotians. The only bang they're getting in this case is flat tires. When is this government going to realize that privatization in the Department of Transportation and Public Works is costing innocent drivers and taxpayers far too much money?

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, there's no process of privatization in the Department of Transportation and Public Works with regard to capital construction. As far back as I can remember, it's always been done by tender and it's been placed out to private contractors.

[Page 5596]

The last paving contract we did was back in, I believe it was 1989 or something, when we had our own paving crew. Now we no longer have our own paving crew.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Annapolis.

HEALTH - MIDDLETON NURSING HOME:

PROPOSAL - GOV'T. RESPONSE

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. Last evening I attended a meeting of 300 residents of Middleton, who were expecting to hear from a representative from the Premier's office with respect to the proposal for the Middleton Nursing Home. They were told a representative would be there. My question is, could the Premier please relay to the House the message his representative was going to bring to the meeting?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Health.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I can tell the honourable member and tell the House through you, sir, that while a representative from the Department of Health itself was not available for that meeting, the Director of Continuing Care for the district health authority attended that meeting. The information that anybody would have brought to the meeting would have been the same information I provided to the honourable member in Question Period on a previous day.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, they were expecting somebody from the Premier's office, somebody from the Premier's office that they were told would be there, unless you're calling into question the people on the Middleton Nursing Home Board. My question is to the Minister of Health. Last week the minister indicated that there is an ongoing consultation being done, that they will be able to determine the need for long-term care beds, yet in May 2004, the minister indicated that there is a needs assessment ongoing in the Department of Health which includes the Town of Middleton. It would seem that if a needs assessment was being done in the Spring, then the present consultation is nothing but window dressing. My question is, has a needs assessment been done for the Town of Middleton within the Department of Health, and if not, when can we expect one?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, the process to which the honourable member refers

is the same process that is underway now and I indicated in the previous Question Period that that is taking place through the efforts of the department, as well as through the Senior Citizens' Secretariat, and that consultation will be completed prior to Christmas and in the new year we will be seeing results of that.

[Page 5597]

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I understand that the consultation process that the minister likes to refer to instead of answering questions is dubbed the task force on aging. So my question is, given that the minister is not willing to listen to the community members about their needs, will the minister set up an appointment, today, with the head of that task force and the members of the Middleton Nursing Home Society?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, what I can do is inform the honourable member that the task force to which he refers will, in fact, be in the Annapolis Valley. I don't have in front of me the precise location. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable minister has the floor.

MR. MACISAAC: They would be most welcome to sit down with the task force when they are in that location and those dates will be made public, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

COM. SERV. - ROOMING HOUSES:

CONDITIONS - MIN. RESPONSIBILITY

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services. On Tuesday another 14 low-income Nova Scotians were left without a roof over their heads because their landlord incurred over 30 violations of the fire code. This, Mr. Speaker, after a rooming house on Cogswell Street was shut down because the landlord was cited for 17 violations by the fire marshal. Many of these people in both circumstances are clients of the Department of Community Services. Yet the minister shows no compassion for their situation.

I would like to ask the Minister of Community Services if he believes that people in this situation make a choice to live in these unsafe, hazardous housing conditions and that he bears no responsibility?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, what the member opposite is alluding to is the need for a sufficient amount of affordable housing in this province. Now, part of having a sufficient amount of affordable housing also deals with the condition of the housing and that's why we are devoting a full 25 per cent of the Affordable Housing Program to a Rental Preservation Program, to address, in fact, those situations.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, what I'm asking is for the minister to stand up and do his job and express his compassion to the people who find themselves in this situation. During debate on an NDP resolution, yesterday, the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations expressed empathy for these people. What's more, he said that he would be prepared to work to speed up the residential tenancies process

[Page 5598]

to ensure that more Nova Scotians don't find themselves in this situation - a situation that should never happen in this province. Given this minister's comments yesterday, I would like to ask his colleague, the Minister of Community Services, have you ever had a conversation with the Minister responsible for the Residential Tenancies Act, who clearly demonstrates more compassion about dealing with these situations?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I would tell you I have a great empathy for the people who face these challenges as they are trying to make do. In fact, that is why we have the Employment Support and Income Assistance Program. That is why we're investing in these clients. That's why we're trying to help them into a better career and that is why we have the Affordable Housing Program.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): In recent media interviews the minister gave, Mr. Speaker, he hasn't expressed his compassion for these people very well. Since the Minister of Community Services appears unmoved by the plight of these individuals, I will direct my last question to the Minister responsible for the Residential Tenancies Act. Given his comments during debate yesterday and his obvious desire to help low-income Nova Scotians living in substandard housing, what action will he take to ensure more low-income Nova Scotians aren't unjustly left without a roof over their heads through no fault of their own?

HON. BARRY BARNET: Mr. Speaker, I will tell the member opposite that we will continue to apply the Residential Tenancies Act that provides for a level of protection for those individuals.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

HEALTH - DENTAL FEES: ADULT/CHILD RATES - FAIRNESS

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. Over the Summer I was contacted by a constituent who was justifiably upset at a rate charge at the dentist office for his daughter's tooth extraction. Mr. Fuller was charged $91 to have his daughter's baby tooth pulled, a procedure that is much less complicated than for an adult, and amounted to 15 minutes from start to finish. As a result of his displeasure, he called around to several dentists only to be told the rate was the same everywhere, because the rate is set by the dental board. In other words, even if it was an option, there was no opportunity to seek out the services of another dentist, because they all charge the same rate. My first question to the minister is, would you admit that the rate of $91, which is the identical fee for an adult procedure, is unfair?

[Page 5599]

[1:45 p.m.]

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I don't feel as if I am qualified to make that assessment. I don't know what procedures are required. Indeed, if I were - well, I'll never be in a position to operate on a child or an adult. I don't feel qualified to make that call.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, dentists told Mr. Fuller to contact the dental board, and he did. It is Mr. Fuller's belief that if a fee is set by the board and all the dentists follow it, then there's something wrong. Yet, the board stated that no dentist is bound to use the fee structure established. Mr. Fuller spent a great deal of time trying to get answers, and feels he's going around in circles. Again to the Minister of Health, how are people expected to know if they are being treated fairly for dental services if there is no public accountability to display either the fee structure rates or the rates being charged?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, certainly the need for citizens to feel that they are being treated fairly is extremely important. I would undertake to the honourable member to investigate this matter further, and get back to him in terms of what is appropriate and not appropriate with respect to how the individual is treated.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for his commitment. Again, in this case to have a baby tooth pulled costs the same as an adult, yet there is less time and effort required for a dentist to do so. As minister you appoint public representatives to the dental board, and my final question is, would you be willing to bring forward a suggestion to the board that would ask them to consider setting a separate fee to have a child's tooth pulled?

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I will undertake to have the exchange that has just occurred here this afternoon, as recorded in Hansard, sent to the board for their comment and consideration.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

PREM. - VOL. SECTOR INFRASTRUCTURE:

STABILIZATION - PLANS

MS. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Many community-based voluntary sector organizations are providing critical and basic public services for Nova Scotians. Organizations which recruit, train and support volunteers are critical to the quality of life and social fabric of our communities, whether it's water safety, recreation, provision of food and meals, search and rescue, fire service, education, youth and seniors' programs, women's centres, transition houses, health programs, sports teams and countless more, yet the voluntary sector is facing serious challenges. My question to the Premier is, what is your government's plan to help stabilize this critical community infrastructure in Nova Scotia?

[Page 5600]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member brings to the floor attention to the fact that we in Nova Scotia are highly dependent on the services that are provided to the people of our province by volunteers. Many members in this House participate every year in the Volunteer of the Year Award ceremony. One of the figures that stands out in my mind, which is always in the remarks that occur during that occasion is that volunteers in our province provide some $2 billion worth of free service to the people of Nova Scotia each and every year. The government is, in fact, very much in the debt of those people because it would be far in excess of the capability of government to provide those kinds of services.

MS. MORE: Mr. Speaker, I agree with the Premier, the provincial government has a significant stake in the viability of this sector because it could never afford to provide all these services directly. Increasingly, more energy and time of volunteers and staff working for these organizations is being spent fundraising for their own operation. This undermines the very programs and services they provide, yet community needs continue to grow every day. My question to the Premier is, when will your government start working with the voluntary sector to protect and strengthen its capacity?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, yes, all of us are in the debt of those who, with these volunteer agencies, take it upon themselves to raise funds. One of the supports, which the government has provided for people who are engaged in this charitable activity, is the Volunteer Protection Act, for example, that allows those who participate as volunteers to have protection from the law relative to the lawful pursuit of their volunteer activities.

MS. MORE: Mr. Speaker, volunteers, in particular, are suffering fundraising burnout. More money must now be raised not to add or enhance programs and services, but to meet the increased costs in event, directors and general liability in vehicle insurance, heating costs, equipment, et cetera. Staff are usually underpaid and overworked. It's essential that this situation facing these organizations funded by the provincial government, in particular, not get any worse. Mr. Premier, will you direct your officials to provide increases to these groups in the next budget?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, that is budget question. In the question, as well, was a comment of the increasing liability costs relative to insurance that these agencies are being asked to bear, and I would ask the minister responsible for the Insurance Review Board to answer that question.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, there's no doubt that the volunteer community has been struck with vastly increased costs for liability insurance. I'd like to give the honourable member an assurance that we are not only well aware of that, but we are making some progress in perhaps resolving that particular problem.

[Page 5601]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Annapolis.

TCH: MARKETING BUDGET/TOURISM DECREASE -

CORRELATION

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage. While this minister likes to brag about the tourism record, the reality is that this government has not met its goal of making tourism a $1.5 billion industry by 2003. Last year, tourism declined from $1.3 billion to $1.27 billion, the 1999 level. While the numbers for this year aren't in yet, every indication is that they are down, and the minister knows it. Marketing is vital to the successful tourism year, yet this government has cut the tourism marketing budget by almost $1 million. This is the second time in three years that the marketing budget has been cut. So my question is, does the minister believe that there is a direct correlation between the sagging tourism in this province and the cuts to his department's marketing budget?

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, the facts speak for themselves. We have an industry that works very closely with government on the planning for government for the marketing aspects, for the product development aspects. It is this government who has grown tourism upwards to the highest amount of $1.3 billion in the history of our province. In light of the facing challenges that we have faced this year, our visitation numbers are still up from January until the end of August.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, the mandate of the department's marketing division is to market Nova Scotia as a tourism destination. So my question is, how does the minister expect to grow the industry when he keeps cutting the budget for promoting this province as a prospective tourist destination?

MR. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, you can take a look at the events that we've had this year, whether it's the Tall Ships, whether it's the Congrès Mondial Acadien, this province has been recognized for hosting world-class events. We will continue to do so. The fact of the matter is, in light of the challenges being faced by many areas of our country, our province is doing as well or better than most jurisdictions.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, he believed that the Tall Ships and the Congrès Mondial would do what his department is not doing, and that is promoting Nova Scotia tourism. Tourism destinations all over this province are losing money and many of the tourist accommodations in Cape Breton are closing early, including the provincially-owned Keltic Lodge. The tourist operators that we've spoken to say the province is not being marketed properly, so my question is, what does the minister have to say to tourism operators hurting in this province because his government keeps cutting the tourism marketing budget?

[Page 5602]

MR. RODNEY MACDONALD: What I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, is that in 2003 this province was recognized by the Tourism Industry Association of Canada by a marketing award. Secondly, he mentions Keltic Lodge. When they were in government Keltic Lodge and the resorts were losing over $1 million a year, now they see an increased capital investment and making money for the Province of Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH: SUICIDE PREVENTION STRATEGY - TIME FRAME

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is for the Minister of Health. Suicide is one of the leading causes of injury related deaths and hospitalization in Nova Scotia. I want to ask the Minister of Health, how much longer will this province have to wait for a suicide prevention strategy?

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, certainly the honourable member brings forward a topic that is very important and one that concerns all of us. Certainly the loss of life in that manner is something that is needless and is something that we consider to be very important, and I can tell the honourable member that we will be . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time allotted for Question Period has expired.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No.134.

Bill No. 134 - Yarmouth Marketing and Promotions Levy Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to stand in my place today and move second reading of Bill No. 134, an Act to Authorize a Marketing and Promotions Levy in the Town of Yarmouth and the Municipality of the District of Yarmouth.

[Page 5603]

I have with me a letter of support from the council for the Town of Yarmouth; I have one from the Municipality of the District of Yarmouth; I have one from Rodd's Grand Hotel in Yarmouth; and I also have one from John Hammel, the marketing agent for Scotia Prince Cruises. Mr. Speaker, I have one from the Best Western Motel in Yarmouth, and I also have a letter from the Yarmouth County Tourist Association that really wants this bill to go through so they can do their own marketing in our region.

This only affects hotels and motels with at least 20 units in their facility. Our whole community has been promoting this and pushing this for two years, and finally they have all agreed and they have asked me to present Bill No. 134, and I'm very pleased to do so today.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I want to tell you that I'm very pleased that the honourable member and minister representing Yarmouth and that district has brought this bill forward. I remember many years ago as I stood in this Legislature and talked, when we in fact brought in the hotel and motel levying fees in the Halifax metropolitan area. At that particular time I stood here and I spoke in support of that resolution because of my many years of serving on the Dartmouth Visitors and Convention Bureau, recognizing the importance of tourism promotion in the Province of Nova Scotia.

I want to say to the honourable minister it is one of the ways in which we can promote certain parts of our province. There are unique parts of our province, and there are unique promotions to parts of our province, with respect to how we deliver tourism throughout the entire province. I want to say this bill comes at the graces of many of the proprietors of businesses who will be levying the fee and it comes from the tourism industry itself. I believe the honourable minister has stated that there is a letter from the tourism entity down there as well.

[2:00 p.m.]

If this is the case, I think they have recognized a special need for tourism promotion in the Yarmouth area. Tourism, as some of us have talked about here earlier and I've listened to some of the members' comments with respect to the decrease in revenues from tourism, but we also know in this province that we still get a real bang for our buck when we invest in tourism. We recognize that for every dollar invested in tourism, I still think the ratio is and can be considered 7 to 1 in return. For every dollar we invest in tourism in this Province of Nova Scotia, we can be assured there will be a $7 return in it.

For the community of Yarmouth and the surrounding area that is bounded by this commitment here to promote tourism through its marketing agencies, I want to say to them, good luck. I want to say to the minister who introduced this bill, good luck, because it's only

[Page 5604]

through tourism do we recognize the potential that Nova Scotia has and the beauty that it holds for everyone to see. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Annapolis.

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I, too, want to congratulate the minister for bringing this bill forward. I also want to thank him for reinforcing my questions I just asked of the Minister of Tourism, that, in fact, that they are cutting close to $1 million off their marketing budget. This reinforces what I was just saying, that business around this province, now are having to tax somebody coming in, an added tax to visitors to this province. If the Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage had left the money that was there in the department, the ability to market this province would be where it belongs and that's with the Department of Tourism, not with the local businesses scattered all over this province. We have marketing in one direction, we have different levels all over this province. It should be consistent from one end of Nova Scotia to the other and it is the responsibility of the Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage and the minister to deal with that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, we certainly have no problem supporting this bill going on to the Committee on Private and Local Bills. But, I do want to make a correction with regard to the comments of the honourable member for Dartmouth North. He spoke with such enthusiasm on a previous day in support of this bill and for the hotel marketing fee. But it was my colleague, the honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes, who introduced the amendment to ensure those individuals who had to travel from long distances - from Yarmouth, Digby, Cumberland County, Cape Breton and so forth - who were bringing loved ones to Halifax for medical reasons, for health reasons through no fault of their own, and to offer protection they're not paying for an initiative that really should have been addressed through a departmental issue on promotions within the Department of Tourism.

Although he's quite enthusiastic about his position on that - certainly, outside of this particular issue, I would agree, a little bit short-sighted, to say the least and misleading, even more so, to suggest that this particular issue was not addressed. Specifically, in reference to the particular piece of legislation, yes, if that's the wish and the will of the local residents. Much the same as the controversial issue with regard to authorizing the local municipality to be able to start taxing the property taxpayers in Shelburne to secure a doctor and start paying Department of Health fees. Clearly what we have here is a rather fragmented approach on a taxing policy in the Nova Scotia Government that we are now downloading through a series of user fees to all of these local agencies, businesses, community organizations and what have you, because the department doesn't want to put the money into tourism promotion as my colleague, the member for Annapolis, has rightfully suggested, and I think that's very unfortunate. The member who introduced this particular piece of legislation is a Minister of

[Page 5605]

the Crown, is a member of the Executive Council who has the pleasure of sitting at the Cabinet Table when budget deliberations are forthcoming and the various departmental officials come in and itemize their priorities.

Certainly I would hope that the honourable Minister of Natural Resources would take the opportunity to press the case to the Department of Tourism officials as to why he has been compelled to go back to the good residents that he represents and the businesses, and all the taxpayers in his community, as to why they and those who are visiting those local destinations have to now start paying a user fee because the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage is unable to secure the proper funding at the Cabinet Table.

Now, if it comes to priorities, obviously tourism promotion, which has been billed a major initiative here in this province, doesn't seem to be getting quite the attention at the Cabinet Table that one would think when another Minister of the Crown has to come before this House with a private and local bill to try to achieve the initiatives that rightfully should be within the department of his seatmate at the Cabinet Table. So it's a measure of what's happening inside the Executive Council. It's a measure of what's happening in terms of taxing policy. It's a measure of what's happening on tourism promotion and it's a measure of what's happening in terms of who's accepting the responsibility. We're now shifting everything to a user-pay system as the government shields itself from the taxing initiatives that were generally all considered to be provincial in nature.

So it would be interesting to see again, and I will make this final plea, Mr. Speaker, that the government would certainly come forth with a clearly defined definition of user fees in this province because we have at least three Ministers of the Crown and the Premier with four different definitions and I think that's very unfortunate. Sooner or later this province is going to find itself in a very difficult situation, in a legal questionable matter, and with that, I will conclude my remarks.

MR. JERRY PYE: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker, I just want to make sure on this point of order there is clarification and that the honourable member for Cape Breton West inferred or implied that I, as the member for Dartmouth North, for some apparent reason did not support an amendment to the legislation that came forward with respect to charging hotel fees, particularly for those Nova Scotians who needed to come here for emergency purposes and use hotels. I want to tell the honourable member there is nothing in the Hansard records that will imply that I have done any such thing and that, in fact, if that amendment was brought forward, the chances are that I spoke in favour of that amendment. (Interruption) And I may not have been present so I can't tell you for certain of the intent, but nonetheless I still would have supported the resolution for the fee and I will support this resolution.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. It's not a point of order, but certainly the member has clarified the facts and his stand on the issue for the House.

[Page 5606]

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: On a point of order, for all members, I draw to the attention of Hansard and for the library public record, this is the same member who chastised the Liberal caucus, and the sponsor of the amendment, very severely for introducing the amendment at a late date and interfering with his scheduled line of thought.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. It is not a point of order, but a disagreement of facts between the members.

If I recognize the honourable Minister of Natural Resources, it will be to close debate on Bill No. 134.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for Dartmouth North, the member for Annapolis, and the member for Cape Breton West. I must say that Yarmouthians, when they come to government, they always come and they always put up their contribution first. They never come with cap in hand and begging. They always come and they want to do what's right for their community and this is what's right for the community.

I must say, Mr. Speaker, since this Party has been in government, the Minister of Tourism, Culture an Heritage has put a tourism officer in our community that they have cried for for for over nine years. It took the Tory Government to put it in our community, and I thank that minister for putting that officer in our community.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to move second reading of Bill No. 134.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 134. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private Members' Public Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 138.

[Page 5607]

Bill No. 138 - Trade Union Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Colchester North.

MR. WILLIAM LANGILLE: Mr. Speaker, it's a pleasure to rise today for a few moments to speak on Bill No. 138, An Act to Amend Chapter 475 of the Revised Statutes 1989, the Trade Union Act. What this bill does is gives police officers in Nova Scotia what they have been requesting for years, and that is to give up the right to strike and not to be locked out by their employers.

Mr. Speaker, the citizens of Nova Scotia, if this bill is passed, I should say when it's passed, can rest, knowing that they are being provided police service by the municipalities in Nova Scotia 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. I would like to point out there have been numerous strikes in Nova Scotia with police forces all across Nova Scotia. I would like to ask this question, who gains by a police strike? Nobody gains, but there's a lot of losers. It's the citizens of Nova Scotia who are the losers.

Mr. Speaker, I'm not going to talk very long on this bill today, as I'm required in the Red Room for the Law Amendments Committee on another very important bill. They're waiting for me now. With this, I shall take my place and look for comments from the Opposition. At this time I would like to move second reading of Bill No. 138.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I won't speak long on this very important bill. It's an interesting bill that the member brought forward. I will be supporting this bill going on to the Law Amendments Committee. I would have liked to have seen a member of the Executive Council move it, but that's not to be. The member is to be congratulated for doing that. With those few words said, our Party will be supporting this bill going on to the next level.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise in support of this bill, as well. Our Party will be supporting this bill. I congratulate the member for Colchester North for bringing this bill to the House. It's certainly a bill that highlights - I think one word - democracy here. The police union in the CBRM have wanted this for some time now. They've voted for it, and they are anxious to get this through the House. I think this is something that will give relief to a lot of anxious people working in the justice system, particularly at the municipal policing level, that they can do their job, for the protection of the people, in the future without having to worry about work disruption. It's something that they've been trying to get for some time. I believe it's the right thing to do. Again, on closing,

[Page 5608]

I want to congratulate the member for bringing this bill to the House today, and tell you that the Liberal caucus will be supporting this bill.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, certainly not to repeat but only to echo many of the sentiments that have been put forth, I'm pleased to see the sponsor of the bill come forth and compliment an initiative that we put forward several weeks ago. It's quite evident that we have a collaborative and co-operative effort on this particular piece of legislation. Yourself, Mr. Speaker, with a policing background, understands the importance of this particular piece of legislation, as does the sponsor of the bill who, in his previous life, had a rather extensive background with the OPP. I know the policing service with the Cape Breton Regional Municipality is quite anxious to see the fruition of this particular piece of legislation.

[2:15 p.m.]

In previous days, in previous years, we've seen some rather unpleasant situations in several of the municipalities prior to CBRM when policing strikes took place, and it was not a pleasant situation for anyone. As had been noted, there are no winners in this particular situation.

I want to make special note to the collaborative effort of Mr. Ross, the Executive Director for PANS, and for all those who perhaps we haven't even mentioned and we failed to mention because it's easy for ourselves as legislators to either support or not support a particular initiative with our limited knowledge on it. When you're an actual stakeholder on the front lines, so to speak, it's very important.

I also want to draw to the attention, Mr. Speaker, a point that I believe we may have been a little remiss on. It's on another piece of legislation but it somehow relates to this piece of legislation and that's the Policing Act that we gave approbation for second reading to send on to the Law Amendments Committee. As we know, in the draft legislation there was Section 35(4) which alleviated the minister's obligation to sign off for any municipal unit to be able to reduce policing services when that municipality saw fit. This is an issue of considerable concern and I think it's something the Minister of Justice - and I know the Government House Leader is listening very intently - but it's an issue of significant concern, particularly with those municipalities that are faced with budgetary crunches.

It does relate, indirectly, to this particular piece of legislation. My concern is, what we would achieve in this particular piece of legislation, we may lose by virtue of the other piece of legislation through the Policing Act. So it's something I would like to serve notice with the Minister of Justice and the sponsor of this particular piece of legislation and, indeed, the Government House Leader.

[Page 5609]

With that, as has been noted, we'll certainly be supporting this to go on. I congratulate the member for Colchester North in bringing this legislation forth.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the honourable member for Eastern Shore it will be to close the debate.

MR. WILLIAM DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the member for Colchester North, I move second reading of Bill No. 138.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 138. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[2:20 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Speaker Mr. William Dooks in the Chair.]

[2:21 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 111 - French-language Services Act.

and the chairman has been instructed to recommend this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, without amendment.

[Page 5610]

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read for a third time on a future day.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 95.

Bill No. 95 - Land Registration Act.

Bill No. 96 - House of Assembly Act.

Bill No. 99 - Vital Statistics Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The motions are carried.

Ordered that these bills do pass. Ordered that the titles be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bills be engrossed.

The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. WILLIAM DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 101.

Bill No. 101 - Public Service Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. BARRY BARNET: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to move third reading of Bill No. 101.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I just want to take a moment of time here on the floor to speak to the amendments that were made to this legislation at the Committee on Law Amendments process, and I want to thank the minister for his co-operation in this .

[Page 5611]

Mr. Speaker, this bill establishes the Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs, which I know all members of this House are fully in support of. Although there weren't a lot of interventions in front of the Law Amendments Committee, in reflecting on the bill, it was the view of members of the NDP caucus that perhaps we could add to the bill an amendment that would enhance of the role of the Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs so that there would be a bit of an advocacy function. That has been added in an amendment to the bill, as well there will be a regular reporting mechanism, so that on an annual basis the Office will table an annual report that will allow an evaluation and accountability in terms of the progress that the Office is making in terms of implementing the plans of that Office to enhance the life experience of members of the African Nova Scotian community.

I'm very pleased to see this bill be brought forward. I'm pleased to see that the process here works in terms of improving legislation, that we've added a bit more accountability and transparency and a bit more oomph, I think in some ways, to this office. I look forward to supporting this bill as it passes into law.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I, too, am in support of this bill. I think it's long overdue in Nova Scotia, and it's representing the largest Black community in all of Canada. It's a pleasure to see this bill go forward, but I have some concerns with the bill - I don't think it goes far enough, and that I've spoken on here earlier. I believe it should really be a full department with a deputy minister, based on the history that's from the Black community and what has happened to the Black community ever since they came to Canada and helped make Canada what it is today.

It is unfortunate that at this time the minister was unable to make it a full department. When the time comes, probably we may make some amendments to that, and see if we can't make it a full department with the proper resources to, indeed, ensure that the Black community has every opportunity to overcome the difficulties they've had in the past. There has been a lot of progress made in that area, but there's not enough and there won't be enough until everybody is treated equally in this province and everybody has the same opportunities - I think we're a long ways away from that, yet.

The actual setting up of this office is a recognition that there is a difference, and I truly appreciate that happening, but again I believe it should be a full department with proper funding and a much broader scope of activities that it should perform. There are all kinds of issues in education, employment, assistance with developing business opportunities for people in the Black community. We have a great group of people in the Black community capable of many things, and sometimes these things aren't made available to them, because of their colour or because of the lack of education, whatever the case may be.

[Page 5612]

I think those things - I know those things have to be changed, and they have to be changed in the very near future. I look forward to any proactive steps the minister will take in this regard to ensure that the community has every opportunity to reach their potential and work forward, making this province and this country a much better place to live, and with that I will support the bill and take my place.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. BARRY BARNET: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the members opposite for their interventions on Bill No. 101. I will say at the outset that Bill No. 101 is an administrative bill that enables government to establish this Office. In developing this bill and developing the Office, there's been a great deal of work on behalf of myself and the staff at the Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs.

We met with over 175 groups and individuals to see what it is that they felt this Office could do for them and how it would work for Nova Scotians. One of the things that we heard over and over again as we participated in this consultation was that they didn't want to see duplication - it wasn't necessary for government to set up another office for another initiative that would just do the same work that some other group or organization is already doing. One of the things that we have structured in our business planning process is that won't happen, we will not duplicate something that some other entity is doing. What we will do, though, is we will advocate on behalf of those communities and those individuals and groups, and we will ensure that the voices of African Nova Scotians are heard, not only at the Cabinet Table but throughout government.

This bill will enable us to do that, and that's why I'm so encouraged that moving this piece of legislation forward is a huge step forward, not only for me as the minister but for the Office and for all Nova Scotians. I'm pleased to move third reading of Bill No. 101.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 101. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that the bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

[Page 5613]

[2:30 p.m.]

MR. WILLIAM DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 102.

Bill No. 102 - Maintenance Enforcement Act.

Bill No. 107 - Prescription Monitoring Act.

Bill No. 115 - Maritime Provinces Higher Education Commission Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The motions are carried.

Ordered that these bills do pass. Ordered that the titles be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bills be engrossed.

The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. WILLIAM DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, at this time I move that the House recess until the hour of 4:00 p.m.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The House will recess until 4:00 p.m.

[2:35 p.m. The House recessed.]

[4:06 p.m. The House reconvened.]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We will now resume the session.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, could I have the consent of the House to revert to the order of business, Presenting Reports of Committees.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 5614]

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, it is a very busy day for the Chairman of the Law Amendments Committee. As Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 132 - Amusement Devices Safety Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 135 - House of Assembly Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I would further ask the consent of the House to have the two bills that were just reported back to the House be approved for inclusion on today's orders for the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 5615]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[4:10 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Speaker Mr. James DeWolfe in the Chair.]

[4:11 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered two bills:

Bill No. 132 - Amusement Devices Safety Act.

Bill No. 135 - House of Assembly Act.

and the chairman has been instructed to recommend these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read for a third time on a future day. When shall they be read?

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Now.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private Members' Public Bills for Third Reading.

[Page 5616]

PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 116.

Bill No. 116 - Liquor Control Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MS. JOAN MASSEY: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise this afternoon just to go over a few points that I did make the other day on Bill No. 116. I'm very happy to hear that all Parties will be supporting this bill. It simply allows for the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation to post various kinds of warnings in their facilities, and we would like to warn women who are thinking of beginning a family or who are pregnant, about the dangers of consuming alcohol, and we can do this through various means. We could place posters, brochures in the liquor stores, and even possibly label products that are sold there. So this would be provided under the regulations of the bill.

So there's lots of opportunity there for the government to react in a positive way that is very helpful to children and parents in this province. We know that the consumption of alcohol is the only cause of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, and I just want to point out a couple of facts for the record again, that 9 in 1,000 babies born in Canada are born with FASD, and this is a life-long disability. It can affect various things. It has effects on the social behaviour of these infants. It has an economic impact and a health impact for numerous people. It's totally preventable, so it's something that we can be proactive on.

The most serious danger, in fact, to a fetus from alcohol occurs within just 20 days of conception and this is before most women actually realize that they are pregnant. Mr. Speaker, children who suffer from fetal alcohol syndrome can suffer from all sorts of different problems: they can have hearing problems; they can be hyperactive; they can have a lack of ability reacting in social situations; they can suffer from aggressive behavior. Then there are very serious physical defects that can occur too, and those could be heart defects, problems with their vision. A lot of the time these children go undiagnosed and the school system sees these children go through and it's something that these children do not grow out of. Of course there is always the possibility of resources being made available to these children, but, as I say, the best way to deal with this issue is in a preventative manner.

So, Mr. Speaker, I'm not going to speak on this for an extended length of time because I did speak for a fairly long length of time the other day. But I would like to say a thank you to all the members here in the House for supporting this and thank you to the parents who did come forward in the Committee on Law Amendments, to speak about this issue that is very near and dear to their hearts and also to the organizations that I spoke to in

[Page 5617]

doing some research on this and everybody in these organizations who has spent a lot of time and effort pursuing a bill like this, and for all the effort that they've put in, getting Web sites up and going, and thanking them for their active work on this issue. I think it's just something again that shows when all of us work together, we can protect those who aren't able to protect themselves. I would move third reading.

[4:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 116. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 121.

Bill No. 121 - Motor Vehicle Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, it's a pleasure for me to rise today and thank the government again for calling this bill forward. I'm pleased to see that it has gone through the Law Amendments Committee with only a very slight amendment to that. As I say, I think that this is a bill whose time has come. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park has the floor.

MS. WHALEN: I think there has been no argument at all that this is an age group of children and a size of children who are certainly being left out and have been called the forgotten children because they are not properly protected at present when they're riding in motor vehicles. We certainly realize that it will be left up to regulation about exactly what weight restriction and seated height restrictions are going to be implemented in this, but we had suggested that the size between 40 pounds and 60 pounds is the size of children that at present are not being properly restrained in car seats.

What really happens here is that we've acknowledged years ago that adults need to be properly belted in when they're sitting in a car, that seatbelts save lives, and it's very important I think that we recognize that all members of society, at whatever age, are going

[Page 5618]

to have the same safety requirement that we've really allowed for with adults. I think maybe over time you might find changes to the seatbelt design. Maybe something will come from car seat manufacturers that will make them safer for young children, but until such time as that occurs, I think it's important that we use what is available and that is the adaptation of having a booster seat which will help children to be safe. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MS. WHALEN: As I say, Mr. Speaker, I would like to just move forward and move third reading of this bill. I think it's a wonderful addition to our safety laws and I thank the government for bringing it forward.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 121. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: I hate to be a pest, Mr. Speaker, but I wonder if we could recess for about 10 minutes.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The House will recess for approximately 10 minutes.

[4:19 p.m. The House recessed.]

[4:30 p.m. The House reconvened.]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

Are the Whips satisfied?

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I now ask the approval of the House to revert to the order of business, Presenting Reports of Committees.

[Page 5619]

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Private and Local Bills Committee, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 71 - Theatre Nova Scotia Incorporation Act.

Bill No. 108 - Chester Yacht Club Act.

Bill No. 127 - Pictou Regional Development Commission Act.

and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, could I have the consent of the House to revert to the order of business, Government Notices of Motion.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 2881

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 5620]

Therefore be it resolved that the House refer the question of funding for hearing on the bill to amend the University College of Cape Breton Act to the Internal Economy Board.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that the bills that were reported back from the committee on the Private and Local Bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills today.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The motion is carried.

[4:33 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Speaker, Mr. James DeWolfe in the Chair.]

[4:35 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

[Page 5621]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 71 - Theatre Nova Scotia Incorporation Act.

Bill No. 85 - Legion-Huston Property in Tatamagouche Act.

Bill No. 108 - Chester Yacht Club Act.

Bill No. 127 - Pictou Regional Development Commission Act.

and the chairman has been instructed to recommend these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: When shall these bills be read a third time?

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Now.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Third Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 71.

Bill No. 71 - Theatre Nova Scotia Incorporation Act.

Bill No. 85 - Legion-Huston Property in Tatamagouche Act.

Bill No. 108 - Chester Yacht Club Act.

Bill No. 127 - Pictou Regional Development Commission Act, The Premier.

[Page 5622]

MR. SPEAKER: The motions are carried.

Ordered that these bills do pass. Ordered that the titles be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bills be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, could I have the unanimous consent of the House to call Bill No. 111 for third reading?

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING]

Bill No. 111 - French-language Services Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to stand today and move third reading of Bill No. 111, an Act Respecting the Office of Acadian Affairs and the Provision of French-language Services.

Je suis très honoré d'être la ministre à presenter cette projet de loi. Dans le passé, la population acadien et francophone de la Nouvelle-Écosse était toujours aux matches de hockey. Mais finalement on est sur la glaçe. Je m'engage d'être sur la première ligne et finalement de faire un but.

That's what I want to try to do. We were always at the hockey game, we were probably cheering and a lot of times we were sitting on the bench but we never got to play the game but we're playing the game today and we're very happy that this bill has come forward. I'm pleased to move third reading of the Bill No. 111.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I want to say a few words on this bill, unfortunately without a prepared statement - and maybe some day that will change - but I'm in a position of only being able to present this one in English. I do want to say that when we spoke on this bill at second reading, there were concerns with this bill, with what it would potentially do. In fact, all it did was create an Office of Acadian Affairs, produces an annual report and said the government may some day pass regulations. It was not even a minimum of what, I think, the francophone community wanted, which is some sense from this

[Page 5623]

government that there was a true commitment to ensure that services of the government would be provided in French at some point.

There were changes made at the Law Amendments Committee and I will say they were changes adopted by all Parties. We moved an amendment with regard to the annual report to make sure that it will not only reflect the office's role within government, but whether or not Acadians and francophones in Nova Scotia will be receiving the services in French that they want. I think that that is an important step in that annual report and I look forward to seeing how it addresses the needs, wants and rights of Acadians and francophones in Nova Scotia on an annual basis.

We also moved an amendment to ensure that those regulations that are the body of this bill, that will provide for identification of the services of the Nova Scotia Government that will be in French, that the regulations would actually be passed. We originally made a motion that that would occur by January 1, 2008. There was some to-ing and fro-ing and in the end that was adjusted to the last day of 2006, which is basically one year earlier, which is good. That will now ensure that within two years and two and a half months, the francophones and Acadians in this province will have regulations - hopefully sooner, but at least by December 31, 2006 - to ensure that they will know what services this government will be providing for them in French.

I will say to the members of the opposite bench, the Tories, that they are going to be watched carefully by the francophone community, by Acadians in this province, to see whether there is a legitimate opportunity to provide real services for francophones and Acadians in Nova Scotia, because if they're not, this Party across the way, this government, will pay dearly, I believe, in those ridings where Acadians do have the ability to make a difference in the vote. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Merci, M. le Président. Ca me fait plaisir de dire quelque mots sur la troisième lecture du projet de loi 111 et puis j'ai trouvé intéressant que le ministre des affaires acadiens a parler de parties de hockey. Je pense pas que je suis prêt a lui dire que ce projet de loi va lui donner un but, mais, au moins comme qu'il dit, cette un début à l'en dire pour les concernes qui s'en face à la communauté acadienne.

Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 111 is a step in the right direction, although many have seen it to be a small step or a bit of a step taken with some reluctance but, just the same, we're at least on the road towards ensuring that Nova Scotia's Acadian and francophone community can communicate with the government agencies, which they rely upon, in their own native tongue.

[Page 5624]

As I've said in the media before, it's not rocket science and a great deal of this work has been done over the years to identify what government agencies, and what government offices that serve the public in various geographies of this province, could be identified so that they do offer French language service. It's very timely in the year 2004 with the Congrès Mondial that took place in Nova Scotia this year, that the government is moving forward on this and some changes have been made to the bill, as was indicated by the NDP House Leader, with the annual report, and also providing a deadline for the implementation of the regulations. I think that was an example, Mr. Speaker, of the spirit of minority government in trying to make legislation work and trying to be reasonable at the same time.

The number first proposed by the NDP House Leader, seemed to us to be a bit too far, and we brought a lower number, and the government was a bit concerned that their hands would be tied. We had reached the number of December 31, 2006, to have the regulations in place and I do hope the minister will have no problems in ensuring that it's going to happen.

Mr. Speaker, I'd be remiss if I did not raise an issue which I've raised a number of times in this House. The fact is today, 2004, I rise in my place to speak on Bill No. 111 and when I speak in French, members other than the members who understand French, have absolutely no means of understanding what I am saying because of the fact we still do not have translation services here in the House of Assembly.

Now, this is the one building, the seat of government in this province, that Nova Scotians of all backgrounds look to for leadership. The fact that still, in 2004, we do not have translation here in this house, I believe it's something that we must all work together - in conjunction with you Mr. Speaker - to ensure that we do take that step forward and move ahead with what many other Canadian jurisdictions are already doing.

I don't have the list in front of me but I believe many Legislatures would be surprised to see that different provinces that one would not think as a big francophone community already do have translation services in their province. I think of P.E.I., where almost all of their government Acts are translated in both languages and available on the government Web site.

Here in our province, other than the Collège de l'Acadie Act, this Act, and I believe maybe a few more, that's it, there are no other Acts that are translated. The Financial Measures Act or any other Act that affects Nova Scotians' day-to-day lives, are still unilingual here in this province. But progress is being made, Mr. Speaker, visitors to this Chamber are provided with bilingual information when they do come here and I've had wonderful feedback when I've gone to speak at high schools that are French language classes, to be able to present information from this House in the French language is something that surprises them and they're extremely pleased to hear.

[Page 5625]

So, we are making steps, but the time has come in 2004 that we take these steps to make sure, where it is appropriate and where it is required, that French language services are made available here in our province. It's a shame to send our children to French Immersion and to Acadian schools and then when they come to do their business with government, they're forced to speak in English and they cannot speak in the language that we send them to school to learn, after telling them the advantages of learning a second language, of learning the French language, that once they arrive to their government offices, that they all of a sudden have to revert to English.

[4:45 p.m.]

I believe there is still a number of challenges that do lie ahead of us. If there's one recommendation that I can make to the minister, if there's one government service that we need to ensure French language services as a priority, it is in our health care system. The day of sending some older members of our families that have not been exposed to the English language on a regular basis, to go for major surgery at our hospitals, whether they be in Sydney, Yarmouth, or here in Halifax, and that those individuals to not have the guarantee that someone will be able to explain to them in French what the doctor is saying that requires a procedure. I can tell you it's very intimidating, it's something that causes a great deal of stress. I know the minister knows what I'm talking about, I'm sure he has experienced that.

We have been fortunate in many cases where some of the hospital staff - I know of one of my cousins who used to be a clerk in the Neurology Department, who would be brought to the Emergency, to explain to someone what procedure the doctor was suggesting for them. She was not trained for that and that is a bit of a danger because you're sending people to explain medical terms, who just casually speak French. It is something that should be guaranteed in our hospitals.

I don't think you need to hire 100 people to do this, we only have so many hospitals and this is something that is reasonable, it's something that la Fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse has been pursuing and there is certainly a number of federal funds that are available to help the province along this way. I believe the Acadian community has been reasonable in their request, I believe they have been patient but, again, as the House Leader for the NDP has said, we will certainly be watching as an Opposition Party, to hold the government accountable for this. The year 2006 is not an unreasonable date to have those regulations in place and I think it is something that we can all be proud of as legislators and as Nova Scotians, that our province is moving forward and it is making services available to those Acadians and francophones in our province.

M. le Presidént, juste en terminant, je veux félicité la fédération acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Tous les différentes organizations soi de systême de l'éducation, soi dans les autres organizations qui existe, le barreaux français, association des juristes expressions français. Tous les groupes, l'association des parents, des élèves français, toutes les personnes

[Page 5626]

qui ont travaillé avec le gouvernement, avec le bureau des affaires acadiens, avec le ministre, pour assuré au ministre, l'importance de ce projet de loi. C'est quelque chose, y a beaucoup de travaille qu'a déja était fait.

Je sais que Real Samson, le directeur du bureau des affaires acadiens a déja une équipe qui est entrain de travailler dans le gouvernement pour identifier les différentes bureaux, les différentes secteurs du gouvernement qui doivent avoir des services en français. Alors, y a beaucoup de travaille qui a était faite.

J'espère que le ministre va continuer à poursuivre ce but et que à la fin de la journée, qu'on peut toutes êtres fières comme acadiens, comme francophones et comme des personnes de la Nouvelle-Écosse que nous avons un gouvernement qui respet les droits de la communauté française et qui est prêt de démontré le role de leadership pour faire certain que les services sont disponibles en français. C'est quelque chose que je peux vous dire, M. le Presidént, que moi même et je suis sur que tous les députés à l'assemblée seront fière de dire qu'on a fait une grande démarche içi pour la communauté acadien et pour la future de la langue française dans la province.

Juste en terminant je veux aussi dire, au ministre et au président de l'assemblé. En 2004, y à aucune excuse que nous avons pas la traduction içi, à l'assemblé. Il y a plusieurs provinces et plusieurs législatures, y a même des plus moyens communauté française et ils ont leur services en français sur l'internet, leur services à l'assemblé et c'est souvent qu'on entend les gens dirent que les anglais aux Québec n'ont pas beaucoup de droits au Québec. Je peux vous dire, que si, les députés francais, ici à la Nouvelle-Écosse, avaient les mêmes services que les députés anglais aux Québec avait, on serait beaucoup plus avancés que nous sommes maintenant.

Alors, y a aucune excuse pour 2004, j'espère que le ministre va poursuivre ceçi avec le support de la Président de l'assemblé avec le support de tous les députés. A la fin de la journée, nous sommes içi pour aggrandir la communauté acadien, la communauté francophone, la loi 111 et une grande démarche pour vouloir réussir sur ce défit. Merci, encore au ministre, à toutes son équipe qui ont travailler sur ce projet de loi et qui va continuer à poursuivre les démarches pour avoir ces services qui ont était promis dans le projet de loi, mis en place.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MS. JOAN MASSEY: Mr. Speaker, I would just like to say a few words on Bill No. 111. My constituency, in fact, does have a large number of francophones. Certainly, speaking from experience, I have had a hard time trying to learn French. Even when I canvassed in my constituency, I took along - when I went to certain areas where I knew there were francophones - a person with me who was bilingual. I think people really appreciated that.

[Page 5627]

Even though they had to repeat what they were saying to him in English so I could understand it, I think it worked out well for everybody. I tried to do that when I could.

I think this is an important first step for this government to take. I think it's so important that people can access the services they need in their own language. I certainly can't put myself in the position of these people, to think that if I had to go to the hospital with a sick child or if I had to go to a Legal Aid lawyer or somebody that could not speak in my language. It must be very frustrating and hard for people to deal with that. I think this can only move us in a good direction in providing services. Let's break down the barriers that are there for everybody in Nova Scotia. I would leave it at that, Mr. Speaker. Thank you, very much.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

MS. MICHELE RAYMOND: Mr. Président, je parle à l'occasion d'ajouter plusieures mots sur ce magnifique initiatif du gouvernement de la Nouvelle Écosse. Je ne suis pas francophone mais j'ai assez d'amis qui sont francophones et je voudrais vraiment aux fond de ma coeur félicité le gouvernement en ce grande démarche pour l'égalité et de services et de reconnaissance de nos copains français.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Je veux dire un peu en français, je pense que c'est très importante pour les personnes francophones en Nouvelle Écosse, d'avoir l'avenue pour cette residant de services en français.

Mr. Speaker, I hope that the francophone people of the province do feel that this piece of legislation is important to be able to activate or get services in our province in French, if they desire. I hope that the government will move on this and increase the services provided in French.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the honourable minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Acadian Affairs.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, the Office of Acadian Affairs is ready to put together these regulations. The team is already in place. I want to thank the folks who have helped us along the way. Of course, I thank the members opposite, they have a little Acadian blood in them too, I think everybody does in this House. It's really a good show to see the people standing and commenting on this bill.

[Page 5628]

The member for Richmond did bring up a couple of issues that we have been working on. I've been talking about translation in the House for quite some time, and it's something that I will continue to discuss. The health care issue is one that the member for Clare has talked about on a number of occasions, as well. That's why there is a committee - en les services en français. That's why there is a Coordinator of French Services within Health, that's why the Minister of Health will be discussing it at the federal-provincial meeting being held in Victoria in a very short period of time, and I've provided him with a bit of information there, to help us along there as well.

Therefore, Mr. Speaker, I would like to take my time here to move third reading of Bill No. 111.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 111. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed. (Applause)

The honourable Government House Leader.

AN HON. MEMBER: En français, en français.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I would do that for you. I will do it in Maori, how does that sound?

Mr. Speaker, I move the House do now rise to meet again on the morrow at the hour of 9:00 a.m. The House will sit from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., maximum. The order of business will be Private Members' Public Bills, Private and Local Bills for Second Reading, Third Reading, and Committee of the Whole House on Bills. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is the House adjourn until 9:00 a.m. tomorrow morning.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House is adjourned until 9:00 a.m.

[Page 5629]

We have reached the moment of interruption.

ADJOURNMENT

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

COM. INFRASTRUCTURE (N.S.): VOL. SECTOR - REBUILD

MS. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to talk for a few minutes on the resolution, "Therefore be it resolved that this government work with the voluntary sector to rebuild Nova Scotia's community infrastructure."

Madam Speaker, I'm pleased to be able to talk about this very important issue for a number of reasons, the first being that our Party, the Official Opposition, has seen the signficance of the voluntary sector and has recognized it by appointing me as the Critic for the Voluntary Sector. Certainly we would encourage the other Parties to appoint a similar role. Also, my constituency of Dartmouth South-Portland Valley is very rich in voluntary sector organizations. I haven't actually been able to add all of them up, but I could estimate that there are approximately 50 or more. They add a lot to the quality of life in our community, and they provide some very essential services in downtown Dartmouth and the surrounding area.

Thirdly, I'm interested in this topic because that's actually the profession I come from. I've spent the last 15 years working in the voluntary sector, and I know well many of the challenges that the organizations and volunteers face, as well as their staff. I would like to suggest that this is a very important issue for the government to take seriously, as well.

[5:00 p.m.]

Volunteers contribute over $2 billion worth of labour in any given year, and this is the equivalent of approximately $25,000 full-time jobs, and they provide essential programs and services - in fact I would guess that every department of the provincial government uses volunteers in some capacity to deliver both their mandate and their extra programs and services. But the voluntary sector in Nova Scotia is facing a crisis, as it is in other provinces in Canada, and it is important for the government not only to hear and to listen to the voluntary sector regarding these challenges, but also to work with them in partnership to try to overcome some of the vulnerable areas.

I'd like to talk a little bit about some of the challenges; the major one is the lack of core funding. In the past, all levels of government did provide operational funds for these community groups and provincial organizations, but more recently the trend has been to

[Page 5630]

provide project funding, and this has had a number of unattended impacts. For example, a lot of organizations have had to somewhat change their mandate to follow the money, and so different levels of government want these organizations working on their own priorities rather than the priorities of the community, or the priorities of the organization itself, and so this has really changed the nature of what is happening in our communities. There are a lot of gaps that are not being filled by community groups, because the project funding that they've applied for, and often been awarded, does not cover these other needs.

Another area of concern is the increasing operational costs, and I'd like to talk a little bit about the impact of the increased insurance rates. This is getting so serious in Nova Scotia that I know of one volunteer who when renewing her home insurance, was asked by the insurance company whether or not she actually volunteered with any community groups - the point being that obviously they feel that a homeowner is a more risky client if they actually are a volunteer in the community, and I think this sends out a very scary and dangerous message to volunteers. In addition, the organizations and groups themselves are having trouble, in some cases, actually getting insurance to cover special events and certain activities; in fact the insurance industry is actually putting higher requirements on these organizations in the government regulations. So, for example, a community hall may have met all the regulations regarding the installation and operation of a furnace fuel oil tank, but the insurance company may have extra expectations and require them to do a lot of extra work, or actually close down the operation.

This is really causing problems. A number of volunteers are refusing to serve on boards of directors; they're very concerned about liability. It's interesting, because today the Premier did talk about the Volunteer Protection Act and, unfortunately, because it hasn't been tested in the Nova Scotia Courts we're not sure just how much protection that actually provides volunteers. There seems to be some concern that volunteers are not covered in such detail as the Premier is suggesting, and so it's just to say - not that the legislation is poor - it's just that perhaps the voluntary sector should have been consulted before that legislation was drafted and passed, because some of these problem areas might have been identified in those early days.

Another challenge facing the sector is the fact that fewer volunteers are now putting in more hours and having to donate more money, and this really puts a strain on those volunteers who are putting extra time and money into their passions in the community and it makes the sector more vulnerable. Also there seems to be a difference, as one would expect, in the kind of infrastructure that the voluntary sector has in rural Nova Scotia and in the metro area, for example, or industrial Cape Breton. Often when community needs are downloaded onto families and communities, government departments don't realize that there's not equity in terms of available organizations and volunteers across this province to help families and communities deal with these particular concerns.

[Page 5631]

Another issue is, who does the voluntary sector speak to in government? Because volunteers are involved in delivering services for every provincial department, there is no one liaison or avenue for them to work through. This is causing a lot of problems. The voluntary sector is very much like Nova Scotian communities in that there are small, medium and large ones. There are some groups who cover just a neighbourhood, some cover a region, others work province-wide. So it's difficult for them to speak with one voice, but there are a couple of initiatives happening at the present time, one being the Nova Scotia Canada Volunteerism Initiative Network, which has brought together approximately 250 organizations from across Nova Scotia. They are working together in terms of trying to enhance the experience for volunteers, to make it a more positive experience in Nova Scotia. I understand that a number of the metro-based organizations have also joined together as sort of a HRM network. These are two obvious groups that would like to work with the provincial government in terms of meeting some of these challenges.

I think the government needs to take this very seriously for a number of reasons. There's no way that the province could actually replace the volunteers and the organizations that support them in delivering these services. So, if that sector is threatened in any way, then the quality of life in Nova Scotia is being threatened. So the government needs to act very quickly and try to strengthen the infrastructure so that communities and families in this province are protected.

The voluntary sector in Nova Scotia provides a crucial level of service provision, and we need to take these issues very seriously. We can't afford to wait. Thank you.

MADAM SPEAKER: The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

MR. GERALD SAMPSON: Madam Speaker, I'm pleased to stand and speak with regard to the voluntary sector to rebuild Nova Scotia's community infrastructure. I'm going to speak on this from a rural perspective. Community activism and organization is getting involved to help promote and lobby for improvements in infrastructure in rural areas. We don't have the population they would have in large areas to create real effective organizations with regard to community. In a rural perspective, with a low population, one of the main reasons for community infrastructure that I would find would be, before it could be built it would have to be pushing for basic infrastructure. For example, roads in rural areas.

You might ask, what would roads have to do with community infrastructure? Nobody will move to an area like that without proper transportation. We don't have public transportation. I cite the ski hill of north of Smokey, people aren't going to go down there and beat up their vehicle to go skiing in the wintertime.

We've heard today that the Keltic Lodge has closed, and of all things, the Highlands Links Golf Course closed. It closed because of that. The Glenghorm Beach Resort closed. Everything is just shutting down, because there's basic infrastructure that draws people to the

[Page 5632]

area and we need the community to get involved. In that very area, down around the Ingonish area, the community got involved and demanded of Victoria County that they have water. We all agree they needed clean water. That waterline is going through for the people plus for the visitors.

Madam Speaker, in a rural area, we all have septic systems and we have our own wells, so water is not a basic infrastructure for us because we have our own; sewage is not a basic infrastructure, we have our own, but roads are.

Madam Speaker, I cite Route 223, which is the road that travels down through central Cape Breton. I've said it before in the House, central Cape Breton, central meaning the backbone of the Island, that is the road that travels down there that has not received nearly the attention that it needs. It's a road that should be a nice quiet drive through a rural area, and that in itself, if that road was completed or upgraded, you would get expansion there.

Madam Speaker, the people in that area are recognizing the need, and they have gotten together - talk about community volunteers all a volunteer group - and they are in the process of developing an aquarium in that area, which would, when completed, be of worldwide renown. In the Bras d'Or Lakes, there are certain organisms that can only be found out off of the Continental Shelf, and here we have them right in the Bras d'Or Lakes. We have an area in the Bras d'Or Lakes that is over 1,000 feet deep. That's where these organisms are found. These, on display in that aquarium, would be an international drawing card.

Madam Speaker, when you look at volunteerism, the Pitupaq Committee, the five First Nations Chiefs, and the five mayors and wardens of the municipalities have come together to remediate the raw sewage in the Bras d'Or Lakes, and they now have the province involved, the feds involved, the Unamaki Institute of Natural Resources, Eskasoni Fisheries are in there. There were three deputy ministers at the meeting last week, of another organization that coincides with Pitupaq and that's Sustainable Communities.

Three deputy ministers there just fit in, they were completely relaxed. It was a meeting for two days where they weren't picked at, finger pointing or blame being set, they were almost invisible in the meeting, and they really enjoyed it, and they were impressed at the fact that community organizations could come together as volunteers and accomplish what they are accomplishing.

Madam Speaker, in rural areas volunteerism is alive and well, although we have a very minimal amount of population. What we've done is combine a lot of rural areas together through these large volunteer committees, maybe opposite to what you would have in a large urban area where you could have small concentrated pockets to get together. In the rural areas, this has brought the larger area of Cape Breton together and all of the municipalities and the First Nations. I'm very impressed with that. I'd like to go on and continue to describe

[Page 5633]

some of these things from a rural perspective, but I have agreed with my learned colleague, the member for Kings West, that I would share my time with him. I hope that what I have said is enough to show the importance of volunteerism, and the value.

The previous speaker had used some statistics, putting a dollar value on the value of volunteers, and that can't be stressed enough, Madam Speaker, that people who spend their lives volunteering and don't get paid and yet they are the first ones to feel abuse. Without volunteers, we all know where our communities would be. My highest respect to any and all volunteers in any community. With that, I will conclude my remarks and turn it over to the honourable member for Kings West.

MADAM SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Madam Chairman, I am certainly pleased to be able to rise this evening and speak for a few minutes on the late debate, with volunteerism and the impact of volunteerism on our communities and the stress that it's under. It's probably that stress that I'd like to talk about. GPI Atlantic, which is the Genuine Progress Index Atlantic has done several reports on volunteer work. The one thing that it is very quick to point out is, in fact, the decline in volunteerism since 1997. Prince Edward Island is in fact the only province that has been holding it's own.

In fact, here in Nova Scotia, since 1997, we have lost 30,000 volunteers. That's the number now in the organizations that can be accounted for, that is having that negative impact on some of the work and as the member opposite pointed out, in fact, is actually causing a very shift and change in the nature and mandate of some of our most highly regarded volunteer organizations.

[5:15 p.m.]

I would like to bring one of those to the floor for just a moment and that is the Kingston Volunteer Fire Department. For the very first time in its 60 year history, it has had to put an ad in the newspaper. I think that is so revealing. Again, it's something that I think, as the topic of the late debate is pointing out, that government will have to take a look and find some ways, I believe, to support volunteers, because those who are also left in the organizations, where the numbers have gone down, now are picking up that burden. Their hours have actually gone up, I think the statistic was from 42.3 hours per capita to 50.1 hours per capita. So it means that those individuals remaining certainly are having a more difficult time.

What we have to realize is that there is also with this volunteer time, especially when you think in our schools and in similar kinds of organizations, it actually equates to a dollar value, which doesn't have to be paid out. In fact, again, GPI Atlantic said volunteer work amounts to about $13.50 per hour if an organization had to pay for the same level of work.

[Page 5634]

So we have to find some ways to give a higher regard for that work. We're talking about the decline in volunteering work that actually cost Canada $2 billion in lost services in the year 2000. So, it is an enormous challenge, I think, that all of our organizations across the country and here in Nova Scotia are having to deal with.

The other thing I guess that we need to recognize is that people are working longer hours and when we see that happening, perhaps, that's where we need to also go because it's somewhat, I guess, systemic in nature that people have to work longer in order to keep up a reasonable quality of life and, therefore, reducing their volunteer hours. Thank you, Madam Speaker.

MADAM SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings North.

MR. MARK PARENT: Thank you very much, Madam Speaker, for the opportunity to speak to this resolution. The importance of volunteers, of course, can hardly be overstated. I think one of the things that we need to remind ourselves as government officials is that there is a whole segment of society of which volunteers are part of that is an important part of civil society and doesn't usually get the recognition or the support that it needs. There is the public sector, through government, there is the business sector and then there is the non-profit sector, which would include the background that I come from, the background that the honourable member across the aisle comes from and all the volunteers that form part of that. Without that sector, without the involvement of volunteers in our society, I would argue that the civil society just would begin to collapse. So it's important that we do what we can to help facilitate volunteerism within the province.

One of the things we do, of course, is the recognition, not that I think volunteers are asking for those recognition of service but certainly it is appreciated to hear that what you contribute so freely and often at great cost to yourself in terms of time is recognized by others and it becomes a model for others as well. We have the one here provincially, one back in Kentville that I try and get to from time to time, that recognizes volunteers on a local level and certainly, I think, those are important, not so much for the recognition for the individuals because they do it for other reasons, not to get recognized, but to hold up the model that volunteerism is important to society.

I belong to two organizations and I'm always amazed at the volunteer efforts that they put in. The Kentville Rotary Club is in the middle of gearing up for its Rotary Auction - I just had to do an advertisement for it the other day on television - and that money is used to fund literacy programs, to get equipment for disabled people, to do scholarships for students at the various high schools in the Kentville area. I'm also a member of the Canning Lions Club, and the Canning Lions Club is one of the four volunteer organizations in the Canning area that keep that community alive, along with the volunteer fire department, the Legion, the Women's Institute and, of course, the various churches.

[Page 5635]

While we're talking on volunteerism and the importance of volunteerism, I can perhaps link that with an issue that's going on right now - the plebiscite on Sunday shopping - because I think one of the reasons why volunteers are becoming a potentially scarce commodity in our society is the time pressures people are under. You can only volunteer if you have certain free time to volunteer in, and I think as a society we need to safeguard that free time that people have. That's one of the reasons why I'm personally against Sunday shopping and would encourage people to think of the impact upon volunteers when they make their vote on the 16th - if they haven't voted already - that we need time free for various activities and for people to have time for themselves and also time to volunteer in other activities to keep society going. So I think there is a tie-in with this issue of Sunday shopping in terms of the pressures that volunteers feel.

The other pressure too, which also ties in with Sunday shopping, is that one of the reasons why we don't have as many volunteers as we used to - and there's a very good book on this that came out of the United States experience. It's the breakdown of community and the sort of aggressive individualism that puts "me first" and doesn't think of the wider community and the effect of my decisions on other people. An example of this is the many people who say to me, I want the freedom to shop on Sunday, I want the privilege - but they're not thinking of how this affects small-business people; they're not thinking of how this affects service workers; and they're not thinking of that larger picture. So I think there is a tie-in there as well.

If volunteerism is to thrive in our society, we need to maintain this emphasis that the individual is more than just an individual; the individual is situated in the context of a larger community; and the good of that larger community is an important goal of individuals. I hardly need state that here in this House where people have given up - many of them - careers they've stepped away from, where they've given up time from family life and other things to devote time to public service, to helping others through public service.

Increasingly, in society in Canada, we seem to be modelling the American model. In the American model there has been this stress and this breakdown - if this book is right - on community and on the volunteer organizations that make communities such a rich place. Nova Scotia, I think, has retained that in many ways as opposed to the United States, as opposed to Ontario, and there is stress on community that I find very healthy and that I'm very, very grateful for.

When you go through all the various volunteer organizations in each of our ridings, it's amazing the myriad of things that people are doing out of the generosity of their heart to help others to keep the sense of community going. I think that's why Nova Scotia is such an attractive place to live. We certainly aren't as wealthy as other provinces, we don't have those sorts of benefits, our jobs are scarcer than, say, Alberta, but people want to live here, my children want to live here and they want to raise families here because of community, because everything is not measured by the dollar, because people are willing to give freely of their time

[Page 5636]

to help other people - and that, I think, is so precious. We take it for granted and that's why it's so nice to have this resolution. We need to do more. I don't have great ideas on how to do that. I've raised two - one which we're already doing, the other, the tie-in to this plebiscite - but it makes Nova Scotia, it makes the ridings of Nova Scotia a very attractive place in which to live and to grow and to raise a family. Many visitors come to Nova Scotia, and after experiencing our lifestyle, experiencing the stress on community that we have, they say to me, boy, you have a treasure here. What a wonderful privilege you have of living in this part of North America.

I concur with the resolution, both on the importance of volunteers, and as I stated before, I think we need to very clearly recognize that non-profit sector, of which volunteers are an integral part, is as important a sector in society as the government, as the public and as the business sector, the private sector, that alongside public and private we have this non-profit and that's where most of the volunteers are giving out their energies, and so it's important for that.

It's also important that we challenge ourselves to think of creative ways in which we can help, I admit - the honourable member for Kings West has stated this - it is a bit harder to get volunteers to be willing to give up their time, and so we need to think of ways, and we need to look at the wider picture, and part of looking in that wider picture is recognizing that whole, vital sector, the non-profit sector that not only is a big economic generator, if you start looking, but that really in many senses, I think, is a sector that pushes civil society and makes civil society what it is, and makes Nova Scotia so special. I thank the honourable member for bringing forth the resolution and for the opportunity to speak to it on behalf of our caucus.

If there's a few minutes, I don't know if my colleague, the member for Kings South wants to say anything? No, he's shaking his head, so, I only have one minute anyway. Thank you very much, and I appreciate the opportunity to speak to this resolution.

MADAM SPEAKER: The time allotted for late debate has ended.

[The House rose at 5:27 p.m.]

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NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 2864

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Club Nationals Swimming Championships were held in Winnipeg on August 5 to August 8, 2004; and

Whereas Brooke Buckland of Lequille, Nova Scotia, participated - swimming for the Eastern Alliance Swim Team; and

Whereas Brooke placed second in the 50-metre backstroke and had the top Nova Scotian finish;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Brooke Buckland on a job well done and wish her success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2865

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Annapolis County Family Resource Centre, otherwise known as Family Matters, opened its doors in 1994; and

Whereas Family Matters provides 150 families at risk in Annapolis County with quality programs and resources; and

Whereas Family Matters celebrated its 10th Anniversary on October 7, 2004;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Family Matters and thank them for their wonderful service to their community.

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RESOLUTION NO. 2866

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in January 1954 a group of residents from the Nictaux area saw the need for a local fire department after a fire in the community saw the loss of lives; and

Whereas since that time these numerous volunteers have served their community with dedication, hard work, courage and bravery; and

Whereas the Nictaux & District Volunteer Fire Department celebrated its 50th Anniversary on October 3, 2004;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Nictaux firefighters and thank them for 50 years of courageous work.

RESOLUTION NO. 2867

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Swim Nova Scotia 2004 Provincial Meet was held on August 20 to August 22, 2004 in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Sea Kings Swim Club hosted the exciting weekend which saw many records broken; and

Whereas Jessica Pelton of the Middleton Missiles Swim Club claimed a gold and a silver medal and made the all-star team;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate Jessica Pelton on a job well done and wish her success in the future.

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RESOLUTION NO. 2868

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Swim Nova Scotia 2004 Provincial Meet was held on August 20 to August 22, 2004 in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Sea Kings Swim Club hosted the exciting weekend which saw many records broken; and

Whereas Andrew Theunissen of the Bridgetown Sea Kings earned high point male honours, made the all-star team, and won gold in five individual events and a silver medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate Andrew Theunissen on a job well done and wish him success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2869

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Swim Nova Scotia 2004 Provincial Meet was held on August 20 to August 22, 2004 in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Sea Kings Swim Club hosted the exciting weekend which saw many records broken; and

Whereas Robbie Hannam of the Bridgetown Sea Kings made the all-star team and broke two provincial records, winning two gold medals, a silver and a bronze;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate Robbie Hannam on a job well done and wish him success in the future.

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RESOLUTION NO. 2870

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Swim Nova Scotia 2004 Provincial Meet was held on August 20 to August 22, 2004 in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Sea Kings Swim Club hosted the exciting weekend which saw many records broken; and

Whereas A.J. Harris of the Bridgetown Sea Kings won a silver and a bronze medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate A.J. Harris on a job well done and wish him success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2871

By: Mr. Stephen McNeil (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Swim Nova Scotia 2004 Provincial Meet was held on August 20 to August 22, 2004 in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Bridgetown Sea Kings Swim Club hosted the exciting weekend which saw many records broken; and

Whereas Devrie Oxner of the Middleton Missiles Swim Club won a silver and bronze medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate Devrie Oxner on a job well done and wish her success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2872

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

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Whereas Paul and Shelley Empey of Myers Point Road are hosting their 9th annual Halloween display fundraiser; and

Whereas the Empeys spend months planning and preparing their spooky Halloween display in their home, on the front lawn, and on a large lot across the street; and

Whereas each year hundreds of dollars are raised for The Birches Nursing Home in Musquodoboit Harbour through the Empey's Halloween display;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Paul and Shelley Empey on a spooky and spectacular Halloween display and wish them many more years of scary success.

RESOLUTION NO. 2873

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre opened in 2001 and is staffed entirely by volunteers; and

Whereas rehabilitation centre volunteers work vigorously to make better and release injured animals, birds and reptiles back into their natural environment; and

Whereas all animals brought to the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre receive a full examination by a veterinarian;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs commend the volunteers of the Cobequid Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre for their tremendous work in assisting injured wildlife.

RESOLUTION NO. 2874

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Hilden Fireside Group is celebrating its 52nd Anniversary this year; and

Whereas the Hilden Fireside Group is a dedicated group of community volunteers working within their community and reaching out to seniors; and

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Whereas over the past 52 years, a total of 78 people have belonged at one time or another, with Mable Delaney being the only charter member still with the group;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs congratulate and extend their warmest wishes to the members of the Hilden Fireside Group working so diligently to make life better for community residents.

RESOLUTION NO. 2875

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jake Mattinson from Oxford, Nova Scotia, was instrumental in helping the Fundy Area Soccer Club win its first provincial gold medal; and

Whereas the gold medal game was for the first time on artificial turf and only seemed to enhance the team's skills; and

Whereas the team, which secured their perfect 4-0 record, was praised for not allowing a single opposing and for their discipline and sportsmanship during some very physical play;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Jake Mattinson and the Fundy Area Soccer Club on their victory and wish them continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2876

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Springhill Knights of Columbus Council 4302 raised $5,000 for the Dr. Carson and Marion Murray Community Centre; and

Whereas the Knights of Columbus raised the money by selling calendars and holding a ticket draw; and

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Whereas District 4 Deputy Jim Macdonald, Grand Knight Joe Allen, and Finance Secretary Jack MacDonald presented the organization and association fundraiser, Valerie Anderson, with the contribution;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Springhill Knights of Columbus Council 4302 on their dedication to the community and wish them continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2877

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the King Street Market in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia, remains a success story for the Parrsboro and District Board of Trade and all vendors involved; and

Whereas the King Street Market is one of many volunteer members of the Parrsboro and District Board of Trade and is held every Saturday at the Board of Trade Community Centre; and

Whereas the market supports the operation of Parrsboro's Visitor Information Centre by selling such items as fresh produce, heritage photos, paintings, crafts, jewellery, ship etchings and many other items;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the King Street Market in Parrsboro on its dedication to giving back to the community of Parrsboro and wish them continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2878

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alan Ferguson, local marksman from 1859 Springhill Army Cadets Master Warrant Officer, returned to Bisley for a second year as a result of his performance on the Bisley exchange in 2003; and

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Whereas in 2004, Alan was one of three returning cadets from the previous year and considered one of the senior cadets for the tour and did well on the St. Georges Match where he was one of 1,200 marksmen competing in a three-stage challenge; and

Whereas Alan, the only cadet to make it through the third stage, finished in the top 70 in this world-class event for marksmen;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Alan Ferguson on this outstanding achievement and wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2879

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Danica Deveaux from Oxford, Nova Scotia, participated and came out on top at the annual Sackville Music Festival at Mount Allison University; and

Whereas Danica placed first in the Canadian Art Song - 13 and under class, second in the Sacred Solo - 13 and under class, first in the Lieder - Grades 7-9 class and, along with Amber Eason, placed second in the Musical Theatre Duet; and

Whereas Danica was also invited to perform at the final concert which is a huge honour;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Danica Deveaux on these outstanding achievements in the Sackville Music Festival at Mount Allison University and wish her continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2880

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Barry Patriquin, a 42-year-old Oxford native, who recently returned from the Canadian Championships in Edmonton, Alberta, with the title of Canadian Champion in the 100-metre, is ready for the upcoming Paralympic Games; and

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Whereas Barry, who crossed the finish line in 17.12 seconds to earn the gold medal, also placed second in the 200-metre and 400-metre race; and

Whereas Barry, who in 2000 returned home from the Sydney games with a bronze medal in the 4 x 100-metre race, is off to Italy for a pre-Olympic training camp;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Barry Patriquin on these outstanding achievements and wish him all the best as he represents his proud community and province in the future.