The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD 08-31

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Alfie MacLeod

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Second Session

WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
Econ. Dev.: Opportunities for Sustainable Prosperity - Progress Rept.,
Hon. A. MacIsaac 3199
Environ.: Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act -
Progress Rept., Hon. M. Parent 3204
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 2844, Garapick, Nancy: Can. Sports Hall of Fame - Induction,
The Premier 3209
Vote - Affirmative 3210
Res. 2845, Bruce, Joe - Ferguson Health Leadership Award,
Hon. C. d'Entremont 3210
Vote - Affirmative 3211
Res. 2846, EMO - S. Shore Field Office: Opening - Congrats.,
Hon. D. Morse 3211
Vote - Affirmative 3212
Res. 2847, Conserve N.S./TIR: Energy-Efficiency Partnership - Congrats.,
Hon. R. Hurlburt 3212
Vote - Affirmative 3212
Res. 2848, Bonny Lea Farm - Anniv. (35th),
Hon. J. Streatch 3213
Vote - Affirmative 3213
Res. 2849, Boutilier, Eric/Educ. Dept./NSSAF: Anti-Bullying
Message - Congrats., Hon. K. Casey 3214
Vote - Affirmative 3214
Res. 2850, Rankin, Elaine/MacDougall, Dr. Steven - Primary Health Care:
Work - Applaud, Hon. C. d'Entremont 3215
Vote - Affirmative 3215
Res. 2851, Lun. Co. Ground Search & Rescue - Anniv. (30th),
Hon. D. Morse 3216
Vote - Affirmative 3216
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 172, Used Vehicle Sales Disclosure Act, Ms. B. Kent 3216
No. 173, Sydney Casino Profits Distribution Act,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 3216
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 2852, Natl. Coast Guard College: Gov't. (Can.) Upgrade,
Mr. D. Dexter 3217
Vote - Affirmative 3217
Res. 2853, Jeux de l'Acadie: Organizers/Vols./Athletes - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Gaudet 3217
Vote - Affirmative 3218
Res. 2854, Oulton, David - N.S. Cattle Producers Assoc.: Chairman -
Appt., Mr. C. Porter 3219
Vote - Affirmative 3219
Res. 2855, Noble Fam. - E. Hants Mun. Vol. Fam. of Yr.,
Mr. J. MacDonell 3220
Vote - Affirmative 3220
Res. 2856, East. Shore Ground Search & Rescue Team: Dedication -
Recognize, Mr. K. Colwell 3220
Vote - Affirmative 3221
Res. 2857, MacKinnon, Neil: Sports Contribution - Applaud,
Mr. P. Dunn 3221
Vote - Affirmative 3222
Res. 2858, Domet, Stephanie - Margaret and John Savage
First Book Award, Mr. L. Preyra 3222
Vote - Affirmative 3222
Res. 2859, Greenwood 517 Air Cadets - Aurora Cup (2008)
Mr. L. Glavine 3223
Vote - Affirmative 3223
Res. 2860, Dubinsky, Ella/Berk, Brian: Name the Ferry Contest -
Congrats., Mr. K. Bain 3223
Vote - Affirmative 3224
Res. 2861, Admiral Murray Branch RCNA - Battle of Atlantic:
Service of Remembrance - Congrats., Mr. C. MacKinnon 3224
Vote - Affirmative 3225
Res. 2862, Bonvie, Dennis: Hockey Retirement - Congrats.,
Hon. A. MacIsaac 3225
Vote - Affirmative 3226
Res. 2863, Prem. - Driving Gloves: PC - Wear,
Mr. G. Gosse 3226
Res. 2864, Lillian Fraser Mem. Hosp. - Anniv. (40th),
Hon. K. Casey 3227
Vote - Affirmative 3227
Res. 2865, Whittle, Brenda - United Way Outstanding Leadership Award,
Hon. J. Muir 3228
Vote - Affirmative 3228
Res. 2866, Hfx. Fairview Member: Actions - Condemn,
Mr. M. Samson 3228
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 279, Prem. - Can. Coast Guard Coll.: Training Vessel - Removal,
Mr. D. Dexter 3230
No. 280, Prem. - Can. Coast Guard Coll.: Training Ship - Ensure,
Mr. Manning MacDonald 3231
No. 281, Health: Redevelopment Funds - Management,
Mr. D. Dexter 3233
No. 282, Health: Wait Times - Fix, Mr. D. Dexter 3234
No. 283, Environ.: Climate Change Action Plan - Responsibility,
Mr. S. McNeil 3235
No. 284, Prem.: GIS - Clawbacks, Mr. D. Dexter 3236
No. 285, Educ. - Tuition Support Prog.: Enrolment Limit - Explain,
Mr. P. Paris 3238
No. 286, Educ.: Tuition Support Prog. - Funding, Mr. L. Glavine 3239
No. 287, Educ. - Sch. Bds.: Fuel Costs Increase - Effects,
Mr. P. Paris 3240
No. 288, Health: System - Accountability, Mr. S. McNeil 3241
No. 289, Com. Serv. - Windsor House: Beds - Vacancies Explain,
Ms. M. More 3242
No. 290, Health: Equipment Upgrades - Funding Stabilize,
Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 3243
No. 291, TCH: Advertising Budget - Allocation Details,
Mr. H. Theriault 3245
No. 292, TIR: S. Shore Reg. Airport - Funding, Ms. V. Conrad 3246
No. 293, Environ.: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Target,
Mr. G. Steele 3248
No. 294, TIR - Hwy. No. 101 (Berwick-Kingston): Passing Lanes -
Construct, Mr. W. Gaudet 3249
No. 295, Econ. Dev. - Commun. Dev. Trust Fund:
Boatbuilders-Assistance, Mr. S. Belliveau 3251
No. 296, Health: Life Flight - Staffing,
Mr. David Wilson (Sackville-Cobequid) 3252
No. 297, Health: Self-Managed Care Prog. - Payment Plans,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 3253
No. 298, Justice: Taser Use - Moratorium, Mr. W. Estabrooks 3254
No. 299, TIR - HRM Transit System: Assistance - Plans,
Mr. W. Gaudet 3256
No. 300, Com. Serv. - Shelter Allowances: Increases - Details,
Mr. T. Zinck 3257
OPPOSITION MEMBERS' BUSINESS:
PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 58, Uranium Mining Moratorium Act,
Mr. G. Steele 3259
Hon. D. Morse 3261
Mr. K. Colwell 3264
Mr. C. Parker 3266
No. 136, Energy Resources Conservation Act,
Mr. H. Epstein 3269
Hon. R. Hurlburt 3272
Mr. L. Glavine 3274
Mr. G. Steele 3276
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. C. Clarke 3278
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ON SUPPLY MOTION:
Mr. H. Epstein 3279
Mr. K. Colwell 3283
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON SUPPLY AT 4:27 P.M. 3288
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 8:33 P.M. 3288
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Thur., May 15th at 9:00 a.m. 3288
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 2867, Patriquin, Chad - Outstanding Snowmobile Youth Award,
Hon. L. Goucher 3289
Res. 2868, Barkhouse, Joyce - Birthday (95th),
Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson 3289
Res. 2869, Payne, Susan - FCA Designation,
Hon. M. Parent 3290
Res. 2870, Miller, Jean: Cumb. Co. Vol. of Yr. (2008),
Mr. E. Fage 3290
Res. 2871, Pugwash Dist. HS - AIMS Top 25 Rept.,
Mr. E. Fage 3291
Res. 2872, Poly Cello/Covert, John/Cumb. Health Care Fdn.:
Contributions - Congrats., Mr. E. Fage 3291
Res. 2873, Historical Heritage Fair: Award Winners - Congrats.,
Mr. E. Fage 3292
Res. 2874, Leslie, Susan: Rug Hooking Commun. - Importance,
Hon. J. Streatch 3292
Res. 2875, Nautel: Natl. Grid Wireless Contract - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3293
Res. 2876, Myra, Bob - Birthday (63rd),
Hon. J. Streatch 3293
Res. 2877, Dist. Chester Mun.: Altinex Truck - Purchase Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3294
Res. 2878, Ride the Lobster Unicycle Race: St. Margarets Bay
Reg. Tourism Dev. Assoc. - Congrats., Hon. J. Streatch 3294
Res. 2879, Lawlor, Robyn/N.S. Prov. Petite "AA" Ringette Team:
Gold Medals - Congrats., Hon. J. Streatch 3295
Res. 2880, Fay, Brent/Jarvis, Michael: Invention - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3295
Res. 2881, Fay, Mary - Royal Conservatory of Music Silver Medal,
Hon. J. Streatch 3296
Res. 2882, Chester Vol. FD - Pumper/Tanker: Purchase - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3296
Res. 2883, Savoy, Renee/N.S. Prov. Petite "AA" Ringette Team:
Gold Medals - Congrats., Hon. J. Streatch 3297
Res. 2884, Rawding, Courtney/N.S. Prov. Petite "AA" Ringette Team:
Gold Medals - Congrats., Hon. J. Streatch 3297
Res. 2885, Burton, Rachael/N.S. Prov. Petite "AA" Ringette Team:
Gold Medals - Congrats., Hon. J. Streatch 3298
Res. 2886, McLean, Erica/N.S. Prov. Petite "AA" Ringette Team:
Gold Medals - Congrats., Hon. J. Streatch 3298
Res. 2887, Spafford, Sara: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3299
Res. 2888, Avery, Meryn: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3299
Res. 2889, Avery, Thomas: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3299
Res. 2890, Davidson, Matthew: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3300
Res. 2891, Doucet, Lindsay: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3300
Res. 2892, MacRae, Chris: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3301
Res. 2893, Jollimore, Nicole: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3301
Res. 2894, Parker, Ben: Curling Success - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Streatch 3302
Res. 2895, MacIntosh, Robert: West Bay Pastoral Charge Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3302
Res. 2896, Hill, Roger: Janvrins Fest Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3302
Res. 2897, Martell, Shirley: Centre La Picasse Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3303
Res. 2898, Carter, Stuwart: E. Richmond ATV Riders Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3303
Res. 2899, Bourque, Peter: W. Arichat & Dist. Village Circle Soc.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3304
Res. 2900, Campbell, Peter: Red Islands Dist. 10 Vol. FD Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3304
Res. 2901, LaRochelle, Pierre: Village on the Canal Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3305
Res. 2902, Marchand, Ramona: Strait Richmond Palliative Care Soc.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3305
Res. 2903, Landry, Rebecca: River Bourgeois Tech. & Training Ctr.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3306
Res. 2904, Doiron, Richard: EnRoute Isle Madame Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3306
Res. 2905, Stone, Richard: Bonnie Brae Seniors Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3307
Res. 2906, David, Ricky: Janvrins Island Sport & Res. Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3307
Res. 2907, Fougere, Vivian: D'Escousse Civic Improvement Soc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3308
Res. 2908, Jeffrey, Warren: Louisdale & Dist. Vol. FD Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3308
Res. 2909, MacNeil, Russell: Point Tupper Heritage Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3309
Res. 2910, Marchand, Sara: W. Richmond Educ. Ctr. Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3309
Res. 2911, Diggdon, Shannon: Richmond Co. Literacy Network Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3309
Res. 2912, Burke, Sharon: St. Peter's Lions Marina Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3310
Res. 2913, Savoury, Sheila: N. Isle Madame Seniors Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3310
Res. 2914, Groom, Sheldon: Island Commun. Justice Soc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3311
Res. 2915, Anderson, Shelley: St. Peter's Br. Richmond Co. Early Childhood
Educ. Assoc. Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3311
Res. 2916, Cotie, Shirley: St. Peter's Scottish Country Dance Group
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3312
Res. 2917, MacMullen, Joyce: Bras D'Or Lakers Seniors Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3312
Res. 2918, Boudreau, Julien R.: La Maison des Jeunes Richmond
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3313
Res. 2919, Marchand, Sara: W. Richmond Educ. Ctr. Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3313
Res. 2920, Collier, Tania: 842 Royal Cdn. Army Cadet Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3313
Res. 2921, Benoit, Thérèse: Comité des Femmes en marche de Richmond
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3314
Res. 2922, Campbell, Theresa: Richmond Co. Seniors Coun. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3314
Res. 2923, Chisholm, Thomas A.: Riverdale Commun. Services Soc.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3315
Res. 2924, Wilkie, Trevor: Richmond Minor Hockey Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3315
Res. 2925, Martell, Velma: Les Amis de la Picasse Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3316
Res. 2926, Bonin, Victoria: Isle Madame Br. Richmond Co. Early Childhood
Educ. Assoc. Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3316
Res. 2927, Getz, Virginia: Grand River Seniors Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3317
Res. 2928, Carter, Charles: Oceanview Wildlife Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3317
Res. 2929, Kemp, Charmaine: L'Ardoise & Dist. FD Ladies Auxiliary
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3317
Res. 2930, Cude, Wilfred: S. Mountain Arm of Gold Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3318
Res. 2931, Bowen, James: Rocky Bay Irish Club Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3318
Res. 2932, Boudreau, Janelle: Immaculate Conception Parish Coun.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3319
Res. 2933, Bonin, Jean: St. John's Anglican Church Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3319
Res. 2934, Penny, Jean: St. Peter's : Sampsonville Terry Fox Run
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3320
Res. 2935, Boudreau, Jessica: Louisdale Girl Guides Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3320
Res. 2936, MacKenzie, Johanna: Strait Richmond Hosp. Advisory Bd.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3321
Res. 2937, Pitts, John: Richmond Wildlife Assoc. Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3321
Res. 2938, Flynn, Donna: Black River United Church Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3322
Res. 2939, Landry, Eileen: Fleur de Lis Seniors Club Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3322
Res. 2940, Richard, Aurine: RCL Br. 15 Ladies Auxiliary Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3322
Res. 2941, Thorneycroft, Berni: Black River United Church Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3323
Res. 2942, Gwynn, Blair: Fourchu United Church Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3323
Res. 2943, Fitch, Blanche: RCL Br. 110 Vol. of Yr.- Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3324
Res. 2944, Boudreau, Brenda: St. Anne Commun. & Nursing Ctr. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3324
Res. 2945, MacNeil, Carolyn: Richmond Acad. Home & Sch. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3325
Res. 2946, Skinner, Catherine: Head of the Bay Seniors Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3325
Res. 2947, Carter, Channing: Lakeside 4-H Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3326
Res. 2948, White, Geraldine: Island View Health Serv. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3326
Res. 2949, Grundmann, Gerd: West Bay United Church Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3327
Res. 2950, Carter, Germaine: St. John the Baptist Parish Co. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3327
Res. 2951, McNamara, Christena: Riverdale Computer Ctr. Soc.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3327
Res. 2952, Terrio, Christopher D.: Strait Area Ground Search &
Rescue Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3328
Res. 2953, Osmond, Darlene: Fest. Acadian de Petit-de-Grat Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3328
Res. 2954, Gwynn, Darryl: Fourchu Dev. Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3329
Res. 2955, Wincey, Dave: Richmond Minor Baseball Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3329
Res. 2956, MacQueen, Delores: Fourchu United Church Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3330
Res. 2957, Forgeron, Dave: RCL Br. 150 Isle Madame Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3330
Res. 2958, Boudreau, Jackie: New Horizon's Seniors Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3331
Res. 2959, Hopkins, Jackie: Louisdale Lions Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3331
Res. 2960, David, Jalisa: East. Co. Reg. Library Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3332
Res. 2961, Rowe, Emmellean: North Side Commun. Improvement
Vol of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3332
Res. 2962, Mombourquette, Francis G.: L'Ardoise Men's Club Vol.
of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3333
Res. 2963, Fougere, Freddie: Janvrins Island Seniors Club Vol. of
Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3333
Res. 2964, MacNeil, G. Joseph: Barra Head Immaculate Conception
Parish Council Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3333
Res. 2965, Poirier, Gemma: RCL Br. 47 Ladies Auxiliary Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3334
Res. 2966, Landry, George J.: Dr. W.B. Kingston Commun. Health
Ctr. Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3334
Res. 2967, MacNeil, Emma: L'Ardoise Ladies Social Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3335
Res. 2968, McInnis, Nicole: St. Louis CWL Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3335
Res. 2969, Hepditch, Nicole: Richmond Skating Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3336
Res. 2970, Boudreau, Odilon: École Beau-Port Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3336
Res. 2971, MacDonald, Germaine: St. Peter's Village Commun. Vol. of
Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3337
Res. 2972, Samson, Gerri: St. Hyacinth's CWL Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3337
Res. 2973, Stone, Glenda: Immaculate Conception CWL West Arichat
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3338
Res. 2974, Landry, Gordon: Lakeside Commun. Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3338
Res. 2975, Marchand, Herman: St. Louis Pastoral Council Vol of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3338
Res. 2976, Doyle, Hubert: Isle Madame Tourism & Trade Assoc. Vol of
Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3339
Res. 2977, Kraitzek, Hubert: Richmond Arena Assoc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3339
Res. 2978, Prout, Marie: E. Richmond Educ. Ctr. Home & School Assoc.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3340
Res. 2979, Mury, Marion; Acadiaville Commun. Ctr. Soc. Vol of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3340
Res. 2980, Burke, Marlaine: St. John the Baptist CWL Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3341
Res. 2981, Stone, Mary: St. Peter's & Area Vol. FD Ladies Auxiliary
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3341
Res. 2982, Touesnard, Mary: River Bourgeois Seniors 50+ Club
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3342
Res. 2983, Jonas, Michele: St. Peter's Commun. Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3342
Res. 2984, Theriault, Michelle: Telile Commun. TV Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3343
Res. 2985, Guyatt, Muriel: Isle Madame Commun. Venture Ctr. Assoc.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3343
Res. 2986, MacPhee, Murray: W. Bay Commun. Club Vol of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3344
Res. 2987, Boudreau, Nicole: Isle Madame Historical Soc. Vol of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3344
Res. 2988, Samson, Leah: Little Anse/Sampsons Cove Social Action
Club Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3345
Res. 2989, Samson, Lena: La Coopérative Radio Richmond Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3345
Res. 2990, Bouchie, Leo G.: RCL Br. 47 St. Peter's Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3346
Res. 2991, LeBlanc, Cheryl: St. Peter's & Area Vol. FD Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3346
Res. 2992, Mombourquette, Lorraine: L'Ardoise Jolly Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3347
Res. 2993, Westlake, Lorraine: Richmond Villa Rec. Dep. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3347
Res. 2994, Boudreau, Madeline Ann: Isle Madame/Louisdale Unit
Cdn. Cancer Soc. Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3348
Res. 2995, Samson, Magdalen: St. Joseph's CWH Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3348
Res. 2996, Johnson. Margaret: St. Francis de Sales CWH Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3349
Res. 2997, Windsor, Margaret: St. Francis de Sales Parish Coun. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3349
Res. 2998, LeBlanc, André: Lennox Passage Yacht Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3350
Res. 2999, Marchand, Anita: Our Lady of Assumption Parish Coun.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3350
Res. 3000, Bona, Anna M.: L'Ardoise Friends of Palliative Care Vol. of Yr.
- Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3351
Res. 3001, Ferguson, Anna: E. Richmond Educ. Ctr. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3351
Res. 3002, Boulet, Linda: Richmond Br. Retired Teachers Org. Vol. of Yr.
- Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3351
Res. 3003, MacNamara, Lisa: Janvrins Island Commun. Ctr. Vol. of Yr.
- Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3352
Res. 3004, Curtis, Lori: Felix Marchand Educ. Ctr. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3352
Res. 3005, Samson, Karen: Our Lady of Assumption CWL Vol. of Yr.
- Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3353
Res. 3006, Clannon, Kelly: L'Ardoise Econ. Assoc. for Dev. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3353
Res. 3007, Lewis, Kevin: L'Ardoise Cap Site Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3354
Res. 3008, Martell, Wilma: St. Peter's & Area Lions Club Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3354
Res. 3009, Sampson, Alexander: Holy Guardian Angels Parish Coun.
Vol. of Yr. - Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3355
Res. 3010, Britten, Alfred: Isle Madame Vol. FD Vol of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3355
Res. 3011, Roberge, Alice: L'Ardoise Unit 53 Cdn. Cancer Soc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3356
Res. 3012, Boudreau, Aloysius: Lawrence Kavanaugh Coun. 4607 Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3356
Res. 3013, Samson, Amedee: Isle Madame Boat Club Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3357
Res. 3014, Clannon, Joan: Richmond Commun. Access Soc. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3357
Res. 3015, Bowen, Joël: Dev. Isle Madame Vol. of Yr. - Thank,
Mr. M. Samson 3357
Res. 3016, Boudreau, Leona: Cdn. Red Cross, Isle Madame Br. Vol. of Yr. -
Thank, Mr. M. Samson 3358

[Page 3199]

HALIFAX, WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 2008

Sixtieth General Assembly

Second Session

12:00 NOON

SPEAKER

Hon. Alfie MacLeod

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Mr. Wayne Gaudet

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We shall commence the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Economic Development.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased today to release the 2nd

Annual Progress Report for Opportunities for Sustainable Prosperity, a companion to the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act.

[Page 3200]

3199

The Government of Nova Scotia is creating winning conditions to meet today's opportunities without compromising tomorrow. Our focus is on creating a smart, competitive economy and a healthy, vibrant environment both now and for future generations. Government recognizes that the health of the environment, the economy and the people of this province are interconnected. As a result, our economic decisions must respect our people and environment, support growth and create jobs to ensure a high quality of life for all Nova Scotians. This progress report for the province's economic growth strategy highlights the steps being taken toward fostering a strong, sustainable business climate.

Our highly trained and skilled workforce is helping us seize opportunities to become leaders in information technology, research and development, and innovation. Programs like Opportunities Nova Scotia, a provincial retention and recruitment initiative, connects employers with job seekers to help build our workforce to support business expansion and job creation. International firms continue to locate in our province and export their services and products to the world.

Nova Scotia, Mr. Speaker, hosts more than 1,400 information technology companies and over 500 firms that offer products and services to the environmental industry. Assistance, through Nova Scotia Business Inc., continues to attract new businesses to the province while the Industrial Expansion Fund helps support the growth of existing businesses. An analysis of the economic impact of the Industrial Expansion Fund shows it created or retained an estimated 11,000 full-time jobs during a six-year period ending in March 2007. It did so by showing a return of $1.89 for every dollar invested.

Mr. Speaker, when this is combined with a similar analysis conducted for NSBI over the same time period, it shows a total of 22,700 full-time jobs created or maintained. That number rises to 39,300 when spinoff jobs are included. NSBI's payroll rebate program was recently enhanced to provide more flexibility and now helps more companies improve competitiveness.

Programs, Mr. Speaker, such as InNOVAcorp's I-3 Technology Start-Up Competition are key to encouraging the formation of high potential, knowledge-based companies. InNOVAcorp will work with up to 50 of the 121 entrepreneurs who participated in the competition, helping them take steps toward forming knowledge-based companies.

Mr. Speaker, we recognize that challenges such as the downturn in the U.S. housing market, weakening economies, the high value of the Canadian dollar and the rising cost of fuel internationally have an impact on our success in trade. We are responding through programs under Nova Scotia's export strategy, Going Global, Staying Local, which has supported 32 businesses in their efforts to become globally competitive.

[Page 3201]

Trade Team Nova Scotia, a federal-provincial-private partnership, is also helping Nova Scotia companies export their goods and services globally. Our continued investment in infrastructure will help ensure Nova Scotia reaches its full potential for trade. The $74.5 million Broadband for Rural Nova Scotia project, supported by all three levels of government, will see this province become one of the most connected jurisdictions in North America by the end of 2009. Connected communities are competitive communities.

Mr. Speaker, a very fine example of community-led development is the unveiling of Cumberland County's Joggins Fossil Centre. This centre is environmentally and economically sustainable, right down to the water faucets. Joggins is internationally recognized as one of the most important fossil sites in the world and is an outstanding example of the earth's history, the coal age and offers 400 years of rich geological inheritance.

Companies like Minas Basin Pulp and Power are further greening their operations, reducing costs and contributing to a stronger economy. The government will continue to invest in companies like Minas Basin, as well as chart a course toward an environmentally sustainable and prosperous economic future for Nova Scotia. Essentially, Opportunities for Sustainable Prosperity encourages innovation, diversity and promotes the best use of resources while concentrating on reducing waste to build healthy and vibrant communities.

Mr. Speaker, I will now table the 2008 progress report for the province's economic growth strategy, Opportunities for Sustainable Prosperity.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, first I would like to thank the minister for ensuring that I was aware that he was going to be making a ministerial statement, and I certainly appreciate that. What I see here is, of course, a lot of good information, but there is absolutely no new information. What we are looking at is an historical document, not a visionary document - there is absolutely no vision in the presentation that was made in this ministerial statement.

Now one of the concerns that I have, Mr. Speaker, is that there is absolutely no mention of Gateway - and nothing has fueled the hopes of people in this province, from Yarmouth to Sydney, than the strings of information that have come forward, particularly from the Premier, in relationship to the hopes of Gateway. I would like to perhaps see the whole ball of yarn rather than the little pieces of thread or strings that we have been getting in relationship to Gateway.

[Page 3202]

Just last Saturday night at a benefit dance, a laid-off, or displaced steelworker from Trenton said to me, you know, does Gateway have any hope for us in the long term - and really there are no answers on where we're going with Gateway. There has been just a whole string of hopes that have been fueled by this. One of the things that has been mentioned to me by my Cape Breton colleagues is that in that document there is absolutely - at least in the ministerial statement there is absolutely - no mention specifically of Cape Breton, an area that has witnessed a lot of out-migration and so on. I would like to have seen something in there also in relationship to single-industry towns like Trenton . . .

[12:15 p.m.]

AN HON. MEMBER: Like Canso.

MR. MACKINNON: And one of my colleagues is saying like Canso. Now I know there is some progress being made in Canso, but we're hoping for some progress in the Trenton area and we're hoping for something through the single-industry town initiative.

So, Mr. Speaker, I'm going to have a couple of hours, hopefully, later in the day to grill the minister to some degree in relationship to the estimates of Economic Development, and certainly many of the historical things that he mentions in the tabling today of the ministerial statement - I'll have a good opportunity to raise those issues. I certainly have to examine the document itself. There are things that are not in the ministerial statement, but I will look at that document itself before I ask my questions of the minister. So I hope there are things in there about Cape Breton and I hope there are things in there about single- industry towns, but certainly there was no mention in the ministerial statement.

So I look forward to reading the entire document and having a good exchange with the minister later in the day. Thank you very much and I appreciate the opportunity. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to hear that the government is getting $1.89 for every dollar invested in new business in Nova Scotia - I think it's way too low, but it is better than nothing.

Anything you exported in the province in the early 1980s was a 7 to 1 ratio; if you exported $1, you received $7 of benefit to Nova Scotia. So, evidently, the government hasn't really been pushing exports out of this province the way they should have.

When you talk about broadband all over Nova Scotia, I can identify some areas where, indeed, the broadband won't be in place within the next year, or two years, right in

[Page 3203]

HRM. So indeed, the government isn't following through on that promise to put broadband all across the province.

You know, you talk about Minas Basin Pulp and Paper Company and in the estimates I identified with the Minister of Environment the fact that Minas Basin Pulp and Paper is importing paper and cardboard from New England and the Resource Recovery Fund Board refuses to pick it up any more. So here's a shortage from a Nova Scotia company that does exporting and even our Resource Recovery Fund Board isn't supporting what they do. So I would say that is a bit of a failure and will continue to be a failure until that's corrected. I've received some replies back from the minister's office and the deputy minister, which simply aren't satisfactory.

Then you look at job growth in this province and manufacturing, and again I stress that in manufacturing jobs, every dollar that you put into manufacturing that is exported - it used to be a 7 to 1 and is probably about the same. So if you look at the job losses at Trenton, which was an export oriented company, every dollar that they would have put in the Nova Scotia economy, you can multiply that by seven. That's seven times what they originally sold in sales, seven times; that's seven times whatever their sales were, which was in the millions, is gone from the Nova Scotia economy.

Then you look at the Moirs candy factory, just across the road here, that nobody really talked about very much; 1,400 well-paying jobs for Nova Scotians are gone - another export company. So the millions of dollars they spent a year, or earned a year in Nova Scotia, again, could be multiplied by seven. That's a significant negative impact on the Province of Nova Scotia.

Nobody has done anything to correct that. As time goes on, this is going to get worse and worse. You know the reason for it, I believe- well, there are several reasons- number one, we're overtaxed, businesses are overtaxed in the province, so it's not a good environment for taxation.

We have some of the highest energy costs in the country. When you get a large company, that's a very serious thing. We've seen this government come here with wind energy, with a regressive bill that charges tax on the rated amount on a windmill, and didn't do anything to really address the serious issue of creating low-cost energy for Nova Scotians.

When you talk about low-cost energy - just in the wind industry alone, if you give people access to the grid so they could make money on selling energy at a lower cost than Nova Scotia Power can produce it. Maybe they're trying to save Nova Scotia Power, one of the worst polluters in the whole country.

If you could eliminate the property tax on these windmills, on the building is fine, but not on the windmills themselves, reduce the cost of energy in this province. You've got to

[Page 3204]

create the environment. This government has not done that and I don't see any movement towards doing that.

I congratulate the government on tying energy efficiency, the environment and business all together - I think that's in the right direction. They're going in the right direction there, but actually made no concrete steps to make this happen. Until that happens, we'll keep losing industries in Nova Scotia, we'll keep getting call centres here that absolutely add very little to the economy. When the grants and assistance for them are gone, they usually pack up and leave anyway, so they're really not adding to our economy, long-term.

You know, we're really reducing the amount of manufacturing we have in this province. Now manufacturing can be all kinds of things. It can be manufacturing computer components that are easy to ship, high technology to do those things, we can be manufacturing solar panels and other energy-efficient equipment. There's almost no manufacturing in this province in that area. Technology that could go into this would really make our economy boom and, at the same time, provide equipment to Nova Scotia and to Nova Scotians that would really help them grow our economy.

I can tell you one thing about being an entrepreneur myself, you give a Nova Scotian an opportunity and they'll take advantage of it . . .

MR. SPEAKER: One minute.

MR. COLWELL: . . . and they will make our economy grow.

I encourage the government to move forward with our environment. I'm glad to see that it's finally gone from the Department of Energy to the Department of Environment, where it should have been to start with, but I think we have so much more work to do and it's so important that we do this work for Nova Scotians in a very positive way. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley on an introduction.

MS. MARILYN MORE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to draw the attention of the House to the west gallery where we have a class of Grade 12 students from Prince Andrew High School. They live in both my constituency and in Dartmouth East. They're here with their teacher, Mr. MacEachern. I would ask them to stand and be warmly welcomed by my colleagues. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Environment.

HON. MARK PARENT: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I'm pleased to rise today and table the first annual progress report on the Environmental Goals and Sustainable

[Page 3205]

Prosperity Act. (Applause) I'm pleased to do that in conjunction with the Minister of Economic Development and his excellent second annual report on Opportunities for Sustainable Prosperity where he writes on Page 18, "An Atlantic Gateway in Nova Scotia will create economic benefits for Canada, the Atlantic region, and Nova Scotia." So an extensive outline of what's going on there, so I'm pleased to be doing this in conjunction with a fellow minister.

It was less than a year ago that the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act was proclaimed, and I want to thank all members of the House for passing that Act unanimously through this Legislature. Already much work has been done to help us meet our goals. This report offers a snapshot on where we are, where we're going and what the future of this province will look like in 2020. The member of the NDP wanted vision, there's vision in the Act.

While we're tackling our environmental challenges, we'll be growing our economy. The health of the environment and the health of the economy are equally important to the future of Nova Scotia.

I'm pleased to report that we are better protecting our water. We are pleased to report that province-wide consultations are taking place to develop a plan to manage our water resources. We are protecting more land, we've increased the amount of land protected in Nova Scotia from 8.2 per cent to 8.7 per cent, helping us toward our goal of 12 per cent by the year 2015. Our targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 10 per cent below 1990 levels are aggressive, and this year we've taken an important step in helping us reach those goals.

The development of our climate action plan will be released in the Fall and will give guidance to industries, businesses, government and individuals about what they must do to meet our 2020 targets. As you can see, we're moving forward on our goals.

There will be challenges that government, industry and all Nova Scotians must face to ensure the protection of our environment and our economy. Meeting some of our targets will be, frankly, difficult. By the end of 2008, all municipalities in Nova Scotia will be required to meet the province's drinking water treatment strategy. To date, 50 per cent are in compliance and it's estimated that about 85 per cent will meet the guidelines by year's end.

Municipalities are working with us co-operatively and they have demonstrated their intent and commitment to meeting these new standards shortly. Nova Scotia's drinking water is safe, the new guidelines will make it even safer. We'll continue to work with those municipalities and provide assistance any way we can to make sure we have full compliance, because it's only through co-operation with the municipalities that we'll be able to achieve this target as well as others in the future.

[Page 3206]

The other big challenge that I want to talk about will be combatting climate change. That will be one of the toughest environmental challenges that Nova Scotia faces. Let me assure the people of Nova Scotia through this Legislature that our 2020 target is among the toughest targets in Canada and it's the very first across Canada to be enshrined in legislation. We recognize, however, that as science changes and new evidence is available, our targets may need to change. That is why the round table will be reviewed as an Act every five years to make sure it's modern, effective and reflective of the very best science.

Some of the work that has been announced to date that will help us toward that target includes:

Managing the environment and the economy for the future prosperity of the province is, Mr. Speaker, a shared responsibility. Governments, businesses, organizations, and all Nova Scotians have a role to play. In 2008, we will be working hard to spread the message about the Act. We want to - in fact we must - engage Nova Scotians, get them excited, inspired and, more importantly, on board with their important role in helping us reach these goals.

Mr. Speaker, I am very proud of this report and I'm proud and humbled for the opportunity to report to all Nova Scotians that we are making progress securing the future of this province. Our province's continued environmental and economic success is making Nova Scotia an even better place in which to live, in which to work, and in which to raise a family. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

[Page 3207]

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: Mr. Speaker, if rhetoric were fuel, this report could power the province for a month.

One year after the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act was enacted, this government grades itself on its progress and, needless to say, it finds it is doing rather well. Now we had proposed the position of environment commissioner, one of whose jobs would be to provide an objective report on the government's progress toward meeting the goals in this Act - that would be a good report, that would be a reliable report, but instead we have the government deciding how well it is doing itself.

[12:30 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the students who are in the gallery today would love to be able to grade themselves, and I suspect that if they did their marks would be rather good. But that is not the way it works in school and that is not the way it should work on the environment. The problem with this government on the environment is that the gap between their rhetoric and the actual on-the-ground reality is wide. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The noise is getting a little high.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview has the floor.

MR. STEELE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The reality is that Nova Scotia is not a leader on the environment. Now this government likes to repeat that as if simply repeating it will somehow make it true. There is no one - no one - outside the borders of this province who looks at Nova Scotia and says yes, they are leaders. The leaders are in British Columbia; the leaders are in Quebec; the leaders are in Manitoba - they are the ones who are actually doing something, and our government could learn a lot by following them - and that is not to mention the progress being made by many U.S. states and many European countries. But I defy the Minister of the Environment to find one credible source outside the borders of this province who can look at the minister's report today and say yes indeed, Nova Scotia is a leader on the environment.

The minister knows what to say, he knows what words he's supposed to use, but where is the plan? Where is the plan on climate change for example, Mr. Speaker? It is stuck somewhere in an office tower in downtown Halifax. This government promised a plan on climate change by the Spring of 2008 - where is it? Where is it? This minister says they are still working on it and it may be ready by the Fall; meanwhile the interim target set by this government for reduction in greenhouse gases is nowhere close to being met for 2010, and the target for 2020 is so distant as to be almost meaningless.

Mr. Speaker, this government passed the Act last year and they talk about a target that they are planning to meet 13 years later. When is the last time we had a Premier who sat in

[Page 3208]

office for 13 years in a row? John Buchanan didn't do it; Robert Stanfield didn't do it; Angus L. Macdonald didn't do it - if you want to find the last Premier who sat for 13 years in a row, you have to go back a full century.

Mr. Speaker, there are not many people who believe that this government is going to last out the decade, never mind the next decade. This government has no stated position on carbon trading , no stated position on carbon pricing, completely inadequate transit funding, no known progress on vehicle emissions. The drinking water guidelines will be failed by 15 per cent of municipal water supply and this government offers no support to those municipalities to help them meet the mandatory guidelines. The time for talking is over. On the environment, the rhetorical jig is up. Our message to this minister in this government is, stop talking and do something.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I was pleased to hear the announcement by the Minister of Environment and the Minister of Economic Development. I've already talked about some of the problems I see with the economic development part of this and I want to talk about some of the issues that we have with the environment part of it.

The government has indicated it would like to have 12 per cent of the land mass in Nova Scotia set up as protected areas in the time they have set forward, by 2020. Unfortunately, in the last number of years since they've come to power in 1999, almost 10 years ago, they've only set up four new locations. Prior to that, under the government that I was a part of, we identified some 90 possible locations and indeed in a very short time had set up 31 of those 90 locations. So the government has really gone backwards on this process and, you know, this is part of the overall problem we're having with greenhouse gases. We need more and more green areas, more and more areas that will indeed protect the environment for us and all our families.

We also have a government that looked at burning tires in Nova Scotia to generate energy for a company, a good company. I don't blame the company for coming forward with that because any time they can cut costs, they want to do that, but I blame the government for even entertaining it. Now their solution was, and has been since then, to ship the tires to Quebec and burn them. So where do the hazardous chemicals come back to? Probably Nova Scotia, increasing our problem with pollutants in the province. So there's a lot of talk but there's no action.

Again, as I said earlier about the regressive tax bill they put forward in this Legislature for windmills, that really doesn't do anything to encourage anyone to put a windmill farm up in this province there are some of them there, there could be a lot more. That's not the solution to our energy costs but it's a partial solution. We don't see any

[Page 3209]

manufacturing opportunities being promoted by this government that would help us build windmills here, build solar panels here, build other things for energy conservation.

Again, as I said earlier, the benefit is seven to one, everything you can export out of this province. We haven't seen a solid insulation program for homes that was started in the 1970s. The minister made reference to it today and it was stopped, it was stopped. We have approximately 60 per cent of all the homes in the Province of Nova Scotia heated by oil. The government's solution was to come up with a program to help people put new furnaces in to burn more oil. That was the solution - more efficient ones, cut it down a little bit - but it really didn't look at the possibility of doing renewable energy to heat homes and that's the easiest thing we can do immediately. We can cut the costs of heating homes.

So we really have to look at insulation programs for homes and more energy efficient ways to do homes. They talk about building new homes that are more energy efficient. I think that's an exceptional idea; that's something that could happen immediately. That could happen immediately and we need some solid initiatives to do that, but the government talks about it down the road, three or four, five years time. That isn't good enough. It's not good enough today. As time goes on, we have to get more and more aggressive with this. We see people who are having a really hard time heating their homes. To fill an oil tank up now is between $1,000 and $1,200 but yet no program to help those people insulate their homes so that could go down. There is no program there to really put renewable energy into the homes to make them easier to heat.

There's a lot of talk, and I believe the possibilities this bill has are very positive, but we've got to stop the talk and start getting some action on these things if Nova Scotians are going to be able to grow the economy here. If you make it so expensive to heat your home that you cannot heat your home, you're not going to stay here. You're not going to invest in this province, if you're an entrepreneur, when it's a lot easier to move to another province in Canada, or outside the country, and make a living and make that area prosperous.

So I think we've really got to work on this a lot faster, we've got to do some positive things, some really key things, to get this started. Work on the long-term picture - we have to do that, it's essential - but we also have to work on the short-term things such as insulating homes, reducing the cost of energy in this province and doing all the other things we need to do to help the economy grow and also to cut our energy costs, so it makes it more attractive for people to set up businesses and operate businesses in this province. Thank you.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 2844

[Page 3210]

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas over three decades ago, young Nancy Garapick impressed all Canadians with her talent and determination in the competitive sport of swimming; and

Whereas this Nova Scotian, at just 14, broke the record for the 200-metre backstroke and won two bronze medals the following year in the event of Montreal's Olympic Games; and

Whereas this province and this country was proud then and is thrilled now to have her name added to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate this fantastic athlete and tremendous citizen for excelling in her sport now and being enshrined in this country's esteemed Hall of Fame for her personal achievements.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 2845

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Joe Bruce of New Waterford has been working tirelessly for the past 25 years to improve services for people with schizophrenia and other forms of severe and persistent mental illness; and

Whereas Mr. Bruce has served on many committees over the years, including the Mental Health Advisory Committee, Mental Health Services Quality Management Committee and the Family Working Group; and

[Page 3211]

Whereas Mr. Bruce recently received the Donald Ferguson Health Leadership Award, an annual award given by the Cape Breton District Health Authority Board of Directors;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud Mr. Bruce on receiving this award, and for his continued work for those people with schizophrenia and their families.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Acting Minister of Emergency Management.

HON. DAVID MORSE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, if I may, I'd like to make an introduction before doing my resolution.

MR. SPEAKER: Please do.

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, today I'm very pleased to welcome guests from Landmark East school in Wolfville, led by their headmaster Tim Moore - Tim, if you could stand up - teachers Dale Hennigar, Irene Nickerson and Gary Porter; and, of course students and parents. If you could please rise and accept the warm greetings of the House. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, on a future day I'm looking forward to reading a resolution about this fine school, but not today.

MR. SPEAKER: How about reading the one for today?

MR. MORSE: I think that's an excellent idea, Mr. Speaker.

RESOLUTION NO. 2846

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 3212]

Whereas coordination with municipal governments is essential to emergency preparedness; and

Whereas the Emergency Management Office opened its South Shore field office in Lunenburg on April 14th; and

Whereas this office will be the home base for Emergency Planning Officer Steve Mills, a 30-year veteran of the RCMP, who will assist municipalities in training, planning and preparedness;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Emergency Management Office for opening its South Shore field office and welcome Steve Mills to the team.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Energy.

RESOLUTION NO. 2847

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Conserve Nova Scotia and the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal have partnered to improve energy efficiency of more than 20 government owned and managed buildings province-wide; and

Whereas older, inefficient lighting in these buildings are being replaced with energy efficient LED technology and high performance fluorescent lights; and

Whereas the annual energy savings from the upgrades are approximately $75,000 and the annual greenhouse gas reductions will be more than 600 tonnes;

[Page 3213]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the staff of Conserve Nova Scotia and Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal for helping government lead by example toward a cleaner, more sustainable Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 2848

HON. JUDY STREATCH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bonny Lea Farm has been operating in Lunenburg County for 35 years; and

Whereas the Province of Nova Scotia recognizes that Bonny Lea Farm has steadfastly carried out their vision of providing assistance and opportunities to people with disabilities to learn the skills needed to lead meaningful and productive lives within their communities; and

Whereas today Bonny Lea Farm continues to provide engaging programs that are delivered by dedicated and committed staff, which enhance the quality of life and employability of individuals with disabilities;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join in congratulating Bonny Lea Farm on 35 years of success and wish them all the best for the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3214]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[12:45 p.m.]

The honourable Minister of Education.

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, with your permission, I would like to do an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER: Please do.

MS. CASEY: In the east gallery, we have visitors here from Bible Hill Junior High School in Truro. We have Eric Boutilier, who is a coach and a guidance councillor at Bible Hill Junior High. With him are two student athletes, Chad Sampson and Laura Sinclair. Laura and Chad are representing their school on a number of teams, school soccer, school basketball and track and together they have worked to support and promote an example across the province of an anti-bullying campaign. We need to work together to address this issue and through a co-operative effort with the Department of Education, and leadership under Eric Boutilier and the Nova Scotia School Athletics Federation, we have a campaign that we're very proud of and I'd like to welcome these students to the House. (Applause)

RESOLUTION NO. 2849

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Eric Boutilier, a coach and guidance councillor at Bible Hill Junior High, is the driving force behind the creation of a special crest students can wear as a symbol of peace and respect; and

Whereas Eric Boutilier has enlisted the support of the Department of Education and the Nova Scotia School Athletics Federation to take the anti-bullying message to sports fields, school gyms and hockey arenas across the province; and

Whereas by wearing a pink crest on their team uniform, school athletes will send a message of safe and respectful learning environments each time they are seen at a school sporting event;

[Page 3215]

Therefore be it resolved all members of this House congratulate the continued efforts of Eric Boutilier, the Department of Education and the Nova Scotia School Athletics Federation for sending the message that bullying has no place in our schools.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 2850

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Elaine Rankin, Director of Population Health and Primary Care at Cape Breton District Health Authority, has been instrumental in developing, implementing and evaluating primary health care initiatives and designed and implemented the Advanced Access Research Project; and

Whereas Dr. Steven MacDougall, former chief of family medicine at the Cape Breton District Health Authority, made the commitment to move to a same-day access practice whereby patients can call in the morning and receive an appointment the same day; and

Whereas Ms. Rankin and Dr. MacDougall recently received the Health Care Provider of the Year Award, an annual award presented by the Cape Breton District Health Authority Board of Directors;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud Ms. Rankin and Dr. MacDougall for their work in improving access to primary health care for Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 3216]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Labour and Workforce Development on an introduction.

HON. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for letting me make this introduction. In the gallery opposite are two good friends of mine, a fellow Rotarian and friends - we go to more community luncheons together and dinners than any other people I know - and that is Cyril and Penny White. They are here because they are supporters of Landmark East, so I would ask them to rise and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Acting Minister of Emergency Management.

RESOLUTION NO. 2851

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lunenburg Ground Search and Rescue on May 10th celebrated its 30th Anniversary of service to the people of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the diligent and dedicated efforts of these volunteers have saved lives and brought comfort to families when loved ones have gone missing; and

Whereas search director Sherry Veinot and her team gathered at the Royal Canadian Legion in Bridgewater on May 10th to celebrate this milestone;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House thank and congratulate proud members of the Lunenburg County Ground Search and Rescue for a job well done.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 3217]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 172 - Entitled an Act to Require Disclosure Respecting Used Vehicles Being Sold by Dealers. (Ms. B. Kent)

Bill No. 173 - Entitled an Act to Establish a Board to Distribute to Charities One Half of the Profits From the Sydney Casino. (Mr. David Wilson, Glace Bay)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 2852

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Atlantic Canadians know that the Coast Guard is essential to the safety and security of Canada's oceans and coastal areas; and

Whereas the officers, members and staff of the Coast Guard have a proud tradition of service to our country, a tradition that begins with the training of the Coast Guard cadets here in Nova Scotia at an important national institution, the Canadian Coast Guard College; and

Whereas in light of recent questions about management and direction of the Coast Guard, Canadians had every right to expect better support for its training and high standards;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the federal government to invest in upgrades of the national Canadian Coast Guard College, located in Point Edward, Cape Breton, rather than moving the college's only training vessel to a distant location.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 3218]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 2853

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: M. le Président, par la présente, j'avise que je proposerai á une date ultérieure l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que plus de 750 athlètes participeront aux 24ième Jeux de l'Acadie le 16 au 18 mai dans la région de Clare; et

Attendu que les jeunes athlètes représenteront les régions de Chéticamp, Halifax, Rive-Sud, Clare, Par-en-Bas, Sydney, Dartmouth, Pomquet, Truro, Greenwood, ainsi que Richmond ; et

Attendu que le Comité provincial des Jeux de l'Acadie a comme mission de valoriser et de promouvoir la culture et la langue acadienne et francophone chez la jeunesse acadienne de la Nouvelle-Écosse en organisant des activités sportives et culturelles;

Qu'il soit résolu que les membres de cette Chambre félicitent le comité organisateur des Jeux de l'Acadie 2008, les nombreux bénévoles qui continuent á rendre service á la communauté acadienne et á tous les jeunes athlètes qui vont participer aux jeux régionaux cette fin de semaine.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this long weekend more than 750 athletes from across the province will gather in Clare for the 27th annual Jeux de l'Acadie; and

Whereas delegations will represent the regions of Cheticamp, Halifax, Rive-Sud, Clare, Par-en-Bas, Sydney, Dartmouth, Pomquet, Truro, Greenwood, ainsi que Richmond; and

[Page 3219]

Whereas the Comité provincial des Jeux de l'Acadie mission is to promote the Acadian and francophone language and culture among the youth of Nova Scotia through the organization of sporting and cultural events;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly extend their congratulations and best wishes to the organizing committee, the many volunteers who contribute countless hours to promoting the Acadian and francophone culture, and to all the athletes who will participate in the games this weekend.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, may I be permitted to do an introduction?

MR. SPEAKER: Please do.

MR. PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I would like to introduce in your gallery Tim Olive, who is a former member of this House and welcome him here today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 2854

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas well known and respected Three Mile Plains resident David Oulton was recently named Chair of the 2008 Nova Scotia Cattle Producers Association; and

Whereas David is an exceptionally well known beef and poultry farmer, and brings considerable experience to his new position, having already served as a director at large in 2005 and as vice-chair of the association in 2006 and 2007; and

[Page 3220]

Whereas David's family is well known in agriculture across Canada, with his late father, Robert, being a pioneer in the breeding of Charolais cattle in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all MLAs in this Nova Scotia House of Assembly applaud David Oulton for being named 2008 Chair of the Nova Scotia Cattle Producers Association.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 2855

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteerism is so rewarding that it can embrace an entire family; and

Whereas the Municipality of East Hants recognizes those families that volunteer and contribute to the community; and

Whereas on May 9, 2008, the Noble family of Elmsdale - Darren, Nancy, Janice, and Brent - were recognized as the Municipality of East Hants Volunteer Family of the Year;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Darren, Nancy, Janice, and Brent Noble on being named the 2008 Municipality of East Hants Volunteer Family of the Year and commend them for their contributions to the community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3221]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 2856

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Shore Ground Search and Rescue is a volunteer organization dedicated to saving lives; and

Whereas the Eastern Shore Ground Search and Rescue was founded in 1978 with over 78 volunteer members, some of which are still serving today; and

Whereas this organization has been successful in conducting many searches for lost individuals over the past 30 years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the Eastern Shore Ground Search and Rescue team for their dedication and determination in finding lost members of our community and bringing them home safely.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 2857

[Page 3222]

MR. PATRICK DUNN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Neil MacKinnon was introduced to sports at a very young age being born into a large rural family comprised of prolific athletes; and

Whereas Neil's extraordinary athletic talents allowed him to play a key role in the Atlantic Juvenile, Atlantic Midget Volleyball Championship, two Nova Scotia Headmasters Provincial Championships, the latter two of which he was captain and three provincial softball titles; and

Whereas MacKinnon was captain of the 1975 Nova Scotia Canada Winter Games volleyball team in Lethbridge, Alberta, and also captain during his four-year tenure with St. Francis Xavier University volleyball squad;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud Neil MacKinnon's contribution to sports, including coaching numerous years at the high school level and for being inducted into the St. Francis Xavier University Sports Hall of Fame.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[1:00 p.m.]

The honourable member for Halifax Citadel.

RESOLUTION NO. 2858

MR. LEONARD PREYRA: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas for the past nine years the Atlantic Book Festival has highlighted many of the talented writers, poets and illustrators throughout Atlantic Canada; and

[Page 3223]

Whereas the 2008 festival featured readings, workshops, tours, book launches and children's activities with celebrations in Halifax, Dartmouth, Saint John, Sydney, Truro, Pugwash, Charlottetown and St. John's; and

Whereas on May 12th the Atlantic Book Award winners were announced at the Alderney Landing Theatre in Dartmouth;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate first- time novelist and Halifax resident, Stephanie Domet, for winning the Margaret and John Savage First Book Award for her tale of love, grief and healing in Homing: the whole story (from the inside out).

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 2859

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 517 Air Cadets from Greenwood have won the 2008 Aurora Cup; and

Whereas the Aurora Cup is a sports, marksmanship, leadership and drill competition, hosted annually by 14 Wing Greenwood in support of its Air Cadet program; and

Whereas on April 12th and April 13th teams from Yarmouth, Liverpool, Shelburne, Windsor, Kentville and Greenwood competed with 517 Greenwood edging out 106 Windsor for the trophy;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate 517 Greenwood Air Cadets on winning the 2008 Aurora Cup and wish them every success in the future.

[Page 3224]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 2860

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the newly constructed ferry for the route between Englishtown and Beach Point at Jersey Cove will be known as the Torquil MacLean, following a name-the-ferry contest; and

Whereas the contest took place when 125 students from school in Baddeck, Middle River, Cape Smokey and Boularderie wrote essays with the most representative ones being forwarded to the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal for a decision; and

Whereas Baddeck Academy Grade 11 student Ella Dubinsky and Grade 5 Middle River Consolidated School student Brian Berk had their essays named as winners, and both will receive a $200 cash award while their respective schools will get $1000 in cash at an official christening ceremony later this Spring or early summer;

Therefore be it resolved that all MLAs in this Legislature applaud the writing skills of all students who took the time to submit an entry, and especially to Ella Dubinsky and Brian Berk for being named essay contest winners.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3225]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 2861

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canada Remembers Program of Veterans Affairs Canada encourages the Canadian public to become involved in events which commemorate Canadian men and women who served in Canada's military in times of war and peace; and

Whereas the casualty percentage rate of those serving in the Navy/ Merchant Marine during the Battle of the Atlantic was the highest suffered by any of Canada's fighting services during World War II, whereby for every seven who served, one was killed or wounded; and

Whereas each year since 1985 the Royal Canadian Navy Association Admiral Murray Branch holds an annual Service of Remembrance at a cenotaph in Pictou Landing;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly commend the volunteers of Admiral Murray Branch RCNA for their dedication and effort to hold a Service of Remembrance every Spring to honour those lost and injured in the Battle of the Atlantic.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Economic Development.

[Page 3226]

RESOLUTION NO. 2862

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Frankville native Dennis Bonvie will conclude his hockey playing career when the post-season ends for his Wilkes-Barre Scranton Penguins; and

Whereas the 34-year-old player with the Wilkes-Barre Scranton Penguins of the American Hockey League is in his 15th professional hockey season - the past five seasons were spent with the Penguins, and Bonvie also played 92 games in the National Hockey League with teams in Edmonton, Chicago, Boston, Ottawa, Colorado, and Pittsburgh; and

Whereas Dennis Bonvie will be remembered as the rugged winger who played a very aggressive hockey game - the Penguins and other league franchises recently honoured the veteran for his contributions throughout the years, and he was often noted by Don Cherry;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in congratulating Dennis Bonvie on his upcoming retirement from hockey, with more than 900 professional games under his belt.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre - sorry, Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 2863

MR. GORDON GOSSE: Thank, you, Mr. Speaker, the member for Cape Breton Centre wouldn't read this.

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 3227]

Whereas Premier Rodney MacDonald in a fiery speech to the Party faithful during the Progressive Conservative Annual General Meeting in February put the Opposition on notice that they will be held accountable; and

Whereas the Premier told Progressive Conservatives that the gloves are off; and

Whereas the Opposition Parties were put on formal notice that the free ride was over;

Therefore be it resolved that this out-of-touch Premier direct the Progressive Conservatives to keep their driving gloves on instead of taking them off, and then maybe he would not have to spend so much time defending Cabinet Ministers' rides from angry citizens of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I . . .

MR. SPEAKER: To start with, you are not allowed to name a member and you did in your beginning . . . (Interruptions)

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Resign! Kick him out!

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. So I assume you would like to strike out the name? Would you like to strike out the name?

AN HON. MEMBER: Read it again, Mr. Speaker.

MR. GOSSE: How about the member for Inverness?

MR. SPEAKER: Or the Premier. You just said his name.

MR. GOSSE: The member for Inverness.

MR. SPEAKER: Did you request waiver? Okay.

There has been a request for waiver with the amendment. (Interruptions)

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 2864

[Page 3228]

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in 1947, the Red Cross opened an Outpost in a summer cottage donated to the community of Tatamagouche by former resident and nurse Lillian Fraser; and

Whereas on March 27, 1968, the Lillian Fraser Memorial Hospital opened its doors for the first time on the North Shore after years of planning, fundraising and hard work; and

Whereas several retired members were welcomed back to celebrate the 40th year in operation;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Lillian Fraser Memorial Hospital for 40 years of providing critical health care services to the residents in the rural area of Tatamagouche.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

RESOLUTION NO. 2865

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brenda Whittle, a Truro resident, was the honoree at the 2008 Outstanding Leadership Award Dinner of the United Way of Colchester County; and

Whereas Brenda Whittle, in 1991, founded Caring for Cancer Patients whose goal is to provide emotional support and added strength to help individuals with cancer restore their self-esteem; and

[Page 3229]

Whereas Brenda Whittle received a Woman of Distinction Award 1996 for her work with cancer patients and in 2005 received a Canadian Living Me to We Award in honour of her community work;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Brenda Whittle on receiving the 2008 Outstanding Leadership Award from the United Way of Colchester County and thank her for her efforts on behalf of persons with cancer.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 2866

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia House of Assembly allows all members the ability to speak freely, while allowing other members to hold each member accountable for their statements; and

Whereas the member for Halifax Fairview seems to prefer remaining silent in the House while relying on other forms of electronic media to make childish and cheap remarks about other honourable members of this House; and

Whereas such actions should come as no surprise to Nova Scotians as they would recall it was the NDP member for Halifax Fairview and his colleague, the member for Halifax Citadel, who in the Winter session of 2007 were found by the Speaker to have breached the parliamentary privileges of the House with their vicious and sustained personal attacks and accusations against both current and former members of this Legislative Assembly;

[Page 3230]

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly condemn the actions of the member for Halifax Fairview and call upon him to stand in his place should he wish to attack other members of this House so that members can defend themselves and hold him responsible for his remarks, rather than hiding behind his blog.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The time is now 1:12 p.m. and we will continue on . . .

Before we start, we have a request for an introduction.

The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

MR. PERCY PARIS: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just got in under the wire. I would like to draw the attention of the House to the west gallery. In the west gallery, we have Kevin and his son, Timothy Burrell. Unfortunately, there was a little bit of a mixup here in the House and they were going to be joined today by some other students and parents with the Equal Education Association of Nova Scotia. I would ask them to stand and receive the warm welcome from the House. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, excuse me if I request the indulgence of the House, this may be ruled out of order, but things were a little confused this morning, there was a group of parents and students downstairs trying to get into the gallery, but the gallery was booked. They have asked me, on their behalf, to table for the Premier, a package of letters the students have taken liberty to write to the Premier and they just asked me to table them.

MR. SPEAKER: The item is tabled.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: It is now 1:14 p.m, Question Period shall go on until 2:44 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM. - CAN. COAST GUARD COLL.: TRAINING VESSEL -

REMOVAL

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question this afternoon will be for the Premier. Yesterday, the federal government announced it's removing the only training vessel from the Canadian Coast Guard College. This college is an important national institution located here in Nova Scotia and is a particular source of pride for Cape Bretoners. Just before

[Page 3231]

the removal of the vessel was announced, the Prime Minister spent some quality time with the Premier at the Canada-Finland hockey game so my question is, what advance notice of this latest federal cut to Nova Scotia did the Prime Minister give the Premier at Monday's hockey game or otherwise?

[1:15 p.m.]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I share my honourable colleague's concern with regard to that vessel moving out of its present port. Having been in that area and seeing the value of what it means and really the training that individuals receive at what is a very prestigious establishment here in Nova Scotia and well recognized across the country. My honourable colleague indicates somehow that the fact that this government has been able to work with the federal government and has seen progress made on many fronts, is a bad thing.

Is he saying it's a bad thing that we're going to finally see an end to the Crown share after 20 years? I disagree with him on that. Does he believe that the over $600 million investment that the federal government is making in Nova Scotia, which I had the honour to be in Antigonish to take part in the signing, is a bad thing for Nova Scotia? If he is suggesting that, I disagree with him.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I thought I was suggesting that taking the training vessel away from the Coast Guard College was a bad thing and maybe the Premier ought to do something about it. That's what I was suggesting.

The federal government had already decided to remove the icebreakers Louis S. St. Laurent and Terry Fox, taking hundreds of jobs and weakening the Coast Guard's protection of Canada's ocean waters. Now, Coast Guard training and Nova Scotians are being let down with the removal of the college's only training vessel. My question is, in view of the importance of the training provided by the Coast Guard College, how will the Premier rally the support he needs to reverse this short-sighted cut?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, we have already indicated with regard to the previous announcements that we want to see every piece of infrastructure stay here in Nova Scotia and we will stand up for Nova Scotians to make sure that happens. The federal government has made huge investments here in Nova Scotia and it's because of the work done with our Minister responsible for Military Relations, because of the work done with the Minister of Economic Development that we do see huge investments being made here. But, I concur with my honourable colleague that we do not want to see that important piece of infrastructure leave Nova Scotia.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I believe it was the Premier of Newfoundland and Labrador who said the federal government preys on the weak when it deals with this government. Federal officials may think that someone who signed away the Offshore

[Page 3232]

Revenue Agreement isn't going to raise the alarm when other federal services in Nova Scotia are also cut back. Mr. Speaker, what Nova Scotians would like to see is a little backbone. My question to the Premier is, when will he stand up and when will his government start standing up for Nova Scotians?

THE PREMIER: (Interruptions) Let's talk about facts here, Mr. Speaker. Here we have a Leader in the NDP who hides behind groups like the Citizens Health Coalition in this province, that's their front for health care. We're more concerned with front line health care in this province. Mr. Speaker, perhaps the rumours are true, perhaps my honourable colleague is seeking a federal career in politics. I don't know if that's true or not . . . (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please, order please. Honourable Premier, are you finished?

THE PREMIER: I'm finished. (Laughter)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

PREM. - CAN. COAST GUARD COLL.: TRAINING SHIP -

ENSURE

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I was just wondering if you could add that time to Question Period. (Laughter) My question is also for the Premier and it also has to do with federal Conservatives playing politics in Cape Breton.

Last April, Fisheries Minister Loyala Hearn announced that the two heavy icebreakers, the Louis S. St. Laurent and the Terry Fox will be moved from Halifax to two Newfoundland bases. Yesterday, we learned that the federal Conservatives will transfer a third Coast Guard vessel out of Nova Scotia to Quebec, leaving the Canadian Coast Guard College in Sydney without a training ship. Mr. Speaker, that certainly is another Conservative slight for Cape Breton.

Once again, Mr. Speaker, we see that the Premier and his Progressive Conservative Government are sitting down rather than standing up for Nova Scotia. My question for the Premier is, what conversations have you had about keeping the 14-metre Cap Perce training vessel here at Point Edward?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, as I already indicated in my previous answer, I share my honourable colleague's concern. We have raised this with the federal government, we'll continue to raise it with the federal government and we will continue to ensure that Nova Scotia is not only treated fairly, but that we get more and more investment in our military. We're seeing that happen right across the water, here, not too far away.

[Page 3233]

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, two great parliamentarians in Nova Scotia, Bob Muir and Allan J. MacEachen, went to great lengths to put the Canadian Coast Guard College in Point Edward. It is one of the finest facilities in Canada for training of mariners in the Coast Guard. Today we see the spectacle - we have the Coast Guard College in Cape Breton with no training ship. It's like a pub with no beer. You have a situation where the Coast Guard College is down there, the Coast Guard College is there doing training and now they're not going to have any training ship. Now what's more ridiculous than that? My question to the Premier is, what is the Premier going to do to ensure that there is a training ship at Point Edward in the future?

THE PREMIER: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I concur with my honourable colleague, that ship should be there. I've raised this with the federal government, will continue to raise it with the federal government. When it comes to standing up to the federal government, those on this side of the House will do so.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, this is Nova Scotia and we are surrounded by water. The plain fact is that Coast Guard and Search and Rescue vessels and operations are key pieces of infrastructure to our province and the provincial Progressive Conservatives sit idly by while Prime Minister Harper and his Conservative government strip our province of crucial programs. The Canadian Coast Guard College in Sydney is vital to research and search and rescue to Nova Scotians and they will need something to replace the Cap Perce. My final question to the Premier is, will he meet with Prime Minister Harper and have this decision overturned?

THE PREMIER: My honourable colleague can be assured that this will be raised with the Prime Minister, Mr. Speaker, and our concerns with respect to anything, any type of infrastructure leaving Nova Scotia have been.

Mr. Speaker, I share the member's passion for the work that is done at the Coast Guard College. I have been there, I have visited the location in the past number of years. Indeed I'm very familiar with the work of such people as Allan J. MacEachen, who was the representative of my own area - and a cousin of my own, I might add, distantly - but we'll continue to ensure that the interests of Nova Scotians are put at the forefront in dealing with the federal government.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

HEALTH: REDEVELOPMENT FUNDS - MANAGEMENT

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. The Progressive Conservatives agreed on a $48 million redevelopment of the IWK in 2003. As of this year when construction was halted, cost overruns were expected to be 21 per cent,

[Page 3234]

or $10.3 million. After assessing the situation, $1.3 million was identified as a possible savings on the renovation cost, still that leaves taxpayers with a huge bill for work that has spun out of control. My question for the Minister of Health is, when the department funds redevelopment, who is responsible for making sure that taxpayers' dollars are spent wisely?

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, we were made aware late in the process that there was a gap in the dollars that were allotted to that project. We did do a report, of course, the Wilson Fitt report indicated a number of issues with this, the impact of deflation, labour and material costs. There were also some changes to the project that were not in the original scope of the budget and, therefore, not approved by Cabinet. I know there were a lot of lessons learned in this one. It's not something that we want to see happen again but we're very happy to provide them with the additional $6.75 million required to finish that great project for the IWK.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, although the IWK renovation team had a hand in this fiasco, it has certainly become abundantly clear that the Department of Health had little or no oversight on the project although it committed the majority of the funding - some $35.6 million. From a consultant's report into the cost overruns, I quote, "It might be said that the Department of Health was complicit to some extent through its relatively passive role in monitoring the project, spotty attendance at the . . . Committee meetings . . ." where it knew extra work had been approved. Mr. Speaker, I'll table that report. My question to the minister is, why didn't the DOH choose due diligence in protecting the $35 million investment into the IWK?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, again as you read further into that report, it also says that the IWK and the building team do not have in place adequate process or project management support to manage a project of that magnitude. We were unaware of the issues that were going on there. We did rectify that by committing another $6.75 million to complete that project for the IWK.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my final question will actually be to the Premier. Cost overruns for this government are not the exception, they are the rule: a 21 per cent cost to increase here in the IWK, $9 million extra; a 30 per cent cost increase at the proposed Colchester Regional, $51 million extra; and another $2.4 million extra at the new QE II emergency room. So my question to the Premier is, are Nova Scotians being hit tomorrow with an 8 per cent electricity tax increase to pay for the mistakes that this government is making?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, you know, from the comments of my colleague from the NDP, I'm sure he'll be very supportive and is supportive of the government's direction to take a look at strategic infrastructure partnerships with the private sector, which come in on time and on budget for projects. So I'm sure we'll be hearing from the NDP indicating

[Page 3235]

their support for that endeavour soon because they certainly haven't been speaking positively about the private sector since I've been in this House.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition on a new question.

HEALTH: WAIT TIMES - FIX

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. The government claims that health care is a priority. The fact is that more people are waiting longer for diagnostic testing. Data collected at the Capital District Health Authority proves that things are getting worse. For example, last summer patients had to wait about 30 days for a CT scan at Dartmouth General. By November of last year that wait time had ballooned to a wait of 69 days. So my question for the Minister of Health is, how can his government state it is committed to reducing wait times when, in fact, the wait times have doubled in just four months on that procedure?

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, the research that goes behind that - you didn't look at the whole province as we do. We look at services that are given to all Nova Scotians. If you look on the wait times Web site that we have, patients can look to see where their shortest wait time is. I know that CT scans in the province do have a good number in Truro, they are good in Kentville, I do believe they are good in Bridgewater as well. For a little bit of travel, people can get them a lot quicker. So we put that in the hands of Nova Scotians to make a decision to deal with their specialist to refer them to the correct location.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, as the Minister of Health knows, they don't fund that travel. They won't even give out a bus pass to get patients there. CT scans are but one diagnostic test with a longer wait time for Nova Scotians. The wait list gets longer almost everywhere you look. Between July and November of last year, the wait for ultrasounds increased from 20 days to 85 days in total. Gastrointestinal testing waits increased. None of the wait times have decreased. When will the minister stop feeding Nova Scotians political platitudes and roll up his sleeves and start working at fixing wait times?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, as the member opposite knows, we cannot tackle all the wait times all at the same time, which is why we focused in on orthopaedics at this time. We feel, with the project that is ongoing at Scotia Surgery, that 500 more patients are getting their surgeries quicker. We are establishing a clinic where orthopaedic patients can be assessed more quickly and therefore receive faster treatment. Oh, wait a minute, that's in the budget they are not supporting this year.

[1:30 p.m.]

[Page 3236]

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, of the 30 testing indicators in the latest operational measures report from our largest health authority, 15 didn't meet their targets, eight didn't even have targets and seven performance indicators were met. So I just table that document for the minister. I am sure he has seen it already. Will the minister explain why he has allowed health care to spiral out of control?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, maybe the member opposite can explain to me why he is not supporting a $31.7 million investment in Family Pharmacare, why he is not supporting $178 million in the Seniors' Pharmacare Program, why he's not supporting $3.96 million in this health care system. Let him explain to Nova Scotians why he's not there for Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

ENVIRON.: CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN -

RESPONSIBILITY

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. This morning, the province released its progress report on environmental and economic goals. It is clear that there is considerably more to be done in terms of reaching the lofty goals that government has set forth in this Act. While other provinces like Quebec and British Columbia have taken the lead on the issue of climate change, our government has actually delayed the climate change report until Fall because they finally figured out that this belongs in the Department of Environment. So my question to the Premier is, why wasn't the Department of Environment responsible for the climate change report in the first place?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, this government has been a leader in this country when it comes to the environment. The Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act speaks to the commitment of this government, whether it be around protecting land mass, whether it be reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the Department of Environment, the Department of Energy and other departments have been working together to ensure that the Climate Change Action Plan reflects a very broad-based approach.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, 60 per cent of Nova Scotians are dependent on oil for heating their homes. The rising price of oil is hitting everyone in the pocketbook and government must work harder to help Nova Scotians become less dependent on oil consumption. We have access to the highest tides in the world and the opportunity for Nova Scotians to use other renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, would help to reduce our oil consumption and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. My question to the Premier is, can you clearly lay out your government's plan to reduce the use of oil in the province and move toward more renewable energy sources?

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THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I will refer that to the Minister of Environment to update my honourable colleague on the initiatives taking place.

HON. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the honourable member of the $5 million investment that my colleague, the Minister of Energy, announced in tidal energy, putting us once again into the lead in tidal energy. I'd like to remind the honourable member of the $10 million last year and $10 million this year in Conserve Nova Scotia, whose aim is to reduce our energy input. I want to remind the honourable member, $500 million that was spent on wind energy, thanks to the work of my honourable colleague, the Minister of Energy, and I want to remind the honourable member of the work that we've done . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Bottom line, vote for the budget.

MR. PARENT: Yes, bottom line, thanks for voting for the budget. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. MCNEIL: Nova Scotia has the highest percentage of tide and wind energy generation in the entire country, Mr. Speaker, and right now only 5 per cent of our energy comes from those sources. We have a system of community colleges and universities that are second to none - they nurture the leaders of tomorrow and they conduct research in fuel innovation. My question to the Premier is, when will your government recognize those advantages, and stand up to Ottawa and make sure that Nova Scotia becomes the research and development capital of Canada when it comes to renewable energies?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, this government has made a commitment that by 2013, 18.5 per cent of our electricity will come from renewable sources. We have shown our commitment time and time again, whether it be through wind energy - and we're seeing over $1 billion of investment happening in that particular area - through the highest tides in the world, and through other alternatives.

Mr. Speaker, my honourable colleague speaks of research and development. In fact, I'm very pleased to say that last week in Fredericton, at the Council of Atlantic Premiers, I put forward that Nova Scotia would host a symposium early next year, gathering distinguished guests, business people not only from Atlantic Canada but from around the world, to talk about research and development.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: GIS - CLAWBACKS

[Page 3238]

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, My question will be to the Premier. As the Premier knows, many seniors in our communities are having a hard time making ends meet and, with the price of food and energy going up, it is becoming even more difficult. Lower-income seniors depend on the federal Guaranteed Income Supplement for an adequate monthly income. Unfortunately for those seniors, the Progressive Conservative Government claws back part of the Guaranteed Income Supplement. So my question to the Premier is this: Why is his government making life harder for seniors by clawing back part of the Guaranteed Income Supplement?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I can't believe my honourable colleague is saying this. In the budget, those who receive the Guaranteed Income Supplement will qualify for the $200 rebate for home heating - something which that member is now going to vote against. He's also suggesting the directive of the government to double the property tax rebate is a bad thing, from $400 to $800, directly affecting those with a Guaranteed Income Supplement.

MR. DEXTER: Well again, Mr. Speaker, I guess the Premier missed the question. I'm going to table a letter sent to the Minister of Finance by Gerald B. Hoganson from Pugwash, dated April 17, 2008. Mr. Hoganson volunteers to help people completing their income tax forms, and he was shocked to learn that people who are receiving the GIS from the federal government because their other income is considered to be below an acceptable standard are, in effect, having their GIS clawed back by the provincial government. My question to the Premier is this: Why is the Premier continuing the practice of clawing back part of the GIS, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, that is paid only to lower-income seniors?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I just outlined a couple of things in our own provincial budget - which the Leader of the NDP is suggesting he is going to vote against, taking money out of the hands of our seniors. He doesn't want them to get that rebate, obviously to keep their homes warm next winter. He obviously doesn't want to see them get the healthy living tax credit of $500. Obviously he doesn't want our seniors to see a balanced budget with a debt going down. Mr. Speaker, I disagree with the direction certainly that that Party wants to take this province in, as do my colleagues.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, what I want is to see seniors who are some of the most vulnerable citizens in our province be able to get the guaranteed income supplement that they're supposed to be guaranteed by the federal government that this government is clawing back. My question to the Premier is, when will seniors see income tax changes that are needed to stop the clawback of their guaranteed income supplement?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I want the honourable member to know that this year's budget contains a number of significant tax cuts for Nova Scotians and if he and his Party would vote for that budget, they will be implemented as quickly as possible.

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MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

EDUC. - TUITION SUPPORT PROG.: ENROLMENT LIMIT -

EXPLAIN

MR. PERCY PARIS: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education. The Tuition Support Program allows certain children with high needs and serious learning disabilities to transfer to specialized private schools with part of their tuition paid for by the department. This program serves a small number of students - only 35 are currently in their third year - and it's cost-effective. The pupil grant is transferred to the private schools. My question for the minister is, why does the department insist on a three-year limit to enrollment?

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to have the member raise the question about tuition support. Tuition support is a program that was introduced by this government. It's a program of which we are very proud and it's a program that helps those students who have some special needs get the special attention they need in a private school.

MR. PARIS: Mr. Speaker, the department is strangely inflexible. The three-year limit has nothing to do with the student's achievement. It's an arbitrary number. Some students might only need a year of specialized help while some might need five. It depends on how far behind they've fallen in the public system. We're into yet another review of the special education system and one element is whether to continue the Tuition Support Program. The review's purpose is to be completed over the next school year. My question for the minister is, will she assure our guests that students currently in the Tuition Support Program can continue in it while this further review is completed and its recommendations implemented?

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, we did have a number of guests in our gallery. Unfortunately, they've had to leave but we have some new guests. I had a chance to speak with them, they were from Landmark East. Landmark East is one of the designated schools which works with the department in order to provide the supports that we believe are needed for students to help close that gap. This has been an excellent partnership. We have it with two other designated schools but I would like to remind the member opposite and all members of this House that we did extend the tuition support from one year to two. It was clearly understood and stated at the time that that would be a transition year and we currently have 17 students who are preparing to do the transition back into our public schools next year.

MR. PARIS: Mr. Speaker, for the record I would acknowledge that there are still guests here in the House from Equal Education and Opportunities. Mr. Speaker, this has gone on far too long. We've had SEIRC, we've had the 2007 review of Services for Students with Special Needs which has spawned yet another review - the Tuition Support Program - and the hiring of a consultant to develop a new learning disability strategy. Will the minister

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simply tell us, when are public schools going to be able to provide a program that is as good as, or better, than those supplied by private schools?

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I believe I could take credit for that last quote because I have said it many times in this House, that we are looking to improve the delivery of programs in our schools to help meet the needs of students. We will not discontinue the Tuition Support Program as it now stands, until we believe we have a program that is equal to, or better than, what they are now getting.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

EDUC.: TUITION SUPPORT PROG. - FUNDING

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education and I am hoping for different answers. Another year has gone by and the minister and the government have, once again, failed to address the long-term uncertainty over special education. While the minister initiated a review of special education and subsequently hired consultants in late December, 2007, the three year cap on tuition support still remains. The one size fits all approach is shortsighted and unrealistic. My question to the minister is, will the minister commit to permanently funding the Tuition Support Program beyond the three year limit?

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, it will be difficult to give a different answer because the position this government is taking is that they will continue the Tuition Support Program as it currently exists until we have a program that is equal to, or better than, that which the students are now getting. We had a recommendation which was to discontinue the Tuition Support Program, I did not accept that, I left that in place because that's good for the students of this province.

MR. GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, Bridgeway, Churchill and Landmark East - and we've had students, parents and teachers here today - have helped many children renew their love for the classroom. Not only have many students found the classroom enjoyable again, they have also made friends and are gaining the skills necessary for them to re-enter the public education system. Currently, the public education system is unable to provide all children with the learning environment they require. Every child is allocated $6,500 by the Department of Education. If the $6,500 follows the students, parents will have more flexibility to send their children to these special schools, with no additional cost to government. This will, in fact, save the government money. My question to the minister is, will the minister allow the $6,500, allocated to each student, to follow the student should they require educational instruction that is currently not offered in the public school?

[1:45 p.m.]

[Page 3241]

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I do want to acknowledge that we do allow the funding per student to follow the students for a maximum of three years in a designated school. I'd also like to remind the folks in the House that when parents find themselves in a situation of need, there is a supplementary funding that's available to them. Last year, we approved 51 applications for supplementary funding and that was approximately $3,000 per student, in addition to the money that went with them from the board.

MR. GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, not only is the program not offered province-wide, many parents were unaware the program existed. For those who are aware, many have expressed their frustration over the application process; oftentimes students must be one, two or even three grades behind just to qualify for support. In the 21st century, this is simply unacceptable. There are parents and grandparents, sons and daughters who are present in the gallery. Some need one or two years more of special education schools before connecting to programs offered by university, especially Saint Mary's and community college. My question to the minister is, will the minister leave these children in educational limbo or will you support their life goals and immediately review the three-year-barrier to tuition support for those who need additional years?

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite speaks of criteria that's used. We do want to make sure that students have an opportunity in our public schools, through an individualized program, to close the gap and meet their needs. Thus we make sure those students who are requesting support for a designated school have already had the opportunity to be part of an IPP, in their school, to help close that gap.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

EDUC. - SCH. BDS.: FUEL COSTS INCREASE - EFFECTS

MR. PERCY PARIS: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education. We all know that the cost of diesel, fuel oil and gasoline has soared in the past year. The Department of Education approves the budget assumptions used by school boards to forecast their fuel costs for each year. My question for the minister is, how much more than the DOE approved estimates did school boards have to pay to heat their buildings and run their buses in 2007-08?

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, we currently have before this House a budget. Should that budget be approved with all-Party support, we would be able to determine the allocation for each board. There are expectations that we have for boards out of that allocation and fuel is one of those.

MR. PARIS: Mr. Speaker, the answer to that question is over $3 million. Fuel costs are up 30 per cent over last year. The Chignecto-Central Board alone has paid $612,000 over the Department of Education's approved budget. That board has received no support from

[Page 3242]

the department for this over-expenditure, neither have any of the other boards which found themselves in the same boat. My question, then, for the minister is, where are the school boards supposed to find the money to pay off this year's fuel bills?

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, if I could speak to the funding to school boards, I would like the member opposite and all members of the House to understand that even in a case of declining enrolments, which this province has experienced in our public schools, our funding for school boards has increased in the face of that, to the point of 4 per cent increase in our proposed budget for this year.

MR. PARIS: Mr. Speaker, the Nova Scotia School Boards Association and individual boards have told the minister that they need another third again to cover their heating costs in 2008-09. We all know that the price of fuel is going to continue to climb but there has been no increase in funding. Why has the Department of Education not made sure that school boards have the money they need to buy heating oil to keep our children warm and fuel for the buses to get them back and forth safely to school?

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, the concerns of which the member speaks, keeping our students warm and getting them back and forth to school, is the responsibility of the boards. I have every faith that the boards will set priorities and use their dollars wisely.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

HEALTH: SYSTEM - ACCOUNTABILITY

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Today the budget of the Department of Health accounts for 43.5 per cent of government spending. With an aging demographic and ongoing capacity challenges in the health care system, drastic changes are needed and they are long overdue. More accountability is needed and the time is now. So my question to the Premier is, does the Premier agree that our health care system warrants more public accountability and scrutiny, yes or no?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, it is the very reason why the government is making investments such as the new Pharmacare Program - to ensure that we ease other pressures within the system. It is the very reason why the Minister of Health has introduced in the budget, the selfcare/telecare program - seven days a week, 24 hours a day - for Nova Scotians, to ease some of the pressure we see in the system. It's the very reason why this government has taken steps with respect to accountability over the past number of years and will continue to do so within the health care system.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, ER closures totalled more than 6,300 hours last year, the equivalent of 262.5 days. We have communities still without physicians and press releases about service pressures in the Valley Regional Hospital have become more frequent.

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The public have consistently rated health care as their number one issue in terms of priority. So my question to the Premier is, will you submit our resolution dated May 6, 2008 - which calls for the creation of a Standing Committee on Health - to the Committee on Assembly Matters for action?

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, within the transformation document that we call the PHSOR, there were a couple of recommendations that really referred to more public consultation, more engaging rural citizens, citizens around Nova Scotia to be in the decision-making process when it comes to health services. That is the direction we are taking and that is the direction that I am very happy to be bringing forward to all Nova Scotians.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I believe that Nova Scotians expect the Legislature to be more open and accountable. The largest budget in government warrants all the focus and attention and solutions that we can offer. So my question to the Premier is, why won't you allow a standing committee on the largest budget item for this province?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, if we look at the makeup of health care in Nova Scotia, of course it is made up of district health authorities. Those district health authorities are made up of members of the community health boards, are made up from individuals who are interested in health care in this province from all walks of life. All issues and all dollars and cents related to health care in this province are available for all Nova Scotians to see, So, Mr. Speaker, we feel that it is as transparent as it possibly can be for the citizens of Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

COM. SERV. - WINDSOR HOUSE: BEDS - VACANCIES EXPLAIN

MS. MARILYN MORE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister of Community Services. Earlier this year we publicly raised the issue of empty beds at Windsor House, a residential care facility in Windsor. An unwillingness by Community Services to fill their vacant beds has caused serious budget shortfalls for that facility. In fact, the operators reported paying thousands of dollars out of their own pockets to keep the home operating. The home has passed its inspections and been commended for the high quality of care it provides. So I ask the minister, why do beds continue to remain empty at Windsor House?

HON. JUDY STREATCH: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I thank my honourable colleague for the opportunity to rise and speak about the good work that is going on within the portfolio of the Services for Persons with Disabilities. Through a multitude of initiatives, we were able to put dollars into community-based programming, which has allowed for that independence, that continuum, to continue for persons with disabilities. We

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continue to work with our service-providers to ensure that the best possible services are being provided for those clients and we will continue to invest wisely and work with all of our stakeholders and, indeed, all Nova Scotians, to ensure that what is in their best interests are met.

MS. MORE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I hope everyone takes notice of who is defending vulnerable citizens in this province and small business. The operators of Orchard Home for Special Care, another residential care facility located in Berwick, are in the same situation. They have a capacity for 21, but they have two vacancies and two more pending. This is causing a significant budget shortfall and the operators again have had to pay out of their own pocket to keep things going. These operators have been told that there will be no new placements for Orchard Home or other residential care facilities. My question to the Minister is, when did this policy change take place?

MS. STREATCH: Mr. Speaker, who is defending vulnerable Nova Scotians? This government is defending vulnerable Nova Scotians. This Premier, this government, and with the $6 million investment in this year's budget, which that NDP party will not support, we are defending vulnerable Nova Scotians.

AN HON. MEMBER: Look what you did, Marilyn, you got her all worked up.

MS. MORE: Mr. Speaker, there are over 400 vulnerable people waiting for residential care placements in this province now, currently. Surely some of them would welcome a residential care facility placement. So if the department intends to stop using residential care facilities, all operators deserve full disclosure. My question to the minister is, why is her department licensing and praising these facilities, while all but ensuring their closure by refusing to fill their vacant beds?

MS. STREATCH: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Once again I'm pleased to rise and speak about the phenomenal work that is being done within the portfolio of Services for Persons with Disabilities. This government supports the over 5,000 Nova Scotians who are in need of our assistance, through that continuum of services. We will continue to support them and if the NDP would like to come onside and support our budget and support those over 5,000 Nova Scotians, I'd be delighted.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

HEALTH: EQUIPMENT UPGRADES - FUNDING STABILIZE

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister of Health. Every year, this government puts aside money for repairs to buildings and new hospital equipment but rarely spends that full amount. In fact, in Nova Scotia, they have the lowest spending rate of health care dollars per capita on capital

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equipment. When the health authorities cannot afford routine maintenance or new equipment, it affects patient care. I'd like to ask the Minister of Health, why doesn't the minister provide stable funding for equipment upgrades and repairs here in the Province of Nova Scotia?

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, as I've explained to the member opposite a number of times, whether through estimates or other instances, this department gets a grant of somewhere between $30 million and $50 million - this year I believe the capital grant is somewhere in around $52 million, which covers the new construction that is happening in this province, the equipment requirements of this province. It is something that has been steady and standard throughout the last number of budgets that we've provided to the district health authorities.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, the minister knows that he has been underfunding the district health authorities for years - 2 per cent of a building's replacement value should be put aside for maintenance and upgrades, but this isn't happening in the province. In Capital Health, for example, the annual maintenance budget is just $2.1 million for materials and services to be shared amongst 39 buildings. Nine long years of Progressive Conservative neglect has left Nova Scotia in a precarious position, so I would like to ask the minister, can the minister explain why this government does not see the value in properly funding maintenance in health care in the province?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I can't imagine what discussion happens at their caucus table - you have the Leader of the Opposition, the Leader of the NDP, chastising us for spending more money on the IWK redevelopment project and then you have the Health Critic saying that we should be spending more. So should we spend less or should we spend more? Figure it out at your caucus table. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, the minister should just spend the money that they approved in the budget - $7 million underspent in Pharmacare last year; $8 million underspent for medical equipment; $13 million underspent for hospital infrastructure. What they need to do is spend the money that they said they're going to spend. They give it with one hand and take it away with the other. Judging by this government's previous record, it will be another six months before the district health authorities know what they can spend this year. So I would like to ask the Minister of Health, how are the district health authorities supposed to repair their buildings when they don't even know how much money they're going to have and it will be almost a year before they know that?

[2:00 p.m.]

[Page 3246]

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, the district health authorities, as he knows, submit a business plan - they know exactly what kind of dollars they're going to be spending in this coming year. I've committed to this House before to make sure that those budgets are going to be approved in the quickest amount of time. I want the member opposite to explain why he's not supporting $262 million in the human care strategy, why he's not supporting a total investment of $142 million in home care. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

TCH: ADVERTISING BUDGET - ALLOCATION DETAILS

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: My question is for the Tourism, Culture and Heritage Minister. Yesterday the minister was questioned on the lack of visible Nova Scotia advertising in this province. The minister's response - I don't understand. Mr. Speaker, it gets better. (Laughter)

AN HON. MEMBER: You mean it gets worse.

MR. THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, the department's lack of advertising is not restricted to Nova Scotia. In 2007, more than 149,000 visitors arrived in this province from western Canada. These visitors represent 7 per cent of the total visitation to our province and yet the department only allocates $100,000 in western Canada advertising. Just imagine how many more people would come to Nova Scotia if proper dollars were placed in advertising there. Mr. Speaker, my question is, can the minister tell Nova Scotia how his department determines his advertising allocation budget?

HON. WILLIAM DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, as I said before, we spent $20 million in marketing and advertising and promoting Nova Scotia across Canada, and within the United States and some parts of Europe. We are very successful in promoting Nova Scotia and encouraging over two million visitors each year to come to Nova Scotia - and I suggest we're doing something right.

MR. THERIAULT: The Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage only spends roughly $6.5 million on advertising for a business that generates $1.3 billion. In 2007, we saw a 20 per cent increase in visitors from western Canada to our province. This represents the single largest increase in visitation by any region last year. Despite that increase, the department has spent a meagre $100,000 to promote Nova Scotia in western Canada. To sell a product, you must be aggressive in marketing, especially in a region of great economic growth such as western Canada. My question is, why is the minister allocating so few advertising dollars to a region that represented a 20 per cent increase in visitors to our province?

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MR. DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, as I said earlier on, we spend $20 million in marketing and advertising. It's not just about the government spending money on advertising Nova Scotia, we do partnerships with private sector industry. Together, it's a tremendous amount of marketing and advertising and I'm sure that people always enjoy coming to Nova Scotia.

MR. THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, not only is the minister failing to promote Nova Scotia to Nova Scotians, he's also failing to advertise Nova Scotia to the rest of Canada. While the department spends less in advertising in western Canada, they spend more in other regions to bring fewer visitors to Nova Scotia. This government spends $370,000 to promote Nova Scotia in Quebec, yet attracts 50,000 fewer visitors to the province. The government's advertising allocation simply doesn't make sense. At this rate, the tourism revenues will continue to be stagnant and not reach its goal of doubling by 2012. To double tourism, common sense tells me you should be doubling your marketing efforts in growth areas such as western Canada.

MR. SPEAKER: Do you have a question?

MR. THERIAULT: Yes, I do, Mr. Speaker. Why is the minister allocating more advertising dollars to a market that brings fewer visitors to Nova Scotia and spending less on advertising in markets where visitors have increased?

MR. DOOKS: Mr. Speaker, $1.3 billion is generated in the Province of Nova Scotia due to tourism. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order. Order, please. Order, please.

MR. DOOKS: Thank you. Mr. Speaker, $1.3 billion in revenues in tourism, 33,000 jobs directly or indirectly related to tourism, two million visitors into our borders - I suggest that we have a plan that's working.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Queens.

TIR: S. SHORE REG. AIRPORT - FUNDING

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. Facing the task of dealing with this province's infrastructure deficit, tough decisions have to be made. During a debate in this House, the minister stated that being in government means being accountable to the people, absolutely, but it also means being responsible for the dollars that we have been given to spend. The minister said this before handing over a $250,000 cheque to the South Shore Regional Airport in Greenfield. That money wasn't requested and was described by the mayor as manna from heaven with no strings attached. My question to the minister is, does he consider this no-strings-attached program to be responsible and accountable?

[Page 3248]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member is absolutely right. We are accountable as members of government to the people of this province. You know, yes, we did offer funding for these airports across this province, and I can tell you that the response across this province has been very positive. Letters to myself, the department, editorials have all been very positive. These airports are a very important part of our infrastructure across this province. I stand by that investment and I can tell you it is well received and well needed in this province.

MS. CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, the greatest concern to this minister's department should be roads. We all know that roads can't be paved this year but when it comes to spending his department's budget, it should be about priorities, not photo ops for local papers. There are miles and miles of roads (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order.

The honourable member for Queens has the floor.

MS. CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, there are miles and miles of roads in Queens that could have used that money. My question to the minister is, why is he more interested in photo ops and gifts of taxpayers' money than dealing with the crumbling roads in Queens?

MR. SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I will table this document. I am going to read from what it says: Funding airport right on time. Perfect timing describes the recent $250,000 donated to the South Shore Regional Airport from the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. Just before the $250,000 was provided, there was a fuel leak there, the Municipality of Queens Mayor John Leefe said. He says we are grateful this money is available to us. Now, the honourable member in that Party may disagree with the elected officials of Queens, but we agree with them and we support them.

MS. CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, if rhetoric could fill potholes, I think that minister just repaired 10 kilometres on his own. I would ask the minister to check on research about the fuel leak. I will table a copy of the article in the local paper of the Minister of Community Services handing over a cheque to the mayor. Clearly, this government is out of touch with the real needs and infrastructure priorities for the residents of Queens. Again, I ask the minister, why was the money not used to carry out much-needed road repairs like those in West Caledonia, Westfield, Hirtles Road, Voglers Cove, Port Medway or Southwest Port Mouton?

MR. SCOTT: Mr. Speaker (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

[Page 3249]

MR. SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I respect the opinion and the information we have received from the elected officials of Queens County. The honourable member should as well. The honourable Leader of the tax-and-spend Party should be. He's from Queens County, he should know that (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.

MR. SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I stood in Question Period about a week ago and I said that I have been here for 10 years with the Leader of the tax-and-spend Party and never heard him once ever tell anybody in this province no. You know, he has never told a community no, he has never told an individual no, he has never told an organization no. But do you know what? (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. SCOTT: But do you know what, Mr. Speaker? I will admit in this House, I was wrong, because he's telling everybody in Nova Scotia today, the students, the nurses, the firefighters, and on and on (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

ENVIRON.: GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS - TARGET

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Environment. The Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act enshrined many targets for Nova Scotia to meet, one of them being to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 10 per cent below 1990 levels by the year 2020. What the government would like people to forget is that there was a prior target, an interim target, to cut greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2010. This commitment was made in 2001 and it was not mentioned anywhere in today's document. The last available data from 2005 shows that greenhouse gas emissions were going up significantly, not down, and the climate change strategy won't be released until the Fall of 2008 at the earliest. In short, there is simply no possible way that this government can meet its own target for 2010. My question to the minister is, when will the government acknowledge that it cannot possibly meet its own target for greenhouse gas emissions by 2010?

HON. MARK PARENT: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. During estimates, the honourable member said our targets were too high and then he said they were too low. He can't seem to make up his mind on whether they're too high or too low (Interruption) They want to tax, they want to spend. Mr. Speaker, our targets are challenging, we'll admit that. The greenhouse gas target for 2020 is a challenging one but we intend to meet it.

[Page 3250]

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, I'll know that I'm in trouble when the minister quotes me accurately and shows how I'm wrong. He knows I said no such thing, but that doesn't stop him anyway.

Since the government cannot possibly meet its 2010 target, what it has now started talking about is targets for 2020, which is convenient because 2020 is so far away that, in effect, it provides no accountability at all. No Nova Scotia Premier for a century has served for 13 consecutive years. The last Premier to hit 13 years in a row was in 1909. I cannot find anyone who will wager a single nickel that this government and this Premier will survive so long. My question to the minister is, if this government can't possibly meet its own target for 2010, why should we believe it will meet its target for 2020?

[2:15 p.m.]

MR. PARENT: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. The honourable member has done his history on the longevity of former Premiers, but he hasn't been able to peer into the future and I predict this Premier will eclipse the record from the past. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order please, order please.

MR. PARENT: I am confused by the Opposition on the environment. They seem to say one thing on one hand, they laud B.C., they laud British Columbia as being environmental leaders, the honourable member said that. Do you know what the target for British Columbia is? It's the same target, the same year, only we put it in legislation a year before they did.

MR. STEELE: Of course, Mr. Speaker, the difference is that both provinces put it into law, but British Columbia is actually doing something about it. (Applause) They are taking a long list of concrete actions to get there. Every environmental group in the country acknowledges that they are the leader and Nova Scotia is trailing. Whether one agrees with every detail of B.C.'s program or not, they are the acknowledged leaders on climate change. Quebec and Manitoba are also taking concrete action. This government is on the sidelines of the national and international discussion about how to deal with the urgent crisis of climate change. My question to the minister is, when is he going to get off the sidelines and get into the game?

MR. PARENT: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member over there has challenged on who outside Nova Scotia thinks that we're environmental leaders. I will tell him one name right now, it was the Speaker from British Columbia at the last AGM of the Nova Scotia Automobile Dealers who got up, after I spoke, doing a sustainability talk, and he said everyone things the leaders in the green environment movement are B.C. - and he was from B.C. I'm here to tell you that the leaders are Nova Scotians. (Applause)

[Page 3251]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Clare. The honourable member for Clare has the floor.

TIR - HWY. NO. 101 (BERWICK-KINGSTON):

PASSING LANES - CONSTRUCT

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister or Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. In November, 2007, the department announced that it was planning to construct passing lanes between Berwick and Kingston on Highway No. 101. Highway No. 101 is one of the most dangerous stretches of road in this province and government must address this issue as soon as possible. So my first question to the minister is, when will the department begin its construction of passing lanes between Berwick and Kingston?

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member opposite for the question. As I indicated to the member yesterday in estimates, this government has continued to spend millions and millions of dollars on Highway No. 101 in the last number of years. We will be paving another section of that this year, or actually we will be plaining another portion of it. We are continuing to acquire land along Highway No. 101 for future planning and future development. As I indicated, as well, we are in the design stages now of those passing lanes that the honourable member asked about.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, there has been a high number of fatal car crashes in Nova Scotia in recent years and in particular throughout the Annapolis Valley. Government must ensure that passing lanes are constructed in this region to try to curb the number of collisions we have recently seen. There is a significant need for this type of highway infrastructure right throughout Highway No. 101, especially from Bridgetown right into Coldbrook. Government needs to pay close attention to this matter. So my question again to the minister is, how much funding is allocated for this project and how many passing lanes can we expect on this stretch of highway?

MR. SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I think I answered that information to the honourable member yesterday during estimates. We continue to plan for the future on Highway No. 101 right through. As well, we have plans underway for Highway No. 103 and many other projects, Highway No. 104, throughout the province and Highway No. 125 in Cape Breton. So there is a lot of work underway in Nova Scotia in regard to our highways, particularly our 100-Series Highways. I can tell the honourable member at this moment, there is ongoing information being gathered for those passing lanes that he talks about and I believe, as I indicated yesterday as well, that we will be consulting with local groups in regard to further development of Highway No. 101.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, in February 2008, an article that appeared in The ChronicleHerald indicated that in 2007, there were 26 fatal collisions between just Kings,

[Page 3252]

Hants and Annapolis Counties - 26. That is an extremely high number for the level of traffic that flows through this area. While human error and weather surely accounted for some of these accidents, the construction of passing lanes may have helped to avoid some of these car collisions. The people in these areas are concerned and their concerns need to be addressed. So my final question to the minister is, has government engaged in any form of public consultation with the people in the Valley region?

MR. SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I believe that since the beginning of the work on Highway No. 101 several years ago, there has been a lot of consultation with local groups. I know some of the organizations in the area have certainly had input. I couldn't agree more with the honourable member that we do everything we can to protect the lives of those who travel the highways, whether they are from Nova Scotia or from other parts of this country or North America. I am pleased to report that to date this year, fatalities in Nova Scotia are down from the best year we have had in a number of years. I know that that is as a result of a lot of things in this province. It is a result of some legislation I believe we are doing, it's a result of strong enforcement with regard to highways. I absolutely agree with the member that we need to do more in regard to making our highways safer and this government will do that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Shelburne.

ECON. DEV. - COMMUN. DEV. TRUST FUND: BOATBUILDERS - ASSISTANCE

MR. STERLING BELLIVEAU: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Economic Development. In March of this year, this government announced an investment of $34 million from a national Community Development Trust to support communities facing economic hardship. The Nova Scotia Boat Builders Association sent a letter to the Premier on April 14th requesting that the boat-building sector be included in the recently announced Community Development Trust Program. Can the minister tell this House if the boat builders of Nova Scotia can expect assistance from this program?

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, indeed we have received requests from a number of organizations around the province. These are being evaluated by various departments and, of course, we will consider each one of them under the guidelines of the trust as it has been established.

MR. BELLIVEAU: Mr. Speaker, the boat-building industry has been a significant contributor to the province's economy. These companies employ about 1,200 people full time, year-round, in mostly coastal communities. My question is, will the Minister of Economic Development include the boat-building sector when he finally comes out with a plan for this program?

[Page 3253]

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, as I indicated in a previous Question Period, we have established the criteria and the method by which we would evaluate applications under the program and certainly the boat builders will be considered under those criteria, and we recognize the very strong contribution which they make to the economy of the province.

MR. BELLIVEAU: Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia boat builders are trying to adjust to the drastic market changes and are facing a double whammy as a result of a faltering U.S. economy and an uncertain domestic fishery. It has been months since this program has been announced and re-announced. Can the minister tell the boat builders that they will be included in this plan?

MR. MACISAAC: Well, Mr. Speaker, I'm sure that not only the boat builders but all the fishermen of this province from each fishing community, whether it be Pictou West or Pictou East, whether it be Queens or whether it be in Shelburne, will be very, very interested to learn that the members of the NDP are going to vote against a budget that has within it a program of loans to allow fishermen to be able to buy licences that would add to the demand for boat building in this province.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

HEALTH: LIFE FLIGHT - STAFFING

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. This morning CBC reported that there were safety concerns on Life Flight because of the dramatic change in staff. Of the 13 critical care nurses, many of them with over seven years experience, only four are going to work with the new employer, Emergency Medical Care. We know Life Flight was assessed two years ago by Fitch & Associates and was described as an exemplary service. So I would like to ask the Minister of Health, will the loss of experienced nurses affect the delivery of service and the impressive record of Life Flight?

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, to the member opposite, I know that quality and safety of service is our greatest priority when it comes to the operation of Life Flight. It's EMC that manages that EHS Crown ambulance system and will be providing consistent management practice in a more seamless approach into our Life Flight Program. This is more cost and resource efficient. I have full confidence in the new flight crew and, of course, the paramedics and nurses who do fly for Life Flight Program.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, the Fitch report also described years of poor management and employee relations. The success of the air ambulance program was quite remarkable despite the strain in the office. After the Fitch report was released, several nurses and paramedics complained about the management of Life Flight. None of the nurses are still with the air ambulance service today but most of the

[Page 3254]

managers are. So I would like to ask the minister, was the change in management companies used as a convenient way to get rid of staff who didn't get along with management and questioned the safety standards of Life Flight?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I understand from the folks at EMC that there is only one new paramedic to Life Flight. The other ones, of course, are from the older program. I'm confident that all paramedics and nurses hired have the clinical skills necessary to provide an exemplary client care to Life Flight patients. So, again, I'm very confident of the capabilities of that program to provide an excellent service to Nova Scotians.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, nine Life Flight nurses, one with over 13 years experience, aren't working on Life Flight today and that should raise alarm bells and some questions should be answered around that.

CBC also reported that medical residents are being assigned to Life Flight as part of their rotation. I'd like to ask the minister, are those medical residents being used to replace those nine flight nurses who no longer work for Life Flight?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, to the member opposite, the Life Flight nurses do work on a rotational basis with the helicopter service. Those nurses who were working with Life Flight, as I understand, are still working on their full-time programs at the district health authority or with the Capital district. Again, we're very confident with the service that is being provided to Nova Scotia when it comes to Life Flight.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

HEALTH: SELF-MANAGED CARE PROG. - PAYMENT PLANS

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. In December 2005, the Department of Health implemented a self-managed care program, a program we support wholeheartedly. There are challenges with the program though that require addressing. I have a constituent of mine, Nelson Martell, whose son, Shawn, is in receipt of self-managed care. When the program started, a payment plan was established that would see 13 cheques per year. When the case coordinator went on training, the payment plan was changed to 12 cheques per year. This left the family having to pay out of their pockets for the care provider while making their remittances to Revenue Canada. Needless to say, they owe Revenue Canada $3,000 - the amount of the absent cheque. My question to the minister is, how can the minister justify a payment plan change that sees a family having to make the choice of paying a care worker or being in arrears with Revenue Canada?

[2:30 p.m.]

[Page 3255]

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I am very happy that the member opposite did bring this issue to the floor of the Legislature. As the member opposite knows, I cannot speak to specifics of this case. I can say that the self-managed care program is one that has been working. It is one we would like to see lots more money invested in it because we do feel patients can make good care decisions when it comes to their care.

Again, we will continue to expand that program and if the member opposite would want to bring more information to me, I would have staff look at it.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, the beauty of the self-managed care program is its flexibility. It enables caseworkers to adapt to the special needs of clients. My constituent's son requires 24/7 care and costs that go beyond the $3,500 limit provided in the program. A fact sheet from the Department of Health states that the care coordinator can recommend modifications to the amount of funding in accordance with policies, procedures and guidelines. My next question for the minister is, does this authority give care coordinators the ability to authorize funding recommendations that are in excess of that $3,500 cap?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, when it comes to the self-managed care program, there is a cap. I don't believe the care coordinators can make a decision to go above that. I know through partnerships with other departments, Community Services and others, we have been making a difference for individuals like Mr. Martell.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, the suggested solution provided in this case was to place Shawn in a nursing home. It's neither an age-appropriate solution nor one in which the care requirements can be met, given that it takes him an hour to eat lunch. Show me a nursing home where staff have that much time to spare. Right now, the family is getting care, just not enough resources to provide 24/7 care. My final question to the minister is, why wouldn't the minister not look at increasing a monthly cheque for a program that provides a more dignified level of care, rather than suggesting a solution that is much more costly?

MR. D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, again as I mentioned in my first answer, if the member opposite wants to bring some more information to me, I'd be happy to have departmental staff look at that. It is a constant challenge that sometimes the needs of individuals is more than the department is able to help with. Again, we will look at this seriously to see if there's a solution for Mr. Martell.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

JUSTICE: TASER USE - MORATORIUM

[Page 3256]

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Justice. While the minister's review of taser use continues behind closed doors, other jurisdictions are conducting public inquires into the use of tasers. Testimony before one inquiry should get the attention of this minister, because according to a report by Canadian Press, which I will table, an inquiry in Vancouver heard this week from the head of the company that makes tasers, and he said in this CP report, "Tasers are not risk-free, are designed to incapacitate and that term 'non-lethal' does not mean safe." My question to the minister is, in view of this less than resounding endorsement of its safety from the manufacturer of tasers, will the minister reconsider his refusal to put a moratorium on taser use in this province?

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member is correct. The process is ongoing with regard to the taser review for this province and, as he would suggest, behind closed doors are an expert panel who are taking into thoughtful consideration all the materials supplied, including the materials that the honourable member supplied the last time he spoke of this matter in the House. If he has information, I will take that into consideration, but there'll be no moratorium put in place.

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, the chairman of Taser International has acknowledged that taser use is not risk-free. Back on November 20th in this House, the minister assured the House that tasers are being used appropriately in this province and in accordance with governance standards. I'll table a copy of the governance standards in this province at this time. A key requirement of these standards was that tasers are to be discharged only ". . . where risk from aggression, violence or other reasonable conditions exist. . ." My question to the minister is, is he satisfied that those standards are being adhered to across this province from one jurisdiction to another?

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, the matter of which the honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect speaks in the House is one we take very seriously, and incidents not only within Nova Scotia but elsewhere are under review for a very important reason, that we have to make sure that our law enforcement and other officials are properly resourced to do their job. This is a taser device, is as an alternate to brute force. We are going to make sure that anything we do is reasoned and reasonable as we go forward. So again, any of the matters brought forward by my honourable colleague will be taken seriously into consideration.

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, the first phase of the minister's review, which was released in March, revealed that there is a wide variation in taser use from one area of the province to another. For example, the chances of being on the receiving end of a taser is more than three times higher in Bridgewater than it is in Truro. There is also a rapid overall increase in taser use, up 80 per cent in the last three years. My question to the minister is, if he won't bring in a moratorium on taser use, will he at least assure this House and assure Nova Scotians that existing provincial standards are strictly and uniformly applied from one jurisdiction to the other throughout this province?

[Page 3257]

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, with regard to the standards and protocols that are in place governing the use of a taser device, we have different protocols in place with regard to the type and use and the environment, whether that be at corrections or sheriff's services or policing. We also, within policing, have the policing provided by the RCMP versus provincially. So all of that is part of that review. I do understand the member's comments and the concerns and they'll be reflected, I think, as you'll see in the report that comes forward.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Clare.

TIR - HRM TRANSIT SYSTEM: ASSISTANCE - PLANS

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Wait for the applause, Wayne, wait for the applause. (Laughter)

MR. GAUDET: I have my assistant manager here in the back. (Laughter) Thank you.

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister or Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. A report from GPI Atlantic in March revealed that although over 71 per cent of HRM residents live in a metro transit service area, only 12 per cent actually use the bus. As the largest city in the Atlantic Provinces, HRM could set an example of creating a more efficient, user-friendly transit system in helping us to reduce our carbon footprint. So my question to the minister is, does government have a plan to help HRM to create a more effective transit system?

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, there are lots of things we could talk about in regard to this initiative around HRM and transportation. Obviously, we are working with HRM, my department is, with regard to infrastructure - the Highway No. 102 corridor, the Burnside Expressway. There are many things we can talk about in HRM but I will remind the honourable member that the federal government has made millions of dollars available through HRM. There is $13 million available that they are looking at now as to how they may spend that. We have indicated in our budget, which the NDP are against, that we will offer $3 million this year to help with transit. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. SCOTT: HRM there are a lot of opportunities but I do agree with the honourable member that it is a real issue and we need to work together to have it resolved.

[Page 3258]

MR. GAUDET: Should I ask that same question again?

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Ask it again. Try it again.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my next question is for the Minister of Environment. The GPI study concluded that privately-owned vehicles traveled more than three billion kilometres per year in HRM. That's approximately 8,000 for every resident of HRM in the city, even the people who don't own a car. That's a lot of wear and tear on city roads and a whole lot of greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles. In fact, that much driving creates about 2.2 tons of greenhouse gas emissions per person. So my question to the Minister of Environment is, what is your government's plan to help curb the use of private vehicles and encourage more environmentally friendly means of transportation?

HON. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for the question. It's a very good question. I do want to remind him of the rail cut project that is part of the Atlantic Gateway that the Premier announced which will help take trucks off of the downtown and will be helpful in alleviating congestion and reducing greenhouse gases. But the honourable member has put his finger upon a very, very important issue and that is that we are the most rural province in Canada. About 60 per cent of our population is rural. They will be depending, in large part, upon cars. So we need to work at helping them to get more efficient cars, smaller cars. There are programs like the Drive Wiser Program, programs that the Ecology Action Centre has but it is a challenge that our province has to rise to, in greater proportion than other provinces which can rely on urban transit systems.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, residents of Halifax directly spend 12.4 per cent of their household budgets to own, operate and park their vehicles. That's $3,327 a year per person. That means $7 million a year is spent by residents and businesses on driving in HRM. With rising fuel costs, energy prices and the increase of food prices worldwide, Nova Scotians need a break whenever they can get it. The fact is this - HRM needs a better and more user-friendly transit system and government should provide support for this system. So again to the minister, what incentive is your government prepared to offer to reduce the use of private vehicles in HRM?

MR. PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I suspect it is in large part because this is in the budget that the honourable member has spoken, or his Party has spoken, positively of the budget and that is the $3 million gas transit tax credit in the Financial Measures (2008) Bill, I believe it is. So that is one thing that we are doing. The other thing that we are doing is supporting HRM in the fast ferry project in terms of their work there in getting federal money for the fast ferry project. So those are some of the things, honourable member, that we are doing to work with HRM and encourage and help them.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

[Page 3259]

COM. SERV. - SHELTER ALLOWANCES: INCREASES -

DETAILS

MR. TREVOR ZINCK: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services. Shelter allowances for Employment Support and Income Assistance clients are falling very short of what is needed in order to rent safe and appropriate housing in most parts of the province. When I asked the minister why her department has not been increasing shelter allowances, she indicated that it is because landlords simply increase their rents whenever the allowance goes up, so the minister's answer is to keep shelter allowances frozen. So I ask the minister, why hasn't her staff explored ways to address this problem, rather than freezing shelter allowances?

HON. JUDY STREATCH: Mr. Speaker, I welcome the opportunity to rise and speak again of the success that this government has had working with all Nova Scotians, particularly when it comes to the issue of ensuring that the income assistance clients receive the full assistance of this government - of course 15.6 per cent would be the increase that would be in place should the NDP decide to vote for the budget, which apparently they are not going to do.

Mr. Speaker, as well, the issue regarding low-income support for wheelchairs, my goodness, the . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time allotted for the Oral Question Period has expired.

The honourable member for Shelburne on an introduction.

MR. STERLING BELLIVEAU: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. If I can draw your attention, on an introduction, to the west gallery, where we have students from Barrington Municipal High who listened to our Question Period today; also we have members from the student council and teachers Vanessa Benoit and Leah Saulnier-Muise. I ask the students and student council to stand and let the House put out a good round of applause. (Applause)

[2:45 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations on an introduction.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I, too, would like to make an introduction and draw the attention of members of the House to the east gallery where my son, James Muir, is visiting for the first time. Would you stand, James. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay on an introduction.

[Page 3260]

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Thank you (Interruption) It's hard to tell sometimes, Mr. Speaker, whether the NDP likes or dislikes me, I'm not sure. (Laughter)

MR. SPEAKER: We'll talk

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure - not very often do groups from Glace Bay get to make the long travel here to Halifax to see the proceedings of the House of Assembly, so I'm especially glad to introduce today the Grade 9 graduating class of Bridgeport School who are here today. They are accompanied by teachers Tanya Jamieson and Wanda Simm and also by my wife, Nancy Wilson. Included in the small group of graduates is my daughter Jeana. They're here also to partake in some Democracy 250 activities and they've also scored some tickets to the Canada game. I'd like them to stand up and receive the warm welcome, please, of the House of Assembly. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome all visitors to the gallery, as well as the ones that have been recognized now today.

OPPOSITION MEMBERS' BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Opposition House Leader.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private Members' Public Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Opposition House Leader.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 58.

Bill No. 58 - Uranium Mining Moratorium Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: I would like to join the member for Glace Bay in welcoming our guests from Cape Breton Island. It is true, Mr. Speaker, it is relatively rare for us to have visitors from Cape Breton Island. I, myself, represent a Halifax constituency so it is relatively easy for students in my schools to come here to the House, so they are very welcome indeed.

Mr. Speaker, lest there be any doubt, I want to say that we love the member for Glace Bay. (Laughter)

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MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. Not to break with caucus solidarity, but I do not include myself among those members. (Laughter)

MR. SPEAKER: I don't believe that that is a point of order.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview has the floor.

MR. STEELE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I do not know what could have given the member for Glace Bay the idea that perhaps the opposite might be true.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today on a very important bill, Bill No. 58 - the Uranium Mining Moratorium Bill. It is of fundamental importance that the 25-year-old ban on uranium mining finally be put into law, into the law of the province approved by this Legislature. For that long, it has only been essentially a policy of the government. It could be changed tomorrow by the stroke of the Cabinet's pen (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Halifax Fairview has the floor.

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, uranium mining is far too important to be left in such an uncertain state. The moratorium came into effect in Nova Scotia in 1981. Many people believe that it came in as a result of the McCleave Uranium Inquiry when, in fact, that's not the case. The moratorium was put in place and then the inquiry was called. After a number of years, Judge McCleave rendered his report where he didn't really say anything strongly in favour of or against the moratorium. What he said was, was that when the moratorium came up for review in 1990, there were various things the government should take into account and he listed the pros and the cons of uranium mining.

As we all know, later governments continued the uranium moratorium as a policy of the government, including the Progressive Conservative Government of John Buchanan and the Liberal Government of John Savage. So in that way, Mr. Speaker, the uranium moratorium has continued to this day, but it is still merely a policy of the Government of Nova Scotia. It is very important, in our estimation, that this be put into law so that if there is a change at some point in the future, on this status quo that has existed now for so long, if there is a change, there should be a debate in this House. If there is to be a change, it should be approved by this House.

The world has a uranium economy of which we do not wish to take part. Uranium is used for only a few things. It is used to build nuclear weapons. It is used to build depleted uranium armaments. It is used to generate nuclear power and a very, very small proportion of it is used for the purposes of nuclear medicine which, of course, we all support, but one fact that members might be interested in is that all the uranium that is used for the purposes of the world's nuclear medicine comes from the United States despite the fact that Canada

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is the world's largest producer and despite the fact that Australia is the second largest producer. The uranium use for nuclear medicine comes from the United States. It is further refined at the Chalk River plants in Ontario, but the raw material comes from the United States.

Mr. Speaker, if I thought for one second that our uranium was needed for nuclear medicine, I would be the first one out with a pick and a shovel to go and get it, but let no one lead Nova Scotians to believe that Nova Scotia's uranium is necessary in order to have nuclear medicine - it is not. If the uranium comes out of the ground in Nova Scotia, it will be used either to build nuclear weapons or to furnish depleted uranium armaments on the world's battlefields, or for uranium fuel rods in the nuclear power industry, and we believe that Nova Scotians do not want to be part of the world's uranium economy.

Now, Mr. Speaker, unfortunately, the Department of Natural Resources' position on this is not clear, not clear at all. If the government truly supported the uranium moratorium as it sometimes claims, then it would pass this bill without debate but they won't do it. Last month this House's Committee on Resources passed a resolution affirming the moratorium and the minister stood in the House and said, well, that's already the government's position when it very clearly isn't.

It reminds me, Mr. Speaker, of the Alice in Wonderland quote where one of the characters says that he can make words mean whatever he chooses them to mean. This resolution very clearly does not reflect this government's position and yet the Minister of Natural Resources stands in the House and says that it does. We know that there's a problem when that happens. What the resolution says is that the uranium moratorium must continue and that the only discussion should be about how to refine the uranium regulations in order to ensure that other mining activity is not unduly impeded. In the current situation when uranium at a certain concentration is found, all mining activity in that area must stop and the drilling machinery must be withdrawn.

We acknowledge that's an issue. We do not wish to get in the way of the mining for other metals and minerals. Nova Scotia has a long, proud history of mining and long may that continue and prosper. But we believe that can happen without mining our uranium. Our government likes to say we're the only jurisdiction in North America with such a ban, the implication being that therefore we must be wrong.

But the truth is that other jurisdictions are joining us. The Labrador Inuit who have some self government over their natural resources have said no to uranium mining. They have a uranium moratorium. Within the last few weeks, the Government of B.C. has announced a policy that amounts to a moratorium on the mining of uranium in that province as well.

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Our position on this and the reason we put this bill forward is that we believe that it is possible to have a healthy, prosperous mining industry in this province while leaving uranium in the ground and we look forward to the support of the other Parties for that proposition. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to have the opportunity to speak about Bill No. 58 because, quite frankly, I'm surprised the honourable member continues to pursue this. The government has been quite clear and I've been quite clear on national television, local television, on the radio, newspapers and by departmental correspondence, we have been clear of our support for the existing policies of the department which uphold the uranium moratorium.

However, the exploration and mining of uranium in Nova Scotia is prohibited by government policy and by regulations under the Mineral Resources Act. If any company finds uranium in concentrations of greater than 100 parts per million while exploring for other minerals, because they are not allowed to explore for uranium, it must report those results and stop exploration. That system is working.

Earlier this year, a company exploring for minerals in Nova Scotia notified the department it had preliminary findings of uranium exceeding the 100 parts per million threshold. That company did what it was supposed to do - it notified the department, closed down its explorations and began working with a committee, struck by my staff, to properly determine if this find is a representative sample of the mineralized zone or if it is just an anomaly.

If it is representative, my department will close down appropriate areas for any further exploration. Just like we have done in other areas where uranium is in high concentrations. The regulations and existing moratorium worked.

But, Bill No. 58 tries to fix a system that isn't broken. Furthermore, I'm not sure how much thought the honourable member put into the drafting of this bill, but I see in the second clause it reads, "no person shall mine or extract uranium in the Province." While I understand his intention, I'm not sure he understands how uranium occurs.

Uranium is a trace element. What that means is, it's everywhere. The question is the concentration. We have quantified a threshold upon which we implement the moratorium. If we were to take this literally - I assume the honourable member gave this consideration and I'm sure his researchers helped him reach this conclusion, but I am not going to blame it on his researchers because ultimately he is responsible for what he has put forward in his bill.

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It says, "no person shall mine or extract uranium in the Province." Now what does that mean? That means if you mine anything in this province, you have mined a trace element of uranium that would, again, as the NDP put forward a year ago, shut down the mining industry, but unlike the bill that was put forward by the member for Cape Breton Centre, this one does not exclude pits and quarries because, Mr. Speaker, again, uranium is a trace element. That means that if this Legislature were to pass this bill, we would have not only effectively shut down the mining industry as we know it, but also the ancillary pits and quarries of the province.

I would leave it to the public's imagination as to just what sort of economic devastation that would entail for this province. I think it's an indication of the amount of research and thought that went into the drafting of this bill and, again, I have to say, I'm a little surprised that the member for Halifax Fairview would put forward such a clause and indeed draw attention to it by making it a subject for debate on Opposition Day. However, that was his decision, based on his research and that of the NDP staff.

Now I don't want to be entirely critical of the member, because I understand he did put forward the resolution at the Resources Committee, that the Standing Committee on Resources expressed its support for continuing the moratorium on the mining of uranium in Nova Scotia. The government appreciates that vote of confidence in what has clearly been our stated position. It goes on to recognize there are some complications from having the uranium moratorium and it does some damage to the provincial economy. I do appreciate that the member has put this forward into a resolution and asked to investigate whether there are any remedies to the unintended consequences of the moratorium.

[3:00 p.m.]

Unfortunately, I am not convinced that there is an easy answer, again because of the trace elements as I explained just moments ago. Effectively, if you mine anything, you have mined a trace amount of uranium. So I'm not confident that that is going to address the very serious financial implications from the moratorium, but I do acknowledge that the member recognizes that there are problems with the moratorium.

I have been very clear, Mr. Speaker, that there are three issues that have to be dealt with before this government could consider changing the moratorium. One, uranium mining has to be deemed safe, scientifically. Judge McCleave has addressed this and I will go into that in greater detail in a moment. It would have to be good for the economy. I could go into that in great detail, but it also has to be generally accepted by the people as being the best decision for the province. While it is clear that it is scientifically safe to mine uranium and, indeed, 16 per cent of power generation in the world is from uranium, a green source of energy, and it is clearly good for the economy, this government is not accepting of the fact that the people of Nova Scotia are looking for this change, at this time.

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The Department of Natural Resources is doing a review of our natural resources strategies, including it's mineral strategy. In fact, this past Monday, we embarked on our public hearings in partnership with Voluntary Planning and we look forward to hearing from Nova Scotians and we have been hearing from them, both for and against the whole question of the uranium moratorium. We want an informed debate on this. This is Nova Scotians' chance to have meaningful discussions and by bringing this up here today, it allows us to further inform those discussions. So we welcome that opportunity. I do take note that when you pass a piece of legislation, especially one that would be as damaging as this, which would shut down the entire mining industry in the province because it says, "no person shall mine or extract uranium in the Province." and that cannot be done because uranium is a trace element in all rocks.

Mr. Speaker, the passage of this bill would not only shut down the mining industry, including all pits and quarries, but it's interesting to me that it would also rob Nova Scotians of the chance to have their say, through the review of the Natural Resources strategy, and we want them to have that chance. It is a little perplexing that a Party that uses the word democratic in its name, the New Democratic Party, would bring forward such an undemocratic motion that, at this time, would rob Nova Scotians of the chance of having their say.

We are very interested in hearing from Nova Scotians. We want them to know that the McCleave Inquiry, led by Justice Robert McCleave, came forward. Initially he envisioned three stages to his commission - a public consultation and issue identification; formal confrontation between the proponents and opposing views; final arguments, conclusions and recommendations. At the end of it, he concluded that there is probably little reason not to allow exploration from an environmental and public safety point of view. That is the Supreme Court Justice's conclusion. He heard the evidence and that is his conclusion. We know that there is huge economic potential if we were to lift the moratorium. However, we will not do that until we know Nova Scotians would want us to take that path.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I first want to state that our Party is in favour of the present moratorium that's on uranium mining in the province. It's a little bit perplexing, my honourable colleague from the government side indicated that the New Democratic Party on one hand wants to ban all uranium mining and uranium extraction in the province, an outright ban and, as the minister has just indicated, that would probably shut down all operations of mining, pits and everything else that there is in the province.

That would be a very interesting scenario when you couldn't get gravel to fix your driveway or all the people who do have income from these types of operation, which are deemed to be safe at this point in time and probably will be for some time to come. Then the same member, at the Standing Committee on Human Resources, said there should be a full,

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public-based, open process to see if there's some way that we can mine other minerals - basically I believe that was the drift of the conversation, at that time, at that meeting, from my colleagues that received unanimous support by all members present, that this process go through and from what I understand from the minister and from the government that, indeed, they're going to have a process like this anyway.

So it's reasonable to assume that the government side would support it and we definitely support open consultation on anything possible that can be done, and then the bill says to ban everything without any public consultation. So, it just doesn't make sense. On one hand you're saying ban it, on the other hand you're saying, well, maybe we shouldn't ban it all, we should just investigate what's going on here first and see what people have to say. There was a bit of fear-mongering here from the Official Opposition indicating, well, everything is going to be used for nuclear weapons and indeed that isn't the case.

A lot of clean energy is produced by Atomic Energy of Canada for their CANDU reactors. Well, it's the safest reactor in the world and, indeed, does eliminate greenhouse gases. Now, I'm not proposing a nuclear power station for Nova Scotia because it's certainly too expensive and there are all kinds of other issues that go with that but, indeed, uranium mining isn't strictly for building bombs and once people start talking about uranium mining, that's the only thing they think about.

There are hazards, however, with radon gas that is associated with that. I'm sure that probably not everyone in this room even, never mind in the province, has even checked their home for radon gas. If you haven't done that and you're discussing this whole issue of uranium and you're against it or for it, whatever the case may be with the individual case, you're really missing the boat here. Because if you don't know what is in your own home - that will definitely cause cancer, it's proven to cause cancer, radon gas - you really should have that test done. Anyone who is listening today should definitely have that test done.

I wasn't aware of this serious danger. I had heard of radon gas many times but until I was briefed by the people, the experts in the field who indicated the severe dangers that are associated with this - I had my own home done and fortunately it was safe. I also had my office done, to make sure my office was safe for the staff who work for me.

I'd like to know sometime from the government if you've tested very government building, including this building, for radon gas. Encourage your staff to do this, it's a very simple test, it costs only around $35 to do and it's just a matter of setting a container, opening the top, let it sit there for a few days, close the top and send it back in with a little questionnaire. It's very, very simple, very inexpensive and it could mean the difference between getting cancer and not getting cancer, that simple.

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I encourage people to do that. Hopefully everyone in this room, which I know isn't the case, has done that in their homes and their offices and any place else they can support this being done, or influence it being done.

It's all part of the uranium mining situation. Indeed, there needs to be an opportunity to again review the 100 parts per million threshold that is there now, to see if there is some safe way that other minerals and mining activities can continue. What I can understand from the mining industry, if they hit anywhere that is 100 ppm or more, the whole thing is shut down. They may be on a huge tin deposit or gold or whatever the case may be, that could generate tremendous economic growth for Nova Scotia in a positive way. As long as it is done properly and within all the regulations and environment and everything considered. That can help our economy, which needs to be helped. There's no question about that, we've seen a lot of closures in businesses and everything here.

So with the right scientific work done, with the right exploration processes in place, that indeed guarantees the safety of the people who are doing the work and of the community long-term, I think that number needs to be reviewed. It has to be reviewed with full scientific facts first; secondly, with full consultation in the communities, as the government has committed to do already in that vein. Because if it isn't done like that, then no one will have comfort that they're safe. People have to feel safe in their own homes, they have to feel safe in their communities and indeed, you have to have that reassurance.

I can tell you, for a short time in my working career I did work with people at Chalk River and the associated parts with nuclear energy. I can tell you that the professionals I dealt with there are just as nervous about uranium as the person who has never seen it, never touched it and never known what it was about, as the general public is, and they're probably more concerned. They want to make sure that things are safe, that things are done properly and every safeguard that is possible is in place, whether you're doing medical work or you're doing a CANDU reactor. The CANDU reactors, their record stands on their own. They've never had an accident and it's because they put due diligence in place. We have probably some of the foremost authorities in this country on the use of nuclear energy and energy by-products.

It's important, we've seen a problem here recently with the medical part of it. That was an unfortunate situation but again, it was corrected and became more of a political issue probably than an operational issue. Which is unfortunate because these things have to continue and have to be done safely so people can be cured of very serious illnesses. I know everybody in this room has had some member of their family touched by cancer and radiation treatment probably has been used in most every case, or most all cases. So it is important that we have that ability here and if we don't have the resources to provide those raw materials to the medical industry, then, indeed, we won't have that treatment available.

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Now I'm not supposing that we mine uranium in Nova Scotia to get that, I'm not doing that and our caucus doesn't support that, but I think a full, public consultation process has to go through. We have to put all the facts out there because a lot of time we hear the fear-mongering that everything is going to be turned into bombs and we're all going to be blown up and if you mine uranium it might blow up on you. I mean there are all kinds of misconceptions out there that aren't true.

So I think it's important that we get the information out to the people. Let people in the province understand what is happening, what could happen, particularly if this law was passed. It would stop everything, basically, going in the province, and that's not acceptable. But we do have to be very cautious about what happens here and indeed I agree with the moratorium that is there. When I was in government, we supported this moratorium and moved it forward and continued with it to make sure that Nova Scotians felt comfortable and safe in their homes. With that, I will take my place and thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Pictou West.

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to be able to have a few minutes this afternoon to rise in my place here and speak on Bill No. 58, an Act to Enforce a Moratorium on Uranium Mining in Nova Scotia, that has been introduced by my colleague, the member for Halifax Fairview. I believe it is a good bill and it is certainly what Nova Scotians are looking for at this time.

As you know, Mr. Speaker, we have a moratorium in place in the province right now on uranium, but it is a policy only. It is really a temporary measure. Right now it's a policy, but it could be taken away very quickly. I guess with a stroke of a pen, it could be gone - here today, gone tomorrow. So the bill simply is asking that we enshrine in legislation a permanency to this moratorium and it seems like there is all-Party support to have a moratorium, but why not put it into a permanent position in legislation? The risk is there that it could be gone at any time.

[3:15 p.m.]

The Resources Committee, of which I am a member, recently - I guess it was last month - passed a motion also put forward by the member for Halifax Fairview, that was asking for a continuation of the moratorium, certainly, but also recognized that there are some difficulties in our mining industry in Nova Scotia when companies or prospectors come across uranium in their drillings, or with their pick, or shovel, or whatever, and come across more than 100 parts per million of this metal.

Certainly it's not the intention of the New Democratic Party to discourage mining in this province. In spite of what the interpretation has been that all mining would be halted in this province if this bill were to pass, nothing, really, Mr. Speaker, could be further from the

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truth. I don't know, perhaps it's in the semantics of the way it's drawn up from our Legislative Counsel, in reality, we are not against mining in this province. We certainly would like to see more of it go on, but just not uranium mining.

People all over this province have been contacting MLAs in this House and have shown their concerns about uranium mining. Of course, that is nothing new. It has been an ongoing issue for many years and actually it was in the early 1980s, as you would know, Mr. Speaker, that the moratorium came to be and I guess that's about 1981 or 1982, in that range. People, especially in Hants County and Lunenburg County - I think it was a concern over a possible uranium mine that was to be established in Millet Brook, which is near New Ross, somewhere near the boundary between Hants and Lunenburg County.

Of course, as we know, there is uranium, not just there but throughout the Annapolis Valley, South Mountain and North Mountain. I believe there is some in the Cobequids as well and maybe elsewhere in the province. At any rate, with a lot of public discussion, petitions, letters and concerns to the members of that time, the government of the day made the decision to put a moratorium on, and that has continued on a five-year basis since then. I think it was actually about 10 years since that has been renewed, but really, it's at the whim of government and the concern is that it could be taken away. That's why we want to make it a permanent law in this province and put it into legislation.

The concerns that were expressed back in the early 1980s are the same concerns that people have today, they're concerned about their health, their communities. The concerns come from the mineral from uranium that has qualities that can cause problems to people's health or general well-being. Concerns over radiation, even, I'm told, during exploration when a prospector is out there with his geological pick, there can be gamma rays or other material coming off that could radiate back to the individual, so there are some dangers there.

Radon gas can be stirred up when further exploration or mining occurs. As we know, that's a concern in people's homes or businesses. Radon and radon daughters are there and while it's easy to get rid of in a house basement, it's still a concern to people's general health.

Of course, the real concern is over uranium mining when you get into that, what do you do with the tailings that are produced? There are tailing ponds and evidence these tailings are long-lasting. In fact, uranium has the property of a half-life that can last for tens of thousands of years, even hundreds of thousands of years. The properties from this mineral can last not just our lifetime, but for generations, for thousands of years so it's a real concern.

How do you safely handle those tailings in a mill pond left over from a uranium mine? If it leaks or you get a huge rain or a flood and they're washed downstream into a tributary and then further downstream to a river and towards civilization, there could be some major problems.

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Out of that mining, if it's used for good or not so good, there's spent-fuel problems, or management on how to safely store those cells after they've been used - whether it's in a power plant or whether it's in nuclear medicine. Isotopes are good, certainly there is that benefit to mining uranium, but the other side of it that has been mentioned is concerns over nuclear armaments, nuclear-tipped weapons that are used in destruction and more. Certainly nuclear bombs have been mentioned.

There's some good and some bad. We all know there are some dangers expressed. So I think basically what Nova Scotians have been saying is there are too many risks, too many perceived risks for the benefits that might be received. Yes, there may be some short-term jobs, but really, is it worth the risk to the people's health or well-being in our communities?

Is there a safe distance where mining can occur? Again, that's a debatable issue, but here in Nova Scotia you can hardly travel anywhere without coming across communities and homes and properties - unlike northern Saskatchewan, which is isolated territory, where uranium is mined. Our settlement patterns here over the decades and the last two or three centuries have people living in almost every area of Nova Scotia. We're much, much closer to any activity that would be underway as compared to the very remote areas of northern Saskatchewan or the Northwest Territories.

Those are some of the reasons I feel we need a permanent ban on uranium mining. There is danger to people's health and well-being and there's no safe place in the province that wouldn't be very close to uranium mining. It's not just the NDP, of course, that's saying this. There are lots of people throughout Nova Scotia who are calling for a permanent ban. Earlier this year, Chester Municipal Council passed a resolution that they would like to see the provincial government have a permanent ban on uranium mining. I believe my colleague, the member for Halifax Fairview, attended a meeting in Chester. After that, the council of the day passed a resolution that would ban uranium mining on a permanent basis and they're asking the province to enshrine that in legislation.

There's a medical specialist, a retired emergency room doctor whom I'll quote from, Dr. David Maxwell. These are his comments on uranium mining - he said that "Uranium and waste products from its mining damages chromosomes, causes miscarriages, birth defects, cancers, fertility problems, and damages kidneys . . . Uranium mining would create only a few jobs that would last little more than a decade", he says, and finally, "It does not justify poisoning our environment for the next 10,000 years. I mean it's utterly ridiculous." So there's a medical specialist who is weighing in with his thoughts on that issue.

We've had letters, we've had e-mails. I know one of my constituents, Catherine Hughes, indicated that. She sent me an e-mail representing a number of people in Pictou County who were adamantly opposed to uranium mining - the Citizens Action to Protect the Environment, CAPE. They've written, I think, every member of this Legislature - they're

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from Hants County - indicating strong support for the moratorium and would certainly like to see it on a more permanent basis. A councillor from the Town of Wolfville has indicated his support for a more permanent ban on uranium mining; and Voluntary Planning, it was mentioned, would be looking at this issue very shortly.

So, Mr. Speaker, I just want to reiterate that the NDP is firmly opposed to uranium mining. I think this bill is good legislation, it's the right thing to do, it's what Nova Scotians want, and I hope that we can pass Bill No. 58. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. The Official Opposition House Leader.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Could you please call Bill No. 136, the Energy Resources Conservation Act.

Bill No. 136 - Energy Resources Conservation Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, thank you very much. Our discussion this afternoon will be on second reading of Bill No. 136 - this is an Act to promote greater energy efficiency in Nova Scotia. This is a bill I introduced - in fact, more accurately, reintroduced, having introduced it in a previous session. I brought it back, and I'm happy to explain what it covers.

This is a particularly good day to be discussing Bill No. 136 because this is the day on which the government made its first annual report on the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act which this Legislature passed, I should say unanimously, a year ago. That's the Statute in which the government set for itself certain targets with respect to environmental sustainability.

Now we had lots of doubts about that, but I think we are very much in favour of reorienting the province towards environmental sustainability. That seems to me fundamental to what it is that we all ought to be contemplating, and this Bill No. 136 is put forward in that spirit. It's put forward in the spirit of making a variety of suggestions to the government, particularly to Conserve Nova Scotia, although any other department that is appropriate in terms of implementation is, of course, welcome to take them up.

The idea is to point out that there are a number of ways in which we can transform the way we live our lives in Nova Scotia onto a sustainability agenda. I've worked in environmental issues for more than thirty-five years and one of the things that I have learned during that time is that the barriers to change are not generally the absence of knowledge about better ways to live our lives - the barriers to change tend more to be in the category of adherence to the status quo. That's the problem - adherence to the status quo.

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There's no shortage of good ideas out there. I'm far from saying that all technological or engineering or medical questions have been answered - everyone knows that we learn more about these matters all the time. At the same time, society is well equipped with solid information about better ways in which we could live our lives, ways in which we could readjust ourselves onto a sustainability agenda, and this bill is an attempt to put out for public debate a number of items that the government could easily take up.

Let me review with the honourable members what we have chosen to put forward only as samples in this legislation.

One of the first proposals is that the government make available interest-free loans for energy efficiency retrofitting of both private homes and certain eligible small businesses. So first, it's money for retrofitting of buildings, buildings that already exist. The second is a proposal that would nullify pre-existing restrictive covenants on property that serve to prohibit property owners from erecting clotheslines on their property. Many people are surprised to find that such things actually exist and are perhaps contemplated by developers of new subdivisions, but they certainly do exist and they do exist in Nova Scotia. So the idea would be to set these aside, and I'll say more about those in a moment.

Another part of the bill is to require the owners and operators of retail gasoline stations to provide, at no charge, air so people can inflate their tires to an appropriate level of pressure. That's something that's designed to promote efficiency in the use of a motor vehicle and well recognized by anyone who has dealings with motor vehicles that this is a useful thing to do. Another aspect of the bill is to prevent construction of buildings so as to obstruct the light that would otherwise go to run solar panels on existing buildings. Now, this is something modeled on law that prevails in California. They've had what's called a solar access law there for quite a number of years. Another aspect of the bill is to require the minister to establish conservation standards for the government, particularly with respect to their buildings, but also with respect to their fleet.

[3:30 p.m.]

So there are examples of things that are initiatives that the government is being encouraged by our Party to take, because all of these things are achievable. None of these are particularly difficult to move forward on. It's a clutch of good ideas. But, do you know what? They weren't in the budget. They weren't part of the legislative agenda. When I observed earlier, Mr. Speaker, that this was a reintroduction of the bill, I have to say that I was profoundly disappointed that I had to reintroduce this bill. I fully expected that in this session the government would have come forward with, if not all the measures that were contained in the previous bill, at least some of them, particularly the clothesline item.

I have to say I was amazed and gratified at all the positive publicity that was attracted by this proposal when I first brought it forward last year. Of course, I'm not alone. I

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subsequently learned that there is all across North America a movement known as the "Right to Dry" movement in which people essentially advocate for the setting aside of restrictive covenants and positive measures by any level of government to allow people to set up clotheslines so that they don't have to use an electrical appliance for something as straightforward as drying their clothes. We can all use the wind to do it. This is something that the beauties and wonders of which appeal to many of us. We often see paintings, we see photographs, we see postcards anchored in the Atlantic Provinces that show us laundry lines as part of our traditional way of life. I'm happy to say I have an actively-used laundry line at my home in the middle of the city. So it's not just something that goes on in rural areas. But I found that when I introduced the bill, formerly, there was an enormous outpouring of goodwill with respect to this particular proposal.

I know at the time there was some talk on the government benches about the possibility of them bringing forward their own proposal to do this. I don't know why they haven't done it. In fact, in Ontario, I see that John Tory, the Leader of the Tory Party and the Opposition in the provincial Legislature in Ontario, has been on record for a number of months saying that, in fact, he is very much in favour of this kind of an initiative, and the Liberal Premier in Ontario has now brought forward a legislative initiative to, in fact, accomplish exactly the same end, that is to say to promote the use of laundry lines. Why not? Why not?

It's a very simple thing. It's not even a money expense for the government, and I should point out that this is designed - doesn't extend to apartment buildings, that's something the government might want to think about, but this really has to do with private properties and the kind of restrictive covenants that are sometimes put in place apparently on the basis of aesthetics. I have to say that's a mistaken view, in my opinion. You don't have to believe with me that laundry lines are beautiful but, in fact, you can certainly recognize that they are energy efficient and there is nothing offensive about them. Really, the prohibitions are all part of encouraging people to use electrical appliances when they don't.

So that is the essence of that proposal, Mr. Speaker. I could speak in more detail about all of the others but what they are is they are common sense proposals that really should commend themselves to the government. I don't know why they haven't moved on an array of items like this. They are very simple, they are straightforward and I have to say that there is a call for them from all parts of Nova Scotia. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker, for the chance to address this bill.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Energy.

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to stand in my place to speak to Bill No. 136, the bill that recommends a number of energy efficient items for consideration. I think, first of all, we are a day late and a nickel short. We have already introduced a number of the issues that the member is talking about.

[Page 3274]

Mr. Speaker, I know hypocritical is not a parliamentary word so I will use misleading members of the House and Nova Scotians. Here we have a member of a Party who is standing there saying, now we should take all these initiatives and here we are, we have Conserve Nova Scotia that has reached out and touched over 300,000 Nova Scotians in the last year and a half. We have created over 50 new programs to help Nova Scotians be more energy efficient and find new and better ways to be more energy efficient in their homes and their driving habits across Nova Scotia. But we have included, in this year's budget, $10.2 million to help expand that program and the member opposite stands in his place and criticizes and will not support the budget.

I know I can't use the word hypocritical so I will use the word misleading members of the House and Nova Scotians, Mr. Speaker. I think we have a great department that is doing great things for Nova Scotians and we have lots of new programs and ideas on the way.

The member speaks about interest free loans. Well, I can tell you the people that I represent and I am sure, Mr. Speaker, the people you represent would rather have a grant of up to $6,500 to help do retrofits in their home than they would have an interest-free loan. If they need help on that, Mr. Speaker, I can assure you and all members of the House, that we are working with a financial institution right now to have a low-interest loan maybe at prime rate, the same as the government borrows at, that will be instituted across the province to help homeowners out if the retrofit is over the $6,500 threshold.

Mr. Speaker, this government, and myself as the minister, and Conserve Nova Scotia cannot do it alone. That is why we have partnered with a number of agencies outside of government. The Ecology Action Centre, Clean Nova Scotia, to name a few that we are working with to implement these new programs. Through our REAP program we have helped 305 low-income homeowners to help make their homes more energy efficient and working with the Department of Community Services and housing and, lo and behold, we are going to do 200 more homes this year.

Mr. Speaker, I think that across this province I have yet to find a law in this province by any municipality that is telling Nova Scotians that they cannot have a clothesline in their back yard. I have checked every municipal bylaw in this province and I cannot find one yet that is restricting. (Interruption)

Mr. Speaker, do I have the floor? What I am saying is, we want to work with Nova Scotians. We want to clean up our greenhouse gases in this province but when you have people on the other side who are saying we can't meet our targets, everybody in this great Assembly of ours has a job to do. The government is leading, by all means, but we need help from over there to educate Nova Scotians and education is a key to success in this province.

[Page 3275]

I am sure, Mr. [Deputy] Speaker, in your previous life, you would agree to that statement, that education is a key to success in this province. We have great things in the future. We have partnered with the Nova Scotia Community College on a lighting program that we are bringing to our own facilities. We just announced a new program, $400,00, about a month ago, with all the school boards across this province. Every school board in this province signed on to work with this government to make sure that our government buildings are as energy efficient as possible. That's what it is, it's partnering.

If members in the House have ideas of ways that we could be more energy efficient, Mr. Speaker, and programs, I'm more than willing to talk and listen and find ways that we can be more creative and work.

Mr. Speaker, in the agency of Conserve Nova Scotia, we have 13 employees, but I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, they're 13 dedicated employees who have introduced 50 programs since conception - a little better than a year and a half ago - and worked with over 300,000 Nova Scotians. That's a good track record

We have lots more to do. Working with the Nova Scotia Home Builders Association, Mr. Speaker, is another program that's been extremely successful and we are looking at implementing new programs in the upcoming year and again, working with them to make sure that the homes are built as energy efficient as we possibly can.

To date, Mr. Speaker, we partnered with so many agencies outside and every agency sits at a round table to help, to give us ideas, to work on better ways that we can be energy efficient, how we can create a better transportation in our province and create a better environment for public transit. That's why this government- again the NDP say they are voting against our budget - $3 million for public transit in the new budget that that group is voting against. So again, I don't quite understand. misleading Nova Scotians, I don't think is what we were elected to be here for.

We're here to work for the people of Nova Scotia and we're here to work together. Absolutely, we're a minority government, but we all have to work together to find solutions and the right solutions for Nova Scotians. That's what this government intends to do and working with the Opposition and Parties - at least there are some on the opposite side who see the goodness of the budget and are supporting the budget because they know that it reaches from one end of the province to the other and all Nova Scotians.

Drive Wiser Program - we have worked with Nova Scotians and the program has been very successful to date and we intend to expand that program, educating driving behavioural practices. I'm not going to get anywhere near where I wanted to go here, Mr. Speaker, but anyhow. We're also working with other governments - there are six government departments that have signed on with us to educate their employees to be more energy-efficient; working with Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, as I announced this

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morning in my resolution; working on government buildings to make them more energy efficient. That's what I call co-operation and government working for the betterment of Nova Scotians and to help clean up our greenhouse gas, to help be more energy efficient so we can take those dollars - over $70,000 just in a little program that I announced this morning - and we can take those dollars and put them out to other programs so that we'll help more Nova Scotians. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I am pleased to rise today and speak on this bill - Bill No. 136, Energy Resources Conservation Act. Certainly the concept of this bill is a very good one and it is one that Nova Scotians welcome. For government to have created a department around energy conservation was, indeed, a very positive move.

I know the department got off to a bit of a slow start with the appointment of Heather Foley Melvin, whom I've gotten to know over the past year or so, but the department has started to get some programs and practical ideas out to the public of Nova Scotia, and that indeed is very positive.

The member for Halifax Chebucto brings forward a number of ideas and practical pieces to implement, which could start us on a stronger track of conserving resources, especially energy. In a province that uses about 90 per cent of non-renewables to create electricity, some of it going, of course, for the heating of our homes, along with 60 per cent of Nova Scotian homes heated with oil, we know we have an enormous challenge around making our homes more energy efficient.

While there is a program in place, in my riding a couple of constituents have brought the program to my attention because they implemented many of the suggestions that were made to increase the efficiency of their homes, but when a technician came in to measure the improvement, it was surprising to find so little improvement with the work they had done. So I plan to get educated myself on that program around making homes more energy efficient and what are the best measures that can be taken to increase the rating of 280 and above.

[3:45 p.m.]

In our province - and I know in the beautiful Annapolis Valley, which has been settled now for over 250 years - there are actually homes that are 200 years old and many that are 100 years old. Getting them to become energy efficient is indeed an enormous challenge. Retrofitting these homes, in fact, is both costly - but with the rising cost of energy due to a fact, of course, that we are perhaps reaching peak oil production, we know that getting a litre of home heating fuel less than $1 is most likely a line from the past and it's only going to be

[Page 3277]

conserving that will make a huge difference. So I'm hoping that government will continue to come forward with substantial programs.

One of the ones that has been raised in this House, that does cause real problems, is for seniors who are receiving income assistance or OAS plus the supplement and with two incomes that are so based, it is impossible to get a major loan or a major grant to refurbish a home, because they are above that threshold that's in place by Community Services. So I think some adjustments there will go, indeed, a long way.

The great fact about Nova Scotia is that - you know, geothermal, solar, wind and, in fact, in Nova Scotia we have the second-best regime in Canada for solar. It's really an area that I don't think we have taken advantage of to the extent that we have. I know in the member for Halifax Chebucto's bill, he proposes the idea of not having buildings erected that, in fact, would block out the capture of solar energy. With wind, we all know again that the province is one of the top three places in North America; with tidal power potential, it's obviously the leader in the world in that regard. So we have enormous potential. It is now shifting to those resources so that we no longer are using the amount of oil, the amount of coal and gas that we currently are, in order to give us the energy that we need for our homes.

We all know, and it makes perfect sense, that the best kilowatt, of course, is the one not used. That is a fact that we need to crown and try to convince Nova Scotians, educate Nova Scotians that this becomes part of our way of life, that we are doing small measures each day to be able to make a significant difference in the amount of resources that we use.

There are many exciting things in this province that we all come across from time to time. Just in this past week, in meeting with the principal of the Nova Scotia Community College in Middleton, next year they will be offering a technician course for energy audits on business and small industrial plants where a person trained will be able to go into a building and actually take a look at what are the measures that can be done to do major conservation of energy, which we also know is good for a business' bottom line. This is going to be a two-year program. This is the kind of exciting thing that I think Nova Scotia can capture to a much greater extent than we currently are.

So while we have a long way to go, there are indeed a few good ideas in this bill that we should take a look at, while there are a few that would provide an immense challenge for us to be able to accomplish in this province. With that, Mr. Speaker, I will take my place.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure, as our Party's Environment Critic, to rise to speak to this bill, which is entitled an Act to Promote Greater Energy Efficiency in Nova Scotia, which is a goal that all of us support in the House. The question really is, how do we do it? There is only so much money to go around, so it's a

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matter of getting the priorities, of doing things that will get the most return with respect to energy efficiency for the investment.

I don't doubt for a second, Mr. Speaker, that the good people at Conserve Nova Scotia are busily working away and doing something, but the issue is not whether they are doing something, it's whether they are doing the very best things available with the limited resources they have. There is only so much money, there are only so many people in Conserve Nova Scotia, so what we need from them and from the government is knowing that they are pursuing those avenues that are going to have the best return for the dollar.

Unfortunately, we don't know that, because the government is not telling us. They claim that it's not true, but they don't tell us. What we need are plans, Mr. Speaker. We need to know what the programs are. We need to know how it all fits together, but of that, there is nothing. The minister said in his remarks that there are lots of new ideas and programs but then he added that they are on the way. We don't know what they are yet, we don't know when the government is going to deliver them, and if this government didn't have such a track record of this yawning gap between rhetoric and reality on the environment, we might have some faith that those programs and ideas were really on the verge of being released.

But as I pointed out in Question Period today, Mr. Speaker, this government, this Progressive Conservative Government, made a commitment in 2001 to meet a certain target for greenhouse gas emissions. Now, they would like people to forget that target was ever even mentioned. In the document released by the Minister of Environment today, it's not even mentioned, not referred to anywhere, not in the charts, not in the words, not anywhere. It's as if that commitment had never been made. Just for the edification of the Minister of Environment, I would like to table that commitment so he can read it again.

Now, instead of explaining why they are not meeting the commitment they have already made for 2010, they prefer to talk about 2020, what they are going to do in 2020, which is 13 years since they passed their Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act, 19 years since they made that commitment back in 2001, 12 years from now. To set such distant goals means there is practically no accountability at all. The minister can make almost any claim that he wants on the environment. As he pointed out today to us all, none of us has a crystal ball, we don't know what the future holds, so he can make any claim that he wants without fear of being contradicted.

That is the record of this government on the environment and so excuse us for being a little bit skeptical when the Minister responsible for Conserve Nova Scotia says there are new ideas and programs on the way. This is a program that did not start well. We all remember how Conserve Nova Scotia started, when it had no mandate from this Legislature, no strategic plan, no funding, hadn't even been approved in the budget of this Legislature. The Premier appointed his outgoing chief of staff to be the boss of the new agency at the same salary.

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That was the beginning of Conserve Nova Scotia, to give a job to a former staff member of the Premier. Then, after she was in place, it was only then that they started thinking about budgets, plans, programs and ideas. I would suggest that when one wants to bring the public on board to get behind the idea of Conserve Nova Scotia, that was probably not the most constructive way to start that particular agency.

But we continue to be the Party of good ideas. We continue to be the Party of constructive suggestions. (Applause) A smattering of applause, Mr. Speaker, from my colleagues. We continue to give the government a range of good ideas, many of which they adopt and then claim as their own. You know what? That's okay. We're in the idea business. If the government wants to take our ideas, they are welcome to them. That's why we're here.

This bill, Bill No. 136, is simply full of good ideas. We commend them to the attention of the government. The essence of the bill is a program whereby people can repair their own homes. That is the single, best, most efficient way for us to get the energy savings that we know we all need. If we want conservation, we have to help Nova Scotians to make their homes more energy efficient. This bill would do that, it provides a way to do that.

It provides that kind of big idea and also little ideas like making sure people can hang out their clothes to dry. The minister said he's not aware of a bylaw in Nova Scotia that prevents it, which of course is true. But nobody has ever said it was a question of municipal bylaws, it's a question of restrictive covenants - restrictive covenants, when people buy property where all the neighbours say to each other, we promise not to put up clotheslines and if anybody tries, it is their neighbours who then enforce it. It never was a question of municipal bylaws. I just wanted to make sure the minister understood that.

Making the government a leader is also an idea here so that the government has a plan. Energy conservation stands for all government buildings and property leased by the government. If we want Nova Scotians to see the way forward, they have to see their government leading the way.

This bill is simply full of good ideas, that's what we're here for. We look forward to this government and Conserve Nova Scotia supporting this bill and applying these very fine ideas coming from the NDP caucus. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Time has expired for debate on Bill No. 136.

The honourable Opposition House Leader.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: That ends our Party's business for today and I will turn it back to the Government House Leader.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 3280]

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, would you please revert to the order of business, Presenting Reports of Committees.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request to revert to the order of business, Presenting Reports of Committees.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 157 - Financial Measures (2008) Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I move that you do now leave the Chair and that the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Supply unto Her Majesty.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

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MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, thank you very much. For the benefit of the public watching at home, I want to note that what we are about to engage in is a special kind of debate. This, according to our traditions, is an opportunity, time limited to 15 minutes, in which members of the Legislature, immediately prior to the start of detailed budget estimates, are given the opportunity to speak to topics of their choosing. Normally it's the choice of members of the Legislature to speak with a particular focus on issues in their own constituency. They will do a tour of schools, or roads, or some other kind of particular focus.

I don't want to use my 15 minutes to do that today, I want to talk in general terms about the Nova Scotia economy. Mr. Speaker, I want to do that particularly because, so far as I can see, we're in for some pretty difficult times in the next number of years. I'm put in mind of the biblical situation in which we have come through seven fat years and now we're going to go into, perhaps, seven lean years. I hope it's not the full seven lean years, but we know we're in the start of some pretty tough times.

[4:00 p.m.]

I am wanting to make note of this because it didn't seem to me that the budget that we just saw come forward from this government really took a serious enough look at the economic circumstances of our province. It's certainly the case that there were passing comments in the document, but you can't read that document and say to yourself that the government is seriously worried about the economic future of our province or, in fact, has structured the budget in a way that really engages with the possibility of serious tough times.

Now there certainly were statements in the budget. On Page 5 of the budget, the Minister of Finance made reference to the slowing U.S. and Canadian economies. The trouble with that statement and a companion one, which uses the term, these uncertain economic times, is it seems to me that they're much too soft. These terms, given what we're facing, are much too soft.

Economists are already forecasting that the federal government may go into deficit some time within the next couple of years. Now that would be a serious change in the economic life of our nation. We have just come out of a period of seven, eight, nine successive years in which our federal government has generated surpluses. Now that's all been to the good, but I have to say that if the prospect is that there will be national deficits, then, in fact, a province that is on the receiving end of equalization and the Canada Health and Social Transfer and other benefits that flow from the general tax base throughout the whole of the country has to worry, and that's our province.

I want to give some examples, because I know that people in my constituency and people all across this province have real doubts and fears about their economic future and I can't see that there was very much in the budget, that we are choosing to vote against, correctly, that really responded to that in any kind of serious way. Let me give you some

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examples. We already know that the U.S.A., our main trading partner, is in uncertain economic times and, in fact, may even be in recession. That's a serious worry, we already know that the Canadian dollar has become very high, which inhibits our exports.

We know all of that, but think about some of the particular examples that we've been up against here in our province. Moirs, a factory in Dartmouth, has closed; the TrentonWorks, it's closed; our pulp and paper plants, they are facing a very uncertain future and they're in a situation where we have to remember that in Quebec, in British Columbia and in New Brunswick there have been massive closures of pulp and paper plants. We have to remember that.

Our port is operating at 50 per cent capacity. That's an enormous underuse of that. There is massive migration to Alberta. The unemployment rates in rural areas are well above national averages, well above those that prevail in the metro area. These are things that really have to worry us. Tourism is down in the Yarmouth area. This is only one part of it. We have to worry about what the future of a big undertaking, like tourism, in Nova Scotia is.

I will give you another example of a manufacturing facility that is closed down. The Shaw Furniture factory in Cornwallis, that closed. The Irving mill in Weymouth. These are examples of the hollowing out of not just the manufacturing and industrial sector in Nova Scotia but, in fact, weaknesses in the commodity sectors. Now we have to remember, when we think about the Canadian economy, and our provincial economy, what are the common features here that prevail because there are a number of obvious common features which, if we kept in mind what they are, we would be able to respond to them.

Now the common features are fairly easy to pick out because they have characterized the Canadian economy since Canada was started, not just as an official nation but for the centuries before that when Europeans first came here. It's a resource-based economy. That's the first thing. Whether it is energy or agriculture or mining or fishery or forestry or it may be, one day, water, we are resource rich. That has been a blessing but it is also something of a difficulty because it means that what goes along with that is that we have not, in fact, transformed ourselves into a completely modern post-industrial economy. We are still resource-based and commodity prices fluctuate, they are vulnerable to the relative value of dollars, all of those things that we are seeing now. Hard fact.

We have a small domestic market. Big country, only 33 million people here. That's a small domestic market. We have one major trading partner, that's the United States. We are so extensively reliant on trade with the United States that it has been a major error of public policy in Canada to do that, not to diversify. We have significant corporate concentration. We have significant foreign ownership and we have a mixed economy. Those are the basic facts about the Canadian economy. Any economist will tell you that. Any sociologist will tell you that. They debate whether these things are good, bad or indifferent

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but those are the facts. They are the context within which we have to make our economic decisions.

I have to say that when I read that Budget Speech and when I listened to the programs that come out of different departments across the way there, I don't see that there is any understanding of the basic structures of what it is that makes our economy go. It's just not there. It's just not there. What have been the answers? What have been the answers? What has happened? Let's agree that those are the factors. Let's agree that there is weakness. Let's agree that we are facing some problems, much more than the budget has acknowledged. So what are the two main things that we've heard? Well, from the governing Tories, we have heard let's raise taxes a little bit on electricity and from the Third Party, we've heard let's take taxes a little bit off gasoline fuel. Well do you know what? That is hardly, from either of those two Parties, a comprehensive program that engages with what it is that we are going to need.

I have to say that there are alternatives available. There are a lot of alternatives that we have suggested over the years and that we are prepared to implement and that we, in fact, favour. Let me start by pointing out that the fundamental benefit to the economy that Nova Scotians could advance here through their government is to invest in education. Education is obviously the way forward. It's the way forward for individual families. It's the way forward for people in metro. It's the way forward for everyone in this province. We are blessed, we are blessed by having the university infrastructure that we have. We have, unfortunately, been plagued by having a government that has been generally hostile to the universities over the decades. That has been a very unfortunate thing.

Post-secondary education, whether it's the community colleges or the universities, is in fact the best investment that the government can make through tax dollars. It's the best investment that individuals can make and they are choosing to make it but we have to make it easier for them. We have to move ahead in that education is a major priority of our Party and we see it as an economic tool. We see it as many things but it is certainly an economic tool.

Let me point out the next thing that has to happen, and it's appropriate to note on this day when the government came down with its first report on the sustainability legislation from a year ago, is that economic decisions should be made keeping in mind sustainability principles. Every economic decision and every government decision should be made because we have to transform every sector of our economy onto a sustainable basis or they simply won't survive. That's true of all those resource sectors that I mentioned before. The fishery has to be put on a sustainable basis, the forests have to be put on a sustainable basis, our energy production has to be put on a sustainable basis and mining has to be put on a sustainable basis.

[Page 3284]

Any sector you like, it has to go onto a sustainable basis and we have the knowledge to move ahead with that. We have been warned time and time again about the fragility of a number of those sectors. Think about our fishery, think about our fishery, which is such a bigger dollar value to our economy, that is under threat. You only have to look at the research of Professor Boris Worm, at Dalhousie University, who has published and is internationally recognized as an expert on fish stocks and the fish health all around the world. He has pointed out abuse upon abuse in fisheries. We can't let that go on here.

Now, unfortunately, fisheries is a federal jurisdiction matter, but we have a provincial department and you hear boo. You don't hear boo out of that department that criticizes the federal government for its fisheries policies. Why is that? We are missing out here. We are missing out and we are placing ourselves at peril. We know that there's fragility in the forestry. The latest observations about that have just come from GPI Atlantic, from the Ecology Action Centre. They have told the government time and time again about the fragility of our forestry practices. All of those things can be transformed to a sustainable basis, but they have not been. That's the second main thing.

Let me point out another thing that we would do and that, in fact, is a different kind of agenda, which is to be collaborative and to favour things, for example, like co-ops. We believe in community economic development. We believe in wide consultation. We believe that communities will figure out for themselves, in many respects, what it is that they ought to do but that the government has to lead that kind of consultation process. Co-ops are an example of that, co-ops in which people work together, whether they're consumer co-ops or producer co-ops, there's a big opportunity in Nova Scotia to do that. That is something that we favour but the government has, in fact, neglected over the years. It's not something that they have done.

What has been the major, major tool of government, the government's so-called economic development plan, Nova Scotia Business Inc. Nova Scotia Business Inc. has been just a disaster and here's why. It is because NSBI has this idea in its head that the main thing to do is to bring in businesses from somewhere else, compete with some other jurisdiction that is in the business of giving subsidies and outbid them, and bring them in here. That's a company that doesn't necessarily want to be in Nova Scotia, that comes here for the subsidies. That's not the best use of public dollars. What you want to do is invest a smaller number of dollars in local indigenous businesses, that are either tied to our natural resources or are spinoffs from our universities in terms of research and take advantage of that because we, as I said before, are blessed by our higher education infrastructure.

So you have to be serious about these things. That has been the big mistake that Nova Scotia Business Inc. has made over the years, to hunt the elephant, that's what it's called, to go look for a big company from somewhere else. We've had a couple of successes with that. We've had Michelin, which has been a big success and we've had RIM which is, I certainly hope, going to be a big success, but those are rare. Those are rare and the

[Page 3285]

government knows very well that what it has brought here are call centres which are so highly mobile, they're only here for the subsidies and after those subsidies are gone, they'll be gone, because they don't even own the buildings that they're in, they rent them, because they know they can move on to somewhere else.

Well, let me tell you, there are alternatives and I think that our Party is well positioned to move ahead with those alternatives. We have alternatives to how it is and, believe me, when I hear comments from the minister's office, and including the Premier, that show complete insensitivity or misunderstanding of how the economy works, including here in metro, I am completely discouraged, completely discouraged, and we get mixed signals from that government all the time. On the one hand they saying that they're all prepared to see metro thrive, but they're not in touch with what it is that goes on here, which is what the real economic health of this province will be. That is what I wanted to say in my 15 minutes and thank you for the opportunity to make some comments on the budget.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MR. KEITH COLWELL: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today I want to talk about many things in my constituency and some of the areas that really need to be addressed. The first thing I want to talk about is that the government has touted their high-speed Internet connection throughout the province, but unfortunately there's one little small area in my riding, up near Eagle Lake Subdivision, that we've tried everything to get the high-speed Internet hooked up. Unfortunately there are a limited number of homes and the power lines, the lines that are existing there, come through in a long, roundabout way to get to the homes that are there, and even with the new program the province has put in place there's no plan to hook up this area. So when they say they're going to have the whole province connected, they're not even going to have the whole municipality connected when they're done unless this changes quickly.

We've done everything - I've written to the minister, we've written to Aliant, we've written to Eastlink - and under the new program they've come out with fantastic announcements, but yet it isn't there to help these homes in this area.

Some of the people in these homes operate their businesses and work from there, so it's important to have high-speed Internet. It's an area - it's in Preston and, unfortunately, the government hasn't paid very much attention to this. So that's one issue I want to put on the record here today, and hopefully the government will listen and change their mind on that and improve that situation.

Also in my area, I have the Mineville community. Now the Mineville community over the past number of years has been a leader in the province, really. They have built infrastructure for recreation, with tons and tons of volunteer hours and the community has

[Page 3286]

done an exceptionally good job of providing recreation where the province and the municipality simply didn't do it at the time.

[4:15 p.m.]

Since then they've taken a small amount of money that they've been able to raise in the community, combined that with volunteer work and contributions from the community and the municipality and the province and the federal government - and all kinds of other places that I didn't even know existed when it comes to supporting communities with funding - and they've built a couple of playgrounds, a multi-purpose court, and a little community facility that they can sell ice cream out of in the summer. That's all been done with volunteers and I want to congratulate the community for doing that. Hopefully, it set a standard for other places in the province that can do that.

Also in our area, in Lake Loon-Cherrybrook - they need a small community centre. Now we've been working on this for many, many years, and indeed the community is growing very, very rapidly with the new developments going on in the area. There's no place for seniors to go to have meetings, work on a quilt, or whatever they may want to do. just as important, and probably more important, there's no place for young people to go after they are finished school, in the community. It's a very close-knit community that takes a great deal of pride in their community, aesthetically, and their homes are beautiful and their yards are beautiful, and they also take a great deal of pride in helping raise the children in the community.

It's unfortunate that they don't have access to a facility like this, and I'm not talking about a multi-million dollar facility here. We're talking a modest facility that they can have community suppers in, they can have recreation there for the children and for seniors, that they can actually do some very positive things to help the community grow stronger and keep the wonderful atmosphere it has in the community. So that's an issue that really has to be addressed. As we look at that and we go through that process, we see so many things that need to be done in the communities. This is one of those things, the community centre would really help that community and surrounding communities resolve many of the problems that they have.

I also want to give credit to the Orenda Canoe Club in Lake Echo. The Orenda Canoe Club has been working there with young people, several hundred young people, over the years. They've had some medalists at the Olympics; they've set Canadian records; they've set Commonwealth Games records - and all from a small little clubhouse. I remember one of the directors of the clubhouse saying to me - they were in Ontario and they won every competition they were in, so this gentleman from Ontario said to the coach, he said you must have a fantastic facility. He says, yes we do, we have great people.

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So about two or three months later that particular coach came to Lake Echo to see this fantastic, big building that they had with these fantastic coaches and everything. He came down and said, that's the size of our garage we keep a few of our boats in. They said yes, it is, but it's the people, like I told you, that make the difference and they have made the difference.

We have wonderful programs there for young people that teach them sportsmanship and training. Actually the club is very, very aggressive. They take the young athletes every winter to Florida and train in Florida for over a month. This is paid for by the community and the coaches go and they also keep up their class work. There are arrangements made with the school so young people in the program don't fall behind with their homework or their school work. I give the community and the club a great deal of credit.

We do need help there for staffing. If we had some staffing available there in the summer for a couple more coaches, they could look after a lot more children and, indeed, teach them competitive paddling. They are competitive, as I say, they've set world records in some events and, indeed, the athletes from there have competed all over the world and shown a wonderful benefit to the community, as you see these young people grow and turn into coaches, like some of them have, and some of them have gone on to pursue other careers. But it's nice to see such a small, little organization making such a fantastic impact on our province.

I know some of the other canoe clubs in the HRM area really get irritated when the small little club comes and beats them at the events. That happens on a regular basis. And it doesn't matter if it's the smallest children there or the senior members, they do very, very well. We need more recreation for the young people in our areas and I think it would cut down on the crime and the other problems we're having, the vandalism, as we move forward.

My previous honourable colleague talked about energy efficiency and improvement for homes. I think that's a very, very important thing. We have seniors who are struggling to pay their oil bills now. They don't have money to insulate their homes, to make their homes easier to heat so they can cut down on their oil bill, so they're faced with selling their homes and moving to a seniors' complex. This is not a very delightful possibility for a senior who has worked their whole life to acquire a home, one they've enjoyed with their husband or wife and family over the years, and now they find they're up in years, want to stay in that home and live their life out in that home and possibly they can't afford to do it.

That is happening more and more. It doesn't matter what community you're in, or where you're from, you're going to see this more and more. Years ago the pension possibilities weren't there as they are today so people have less income. I have many, many seniors in my area living on income of around $8,000, $9,000 a year. So if you pay $1,000 for a fuel bill - one fuel bill for one month - it doesn't take very much math to figure out what's going on and what's going to happen.

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So we really have to help seniors get their homes more energy efficient and work toward programs that can help them stay in their own homes. These people have contributed so much to our economy over the years and now I think it's time we help them stay in their homes and enjoy their homes and their community where they're well-known and well-respected.

We also have some serious traffic problems. We look at the traffic that's building as it comes in from the Eastern Shore and from Porters Lake and all the other areas on Highway No. 7, a lot of people are shortcutting through the Montague area and causing a lot of problems in the area. There's a school in the area and the traffic volumes are really high at rush hour, both coming and going at night. The speed is also a problem, even though there have been radar traps set up there, and I'm sure there will be many more, so anyone who's listening, make sure you don't speed on the Montague Road.

It's a serious problem and we really need a bypass. There was one started years ago and I've been lobbying the government to try to get a Highway No. 107 bypass that would bypass all that, take all this traffic off of Main Street, off of Montague Road and make it a lot safer area. There are a lot of issues there that have to be addressed and it affects Montague, Westphal and that whole area. In the mornings, sometimes the wait is 45 minutes to get through one set of lights. That has to change, it really has to change. There are so many problems there that need to change.

One other thing I've been pushing for and working with is the Black Cultural Centre, to get adequate funding. Now the Black Cultural Centre, I have spoken about it here many times, about how important it is to Nova Scotia. It is the only facility like it in the country. It is there to preserve, protect and promote Black history and culture in Nova Scotia and in the province, indeed in the province, not just in my area. The people who work there work absolute miracles with the resources they have to work with. We really need to turn that into a provincial museum, give the centre the proper resources it needs so they can promote that very important history and culture which has really helped build and promote our province and grow our province to the fantastic place it is today to live and work.

We need to do so many of these things and as you look at the communities and what is happening in the communities, it is so important that we protect our young people and look after our seniors. The rest of us in the middle somehow or other always can make it and we can do things. But there also has to be help for the working group of people, to help insulate homes and become more energy efficient which will work right toward what the Department of Environment and Minister of Environment is trying to do but they haven't put any positive programs in place.

One of the last things I want to talk about is O'Connell Drive in Porters Lake. Now, thanks to the province, O'Connell Drive was paved from Highway No. 7 to the school in Porters Lake. The school created pretty well all the traffic on that road that was damaging the

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road on that section of road. There was no argument from anybody in that area that indeed that needed to be done. Unfortunately, the local councillor took it upon himself to get the upper part of the road paved, unbeknownst to anybody. It wasn't there on the list to be done. It was never petitioned. Nobody had asked for the road to be paved. It was just a non-issue. There had been about 64 or 65 streets within HRM that had been waiting years to get the roads paved under the aid to municipalities.

Somehow or other, he convinced the government, put it on a list, got the road paved and then afterwards started the consultation, which there was no consultation. It was just this has happened, now you have to pay. Not only that, but what happened with that whole process was that the people on the lower part of the street that absolutely got no benefit from the upper part of the street have now been hit with an area rate. This is precedent-setting in the province and I don't believe it's legal. All the side streets got an area rate as well to pay for this road.

If anyone thinks this is not an issue for their street and that people on O'Connell Drive should pay, that's fine but you have to remember that if your street is paved, someday down the road if another street is paved four or five kilometres away, you might get an area rate to help pay for that one too. On the side streets that aren't even paved, they are going to pay the area rate now and when the road is paved, they are going to have to pay again. So they are going to be paying twice for the same service, a service they don't even have yet.

So this has been a total injustice to the people of that community and I would hope that the government would see that, review this situation and at least eliminate the area rate that the residents in the area have been really stricken with, without the proper consultation or even a precedent-setting that this was ever done before and indeed help the people. Some of the people in that area are retired, they are seniors and not expecting a bill of $1,600, never mind the residents who are higher up the street who are hit with a bill for $2,000 each. The worst about the area rate is, it's over a period of time. They can't even pay it in advance and at the whim of the councillor, if they want to increase the area rate for some other reason, they will jack it up again.

So this kind of activity has to stop. We have to put laws in this Legislature to prevent this ever, ever happening again to anyone in this province. I don't see any movement on the government to go in that direction. All I can do is encourage them to do it and perhaps some day when we are back in power again, we are going to have this thing changed so this won't happen.

Anyway, thank you very much for the time today and I look forward to further debate.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried.

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[4:27 p.m. The House resolved itself into CWH on Supply with Acting Deputy Speaker Mr. Chuck Porter in the Chair.]

[8:33 p.m. CWH on Supply rose and the House reconvened with Deputy Speaker Mr. Wayne Gaudet in the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The Committee of the Whole House on Supply reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and made very considerable progress and begs leave to sit again.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move the House do now rise to meet again tomorrow from the hours of 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. After the daily routine and Oral Question Period, we will move into Committee of the Whole House on Supply and, from there, into Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. The motion before the House is for the House to rise and meet again tomorrow from 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay

The motion is carried.

The House stands adjourned until 9:00 a.m. tomorrow morning.

[The House rose at 8:35 p.m.]

[Page 3291]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 2867

By: Hon. Leonard Goucher (Immigration)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas "On the Right Trail" was the inaugural off-highway vehicle/trail conference held at Oak Island Inn on May 3, 2008, and the event took time to recognize individuals for their volunteer work for snowmobile clubs; and

Whereas Chad Patriquin was nominated for Outstanding Snowmobile Youth by the Driftclimbers Snowmobile Club; and

Whereas Chad won the award through his continual contribution to organized snowmobiling in Nova Scotia by spending hundreds of hours throughout the year on cleaning trails, fundraising, and promoting safe, responsible snowmobiling to others;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Chad Patriquin on his Outstanding Snowmobile Youth Award and thank him for promoting safe and environmentally- responsible snowmobiling to others who enjoy the Nova Scotia trails.

RESOLUTION NO. 2868

By: Hon. Carolyn Bolivar-Getson (Human Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas longevity is a goal which we all seek; and

Whereas celebrating a 95th birthday is a very significant personal, family and community event; and

Whereas Joyce Barkhouse of Bridgewater has reached that milestone;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend best wishes to Joyce Barkhouse on her 95th birthday.

[Page 3292]

RESOLUTION NO. 2869

By: Hon. Mark Parent (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nova Scotia each year recognize members whose career achievement or achievements in the community have brought honour to the profession; and

Whereas they recognize these members with the designation of Fellow Chartered Accountant (FCA) as a result of superior financial expertise, plus strategic thinking, business insight and leadership skills for a successful career in business, government, education, or in the non-profit community; and

Whereas Ms. Susan Payne of Port Williams, President and CEO of ACA Co-operative Ltd., was awarded this honour at the 2008 convocation;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Susan Payne for her accomplishments and receipt of the institute's highest honour.

RESOLUTION NO. 2870

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jean Miller of Brookdale, Nova Scotia, was chosen as Cumberland County's 2008 Volunteer of the Year; and

Whereas she has been a member of the local hospital auxiliary since 1987, served as secretary, vice-president, and president, as well as representative for the Above and Beyond Campaign; and

Whereas Jean is also involved with Autumn House, the Arthritis Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Christmas for Kids, and other organizations in her community, and Jean was respectfully acknowledged at the Provincial Volunteer Awards ceremony in Halifax recently;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in sending our congratulations to Jean Miller for this honourable distinction.

[Page 3293]

RESOLUTION NO. 2871

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Pugwash District High School is the only one of Cumberland County's seven high schools to finish in the top 25 of the AIMS Report Card; and

Whereas they were in 16th spot last year and moved into 10th place this year; and

Whereas AIMS vice-president stated "they've done a good job of preparing students for post-secondary education and their achievement numbers are above the provincial average.";

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in sending our congratulations to Pugwash District High School for ranking high in performance.

RESOLUTION NO. 2872

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cumberland Health Care Foundation presented their 2008 Distinguished Service Award for Health Care Philanthropy in Northern Nova Scotia to Polly Cello; and

Whereas this Amherst company looks after their own employees as well as investing in health and wellness in their community by participating in fundraisers and donating funds for hospital equipment; and

Whereas the CHCF chose John Covert as Volunteer of the Year for his hours of dedication to their fundraisers - the Kidney Foundation, the Cancer Society and Meals on Wheels - and it is worthy to note that the CHCF raised $19,000 for bursaries to assist medical students who will work for the Cumberland Health Authority for a specified time after graduation;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in sending our congratulations to Polly Cello, John Covert and the Cumberland Health Care Foundation for their contributions to our local health care system.

[Page 3294]

RESOLUTION NO. 2873

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Pugwash students brought home awards from a historical Heritage Fair held in Truro, May 2nd, and hosted by the local school board; and

Whereas those winning awards: Jordan Sprague, Best Use of Technology; Josh Froebe, Best Life Story Project; Josh Borgal, Best Individual Structure; and Brad Elliott for Outstanding Heritage Parade Participant; and

Whereas Jordan Reid of Wallace received the Artifact Identification Contest Award and Lydia Lawless of Pugwash was the only student awarded a Laurier LaPierre Medal for dedication to, and enthusiasm for, Canadian history;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in sending our congratulations to all of these students for their distinguished awards.

RESOLUTION NO. 2874

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas The School House Rug Hookers have hooked a mat which is both a fundraiser for the Bay Community Centre and a tribute to their good friend and mentor, Susan Leslie, who passed away on September 2, 2007, after a courageous battle with cancer; and

Whereas for the past 10 years, Susan, an avid, talented and master rug hooker coordinated the making and selling of a group rug to raise money for various charities and this year the tradition will continue in her honour; and

Whereas it is safe to say Susan's rugs are in homes throughout North America and abroad, having sold many pieces over the years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the importance that Susan Leslie has played in the rug hooking community.

[Page 3295]

RESOLUTION NO. 2875

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nautel Limited is a secret gem in Hacketts Cove, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas National Grid Wireless is the United Kingdom's leading provider of large-scale transmission infrastructure for broadcasters and mobile network operators; and

Whereas National Grid Wireless has trusted Nautel Limited with a major contract to be the key supplier in the deployment of high powered FM transmitters;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Nautel and their general manager, Peter Conlon on receiving their new contract and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2876

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 1945 is best known for the end of World War II; and

Whereas on April 19th, Rodgers and Hammerstein's Carousel, a musical play based on Ferenc Molnar's Liliom, opened on Broadway and becomes their second long-running stage classic; and

Whereas on April 19th,in Western Shore, the Myra family was celebrating the birth of their bouncing baby boy, Robert, who many years later has become known as Councillor Bob Myra;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend their best wishes to Bob Myra on his 63rd birthday and wish much health and happiness in the future.

[Page 3296]

RESOLUTION NO. 2877

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas residents in the Municipality of the District of Chester will benefit both economically and environmentally because of technology that was unveiled February 7, 2008; and

Whereas the municipality is the first in North America to purchase the Altinex dewatering truck that will reduce the dependence on septage lagoons and lower transportation costs; and

Whereas the truck pumps the septic system and separates the liquids from the solids, putting the liquid portion back into the septic system reducing the threat of septic system failure while the solid portion may be composted and used in landscaping, land reclamation, silviculture and the creation of biofuels;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Municipality of the District of Chester for purchasing this truck and making a significant investment in protecting our environment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2878

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas an 800 km unicycle race that is attracting teams from the world will literally put the Bluenose Coast and the St. Margaret's Bay area on the world map; and

Whereas the Ride the Lobster Unicycle Race is scheduled from June 16th to June 20th with cyclists cycling from Yarmouth to Cape Breton and those interested can track the racers in real time on Google Earth; and

Whereas the Ride the Lobster Unicycle Race will be stopping in Hubbards to view the beautiful shores of Chester-St. Margaret's;

[Page 3297]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the St. Margarets Bay Regional Tourism Development Association for bringing this event to Chester-St. Margaret's.

RESOLUTION NO. 2879

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team won two gold medals within two weeks; and

Whereas the group of 11-year-old girls participated in the Sackville Christmas Tournament in December, beating the Sackville Tweens in the gold medal game and a couple days later the team headed to Montreal for the Pierrefonds Tournament; and

Whereas five girls from the Halifax St. Margarets Ringette Association, including Robyn Lawlor, are members of this team;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Robyn Lawlor and the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team on a job well done and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2880

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brent Fay has helped make chocolate trays and winter tires, and all that experience came into play in developing a brand new product that prevents potentially deadly reactions in people who are taking medicine; and

Whereas Mr. Fray and his business partner, Michael Jarvis, are making the world's first self-cleaning pill dispensing system and they're doing it out of their machine shop in Chester; and

Whereas it has been tested by the National Research Council, where scientists have proven it is a drastic improvement over the traditional plastic trays pharmacists use to dispense pills;

[Page 3298]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Brent Fay and Michael Jarvis on this new invention and wish them much success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 2881

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas achieving excellence in live music performances can be a bit like trying to capture lightning in a bottle, however, by winning a silver medal from the Royal Conservatory of Music for the second time in her young life, 9-year-old pianist, Mary Fay of Chester, has managed to capture that lightning twice; and

Whereas the Silver Medal Award is granted to the top student in each grade level in the Atlantic Region and it is rare to see repeat winners; and

Whereas the awards are based on the results of exams where abilities and talent are measured, and in the latter Mary had to play a number of different songs and participate in ear-training, where a piece is played and the student has to clap the melody back, and to take part in sight-reading where the student plays a piece he or she has never played before, as well as be examined on theory;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Mary Fay on her silver medal and wish her continued success in future years.

RESOLUTION NO. 2882

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on January 12 a new custom pumper/tanker was purchased by the Chester Volunteer Fire Department; and

Whereas Chester Fire Chief Duke Chafe welcomed the new fire truck with open arms and explained that the truck is multi-functional, but it is specifically designed as a supply pumper; and

[Page 3299]

Whereas the new truck came with a hefty price tag of $490,000, but after just three years' worth of fundraising savings the department was able to place the order;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Chester Fire Department on the purchase of their new truck and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2883

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team won two gold medals within two weeks; and

Whereas the group of 11-year-old girls participated in the Sackville Christmas Tournament in December, beating the Sackville Tweens in the gold medal game and a couple days later the team headed to Montreal for the Pierrefonds Tournament; and

Whereas five girls from the Halifax St. Margarets Ringette Association, including Renee Savoy, are members of this team;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Renee Savoy and the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team on a job well done and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2884

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team won two gold medals within two weeks; and

Whereas the group of 11-year-old girls participated in the Sackville Christmas Tournament in December, beating the Sackville Tweens in the gold medal game and a couple days later the team headed to Montreal for the Pierrefonds Tournament; and

Whereas five girls from the Halifax St. Margarets Ringette Association, including Courtney Rawding, are members of this team;

[Page 3300]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Courtney Rawding and the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team on a job well done and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2885

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team won two gold medals within two weeks; and

Whereas the group of 11-year-old girls participated in the Sackville Christmas Tournament in December, beating the Sackville Tweens in the gold medal game and a couple days later the team headed to Montreal for the Pierrefonds Tournament; and

Whereas five girls from the Halifax St. Margarets Ringette Association, including Rachael Burton, are members of this team;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Rachel Burton and the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team on a job well done and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2886

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team won two gold medals within two weeks; and

Whereas the group of 11-year-old girls participated in the Sackville Christmas Tournament in December, beating the Sackville Tweens in the gold medal game and a couple days later the team headed to Montreal for the Pierrefonds Tournament; and

Whereas five girls from the Halifax St. Margarets Ringette Association, including Erica McLean, are members of this team;

[Page 3301]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Erica McLean and the Nova Scotia Provincial Petite AA Ringette team on a job well done and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 2887

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Mate Sara Spafford and her team had tremendous success with a record of five wins and one loss, leading them to the Challenge Cup Series;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Sara Spafford on her latest success and wish her much luck in her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2888

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Second Meryn Avery and her team had tremendous success with a record of five wins and one loss, leading them to the Challenge Cup Series;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Meryn Avery on her latest success and wish her much luck in her future endeavours.

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RESOLUTION NO. 2889

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Second Thomas Avery and his team had tremendous success with a record of six wins and one loss, earning them the Low Road Championship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Thomas Avery on his latest success and wish him much luck in his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2890

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Lead Matthew Davidson and his team had tremendous success with a record of six wins and one loss, earning them the Low Road Championship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Matthew Davidson on his latest success and wish him much luck in his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2891

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

[Page 3303]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Skip Lindsay Doucet and her team had tremendous success with a record of five wins and one loss, leading them to the Challenge Cup Series;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Lindsay Doucet on her latest success and wish her much luck in her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2892

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Mate Chris MacRae and his team had tremendous success with a record of six wins and one loss, earning them the Low Road Championship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Chris MacRae on his latest success and wish him much luck in his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2893

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

[Page 3304]

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Lead Nicole Jollimore and her team had tremendous success with a record of five wins and one loss, leading them to the Challenge Cup Series;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Nicole Jollimore on her latest success and wish her much luck in her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2894

By: Hon. Judy Streatch (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on March 29th, eight young curlers from Chester-St. Margaret's headed to Scotland to play the sport they love; and

Whereas the two teams competed, for the first time in a stadium setting, against eight different countries in the Dumfries International Globe Bonspiel; and

Whereas Skip Ben Parker and his team had tremendous success with a record of six wins and one loss, earning them the Low Road Championship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Ben Parker on his latest success and wish him much luck in his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 2895

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3305]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank West Bay Pastoral Charge Volunteer of the Year, Robert MacIntosh, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2896

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Janvrin's Fest Volunteer of the Year, Roger Hill, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2897

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Centre La Picasse Volunteer of the Year, Shirley Martell, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2898

[Page 3306]

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank East Richmond ATV Riders Volunteer of the Year, Stuwart Carter, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2899

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank West Arichat & District Village Circle Society Volunteer of the Year, Peter Bourque, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2900

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 3307]

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Red Islands District 10 Volunteer Fire Department Volunteer of the Year, Peter Campbell, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2901

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Village On The Canal Association Volunteer of the Year, Pierre LaRochelle, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2902

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3308]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Strait Richmond Palliative Care Society Volunteer of the Year, Ramona Marchand, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2903

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank River Bourgeois Technology & Training Centre Volunteer of the Year, Rebecca Landry, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2904

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3309]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank EnRoute Isle Madame Volunteer of the Year, Richard Doiron, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2905

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Bonnie Brae Seniors Club Volunteer of the Year, Richard Stone, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2906

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3310]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Janvrin's Island Sport and Recreation Association Volunteer of the Year, Ricky David, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2907

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank D'Escousse Civic Improvement Society Volunteer of the Year, Vivian Fougere, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2908

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3311]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Louisdale and District Volunteer Fire Department Volunteer of the Year, Warren Jeffrey, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2909

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Point Tupper Heritage Association Volunteer of the Year, Russell MacNeil, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2910

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3312]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank West Richmond Education Centre Volunteer of the Year, Sara Marchand, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2911

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond County Literacy Network Volunteer of the Year, Shannon Diggdon, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2912

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3313]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's Lions Marina Volunteer of the Year, Sharon Burke, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2913

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank North Isle Madame Seniors Club Volunteer of the Year, Sheila Savoury, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2914

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3314]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Island Community Justice Society Volunteer of the Year, Sheldon Groom, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2915

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond County Early Childhood Education Association, St. Peter's Branch Volunteer of the Year, Shelley Anderson, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2916

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's Scottish Country Dance Group Volunteer of the Year, Shirley Cotie, for her hard work and commitment.

[Page 3315]

RESOLUTION NO. 2917

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Bras d'Or Lakers Seniors Volunteer of the Year, Joyce MacMullen, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2918

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank La Maison des Jeunes Richmond Volunteer of the Year, Julien R. Boudreau, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2919

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3316]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank West Richmond Education Centre Volunteer of the Year, Sara Marchand, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2920

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank 842 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Volunteer of the Year, Tania Collier, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2921

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3317]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Comité des Femmes en marche de Richmond Volunteer of the Year, Thérèse Benoit, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2922

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond County Seniors Council Volunteer of the Year, Theresa Campbell, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2923

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3318]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Riverdale Community Services Society Volunteer of the Year, Thomas A. Chisholm, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2924

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Minor Hockey Association Volunteer of the Year, Trevor Wilkie, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2925

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3319]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Les Amis de La Picasse Volunteer of the Year, Velma Martell, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2926

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond County Early Childhood Education Association, Isle Madame Branch Volunteer of the Year, Victoria Bonin-MacKenzie, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2927

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Grand River Seniors Volunteer of the Year, Virginia Getz, for her hard work and commitment.

[Page 3320]

RESOLUTION NO. 2928

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Oceanview Wildlife Association Volunteer of the Year, Charles Carter, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2929

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise and District Fire Department Ladies Auxiliary Volunteer of the Year, Charmaine Kemp, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2930

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3321]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank South Mountain Arm of Gold Association Volunteer of the Year, Wilfred Cude, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2931

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Rocky Bay Irish Club Volunteer of the Year, James Bowen, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2932

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3322]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Immaculate Conception Parish Council Volunteer of the Year, Janelle Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2933

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. John's Anglican Church Volunteer of the Year, Jean Bonin, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2934

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3323]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's-Sampsonville Terry Fox Run Volunteer of the Year, Jean Penny, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2935

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Louisdale Girl Guides Volunteer of the Year, Jessica Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2936

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3324]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Strait Richmond Hospital Advisory Board Volunteer of the Year, Johanna MacKenzie, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2937

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Wildlife Association Volunteer of the Year, John Pitts, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2938

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3325]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Black River United Church Volunteer of the Year, Donna Flynn, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2939

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Fleur de Lis Seniors Club Volunteer of the Year, Eileen Landry, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2940

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3326]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Royal Canadian Legion Branch 150 Ladies Auxiliary Volunteer of the Year, Aurine Richard, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2941

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Black River United Church Women Volunteer of the Year, Berni Thorneycroft, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2942

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Fourchu United Church Volunteer of the Year, Blair Gwynn, for his hard work and commitment.

[Page 3327]

RESOLUTION NO. 2943

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Royal Canadian Legion Branch 110 L'Ardoise Volunteer of the Year, Blanche Fitch, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2944

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Anne Community and Nursing Centre Ladies Volunteer of the Year, Brenda Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2945

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3328]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Academy Home and School Volunteer of the Year, Carolyn MacNeil, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2946

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Head of the Bay Seniors, West Bay Volunteer of the Year, Catherine Skinner, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2947

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 3329]

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Lakeside 4-H Club Volunteer of the Year, Channing Carter, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2948

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Island View Health Services Auxiliary, Strait Richmond Hospital Volunteer of the Year, Geraldine White, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2949

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 3330]

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank West Bay United Church Volunteer of the Year, Gerd Grundmann, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2950

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. John the Baptist Parish Council Volunteer of the Year, Germaine Carter, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2951

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3331]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Riverdale Computer Centre Society Volunteer of the Year, Christena McNamara, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2952

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Strait Area Ground Search and Rescue Volunteer of the Year, Christopher D. Terrio, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2953

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3332]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Festival Acadien de Petit de Grat Volunteer of the Year, Darlene Osmond, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2954

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Fourchu Development Association Volunteer of the Year, Darryl Gwynn, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2955

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Minor Baseball Association Volunteer of the Year, Dave Wincey, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2956

[Page 3333]

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Fourchu United Church Women Volunteer of the Year, Delores MacQueen, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2957

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Royal Canadian Legion Branch 150 Isle Madame Volunteer of the Year, Dave Forgeron, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2958

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3334]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Isle Madame New Horizon's Seniors Club Volunteer of the Year, Jackie Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2959

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Louisdale Lions Club Volunteer of the Year, Jackie Hopkins, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2960

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3335]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Eastern County Regional Library Petit-de-Grat Branch Volunteer of the Year, Jalisa David, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2961

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank North Side Community Improvement Volunteer of the Year, Emmellean Rowe, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2962

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3336]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise Men's Club Volunteer of the Year, Francis G. Mombourquette, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2963

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Janvrin's Island Seniors Club Volunteer of the Year, Freddie Fougere, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2964

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3337]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Immaculate Conception Parish Council Barra Head Volunteer of the Year, G. Joseph MacNeil, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2965

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Royal Canadian Legion Branch 47, Ladies Auxiliary Volunteer of the Year, Gemma Poirier, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2966

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3338]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Dr. W.B. Kingston Community Health Center Volunteer of the Year, George J. Landry, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2967

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise Ladies Social Club Volunteer of the Year, Emma McNeil, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2968

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3339]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Louis CWL Volunteer of the Year, Nicole McInnis, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2969

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Skating Club Volunteer of the Year, Nicole Hepditch, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2970

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank École Beau-Port Volunteer of the Year, Odilon Boudreau, for his hard work and commitment.

[Page 3340]

RESOLUTION NO. 2971

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's Village Commission Volunteer of the Year, Germaine MacDonald, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2972

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Hyacinth's CWL Volunteer of the Year, Gerri Samson, for his hard work and commitment.

[Page 3341]

RESOLUTION NO. 2973

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Immaculate Conception CWL Volunteer of the Year, Glenda Stone, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2974

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Lakeside Community Association Volunteer of the Year, Gordon Landry, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2975

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3342]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Louis Pastoral Council Volunteer of the Year, Herman Marchand, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2976

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Isle Madame Tourism and Trade Association Volunteer of the Year, Hubert Doyle, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2977

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3343]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Arena Association Volunteer of the Year, Hubert Kraitzek, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2978

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank East Richmond Education Centre Home and School Association Volunteer of the Year, Marie Prout, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2979

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3344]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Acadiaville Community Centre Society Volunteer of the Year, Marion Mury, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2980

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. John the Baptist CWL Volunteer of the Year, Marlaine Burke, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2981

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3345]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's and Area Volunteer of the Year, Mary Stone, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2982

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank River Bourgeois Seniors 50+ Club Volunteer of the Year, Mary Touesnard, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2983

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's Community Club Volunteer of the Year, Michele Jonas, for her hard work and commitment.

[Page 3346]

RESOLUTION NO. 2984

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Telile Community TV Volunteer of the Year, Michelle Theriault, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2985

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Isle Madame Community Venture Centre Association Volunteer of the Year, Muriel Guyatt, for her hard work and commitment.

[Page 3347]

RESOLUTION NO. 2986

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank West Bay Community Club Volunteer of the Year, Murray MacPhee, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2987

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Isle Madame Historical Society Volunteer of the Year, Nicole Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.

[Page 3348]

RESOLUTION NO. 2988

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Little Anse/Sampsons Cove Social Action Club Volunteer of the Year, Leah Samson, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2989

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank La Coopérative Radio Richmond Volunteer of the Year, Lena Samson, for her hard work and commitment.

[Page 3349]

RESOLUTION NO. 2990

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Royal Canadian Legion Branch 47 St. Peter's Volunteer of the Year, Leo G. Bouchie, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2991

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3350]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's and Area Volunteer Fire Department Volunteer of the Year, Cheryl LeBlanc, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2992

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise Jolly Club Volunteer of the Year, Lorraine Mombourquette, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2993

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3351]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Villa Recreation Department Volunteer of the Year, Lorraine Westlake, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2994

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Canadian Cancer Society Isle Madame/Louisdale Unit Volunteer of the Year, Madeline Ann Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2995

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3352]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Joseph's CWL Volunteer of the Year, Magdalen Samson, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2996

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Francis de Sales CWL Volunteer of the Year, Margaret Johnson, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2997

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3353]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Francis de Sales Parish Council Volunteer of the Year, Margaret Windsor, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2998

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Lennox Passage Yacht Club Volunteer of the Year, André LeBlanc, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 2999

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3354]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Our Lady of Assumption Parish Council Volunteer of the Year, Anita Marchand, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3000

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise Friends of Palliative Care Volunteer of the Year, Anna M. Bona, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3001

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

[Page 3355]

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank East Richmond Education Centre Volunteer of the Year, Anna Ferguson, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3002

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Retired Teachers Organization (Richmond Branch) Volunteer of the Year, Linda Boulet, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3003

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

[Page 3356]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Janvrin's Island Community Centre Volunteer of the Year, Lisa MacNamara, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3004

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Felix Marchand Education Centre Volunteer of the Year, Lori Curtis, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3005

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Our Lady of Assumption CWL Volunteer of the Year, Karen Samson, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3006

[Page 3357]

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise Economic Association for Development Volunteer of the Year, Kelly Clannon, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3007

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank L'Ardoise Cap Site Volunteer of the Year, Kevin Lewis, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3008

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3358]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank St. Peter's and Area Lion's Club Volunteer of the Year, Wilma Martell, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3009

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Holy Guardian Angels Parish Council Volunteer of the Year, Alexander Sampson, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3010

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3359]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Isle Madame Volunteer Fire Department Volunteer of the Year, Alfred Britten, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3011

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Canadian Cancer Society Unit 53, L'Ardoise Volunteer of the Year, Alice Roberge, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3012

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3360]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Lawrence Kavanaugh Council 4607 Volunteer of the Year, Aloysius Boudreau, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3013

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Isle Madame Boat Club Volunteer of the Year, Amedee Samson, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3014

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

[Page 3361]

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Richmond Community Access Society Volunteer of the Year, Joan Clannon, for her hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3015

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Development Isle Madame Volunteer of the Year, Joël Bowen, for his hard work and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 3016

By: Mr. Michel Samson (Richmond)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers truly are the heart of our community; and

[Page 3362]

Whereas volunteers give freely of their time to help organizations throughout our county; and

Whereas on Friday, May 2, 2008, I joined Warden John Boudreau, municipal councillors and staff at a supper to recognize the 120 volunteers from throughout Richmond County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Canadian Red Cross Isle Madame Branch Volunteer of the Year, Leona Boudreau, for her hard work and commitment.