The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House resumed on:
September 21, 2017.

HANSARD 07-2

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Alfie MacLeod

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://ww w.gov.ns.ca/legislature/HOUSE_BUSINESS/hansard.html

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______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________

Second Session

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Fish.: Little Entrance Wharf (Caribou Hbr.) - Dredge & Repair,
Mr. C. Parker 23
TIR: Rte. 215 (Walton to Moose Brook) - Repave, Mr. J. MacDonell 24
Fish.: Canso /Guysborough Co.: Citizens - Meet, Mr. C. MacKinnon 24
TIR: Brookside & Kelly Rds. - Upgrade, Mr. W. Estabrooks 24
TIR: French River Rd. (Pictou Co.) - Rebuild, Mr. C. MacKinnon 25
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
Seniors - Falls Prevention, Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson 25
Ms. M. More 26
Mr. H. Theriault 26
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1, Fin. Minister (MLA for Lunenburg): Best Wishes - Send,
The Premier 27
Vote - Affirmative 28
Res. 2, MacInnis, Al - Hockey Hall of Fame: Induction - Congrats.,
The Premier 28
Vote - Affirmative 29
Res. 3, MacKeen, H. David: Death of - Tribute, Hon. A. MacIsaac 29
Vote - Affirmative 29
Res. 4, Bill C-2: Importance - Recognize, Hon. C. Clarke 29
Vote - Affirmative 30
Res. 5, MADD Canada: Efforts - Recognize, Hon. M. Scott 30
Vote - Affirmative 31
Res. 6, Commun. Serv.: Youth Achievement Award Winners - Recognize,
Hon. Judy Streatch 31
Vote - Affirmative 32
Res. 7, EMO - Storm Forecasters: Dedication - Acknowledge,
Hon. C. Bolivar-Getson 32
Vote - Affirmative 32
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 1, Trade Union Act, Hon. M. Parent 33
No. 2, Motor Vehicle Act, Mr. D. Dexter 33
No. 3, Public Utilities Act, Mr. M. Samson 34
No. 4, Pension Benefits Act, Hon. M. Parent 34
No. 5, Retail Business Uniform Closing Day Act, Mr. D. Dexter 34
No. 6, Smoke-free Places Act, Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 34
No. 7, Motor Vehicle Act, Hon. M. Scott 34
No. 8, Motor Vehicle Act, Mr. G. Steele 34
No. 9, Municipal Finance Corporation Act, Mr. L. Preyra 35
No.10, Gunshot and Stab Wounds Mandatory Reporting Act,
Hon. C. Clarke 35
No. 11, Civil Forfeiture Act (Hon. C. Clarke) 35
No. 12, Evidence Act (Hon. C. Clarke) 35
No. 13, Probate Act (Hon. C. Clarke) 35
No. 14, Assets Management and Disposition Act (Hon. C. Clarke) 35
No. 15, Small Claims Court Act (Hon. Cecil Clarke) 35
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 8, Williams, Morgan: Rugby Career - Congrats., Mr. D. Dexter 35
Vote - Affirmative 36
Res. 9, Atl. Accord: Unamended Version - Support, Mr. S. McNeil 36
Res. 10, SMU Huskies Football Team - Vanier Cup Game: Best Wishes -
Extend, Hon. K. Casey 37
Vote - Affirmative 38
Res. 11, Proudfoot, Heather: Death of - Tribute, Mr. F. Corbett 38
Vote - Affirmative 38
Res. 12, Sobey Family: Work - Congrats., Mr. P. Dunn 39
Vote - Affirmative 39
Res. 13, Elizabeth Fry Soc. Mainland N.S. - Anniv. (25th),
Ms. M. More 39
Vote - Affirmative 40
Res. 14, Casey, Bill: Atl. Accord Stance - Applaud,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 41
Res. 15, Donovan, Chief Lyle/Ingonish Vol. FD - Anniv. (45th),
Mr. K. Bain 42
Vote - Affirmative 42
Res. 16, Shubenacadie & Dist. Vol. FD, Mr. J. MacDonell 42
Vote - Affirmative 43
Res. 17, Gov't. (N.S.): Quarry Planning Process - Start, Mr. H. Theriault 43
Res. 18, Sobey, David & Donald: Cdn. Business Hall of Fame -
Induction, Mr. P. Dunn 44
Vote - Affirmative 45
Res. 19, Wedge, Elly: Fiddler's Grand Prize Award - Congrats.,
Ms. J. Massey 45
Vote - Affirmative 45
Res. 20, Shepherd, David/Price, Travis: Anti-Bullying Efforts -
Recognize, Mr. L. Glavine 45
Vote - Affirmative 46
Res. 21, Moffett, Linda & Desmond - Victoria Co. Hosp. Charitable Fdn:
Fundraising - Commend, Mr. K. Bain 46
Vote - Affirmative 47
Res. 22, River John "Read by the Sea Festival": Organizers - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Parker 47
Vote - Affirmative 48
Res. 23, Operation Red Nose: Vols./Sponsors - Congrats.,
Mr. L. Preyra 48
Vote - Affirmative 48
Res. 24, Sambro Island Light: Sound Signal - Reinstate,
Ms. M. Raymond 49
Vote - Affirmative 49
Res. 25, Lockview HS Intermediate Boys Cross Country Team:
Championship - Congrats., Mr. P. Paris 49
Vote - Affirmative 50
Res. 26, Loveridge, Michael/Mersey House: Mar. Music Support -
Recognize, Ms. V. Conrad 50
Vote - Affirmative 51
Res. 27, St. Peter's Anglican Church - Anniv. (175th), Ms. B. Kent 51
Vote - Affirmative 51
Res. 28, Melmerby Beach Triathlon: Participants - Commend,
Mr. C. MacKinnon 52
Vote - Affirmative 52
Res. 29, Duke, Anthony "Toni": PSC Serv. (35 yrs.) - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Porter 52
Vote - Affirmative 53
Res. 30, Heleno, Sonya: TD Can. Trust Scholarship - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 53
Vote - Affirmative 54
Vote - Affirmative
Res. 31, Schilling, Curt - ALS Sufferers: Positive Impact - Congrats.,
Hon. B. Taylor 54
Vote - Affirmative 55
Res. 32, Armstrong, Rev. Clarence: Service - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Estabrooks 55
Vote - Affirmative 55
Res. 33, Bishop, Anne: YMCA Hfx./Dart. Peace Medal - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Porter 55
Vote - Affirmative 56
Res. 34, Louisbourg: UNESCO World Heritage Site Application -
Support, Ms. M. Raymond 56
Vote - Affirmative 57
Res. 35, Elliott, Harold "Chuck": Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur -
Congrats., Ms. B. Kent 57
Vote - Affirmative 58
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
Mr. D. Dexter 58
Mr. S. McNeil 73
Adjourned debate 82
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Mon., Nov. 26, 2007 at 7:00 p.m. 82
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 36, Woods Hbr. Mosquito R Navigators: Provincial Championship -
Congrats., Mr. S. Belliveau 83
Res. 37, Bosdet, Peggy Ann/The CandyShop: Grand Opening - Congrats.,
The Premier 83
Res. 38, Firefighters/Auxiliaries - Thank, Hon. M. Scott 84
Res. 39, Taggart, Sarah: Int'l. Children's Games - Swimming Results,
Ms. M. More 84
Res. 40, Meredith, Will: Int'l. Children's Games - Swimming Results,
Ms. M. More 85
Res. 41, Smith, Hugh - Moonsalto Cup (2007): Representation - Congrats.,
Ms. M. More 85
Res. 42, Balish, Sarah: Athletic Achievements - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 86
Res. 43, Mackay, Robert: Vol. Efforts - Congrats., Mr. S. Belliveau 86
Res. 44, Atwood, Robyn: Lt.-Gov's Award - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 86
Res. 45, Conrad, Roddy: Vol. Efforts - Commend, Mr. S. Belliveau 87
Res. 46, Henneberry: Soap Box Derby Trophy - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 88
Res. 47, Dixon, Ryan: Golf Championship - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 88
Res. 48, Gregory, Devon: Soap Box Derby Competition - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 89
Res. 49, Shelburne Reg. HS: 30-Hr. Famine - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 89
Res. 50, Shag Hbr. Incident Soc.: History Preservation - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 90
Res. 51, Swaine, Sally: Sportsmanship/Dedication - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 90
Res. 52, Kenney, Robbie: Vol. Efforts - Commend, Mr. S. Belliveau 91
Res. 53, Clark, Richard: Political Involvement - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 91
Res. 54, Nickerson, Rhylie: Roseway Literacy Prize - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 92
Res. 55, Dixon, Nick: Frog Hopping Race - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 92
Res. 56, Harlow, Morgan: Athletic Success - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 93
Res. 57, McGowan Lake Fish Hatchery - Anniv. (20th),
Mr. S. Belliveau 93
Res. 58, Phillips, Mary: Commun. Serv. - Thank, Mr. S. Belliveau 94
Res. 59, O'Connell, Linda - Relay for Life: Participation -
Congrats., Mr. S. Belliveau 94
Res. 60, Poire, Manu: Women's Motorcycle Interest - Promotion,
Mr. S. Belliveau 95
Res. 61, Harris, Logan: Lt.-Gov's. Medal - Congrats., Mr. S. Belliveau 95
Res. 62, Munroe, Mallory: Roseway Literacy Prize - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 96
Res. 63, Keeler, Laura: Lt.-Gov's. Award, Mr. S. Belliveau 96
Res. 64, Goreham, Kay - Wood Hbr. FD: Dedication - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 97
Res. 65, Harris, Kaitlyn Anne: Lt.-Gov's. Medal - Congrats.,
Mr. S. Belliveau 97

[Page 23]

HALIFAX, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 2007

Sixtieth General Assembly

Second Session

9:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Alfie MacLeod

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Mr. Wayne Gaudet

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We'll commence the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Pictou West.

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of fishermen and other users of the Little Entrance Wharf at Caribou Harbour in Pictou County. The operative clause is:

"Whereas The Little Entrance Wharf at Caribou Harbour,

Is used by 9 Fishing Vessels, and other craft. We the under

Signed Fishermen and users of this wharf, support efforts,

To have dredging and minor Repairs carried out as soon

As possible."

Mr. Speaker, it's signed by 30 residents, and I too have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

[Page 24]

23

The honourable member for Hants East.

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of residents in the Walton-Noel area of Hants East. The operative clause is:

"We the residents living on and near Route 215, and regular users of this disgraceful, dangerous, pothole-filled highway, do hereby petition the Minister of Transportation and Public Works to immediately place the section of Route 215 from the village of Walton through to the recently paved portion in or near Moosebrook [sic] on the priority list for repaving."

Mr. Speaker, there are 335 signatures, plus mine.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to introduce a petition from the citizens of Canso and the rural communities throughout eastern Guysborough County. The operative clause is:

". . . to take immediate action to meet with the citizens of this economically depressed region of Nova Scotia to seek ways and means of replacing empoyment [sic] opportunities lost by the closing of the only major industry in the area."

That is directed to all three levels of government, and this is signed by 486 local residents. I too have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I welcome the opportunity to table a petition, and I beg leave that the House pay attention to the petition. The operative clause is, "The Brookside Road has been severely impacted by the heavy trucks used in the construction of housing projects . . ." in that area. There are 272 signatures requesting attention to the improvement of Brookside and Kelly Roads, and I too have affixed my signature. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

[Page 25]

The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I beg leave to introduce a petition or table a petition from the residents of French River Road. The operative clause, of course, is dealing with the French River Road and requesting that this road in Pictou East be rebuilt. It is signed by 246 local residents, and I too have affixed my signature. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Seniors.

HON. CAROLYN BOLIVAR-GETSON: Mr. Speaker, we are all at risk of injury due to falls, but seniors in our province are especially vulnerable. Given our aging population, Nova Scotia cannot permit complacency concerning seniors' falls. We must continue to address this problem, and we will.

Falls among seniors cost Nova Scotians $72 million per year. On average, 76 Nova Scotian seniors die from falls each year. Mr. Speaker, according to the report, seniors' falls in Nova Scotia - released in June of this year - falls utilize a disproportional number of hospital days for seniors and cause challenges to our acute care and long-term care systems. Among the report's findings is that 10 per cent of the 2.1 million hospital days used by seniors between 2000 and 2004 were due to fall-related injuries. Those fall-related hospitalizations are also three times lengthier than hospital stays for all other reasons.

Mr. Speaker, 20 per cent of seniors die within one year of a hip fracture. The likelihood of seniors being injured or killed by a fall increases dramatically with age. Given that the number of Nova Scotians aged 65 years of age and older will double by 2026, the volume of these injuries will continue to grow if left unchecked, with a resulting profound impact on the lives of Nova Scotia families and on our health care system.

Mr. Speaker, preventing falls among seniors is one way to lessen the demands for health resources, by reducing the strain on emergency departments, lowering the demand for non-elective and emergency surgery such as hip replacements, reducing the number of hospital admissions among seniors, and slowing the demand for . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The chatter is getting a little high.

[Page 26]

MS. BOLIVAR-GETSON: It is accepted that nearly all injuries are preventable. Falls among seniors are serious injuries that many people are not aware of, and that's what makes it so dangerous. By being aware of the risks and making changes to our homes and communities, we will all be safer. By becoming aware of safety tips and by keeping healthier, we are drastically reducing our chances of becoming injured.

Mr. Speaker, as Minister of Seniors, I look forward to the continued work of the Department of Health Promotion and Protection; the Department of Health; the Preventing Falls Together Program and its community-based falls prevention coalitions; and our many other partners within and outside government as we continue to raise the importance of preventing falls related to injuries among seniors.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

MS. MARILYN MORE: Well, I have to say this is a proud moment in my life because of the topic being discussed today as part of the ministerial statement. In all due modesty, I have to tell you that I am the Godmother to Preventing Falls Together. I was actually instrumental, with my organization Community Links, in this initiative starting in Nova Scotia.

I am so pleased to see it grow to the extent that we now have 11 regional coalitions around this province with four staff. We began very humbly when I was the only coordinator and we had financial support from the federal government. At the time, Health Canada felt that our project in Nova Scotia was too ambitious, that there was no way of achieving it because we were trying to attempt to cover the whole province. I want to say that we chose a model of collaboration in working with government, with community-based organizations, with the voluntary sector, and volunteers in our community to grow this project to the point where it's going to make a significant difference in reducing falls in our province. There is a huge beneficial impact there to seniors and family members but also to our budget, because falls are a very expensive way, after the fact, of delivering health care and health service.

I just want to say if anything ever made me realize that accidents are preventable it was working on this initiative. There is so much that we can do as politicians and in our public policy to reduce the risk of falling not only in homes, but in our communities and through the development of good public policy. I hope that this is a call to action for all members of this House to really learn more about the Preventing Falls Together initiative. I congratulate the Government of Nova Scotia for coming in as a full partner and I know that we're going to hear very great things in the future from this as well. Thank you, Mr. Speaker,

[9:15 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

[Page 27]

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I welcome the minister's concern, I welcome her statement concerning our seniors of this province. I see no solutions in this statement and I see the only concern that she has is our seniors falling. Where I come from I don't hear tell of too many of our seniors falling, the odd one. What I hear tell of from our seniors - and I will even speak about my mother - is the poverty that the seniors are going into in this province as we speak here this morning. They're wondering whether they're going to be able to have money to fill their oil barrel before Christmas or to use the money for food.

My mother's 85 years old down in Digby living alone. She is wondering whether to put a wood stove in along with her oil furnace - that's what her worries are right now. She hasn't fallen yet, God's blessing with her I hope she doesn't, but she's more concerned about the little paycheck she receives every month from the government. That is her concern and I think 90 per cent of the seniors' concerns in this province is what they're receiving each month to try to live on. You will find that there are a few, and I believe the minister's statement, that there is a problem with our seniors falling. I hope there's a solution to correct that, but I believe if we care about our seniors we'll certainly look into a lot more problems than just our seniors falling. With that, I'll take my seat Mr. Speaker. Thank you.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 1

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas cancer is a disease which has no doubt affected everyone in this House - in some cases directly- or because it has afflicted a family member or friend; and

Whereas the honourable member for Lunenburg and Minister of Finance continues to battle this disease, yet carries out his work on behalf of his constituents and on behalf of all Nova Scotians with the same vigour and earnestness he has done since elected to the job in 1998; and

Whereas while we are missing the member in the Legislature today, as he was recently sidelined from his job to recover at home from hip surgery, we will no doubt see him back on his feet very soon - probably sooner than his doctor wishes;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House send our best wishes to our friend as he hopefully rests and heals, and wish him well in showing the patience required to follow the orders of his doctor and wife in the days ahead.

[Page 28]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Premier.

Excuse me - I'm a little nervous, folks. Are you ready for the question?

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 2

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Al MacInnis, the pride of Port Hood, Nova Scotia, had one of the most powerful slapshots in the NHL and was one of the few defencemen to record over 1,000 career points; and

Whereas in his 23-year career with the Calgary Flames and the St. Louis Blues, Al MacInnis was a James Norris Memorial Trophy winner, a Stan Kaminsky Trophy winner, a 15-time NHL All Star, recipient of the Conn Smythe Trophy, an Olympic Gold Medal winner, and Stanley Cup Champion; and

Whereas on November 12, 2007, Al MacInnis became the first Nova Scotian to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Al MacInnis on his induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame and thank him for being such a wonderful ambassador for Nova Scotia and for the game of hockey.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 29]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried. (Applause)

The honourable Deputy Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 3

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas both Halifax and this province will miss the bright mind and community and political spirit of H. David MacKeen, who passed away this week; and

Whereas among his many proud accomplishments this Haligonian served as a Ward 3 alderman from 1969 to 1974, during which time he also acted as Deputy Mayor from 1972 to 1973; and

Whereas Mr. MacKeen not only gave back to his community through dedicated public service and work with groups such as the John Howard Society and the Halifax Welfare Rights organization, he also served through his political service with the Progressive Conservative Party, offering sage advice for years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House offer our sympathies to Mr. MacKeen's children, Cameron and Alison, his grandchildren, sister and many loyal friends on this sad loss to our community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 30]

The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 4

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas it is a basic responsibility of any government to ensure the safety and security of its citizens; and

Whereas crime continues to exist in our province, and indeed throughout all of Canada, so must governments' efforts to address criminal activity; and

Whereas the initiatives proposed in Bill C-2, including enhancing protection of our young people from sexual predators, enhancing protection of our communities from dangerous offenders and creating stringent bail rules when a gun is used to commit a crime, will only serve to aid Nova Scotia's and Canada's efforts to address criminal activity;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the importance of Bill C-2 in providing lasting improvements to the Canadian criminal justice system and support its passage in the House of Commons.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

RESOLUTION NO. 5

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mothers Against Drunk Driving's national Project Red Ribbon campaign is a public awareness effort for sober driving through the holiday season; and

[Page 31]

Whereas the MADD Canada ribbon has become a familiar symbol of safe and sober driving throughout Canada; and

Whereas more than 4 million red ribbons distributed across the country by MADD Canada volunteers and the organization's sponsors deliver the sober driving message during the busiest social time of the calendar;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize MADD Canada for its tireless efforts in fighting the battle against impaired driving in Nova Scotia and across our nation.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 6

HON. JUDY STREATCH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today, November 23rd, marks the eighth annual Nova Scotia Council for the Family Youth Achievement Awards celebrating the accomplishments of youth in care of the province; and

Whereas each award winner has been nominated by someone close to them, someone who has recognized their abilities and achievements; and

Whereas I am honoured, once again, to help recognize these young people for their educational achievements, leadership qualities, outstanding achievements in sport, art and culture, and for their outstanding perseverance in facing life's challenges;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the achievements of these youth, and join me and all Nova Scotians in our pride to have these young people in our communities.

[Page 32]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Emergency Management.

RESOLUTION NO. 7

HON. CAROLYN BOLIVAR-GETSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tropical Storm Noel swept ashore on November 3rd after creating widespread destruction in the Caribbean and Eastern Seaboard; and

Whereas Nova Scotians heeded the many warnings by weather forecasters at the Canadian Hurricane Centre and from our own Emergency Management Office; and

Whereas preparation is absolutely essential to ensure public safety;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge the dedication of those who worked around the clock, at the local and provincial levels, to keep Nova Scotians well-informed about the dangerous storm.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 33]

The honourable Minister of Environment and Labour.

HON. MARK PARENT: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and before I introduce a bill, would it be possible to make mention of some guests in the gallery?

MR. SPEAKER: I will allow that, yes.

MR. PARENT: I would like to introduce two guests who are well-known to the House, and I draw your attention to them and welcome them to our Legislature this morning: Joan Jessome, the President of NSGEU and Janet Hazelton, the President of NSNU. (Applause)

If possible, Mr. Speaker, my colleague, the Minister of Health, would like to introduce some guests as well.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, in your gallery, there is Pat Lee, he's the CEO of the Pictou County Health Authority, as well as Bob Cook who is the President and CEO of NSAHO. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: I would extend a warm welcome to all visitors in the House, those who are introduced and the other visitors we have here today.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 1 - Entitled an Act to Provide for the Fair Resolution of Health Care or Community Services Disputes Through Mediation and Binding Arbitration. (Hon. Mark Parent)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read a second time on a future day.

The honourable Leader of the Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I'd like at this time to, if I may, introduce to the House a number of people who are in the gallery today for the purpose of discussing the bill that was just introduced, and of course to also speak about the real solutions to health care issues and shortages.

Mr. Speaker, they are in the east gallery: Kenda McKinley from Dartmouth; Wendy Williams from Preston; Barbara Vidito of Cole Harbour; Paul Acker of Bedford; Bernadette Deveau, it says North End, Halifax; Carl Crouse, Middleton; Karen MacKenzie of Truro;

[Page 34]

Janet Hazelton was already introduced; and Sean Fole of Truro. If they would just rise and receive the welcome of the House. (Applause)

[9:30 a.m.]

Bill No. 2 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 293 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Motor Vehicle Act. (Mr. Darrell Dexter)

Bill No. 3 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 380 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Utilities Act. (Mr. Michel Samson)

Bill No. 4 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 340 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Pension Benefits Act. (Hon. Mark Parent)

Bill No. 5 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 402 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Retail Business Uniform Closing Day Act. (Mr. Darrell Dexter)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, with your permission before I introduce this bill, if I may do an introduction of some people who have joined us in the gallery today.

In the west gallery, joining us today are Meg MacCallum and Mike Derosenroll of the Canadian Cancer Society; Sharon MacIntosh of Smoke Free Nova Scotia; and Allen McAvoy of the Heart and Stroke Foundation. If the House would give them a warm welcome, please. (Applause)

Bill No. 6 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 12 of the Acts of 2002. The Smoke-free Places Act. (Mr. David Wilson, Glace Bay)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: In the Speaker's Gallery, I'd like to introduce to the House today several prominent Nova Scotians. The Deputy Mayor of the Halifax Regional Municipality, Mr. Steven Adams; Chief Frank Beazley of the Halifax Regional Police; Chief Gary Copeland, President of the Police Association of Nova Scotia; Superintendent Gordon Barnett with the RCMP; Nancy White, Nova Scotia Safety Council; and Susan Bruschett, Executive Director of Injury Free Nova Scotia. With them is the Deputy Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, Mr. Dave Darrow, and several staff members

[Page 35]

from my department and the Department of Justice are here today, Mr. Speaker, for the introduction of this bill. I ask them to stand and receive a warm welcome of the House.

Bill No. 7 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 293 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Motor Vehicle Act. (Hon. Murray Scott)

Bill No. 8 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 293 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Motor Vehicle Act, to Enable the Further Restriction of the Use of Diesel Engine Enhanced Braking Systems. (Mr. Graham Steele)

MR. SPEAKER: Just a reminder that the chatter is a little high and it is hard to hear sometimes. Please keep that in mind.

The honourable member for Halifax Citadel.

Bill No. 9 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 301 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Municipal Finance Corporation Act. (Mr. Leonard Preyra)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, just before I introduce my bill, I too want to welcome our special guests from the policing sector and from the Department of Justice who have joined us here in the House today.

Bill No. 10 - Entitled an Act Respecting the Mandatory Reporting of Gunshot and Stab Wounds. (Hon. Cecil Clarke)

Bill No. 11 - Entitled an Act respecting Civil Forfeiture of Property. (Hon. Cecil Clarke)

Bill No. 12 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 154 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Evidence Act. (Hon. Cecil Clarke)

Bill No. 13 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 31 of the Acts of 2000. The Probate Act. (Hon. Cecil Clarke)

Bill No. 14 - Entitled an Act Respecting Provincial Assets Management and Disposition. (Hon. Cecil Clarke)

Bill No. 15 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 430 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Small Claims Court Act. (Hon. Cecil Clarke)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

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NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 8

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cole Harbour professional rugby player 31-year-old Morgan Williams has had a long, outstanding career on the national and international sports scene; and

Whereas Morgan Williams, as Captain of the Canadian team, was twice named Man of the Match during Canada's Rugby World Cup Tournament played in Bordeaux, France in September 2007; and

Whereas after having participated in three world cups and answered the call to play for Canada 55 times, Morgan Williams has decided this 2007 World Cup would be his last performance as he ends his career as a rugby player.

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Morgan Williams for a brilliant career as one of the world's premiere rugby players and extend our appreciation to him for representing his country at the highest level of competition, and wish him well as he retires from the sport of rugby.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 9

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 37]

Whereas Premier MacDonald's new agreement on equalization is not the Atlantic Accord that was signed back in 2005 and is not the accord Nova Scotians wanted; and

Whereas the Premier and his Finance Minister admitted that the Harper-MacDonald Accord will give Nova Scotians $50 million less next year and $139 million less over the next eight years; and

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

MR. MCNEIL: Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Whereas Nova Scotians wanted their Premier to fight for the Atlantic Accord, and its full protection of our offshore revenues, in the continuation of an unamended economic development agreement in its entirety;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly reiterate their support for the unamended, unchanged Atlantic Accord so that Nova Scotians can be the full beneficiaries of our offshore revenue.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

[9:45 a.m.]

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 10

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Saint Mary's Huskies will play in the 2007 Vanier Cup tonight in Toronto against the University of Manitoba; and

[Page 38]

Whereas tonight's game will see the Huskies attempt to win their 4th national university collegiate football championship; and

Whereas the Huskies advanced in an amazing fashion with a stunning victory over previously undefeated Laval last weekend here in Halifax;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House extend our best wishes to the Saint Mary's Huskies football team, quarterback Ted Abraham, head coach Steve Sumarah, and all players and all coaches as they vie for another national championship in Toronto tonight.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 11

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Heather Proudfoot became a familiar and trusted figure in Nova Scotia homes through the quality and integrity of her work as the ATV legislative reporter; and

Whereas Heather Proudfoot's courtesy, professionalism, and dedication to accurate, thorough news coverage was widely recognized by her colleagues and MLAs from all Parties; and

Whereas Heather Proudfoot Barry passed away in September, three years after being diagnosed with breast cancer;

Therefore be it resolved that this House express its deepest condolences on the death of Heather Proudfoot to her husband, Art Barry, their sons, Michael and David, her parents, relatives, and many friends.

[Page 39]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 12

MR. PATRICK DUNN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas one of Nova Scotia's most important icons marks 100 years in business this year; and

Whereas grocery giant Sobeys is celebrating its place in the Nova Scotian and now Canadian business communities, offering a reflection on the growth of one meat store to the grocery and entertainment empire we know today; and

Whereas one of the lasting legacies of the Sobeys business is its insistence on giving back to its community through charitable works, particularly in Pictou County, where sponsorships and donations have improved the region. From soccer fields, baseball grounds and public parks to schools and hospitals, Sobeys' support has helped put Pictou County on national and international maps;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House send their heartfelt congratulations to the Sobeys family on a century of hard, meaningful work that is a significant addition to the Canadian business and cultural landscape.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 40]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth South-Portland Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 13

MS. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Elizabeth Fry Society started in the metro Halifax area in November 1982 to support women in conflict or at risk of becoming in conflict with the law; and

Whereas this not-for-profit organization's increased focus on healthy communities and safe living environments is reaching even more women in need; and

Whereas Holly House opened last year in Dartmouth South-Portland Valley to provide secure, affordable housing for eight homeless women and program support for the wider community;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the board, staff and clients of the Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia on its 25th Anniversary and thank them for their continuing support for women to make positive contributions to society.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, if I may make an introduction of several people who are in our gallery today?

MR. SPEAKER: Please do.

[Page 41]

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): The people who are here are health care workers and have come to the Legislature to talk with MLAs about the anti-strike legislation and about what they feel are real solutions to health care issues and shortages. I'm not sure exactly where they are but I know they're somewhere in the gallery today - David Lawrence of the NSGEU, Lacy Costain of the NSGEU; Gina Boyd of the NSGEU; Judy Davis of the NSGEU; Gerri Oakley of the Nova Scotia Nurses' Union; and Shauna Wilcox of Glace Bay of the CAW. Would the House please give them a warm welcome here today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

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RESOLUTION NO. 14

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bill Casey, Member of Parliament for Cumberland-Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley, was first elected to the House of Commons in 1988 and after the 1993 election returned to the private sector for a brief time; and

Whereas Mr. Casey regained his former seat in the House of Commons in the 1997 election with an 8,000 vote majority and was subsequently re-elected in 2000, 2004 and 2006; and

Whereas Mr. Casey was cast out of the Conservative Party of Canada's federal caucus for standing up for the rights and privileges of Nova Scotians, being the only Conservative MP from this province to vote against the federal budget, which dishonoured the Atlantic Accord, a signed document by the previous federal Liberal Government and the former Premier of Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly applaud Mr. Casey for his fight against his own Conservative caucus which, along with the provincial Progressive Conservative Government, has now replaced the original Atlantic Accord with a roll of the dice and another occasion for our have-not province and our Premier to play second fiddle to the rest of Canada.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Human Resources on an introduction.

HON. CAROLYN BOLIVAR-GETSON: Mr. Speaker, I rise today to introduce a group of students who are visiting us from New Germany Rural High School. They're Grade 12 students in the law class there and accompanying them today is Glenna Jenkins, Ivy Lowe and Kim Walker. So I definitely want to extend the warm welcome of the House and hope that you do enjoy today your tour and your time here with us. I would also like to

[Page 43]

acknowledge that one of those students took part in the mock Legislature that we had here and was our Acting Minister of Finance on that day. So welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 15

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Ingonish Volunteer Fire Department was founded in 1962; and

Whereas the Ingonish Volunteer Fire Department provides fire protection and promotes fire safety within their coverage area; and

Whereas 2007 marks the 45th Anniversary of the Ingonish Volunteer Fire Department;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Chief Lyle Donovan and the Ingonish Volunteer Fire Department on their 45th Anniversary and thank its members, both past and present, for their dedication and commitment to their community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 16

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas few things can upset and devastate lives like a fire; and

[Page 44]

Whereas volunteer fire departments now provide services of first responder as well as protection against fires; and

Whereas on November 3, 2007, the Shubenacadie and District Volunteer Fire Department celebrated its 45th Anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved this House of Assembly congratulate the members of the Shubenacadie and District Volunteer Fire Department on their many years of faithful service to their community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 17

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in October, a joint panel review committee on the Digby Neck quarry returned a decision stating that the government reject the proposed industrial quarry for this particular area, and the government has agreed; and

Whereas the vast majority of people on Digby Neck and Islands are pleased with this decision, however they are not pleased with what this process has cost both the community and the quarry company; and

Whereas this was the second battle to stop a quarry in the past 15 years in this same area with the cost being in the millions of dollars, many years of hard work, much stress and community division for both the community and company, only ending up to be back where we were before both of these battles began;

[Page 45]

Therefore be it resolved the members of the House of Assembly urge government to start a planning process today so our battle-tired community and the mining industries will know from this day forward where major industrial quarrying can and cannot take place in this Province of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 18

MR. PATRICK DUNN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas two of Nova Scotia's finest businessmen were recently honoured with their induction into the Canadian Business Hall of Fame; and

Whereas David and Donald Sobey were singled out by their peers, earlier this year at a ceremony in Toronto, for the decades of service they have both given to the legendary company started by their grandfather, J.W. Sobey, which flourished under their father, Frank; and

Whereas both David and Donald joined their father in business in the 1950s and held several posts over the years within both the Sobeys and Empire organizations, guiding the businesses into the giants they are today - their only regret is that late brother, Bill, is not here to join them in the honour;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House send their sincerest congratulations to brothers David and Donald Sobey on their worthy induction into the Canadian Business Hall of Fame, adding to the 100- year celebrations of the Nova Scotia institution.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 46]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 19

MS. JOAN MASSEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in July of 2007 I had the pleasure of attending the 58th Maritime Fiddle Festival at Prince Andrew High School; and

Whereas I had the opportunity to present Elly Wedge of Richmond, Ontario, the Fiddler's Grand Prize Award; and

Whereas the Maritime Fiddle Festival is now the longest- running festival of fiddle music in North America;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Elly Wedge of Richmond, Ontario, on winning the Fiddler's Grand Prize Award, and thank all those who helped make the 58th Maritime Fiddle Festival a success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 20

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MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas David Shepherd and his classmate, Travis Price, have created a global phenomenon and brought a new twist to the anti-bullying campaign; and

Whereas on the first day of school at Central Kings High School a new student was bullied for wearing a pink polo-style shirt, and David and Travis sent a strong message that bullying would not be tolerated at their school; and

Whereas the two purchased bags of pink shirts and handed them out to fellow students in a show of support for the new student and to demonstrate to the bullies that their behaviour was not acceptable, creating a media frenzy and bringing the issue of bullying to the forefront of people's minds;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House recognize the significance of the Pink Campaign, and thank David Shepherd and Travis Price for their innovative and courageous efforts to stop bullying.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 21

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Victoria County Memorial Hospital Charitable Foundation held their annual "Spooktacular" afternoon tea at the five-star Castle Moffet Inn for the fourth time on Saturday, October 27th; and

[Page 48]

Whereas Jackie Morrison was worth the price of admission alone as he set the afternoon celebratory tone on the baby grand piano in the Windsor dining room of the inn, which was built in 1992; and

Whereas money raised from this annual "Spooktacular" tea enables the hospital foundation to assist in the purchase of medical equipment such as wheelchairs and CPR defibrillators;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House commend the genuine caring of Linda and Desmond Moffett, and the fundraising efforts of the Victoria County Hospital Charitable Foundation.

[10:00 a.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 22

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the highly successful Read by the Sea Festival was held again this year on July 21st, in River John, featuring seven of the nation's most outstanding writers; and

Whereas the main event consisted of authors reading from their books, including that of photographer-writer Freeman Patterson with his most recent book The Garden, Joan Clark reading from An Audience of Chairs, Ami McKay from The Birth House, and Don Hannah reading from his new book, Ragged Islands; and

[Page 49]

Whereas activities for children included a word play event, a non-fiction writing workshop hosted by author Pamela Hickman, readings and a writing workshop hosted by author Gary Blackwood, and a drawing workshop hosted by Mark Oakley;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the organizers of the River John Read by the Sea Festival for another successful year, and wish them continued success in the years to come.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary mined, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Citadel.

RESOLUTION NO. 23

MR. LEONARD PREYRA: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Operation Red Nose, an exciting anti-drinking and driving program, helps keep those drivers off the road who feel they may not be fit to drive; and

Whereas Operation Red Nose is run entirely by volunteers and operates throughout Canada, including Halifax, Truro and Sydney; and

Whereas in 2006, 401 Operation Red Nose volunteers provided 657 rides and got 1,336 Nova Scotians home safely during the holiday season;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Operation Red Nose, its volunteers, sponsors, and those who choose this safe and responsible alternative to getting home safely when they might not feel fit enough to drive themselves.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 50]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

RESOLUTION NO. 24

MS. MICHELE RAYMOND: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this province will celebrate next year the 250th Anniversary of representative democracy in Nova Scotia, since the first elected Assembly came together at Halifax on October 2, 1758; and

Whereas one of the first actions the Assembly undertook that day was the passage of an Act to establish a lighthouse on Sambro Outer Island, financed by appropriating �1,000 from the duties paid on spirituous liquors, and a tax on all vessels entering the harbour; and

Whereas the stone building which is Sambro Island Light is today the oldest operating lighthouse in the Americas, but its sound signal is to be turned off just as it marks the quarter millennium;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the people and lightkeepers of Sambro, and express its displeasure to the federal government for such a careless disregard of the nation's Maritime heritage and its history of responsible government, requesting that the sound signal be reinstated immediately.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 51]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

RESOLUTION NO. 25

MR. PERCY PARIS : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lockview High School Intermediate Boys Cross Country Team won a three-race series which took place in September and October 2007; and

Whereas this four-person team brought home a championship banner which now hangs proudly at Lockview High in Fall River;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate team members Alex Whebby, Derek Campbell, Jordan Gibson, and Russell Currie, along with their coach, Bruce Chanter, on winning the Metro High School Athletic Association Intermediate Boys Cross Country Championship.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 26

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas arts and culture in Queens County has always been important, and in the past number of years Queens County has hosted some of the most important musical events to be held in Nova Scotia; and

[Page 52]

Whereas Queens County is very fortunate to have the Mersey House in Liverpool, which includes a recording studio, restaurant and Internet café; and

Whereas having just been recognized by winning the Venue of the Year at the Nova Scotia Music Awards, which was voted on by musicians and other industry stakeholders;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly recognize Michael Loveridge

and his wife, Heather, of the Mersey House, for their very innovative support for Maritime music in Queens County and in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 27

MS. BECKY KENT : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the parish of St. Peter's Anglican Church, located in the community of Eastern Passage, is celebrating its 175th Anniversary; and

Whereas the parish of St. Peter's is also celebrating 175 years of community history as the first Christian church in Eastern Passage; and

Whereas the parish of St. Peter's continues to be a vital resource to the families of the Eastern Passage community;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the parish and congregation of St. Peter's Anglican Church on celebrating their 175th Anniversary, and recognize the parish on being the first Christian church in the community, extending sincere wishes for many continued years of service to the community of Eastern Passage.

[Page 53]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.(Applause)

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 28

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the YM/YWCA of Pictou County engages volunteers and staff to host an annual triathlon at Melmerby Beach, in Pictou County, to include all levels of fitness from first-timers to Olympic distance participants; and

Whereas the annual event encourages participation from children as young as seven years old by holding the Kids of Steel Triathlon; and

Whereas well over 2,000 people have swam, biked, and run, over the 25 years of the Pictou County YM/YWCA hosting the triathlon;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly commend the enthusiastic participation of the numerous volunteers and athletes of all ages, and acknowledge the expert role played by the YM/YWCA staff in this successful growing event that is a hallmark of the summertime at Melmerby Beach in Pictou County, Pictou East.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 54]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 29

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Public Service Commission is dedicated to building a service that strives for excellence while recruiting Nova Scotians to meet the needs of a modern and innovative Public Service; and

Whereas Anthony "Toni" Duke of Falmouth in the constituency of Hants West, was recently recognized for his 35 years of faithful public service with the Nova Scotia Government; and

Whereas Toni is the Manager of Wildlife Resources with the Department of Natural Resources in Kentville;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud the tremendous work ethic and commitment of Anthony "Toni" Duke of Falmouth, Hants County for his 35 years of dedicated public service.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Shelburne.

RESOLUTION NO. 30

[Page 55]

MR. STERLING BELLIVEAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sonya Heleno of Shelburne County was one of 20 students across Canada to earn the TD Canada Trust 2007 Community Leadership Scholarship; and

Whereas Sonya will receive up to $60,000 towards her university studies including tuition fees, living expenses, and guaranteed summer employment; and

Whereas Sonya is active with programs like Big Brother, Big Sister, and Students Against Poverty. As well as being a volunteer tutor, Sonya has also helped raise bed kits for Third World children through the Sleeping Children Around the World campaign and has had the opportunity to join the Sleeping Children Around the World organization in Togo, Africa, to hand out these bed kits to less fortunate children;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Sonya Heleno for being named a recipient of the TD Canada Trust 2007 Community Leadership Scholarship, and commend Sonya for her hard work, dedication and volunteer efforts.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 31

HON. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Wednesday of this week, athlete, sports star, and ALS foundation supporter and spokesperson, 2004 and 2006 World Series winning pitcher Curt Schilling phoned Middle Musquodoboit resident Richard Farnell, who was recently diagnosed with the affliction; and

[Page 56]

Whereas Richard has played for the Senior A Brookfield Elks, the Musquodoboit Marquis, to name a couple of teams, and worked with young people and is extremely dedicated to his family and his community; and

Whereas except for a stint in the Royal Canadian Navy, Richard has been a career lineman up until his retirement, which was premature;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling for the profound and positive impact he has on ALS sufferers, and wish Richard and his family all the best.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 32

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Reverend Clarence Armstrong of the Beechville Baptist Church gives exemplary service as a pastor and as a volunteer in our community; and

Whereas Pastor Armstrong has successfully recovered from a recent brain operation; and

Whereas Pastor Clarence, his wife Rosemarie and children Trinitee and Hezekiah are valuable members of our community;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate and thank Reverend Clarence Armstrong for his exemplary services as a pastor and dedication to the community.

[Page 57]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 33

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ms. Anne Bishop is a resident of Mount Denson and the author of the book Beyond Token Change: Breaking the Cycle of Oppression in Institutions; and

Whereas Ms. Bishop's book is about conflict, resolution and team building, which are critical components of building peace; and

Whereas the YMCA of Halifax-Dartmouth chose Anne Bishop as the recipient of their highest honour, the Peace Medal, in November 2006;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House applaud Anne Bishop for her authorship and for her accomplishments in striving toward making positive changes in today's seemingly fractured society.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 58]

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

RESOLUTION NO. 34

MS. MICHELE RAYMOND: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Fortress of Louisbourg was built by France in 1713 to counter the British threat in the New World after the Treaty of Utrecht ceded Acadie to the British; and

Whereas Louisbourg, at the mouth of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, defended the sea road into the heart of North America until it was finally destroyed at the second siege in 1758; and

Whereas the French/British struggle over the new continent was largely determined at Louisbourg and next year will mark the 250th Anniversary of that second and final fall;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly support an application by the Province of Nova Scotia for designation of Louisbourg as a world heritage site under UNESCO.

[10:15 a.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 35

MS. BECKY KENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Eastern Passage resident Harold "Chuck" Elliott was awarded the Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur, the premier order of France and one of great distinction; and

[Page 59]

Whereas Harold Elliott has been honoured by the country of France for his exemplary and outstanding behaviour demonstrated through the fierce battle for the liberation of France; and

Whereas Harold Elliott is one of Canada's greatest and bravest heroes;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Harold "Chuck" Elliott of Eastern Passage on being recognized as one of Canada's greatest heroes and on being named the recipient of the Ordre national de la Légion d'honneur - a French equivalent of the British Victoria Cross - for his exemplary and outstanding behaviour as demonstrated through the fierce battle for the liberation of France.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: Yesterday at the end of the day, the honourable Leader of the Opposition adjourned debate.

The honourable Leader of the Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, yesterday I spoke briefly and informally to start my remarks. Today I would like to begin with the customary and heartfelt congratulations to Her Honour the Lieutenant Governor who delivered a Throne Speech for the first time yesterday. Her Honour has a distinguished record of public service, which is a great source of pride to Whitney Pier but also to the rest of Nova Scotia.

[Page 60]

Nova Scotians have gained greatly from Her Honour's lifelong work to foster a diverse and welcoming society where each one of us can live without the limitations created by discrimination. Her Honour conducts her duties with a sense of responsibility to all the residents of our province. I am happy to congratulate her for her inclusive and open manner in which she represents the Crown.

Mr. Speaker, if I may, I would like to take a moment to congratulate you on your election as Speaker of this House and commend you for your involvement in House matters. I also want to thank you in advance for the balanced job that I know that you will do in this and in future sessions of this House.

I would also like to congratulate the member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage, who recently joined us with the great support that she won in the recent by-election. I am confident that she will provide a great service to her community, as well as making a solid contribution to the House. (Applause)

I'd also like to acknowledge the legislative staff, the Pages, the Library staff for the assistance that they provide for us in each and every session. The operations of this House rely entirely upon their knowledge, skills and professionalism and we could not attend to the business of the province without them.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the new Leader of the Third Party. I look forward to working with him in this minority government as we strive to make Nova Scotia the best province in Canada to live, to work, to raise a family and retire in. (Applause) All of which brings me to my comments in response to the Throne Speech.

To quote directly from the opening page of the Throne Speech, " . . . it is the duty of our Legislature to give Nova Scotians something in which to believe." I'm puzzled as to how this Legislature can accomplish this when government after government, especially this Progressive Conservative Government, makes a promise to Nova Scotians and then fails to deliver on it, only to deliver the same promise again and again, only to come up with excuses and roadblocks and ultimately broken promises. I am truly disappointed that this Throne Speech appears to be mere words, glossing over previously promised and neglected commitments from a government that is clearly out of touch with this province.

A vision for a new Nova Scotia for the year 2020 is ambitious, especially since it is at least three elections into the future. One of the great things though about living in the new Nova Scotia - living in the 2020 Nova Scotia - is that you don't have to fret much about those annoying present realities. Realities such as the impact of the rising dollar on our farmers, our fishers, our Christmas tree growers, our manufacturing industries. All you have to do is write a letter to the Prime Minister asking him to do something and then get back to the happier task of contemplating the new Nova Scotia - the 2020 Nova Scotia.

[Page 61]

The same thing with climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. It's mich nicer for the government to talk about the new Nova Scotia of 2020 when emissions, they claim, will be 10 per cent below 1990 levels, far better from their point of view. (Interruptions)

They applaud, Mr. Speaker, and certainly, it's far better from their point of view to think about the 2020 Nova Scotia than today, when emissions are 20 per cent higher than they were in 1990, 20 per cent higher today than they were in 1990, but according to their Speech, our actions to reduce the impact of our carbon footprint are working. Perhaps there's some kind of time warp as you walk through the door here. Maybe that line was written by somebody who is already living in the 2020 Nova Scotia. I think it is foolish to believe that we're going to 2020 without plans, without programs, without details that effectively chart our path.

A new Nova Scotia sounds like what it is - a new slogan for the same, old, unkept promises. Nova Scotians want and deserve a plan, and they deserve details. I, and in fact many of my NDP colleagues, have been warning of a skill shortage in Nova Scotia for some time and I've always wondered why the government wasn't focused on doing something about it. Well, the Throne Speech tells us that this Premier and this government saw what was happening, where the province was heading, and did nothing much.

Now the first priority of the government in the Throne Speech is educating to compete. To me, that rings hollow. To make matters worse, there is no plan, there are no details. There is a recital of what is already being done and a promise that a creation of a new department will mean " . . . we can reach our goals in 2020." Goals that actually mean something, Mr. Speaker, are not spelled out.

The government offers Nova Scotians nothing more than false hope and empty words. If you don't believe me, Mr. Speaker, ask the workers at Britex or Maple Leaf Foods or Seafreez or TrentonWorks or Moirs, and the list goes on. They can't wait until 2020 to feed their families or gain the skills that they will need to fill the jobs that are vacant now.

If this government wants to get serious about education and improving the skills of our workforce, our youth and our citizens, they would look long and hard at the cost of post-secondary education in Nova Scotia. Last year, this government finally listened to the NDP and froze tuition fees at the 2007-2008 rate. That rate though, Mr. Speaker, is still the highest in Canada. This province is turning away our best and brightest because staying at home for an education just isn't a viable financial option any more.

Nova Scotia is rapidly becoming a seniors population and unless we reverse these trends, who knows what the fate of the province will be. I can tell you one thing - I have great respect for the seniors of our province but they are not going to rebuild the province. It has to start with this government and this Premier - oh, and the new Minister of Labour and Workforce Development.

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Here are some stats for the Premier and for the new minister which, by the way, aren't found in the Throne Speech. One-quarter of Nova Scotia's full-time workers - approximately 88,000 Nova Scotians - are in low wage jobs. In Manitoba, that figure is 20 per cent; in Saskatchewan it is 18 per cent; and in B.C., it is just 12 per cent. Half of these workers are the primary earner in their family. This means that 40,000 families in Nova Scotia survive on low wage incomes with few benefits and very little pension provisions.

A further 88,000 workers in Nova Scotia are employed part-time and the government states that 35 per cent fewer people are living under the low income cutoff. The real question, Mr. Speaker, is this: How many of them are surviving in the low wage cycle of trying to make ends meet every paycheque?

This must be a priority for the Premier and the new Minister of Labour and Workforce Development, as should affordable childcare and early childhood education and updated labour standards so that Nova Scotia can compete in an era of growing labour shortages, rather than the attitude toward workers that was made evident when retail workers were abandoned by the Premier's sudden decision to allow a free-for-all in Sunday shopping.

The Progressive Conservatives sit here on the government side due in no small part, Mr. Speaker, to their opposition to the public-private partnerships. Now let's remember that these P3 contracts are not traditional partnerships with the private sector for the delivery of infrastructure, on which we all agree. The private sector already builds, paves and designs most public infrastructure and if that is simply continuing, it would not be featured in the Throne Speech.

Mr. Speaker, these are financing schemes which allow the government to off-book debt and dance around the accounting practices. I remember all too well, the contortions of a previous government as they became pre-occupied with evading the condemnations of the Auditor General, trying as they might to convince Nova Scotians that the P3 deals weren't as bad as they seemed. Let us remember that these deals place public responsibilities in private hands and it is too easy for the current government to say they have learned from past mistakes. I would even go so far as to say the government has apparently learned nothing from the previous Liberal experiments with public-private partnerships.

The fact of the matter is that this Progressive Conservative Government has its own track record with respect to these partnerships and it's not a good one. This government wants Nova Scotians to believe that P3 agreements are good for this province and they can manage the system better - better than the Liberals did - to build highways and schools and, Mr. Speaker, even hospitals when the Progressive Conservatives have their own public-private failure in the Cornwallis contract to run the immigrant nominee program.

One has to ask whether the Premier is suggesting that the Cornwallis contract - which he personally oversaw - is the model that he wishes to apply to hospitals, schools and roads?

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(Applause) Is the government's track record on Cornwallis their model for accountability, for value, for money? Mr. Speaker, I would have thought that this Throne Speech would have promised no more private partnerships until the lessons of Cornwallis had been learned and applied. Instead, it seems we got a promise to repeat those mistakes again and again.

Although the Progressive Conservatives were first elected on a tide of opposition to P3 projects - costly, inefficient projects with little or no public accountability - having been elected on that basis, and never having promised to do anything else, the Premier yesterday suddenly told Nova Scotians that he was willing to consider private for-profit hospitals at public expense, not just the private for-profit schools at public expense that his Party fought so well.

Let's look at what the Progressive Conservatives said about public-private partnerships before the elections that they won.

[10:30 a.m.]

In the 1998 Leader's debate, the then Opposition Leader, John Hamm, criticized P3 financing. Here is what he said, and I quote:

"We need to build schools. We need to renovate other schools but we need to do it in a way that makes sense. We believe we can do this through a municipal, through a non-profit corporation like a municipal finance corporation in order to make sure that the money goes into the classroom and not into the pockets of the friends of government."

In that 1998 campaign, Dr. Hamm, the member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley, and a large truck appeared together on the Cobequid Pass to emphasize their concern about the tolls that were being imposed as part of that private enterprise. No one was surprised when Cumberland County, which had voted so strongly for the Liberals in 1993, swung even more strongly to the Conservatives in a campaign where opposition to that toll highway was the major local issue.

On October 8, 1999, in the very first Ministerial Statement of the new Progressive Conservative Government which was striving to keep faith with the voters, the Finance Minister, Neil LeBlanc - a man well known to the Premier - said this:

"We are questioning the very nature of public-private partnerships. We are looking for some basic answers. We want to know if the theory of public-private partnering can really work and what should be the expected benefits? Has it worked for Nova Scotia? Has it achieved government

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objectives? And finally, Mr. Speaker, if public private partnering can deliver good value for the taxpayers, what changes should we make to maximize those benefits? In simple terms Mr. Speaker, does P3 represent a good deal for Nova Scotia?

With this independent advice, we feel we will have the answer to these fundamental questions. To take it a step further, this analysis will also allow us to consider P3 within the context of our new accounting principles - principles of openness that let Nova Scotians see the true cost of the services and programs that they, as taxpayers, fund.

By moving to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, it doesn't matter whether we have a capital lease, an operating lease or a mortgage on the building. In each case, there is a real long-term cost for the taxpayers that shows up every year in the form of interest, depreciation or lease payments. Now that the accounting is out of the way, we want to see if this method of supplying capital projects has enough benefits to warrant its continued use for schools, jails, or other forms of public infrastructure. Mr. Speaker, the government is committed to doing these sorts of projects in a way that gives the taxpayers good value. That means we want to do it in the most efficient manner possible."

Mr. Speaker, that independent review led to a decision. The P3 option was shut down. The money borrowed to pay for P3 facilities was recognized as the debt of the province and the view was that never again would Nova Scotians see a private-for-profit company telling them when and how they could use a public facility like a school - or for that matter, a hospital - or how much they had to pay for it.

The P3 option was rejected for another reason, which should also be quite familiar to the members opposite. It became clear that it was a way to hide the debt of the province on someone else's books and to pay them for hiding our public debt. Nova Scotians saw that the government of the day was essentially keeping two sets of books and that they were trying to stay one step ahead of the Auditor General.

Mr. Speaker, today, where do we stand? No independent review of the public-private partnerships - at least, not yet; no framework for accountability - at least, not one that anyone has seen; no evidence that they will reduce costs, unlike the higher costs associated with most such projects in this province.

[Page 65]

Mr. Speaker, let us not go down the P3 road again, a road paved with poor planning, quick deals and a political agenda that ignored the financial realities. Let us not tear down an unquestionable achievement of the Hamm Government - clear, clean, open accounting to Nova Scotians for the cost of public services with a balanced budget that is really balanced. Before any plan to hide public debt is launched, tell the voters about that plan and let them decide. One way or another, it is going to be the voters who are going to pay for the decisions this government makes.

Mr. Speaker, there is a parallel here. The Progressive Conservatives did not promise or even hint in their election campaign that they would take away the right to strike from thousands of health care workers. They simply and certainly did not say that they would make up their minds about the right to strike before they even sat down and talked with the representatives of the nurses and other health care workers. I would respectfully suggest the government should spend more time keeping the promises it made rather than wasting its efforts on these items which were never mentioned in their election campaigns.

News reports suggest that this hidden agenda is driven by the government's desire to set itself apart from the NDP. This is free advice so you know what it's worth, but I think the government should worry less about the NDP and worry more about the PCs. (Applause) It is this government's performance and the way they rely on the ideas put forward by other Parties that have created so much of their political problem.

The Throne Speech suggests there are, for example, undue barriers to development in downtown Halifax. With a well-balanced municipal planning strategy in place, these are largely private sector decisions based on a careful calculation of the future market for office space - unless the Premier plans to imitate the Buchanan model of major commitments to hand-picked developers with taxpayers picking up the tab.

Mr. Speaker, a presentation made at the September conference of the Atlantic Institute of Planners reported that Nova Scotia tied Alberta for the fewest development appeals and that appeals here are faster than in most other provinces. I hope the Premier is not again using the Throne Speech to focus on the NDP instead of focusing on doing their own job well.

As a province, we are at a critical point in our rich history. Each and every one of us here today has to look at how we can make the most of the economic opportunities here in Nova Scotia. This is a province with great opportunities and a proven ability to seize them. However, our discussion of how to make the most of economic opportunities starts with some fundamental challenges - challenges being neglected by this government, but challenges I believe we can meet.

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The 2006 Census has confirmed the dimensions of the Nova Scotia demographic challenge. Nova Scotia's population is now the oldest in Canada with a median age of 41.8 years. As a province, our median age has increased by three years since 2001.

The number of seniors in Nova Scotia is expected to grow from 134,000 last year, to more than 246,000 in the year 2026. Currently, 15 per cent of the province's population is 65 or older, and in 2026 that number will be 25 per cent. This means more health care needs - and very much, it means we must deliver better health care and better ways to help people stay strong and self-sufficient throughout their lives.

There were 60,000 young children in Nova Scotia in 1994, those are children under the age of 5. Today there are less than 45,000, a drop of 25 per cent. This is partly due to a declining birthrate, but it is also a consequence of the challenges that families face these days, the lack of child care, lack of steady well-paid work, concerns about the quality of education and other essentials for a family raising children.

A key public policy goal for Nova Scotia must be the commitment to make our province truly welcoming for young families to live, to work and to give their children a good start in life. But it's not just young families who face challenges in building a life here.

Many young people leave the province as soon as they finish their education. Recent figures show that one-third of Nova Scotian out-migrants are ages 25 to 44. That figure is higher here than in any other province experiencing out-migration. The age profile of our workforce is increasing, with workers over 55 years old increasing from 10 per cent to 15 per cent of the workforce in recent years. Graduates often leave because of large debts rung up to pay for a post-secondary education in Nova Scotia - the home of the most expensive tuition in the country. Others have been lured West with the opportunities for highly paid jobs that don't require post-secondary qualifications.

Nova Scotia cannot outbid the oil sands, so we need to find other ways to make our province a more attractive place for young people at the start of their working lives. We should focus on developing interesting careers and entrepreneurial opportunities that relate to the 21st Century priorities - information and communication technologies, biotechnology, geomatics, energy production and efficiency, and sustainable economic development.

I have outlined these challenges to business groups, to labour groups, to community groups and to Party groups, because everyone in Nova Scotia has to be engaged in meeting these challenges and finding the opportunities that exist for us.

In business, entrepreneurs are known for dreaming big and letting no opportunity pass them by and government must have the same spirit when it sets out to win investment and jobs for our province, because opportunities may arise only once.

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Without using names, I can cite two incidents that underline the importance of infusing our job creation activities with a sense of urgency. In one case, a large and long-established manufacturing plant - part of a sector undergoing significant transformation - closed suddenly. My caucus colleagues and I discovered afterwards that although the possibility of the closure had been well-known, the parent company had launched a fundamental restructuring several months earlier. The province did not know the key contacts at the parent company, had not assessed the option for renewing the enterprise and, in fact, had no one working on the file. That closure was a fait accompli, which Nova Scotia had to accept despite the loss of hundreds of jobs.

The second case involves a similarly large, locally-based enterprise. The company approached members of the NDP caucus to express its concern that possible closure of its operation in Nova Scotia had not gotten a provincial response. This company had three options: they could consolidate their operations elsewhere in Canada; they could improve and expand their existing Nova Scotia plant; or they could build a new, state-of-the-art plant.

Everyone the management team had approached said, "Sorry, we can't help - my program doesn't cover you." We were able to help them negotiate the web of provincial programs and officials, and find an open door. Recently, Mr. Speaker, the company announced an expansion in Nova Scotia with provincial support, so this has become a happy ending.

Of course, it is vital to engage in opportunity searches on an ongoing basis; recruiting IT and financial services companies to relocate and to grow in Nova Scotia. However, it is equally important to adopt the same entrepreneurial approach to our existing businesses and to support them if we want to expand or upgrade job opportunities right here.

There are some 40,000 manufacturing jobs in this provinces - most of them are in rural Nova Scotia, where they form the economic foundation of our smaller urban centres. Nova Scotians have shown we can be the best in the world at attracting investments and turning out high-quality products, thanks to the skill and talent of local management teams and workers - not to mention our location, next to one of the richest markets in the world.

[10:45 a.m.]

Some examples of the recent investments won by Michelin's Nova Scotia plants: the advances made by Oxford Frozen Foods; the history of environmentally conscious production by Minas Basin Pulp and Paper; construction of the most efficient super-calendared paper mill in the world; and our newfound expertise in aerospace, led by Composites Atlantic, IMP and others. There are so many examples of sunrise companies that are seizing every opportunity and proving that the world will beat a path to our door, if we recognize how innovation is a great partner with the excellent workforce and the natural opportunities that Nova Scotians already enjoy.

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We have proven that we can build clusters of manufacturing excellence that holds communities together in prosperity. Now we must apply that experience to scientific and service sectors. We must leverage the strength of what we have - a marine tradition, a first-class university sector, a history of trade and financial services - to get where we want to be. More than 10,000 students travel here every year to be educated because our campus research programs are world-class, and we offer Canada's premier undergraduate programs. We must increase the opportunities we have to profit from educating the world's finest undergraduates and graduates.

Almost one billion research dollars have been invested in this province in recent years, building expertise in subjects as diverse as nano-technology and genetics, renewable energy, our oceans, poultry and blueberries. This knowledge and expertise can be put to work to create jobs and prosperity right here in Nova Scotia. Our provincial priorities can be realized with the help of the expertise and knowledge being created right here. To build our research strengths, we have incubation centres and agencies that help turn big ideas into small businesses that can grow. We also have a proud tradition in the trades and engineering from which to develop new companies.

However, the steps an entrepreneur takes from the drawing board to the boardroom are often overseen by different agencies, which sometimes don't seem to have the same priorities. This province needs a clear, coherent economic strategy so that everyone on the team - the entire broad Public Service - is pulling in the same direction. We need to pool all of the resources we have made available for growing new companies. We also need to refocus government incentives so that they achieve more of what we're good at:

As an aside, let me tell you that Nova Scotians are living through a severe dollar-related pressure on the jobs that are rooted in farming, fishing, forestry, tourism and shipping, most notably. This is a province of traders and exporters. If the federal government is really going to help sustain Canada's major industries through the instability caused by the rapid drop in the U.S. dollar and the rise in ours, Ottawa must not overlook Nova Scotia. I don't think that it is in anyone's interest for our province and country to emerge from a temporary exchange rate situation with thousands of value-added jobs permanently destroyed. As John Bragg, one of our outstanding business leaders said recently, the provincial government must seriously consider whether its own policies are hindering investment in key industries.

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In each of the industries I have mentioned, there are owners, managers and workers with the know-how to find new opportunities, make successful new investments and provide jobs this province will need. They are concerned that the province is not paying attention and not always alert to those same opportunities. Yesterday, the management and workers in those bedrock industries found no reassurance in a Throne Speech that barely addressed forestry, fishing, farming or tourism. They got a sentence, Mr. Speaker.

Our caucus met this Fall in Digby and I have visited Yarmouth several times since. I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, that tourism operators throughout the areas south and west of Halifax are concerned about the long-term prospects for the Digby ferry and the transport links with New England that are vital to tourism and business at that end of the province. The bulldozing of a motel in Yarmouth may have been the tip of the iceberg for Nova Scotia businesses who tell me that they look across the Bay of Fundy and they see a 17 per cent increase in tourism in the Saint John area. Let us hope that job creation in the new Nova Scotia is not simply the addition of yet another Cabinet Minister. (Applause)

Keeping the jobs we have, winning new investments and new jobs will also require Nova Scotia to become a learning province which meets the educational needs of two-year olds, right through to the literacy requirements of workers in their 50s and 60s. Nova Scotia must continue to invest in training and re-skilling our workers, particularly when they may soon hit the point when our labour force is about to shrink. Otherwise, Mr. Speaker, the search for workers may be even more frustrating than the search for jobs used to be.

Nova Scotia's largest and most promising potential new work force is the people already living here with no intention of moving away, who do not currently work outside the home because of the lack of skills and confidence needed to take up jobs that are already available in many communities. If Nova Scotia - and particularly Nova Scotia outside the Halifax-Dartmouth area - is to thrive, we need to create a culture where learning is part of everyone's life every year. (Applause)

The Nova Scotia Community College is completing a tremendous period of new investment and expansion planned to help meet the training needs of the 21st Century. Rather than being content with that achievement, the province needs to step up its emphasis on learning, starting with early childhood education, a much greater emphasis on distance education, the co-op education at high school level, as we work toward making this a learning province. This is the key to attracting and keeping young families.

Someone stated recently that although the two-income family had become the standard in the 1970s, public policy and institutions are still based on the assumption that most families have one parent at home and another parent working outside the home. The province must ensure that affordable, quality child care and good early childhood education are readily available everywhere we want young people to live and work. It can be a powerful reason to live here and it will give new generations an excellent start as we look to them for the future.

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There is excellent work and expertise in Nova Scotia, a province that has inspired the world with our models of adult education, most notably the Antigonish Movement of Moses Coady and Jimmy Tompkins. Today, those involved with our province's workplace-based literacy programs tell me that it has become the model for other jurisdictions although here at home it is small and underfunded. We need to recognize that the learning which takes place in the workplace and in the community is a very important part of the future and it is a way to help young people put down roots here.

Mr. Speaker, young families want a health care system that works for them and we in the NDP caucus have launched a major campaign to try to convince the government to shorten wait times. I truly believe that Nova Scotia has the best health care system in Canada. The quality of care is second to none. Access to this care, on the other hand, is a concern to myself and to all Nova Scotians. It's time to stop waiting for health care in this province. Nova Scotians deserve quality health care delivered in a timely fashion.

The only way that Nova Scotians are going to see improved access to health care is when the government finally focuses on the key concerns facing health care in this province. The issue is not with the workers, it has nothing to do with the right to strike. Our health care system is great because of these hardworking, dedicated professionals. What it lacks is a government that is ready and willing to take up the task of improving wait times. The last line for this government is the top priority for Nova Scotians - shorter wait times.

Nova Scotians want results. The NDP realizes that the only way to achieve these results is through strong leadership, dedication to fixing the problem, and having the patience to see it through. I believe that with strong leadership and common sense, we can work together to shorten wait times for health care in Nova Scotia. (Applause)

We believe that focusing on five areas will take our quality health care system to the next level by improving wait times for all Nova Scotians. Our goals are to keep ERs open, to shorten wait times for surgery, to make sure that everyone has access to a family doctor, and to provide timely screening for serious illnesses and to ensure access to more hospital beds. Much like a minority government, I believe success will only be realized if we work together. Unfortunately, the government tried to convince Nova Scotians that nurses and other health care workers can't be trusted to make responsible decisions. (Interruptions) They say no, but that's exactly right.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please. The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition has the floor.

MR. DEXTER: One side note on the issues of trust and health care according to the Throne Speech: "Even those with insurance know there are some life-saving prescription drugs that are so expensive that private insurers will not cover them." Does this mean that there will be no limitations on the drugs covered under the promised 2008 program? What

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about right now, Mr. Speaker? I'm sure Jim Connors, and all the other people who might die from colorectal cancer because this government won't fund drugs like Avastin, would like to know. (Applause) I am sure that Nova Scotians who need insulin pumps and the ancillary supplies would like to know if they're covered.

Mr. Speaker, I urge the government to set aside the politics of division particularly with something as important as health care and join us. The NDP goals are not about reinventing the wheel. We are proposing simple, effective steps that this government can take to improve wait times in Nova Scotia, not on a piecemeal basis, not just at Throne Speech times, but in a focused, coherent manner.

Mr. Speaker, before I continue, I know that my colleague would like to make an introduction. I would be happy to cede the floor to him at this point in order to do that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

MR. PERCY PARIS: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to also thank the honourable member and Leader of the Opposition for allowing me to make this introduction. I'd just like to take a brief moment, up in the west gallery, to introduce to you, from the beautiful school of Beaver Bank Kinsac Elementary, the Grade 5 and Grade 6 students. I'd like to just read, Mrs. MacGillivray's class and Ms. Baker, their Grade 6 students; Mr. Deal with his Grade 5 and 6 students, and also I would like to take another brief moment to acknowledge some of the parents that are here. We have Maureen Baker, Laura Conrad, Jen Morehouse, Chuck McEvoy, Chris Lloyd, Jim MacEachern, and Leah Fisher. I'm just wondering if the students would rise and get a warm greeting from the House this morning. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned, we're not about reinventing the wheel, what we're trying to present are simple and effective steps this government could take. For example, Nova Scotia was a pioneer in educating nurse practitioners, yet we have fallen behind in training and hiring these crucial health care workers. More nurse practitioners will allow for the creation of collaborative health teams - without waiting as long as five years for better access to family doctors.

[11:00 a.m.]

We have proposed a provincial "pre-hab" program to help deal with surgery wait times. Multi-disciplinary "pre-hab" teams can assess and prepare patients for surgery. Since 2003, and again in this campaign, we proposed a central surgical list. This would allow streamlining surgical appointments and giving patients the first available date. Ironically, after years of provincial failure in this regard, Dalhousie doctors and the QEII are taking

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matters into their own hands and moving to establish a central wait list. Good for them - and I hope the government will now follow them. (Applause)

By directly funding collaborative multi-disciplinary practices that team doctors and nurse practitioners with other health care professionals, Nova Scotia can ease the direct workloads on doctors by almost 30 per cent. These collaborative clinics work and they work in Nova Scotia. We don't have to look any further than Middleton, where a new collaborative clinic has cut wait times in half. The Throne Speech promised just one more such practice, in a community where the need was identified years ago. That is just not good enough.

Mr. Speaker, there should be no excuses. Nova Scotians deserve quicker access to health care in this province. Despite our aging population, the current government has reduced the number of long-term care beds between 1999 and 2006, despite being elected on a promise to lift the previous freeze on new long-term care beds. Compared to the rest of Canada, we have a deficit of over 500 beds for a population aged 75 or older who need them. This has created a major problem for our hospitals, as the minister would know. At least 300 beds needed for surgery and acute care have been blocked.

The opportunity that waits is for Nova Scotia to do more than just clear up the backlog. We should be rapidly opening up opportunities for self-managed care, for improved seniors' housing that promotes independent living, and for caregiver support because it is those two income families who are usually called upon when a parent or other close relative suddenly has urgent health care requirements.

Our home care system must get better and better at preventing the kind of health crisis which can put otherwise healthy people into a nursing home. The solution should be flexible and community based rather than central, institutional perspectives. My opinion is that in Nova Scotia at least, local communities, friends and family often come up with the best solution if government facilitates rather than entangle them. If we plan well, the jobs that are needed to sustain communities and local services to keep this an attractive province for businesses and young families will come partly from the enhanced services at home and the improved seniors' housing options, which are the most cost-effective ways to serve the 25 per cent of Nova Scotians who will be 65 or more.

Mr. Speaker, just briefly I'd like to turn to palliative care. Care and compassion are central to who we are as Nova Scotians. We count on each other as we journey through life's many transitions. We hope to enjoy our lives with those whom we love, and we hope these same people will be with us when we die; unfortunately it's not often possible. More than 80 per cent of Canadians say they want to die at home in familiar surroundings with the people they love, yet most of us die in hospitals.

Family and friends often find that it is difficult to gain palliative care services for a loved one to spend their last days at home or in a similar family-centred setting in a hospital. The

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Nova Scotia Hospice Palliative Care Association describes it best: "Palliative Care matters . . . Because everyone deserves a good death."

Earlier this year, and again during this session of the Legislature, my colleague the member for Sackville-Cobequid, who is the NDP Health Critic, is introducing legislation that would see the development and implementation of a palliative care strategy across the province. (Applause) A key component to the NDP proposal is consultation with the district health authorities, health care workers and the Nova Scotia Hospice Palliative Care Association, as well as other stakeholders. This is an important piece of legislation because Nova Scotia has shining examples of palliative care, but it is not consistently available across the province.

In the meantime, many people in this province are suffering physically, emotionally and spiritually, living with a terminal illness, and we are not providing them with the support services they need.

Mr. Speaker, in South West Health they have developed their own response - a symptom kit to provide prescription drugs required to deal with end of life care - a stop- gap response to try and deal with the lack of a provincial strategy. We need a provincial palliative care strategy so that people can die at home if they choose, no matter where they live in Nova Scotia.

A well thought-out palliative care strategy could provide a single point of access so that families are not left on their own to locate the needed care. The Nova Scotia Hospice Palliative Care Association has never given up on its effort to gain a palliative care strategy for Nova Scotia. They need to know, and Nova Scotians need to know, that the NDP is fully committed to doing all we can to make sure this strategy, which is so important to all of us, becomes a reality.

Mr. Speaker, community safety - strong leadership means finding ways to achieve in ensuring things get better; therefore it is not good enough for the Premier to deflect the issue of community crime and youth crime to the federal level. It's not good enough because there is much that can be done at the provincial level. There are steps that he can take as Premier immediately to reduce community and youth crime.

For example, Mr. Speaker, I have introduced legislation that will help protect the public from the dangers of illegal street racing. It's time to put the brakes on street racing. (Applause) There's hardly a community in this province that has not been shocked by the increase of this activity over the summer. People are being hurt; people are being killed. We have stiff penalties for most other dangerous driving activities - it's time we passed laws that make the streets of our communities safer.

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I believe - and we all believe - that everyone has the right to walk the streets in safety, that seniors feel secure in their homes, and that youth are safe at school. Those who offend and reoffend often do so because they don't fear the consequences. They have no respect for the institutions of society which are meant to guarantee security for you and me.

To help improve community safety and eliminate youth crime, actions must have consequences, and those consequences must be handed down in a timely fashion. There is action that can ve take right now:

- Set up a special unit or task force for police and prosecutors to deal with people arrested and immediately released on conditions. This means more resources to monitor those who are likely to reoffend and faster trials for any new charges;

- High visibility by police forces can send a stronger message to those who are criminally minded. The province can work with municipalities so that the additional police officers are used to dramatically reduce petty crime;

- Impose selective curfews on youth who act in an anti-social manner, as well as providing the resources to make those curfews meaningful. This province has a legislative framework to provide family resources and protective services for anti-social children and youth;

- Open our schools after hours on holidays and weekends at no cost to the participants. Don't keep promising it, actually do it. It is time to give Nova Scotia's youth alternatives to wandering the streets. There is a role for provincial responsibility, and follow-through can make it happen.(Applause)

Mr. Speaker, I want to address one last piece in the couple of minutes that I have. In 2005, John Hamm assembled the vast weight of opinion of this province and gained support of all Parties and Members of Parliament for a simple proposition: That regardless of what the equalization formula or tax system may be from time to time, the federal government would return its direct and indirect revenue from our offshore to this province during the years when we have our first major success from it.

That view, the offshore revenue agreement, commonly described as the Atlantic Accord, was unanimously endorsed by the Nova Scotia Legislature this Spring - the support that Dr. Hamm assembled for that view may actually be stronger here today than it was at the time. This will be a litmus test for the credibility of those who have endorsed the 2005 Accord.

I know that the Members of Parliament will be giving this legislation careful attention. The Nova Scotia NDP decided in 2001 and 2002 that they would take a constructive approach to the debate of provincial issues and that remains our role in fostering good public

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policy. That constructive approach has turned out to be ideal for a period of minority government because we had a positive agenda and wide public support.

The Nova Scotia NDP has not co-operated simply for the sake of co-operation; instead we frame our efforts around the goal of a better deal for today's families. As the political situation keeps unfolding, as key elements of that better deal are enacted, we develop and present new ways to achieve the better deal, and we learn more about the challenges that confront a government of any stripe that wishes to make the most of Nova Scotia's economic opportunities.

Mr. Speaker, that is how our caucus and Party will proceed in the session and in the months ahead, and I thank you for the opportunity to speak today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Liberal Party.

MR. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am honoured to rise today as the new Leader of the Nova Scotia Liberal Party to deliver a Liberal response to the Speech from the Throne on behalf of our caucus and on behalf of those who believe in a richer, fairer, more compassionate Nova Scotia.

I'd like to thank the new Lieutenant Governor, Mayann Francis, and acknowledge the work she had done with the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission and the good work that she has been doing since becoming our new Lieutenant Governor.

I also want to congratulate you, Mr. Speaker, on being chosen Speaker of the House. It is wonderful to see a man with a beard sitting in the Speaker's Chair. If I had my way, Mr. Speaker, beards would be taking over in this place soon, so don't worry about it.

To those who work on the floor of the Legislature and behind the scenes, thank you for supporting the job that we do as MLAs. It is not the tradition in this province for government to prorogue the Legislature and deliver a Throne Speech midway through their mandate, nor is it the tradition for their elected representatives to be out of the House for seven months. I'd like to recognize the Premier for calling MLAs back to the House and I would also like to acknowledge him for not making his Throne Speech a confidence motion, but for demonstrating his will to make this minority government work.

The Liberal caucus is committed to working with the Progressive Conservatives and the NDP and all members of this House to provide good government, fair government and balanced government, and I'm proud to take part in that debate.

I welcome the opportunity to respond to the Premier's agenda and lay out a Liberal approach to those issues that matter most to Nova Scotians and their families. Liberalism has long been synonymous with economic progress and social change, and I see our Party as a

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tool for advancing the values of courage, responsibility, compassion and integrity. These are Liberal values and they are Nova Scotian values. They are values that will guide my response today and shape my Party's vision for Nova Scotia.

After this minority government was elected they promised the people of Nova Scotia that they would seek common-sense solutions to the challenges we face - well, I am here to express my profound disappointment in the government's record. In June 2006 the Progressive Conservatives mapped out a path for this province and promised Nova Scotians that they would address their priorities. Yesterday's Speech did not wipe clean the record of this government's mismanagement, nor does it change the fact that they have let Nova Scotians down - and here we are again, just over a year later, Nova Scotians are looking for leadership and they are looking for a road map that will take our province into the future.

[11:15 a.m.]

This minority government promised to provide common-sense solutions. Nova Scotians are reasonable people, but there is nothing reasonable about taking away health care workers' right to strike. Our ailing health care system will not be fixed by picking a fight with the province's valued health care professionals. The Premier and his ministers are trying to distract Nova Scotians from the real issues. Anti-strike legislation will not bring more doctors and nurses to this province, it will not address the unacceptable wait times, and it will not keep our emergency rooms open.

Early in September I announced that the Liberal caucus will not support legislation that takes away workers' right to strike. We were the first Opposition Party to publicly declare our position and we will keep our word to Nova Scotians.(Applause) This was not a decision that came lightly - we met with union representatives, we met with doctors and nurses, and we met with some of the very same people who filled the streets in protest yesterday. We reached out to Nova Scotians because Liberals are consensus builders and we are committed to providing balanced policy positions that are in the best interests of Nova Scotians. Our health care workers want to be on the job, not on the picket line, and they are committed to providing the best quality health care to Nova Scotians.

Essential services legislation has not worked in other jurisdictions across Canada; it has not prevented illegal strikes. The collective bargaining process is working in Nova Scotia. Our system has not been plagued by strikes or work stoppages - it has been suffering from government's indifference, and that indifference has led to a crisis in our health care. Mr. Speaker, that is the real issue.

This year alone the province's emergency rooms have been closed for over 5,700 hours. Imagine for a moment that your sick child requires immediate medical assistance. You drive to the hospital and there's a "closed" sign on the door. This is the reality for too many Nova Scotians in too many communities across this province, and this is unacceptable.

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Health care professionals are stretched to their limits. The Liberal caucus has offered practical solutions to alleviate pressure on emergency room workers, but the government has chosen to ignore our practical, common-sense solutions. This summer the member for Digby-Annapolis took matters into his own hands. He approached The Pines Resort and asked them to provide accommodations for travelling doctors willing to cover ER shifts at Digby General, and the resort recognized the value of this suggestion and agreed to take in the doctors free of charge. Now, if that's not a common-sense solution, I don't know what is.

Our Liberal caucus has called on the government to create a centralized service for health authorities within the Department of Health that matches ER doctors with hospitals in need. We suggested that the province hire a force of local physicians to fill the need on a temporary basis, but government has refused despite community support for this initiative and the willingness of doctors to try this option.

The government speaks of its efforts to recruit nurses and doctors while they wage an open battle with health care professionals over anti-strike legislation. This doesn't make sense. The issues plaguing our health care system are some of the same issues that Nova Scotians were talking about on the doorsteps during my first campaign in 1999. The Progressive Conservatives had eight long years to strengthen the system. The current government has had over a year to present Nova Scotians with a plan for health care and they haven't. Nova Scotians are still waiting for this government's plan to address spiralling tuition rates and declining enrolment in Nova Scotia's universities.

Federal funding for educational infrastructure will dry up at the end of 2007-08. Where is the plan to take us beyond the end of that year? Our Liberal Education Critic - the member for Kings West - has been calling on the government to tell us how they intend to meet their stated commitment of reducing tuition fees to the national average by 2010. Frankly, $500 in tuition relief for Nova Scotia students only goes so far, when the average undergraduate tuition fee in this province is $5,878. With the highest tuition fees in the entire country, a university education remains out of reach for many.

Right now, students are funding the operational costs at most of the province's universities at a higher rate than government. Students shouldn't be paying the price for government's neglect of the system, but they are. High tuitions and low government funding are resulting in Nova Scotia students leaving our province to pursue their post-secondary education elsewhere. We should be doing everything we can to encourage our young people to learn and work in Nova Scotia.

This session, our caucus will be asking the government to prove to Nova Scotians that they have a plan to make post-secondary education more accessible for those students who have the grades and wish to study here in Nova Scotia. The Progressive Conservative Government has committed to helping students learn better. Let's work together to make this a reality. A quality public education system is the foundation for a more competitive and

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prosperous Nova Scotia. We need to get back to the basics and address our province's failing grades in math and literacy. We need to look at reducing class sizes to acceptable levels beyond third Grade. Large classes put an added strain on our educators and make it more difficult for students to receive the one-on-one attention they deserve.

Nova Scotia students should be provided with a full range of assessments in the primary year of schooling, so that learning disabilities can be determined early on and appropriate measures can be implemented. Each and every Nova Scotian student deserves to be provided with the learning environment that meets his or her needs. That's why we Liberals want the government to expand tuition support for special needs students attending the province's private special education schools. We believe in a strong public education system, but the reality is that system is failing those who need our help the most. Tuition support should be available for eligible students for an unlimited period of time, until it is determined that their needs can be met in the public education system. When it comes to a pre-primary education, the province has to do better. Nova Scotia doesn't have a strong early childhood education program. If the government is not going to expand the 2005 pilot program, it should be looking into other options to strengthen pre-primary education in this province.

A Progressive Conservative Government promised Nova Scotians that it would support those most in need. Today over 11,500 children of working parents live in poverty in Nova Scotia - let me repeat that, that is of working parents.

I applaud the Premier for recognizing that we have not done enough to help the most vulnerable in our province. Poverty is not a matter of charity, poverty is a human rights issue. I believe that this government has an obligation to ensure that the opportunities are distributed equally in this province and that no one is left behind.

Last Fall, I introduced a bill in the Legislature calling on government to strike a committee to develop a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy for Nova Scotia. Initially, this government reduced the issue of poverty to a community-service problem. Clearly, poverty is not just a community-service issue. That is why our legislation called for representation from departments such as the Advisory Council on the Status of Women, Community Services, Health, Health Promotion and Protection, Justice, Finance, Education and Aboriginal Affairs.

We stress that this committee should not work in isolation from community stakeholders, but in collaboration with anti-poverty groups, women's groups, academics, mental health organizations and other relevant stakeholders. Our province's anti-poverty groups have the knowledge, skill and experience that the committee will need to do this job effectively. They are on the front lines of this issue, they are working with Nova Scotia's poor every day. A couple of days of consultation isn't going to cut it. We need to create a process that formally engages our experts and gives them a voice in determining the direction this strategy takes.

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During our last Spring sitting, I presented a resolution calling on government to create this poverty reduction strategy committee as soon as possible. That resolution received unanimous approval from the members of this Legislature. That is why I will reintroduce my bill and encourage the government to follow through on its commitment of the basic structure we suggested - multi-departmental and community representative.

Let's move forward with the goal of building a province that provides everyone with the opportunity to create a better life for themselves and their family. A poverty reduction strategy is an important step towards eliminating poverty, but we can do more and we must do more. We have called on the government to strengthen programs like Career Seek to help provide individuals with realistic opportunities to upgrade their education so they can get off social assistance permanently.

We have called on government to strengthen the Harvest Connection program and allow Nova Scotians on assistance the opportunity to gain valuable work experience without having their benefits reduced. Work programs need to be practical and they need to be extended to more industries in more parts of the province.

We have asked the government to expand the mandated programs provided by Nova Scotia Legal Aid. The advocacy work currently undertaken by Dalhousie Legal Aid is not provided by other organizations outside of metro. The province needs to increase the programs and services it provides through Nova Scotia Legal Aid so advocacy programs can be provided right across this province.

Liberals have called on the government to end the moratorium on the creation of small options homes. Affordable housing is simply not available in many areas of this province and the problem is getting worse. Rents are steadily increasing and there are too many vacancies in Community Services housing units.

The moratorium on small options homes in this province has created a crisis situation among low income disabled persons trying to gain their independence. Liberals have asked the government to permit those on social assistance to earn up to $3,000 before any money is clawed back.

Liberals have also called on the government to reintroduce Keep the Heat Program to provide financial assistance for low income individuals. The cost of heating oil is up 16 cents per litre from this time last year. The Salvation Army says it is getting more than a dozen calls a day from people who can't afford to keep their homes warm and the cold season hasn't even hit here yet. No Nova Scotian should be cold. (Applause) We will again be calling on government to re-establish the much needed program.

These recommendations will not put an end to poverty, but they are a few practical ways to address the situation that is making life unbearable for many Nova Scotians. Numerous

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studies and reports have determined that poverty is a major factor in youth violence. Poverty forces people into desperate situations. Some of our province's youth commit crimes to survive, not because it's the path they have chosen.

Liberals know that one of the best ways to reduce crime is to prevent it from occurring in the first place. Until the government gets serious about poverty, homelessness, mental health issues, substance abuse and unemployment, our crime rate will continue to cause alarm for Nova Scotians. It's time for the Premier and his government to invest in our youth and providing our communities with first-class recreational facilities is one way to do this. (Applause) Our province needs to do better providing educational and after school programs. The government needs to provide resources that engage youth and give them a meaningful role in our communities.

Mr. Speaker, the Progressive Conservatives have committed to making our streets, neighbourhoods, communities safer. But, the reality is, people are scared and they are looking for government to take a leadership role on this issue. While overall crime rates are decreasing, incidents of sexual assault and violent assaults in Nova Scotia are among the highest in the country. Perhaps the most troubling statistics are those that indicate a 17 per cent increase in youth crime in this year alone.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the former Justice Minister for taking action to address illegal drug activity in our communities through the creation of the Public Safety Investigative Unit. This is a common sense solution that is making a real difference in the communities in Nova Scotia. The Premier and his new Justice Minister are correct when they say that the federal government needs to strengthen the Youth Criminal Justice Act, but they have to stop blaming our province's high crime rate on Ottawa. It is time to stop hiding behind a piece of legislation.

The Liberal caucus has presented the Premier with some of our own ideas. The Premier could require convenience stores and gas stations to double-staff during overnight shifts, but he has refused. The Premier should make good on his promise to hire all 250 police officers to have a greater police presence on our streets, but he hasn't. Liberals believe that we should get tough on crime and balance stronger enforcement measures, stronger legislation and a genuine commitment to target the root causes of crime.

Nova Scotia are looking for leadership on crime but they are also looking for answers on other issues. The Premier owes Nova Scotians an explanation for the failed Business Mentorship Program for Immigration. From its inception, this was a poor program. Nova Scotians are reasonable people and there was nothing reasonable about this program. The province charged immigrants over $130,000 of their own money to come to Nova Scotia and participate in this program. They gave $20,000 to a headhunter somewhere in the world who matched the immigrant with the business and then they gave $10,000 to a company - through

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an untendered contract - to administer the program. To add insult to injury, the immigrant worker was paid a minimum of $20,000 of his or her own money.

This program fell under the purview of several former Cabinet Ministers, including our very own Premier. Despite widespread concern with the program, these ministers and our Premier did nothing. This program has tarnished our reputation, and has tarnished the reputation of Nova Scotia as a warm and welcoming province. It has tarnished Canada's reputation around the world and we should all be embarrassed.

Canada was built on a wise immigration policy; this province was built on a wise immigration policy. We have flourished because of immigration, and this Premier has turned our immigration policy from a source of pride into a source of disgrace. This is no way to welcome future Canadians and I am calling on the Premier to refund those nominees who have completed the program and stayed in Nova Scotia, refund them the difference between the $100,000 they paid to the mentoring business and the salary they received. This is the right thing to do. (Applause)

We need to provide opportunities to help newcomers settle comfortably in our communities and use the skills and expertise to contribute to the economy of this province. Immigration is just one aspect of the successful economic development strategy and the Atlantic Accord was another. In 2005, Nova Scotia signed an agreement with the federal government that ensured 100 per cent of the province's offshore revenue would be protected from equalization clawbacks. The Atlantic Accord was an economic development tool that guaranteed our provinces hundreds of millions of dollars in the long term. It was a formal agreement that allowed us to dream of a more prosperous Nova Scotia for our children. It allowed my children to dream about dreams that my generation cannot.

Yesterday afternoon in Ottawa, my federal colleagues received their long-awaited briefing from federal finance officials. Not surprising, finance officials flatly refused to confirm that the benefits would flow to Nova Scotia under this new deal. They say our Premier's numbers are unreliable - speculative at best. A two-page Atlantic Accord has been transformed into a highly technical 24-page document. This makes Bill Casey nervous and it should make all of us nervous as well. Despite what Peter MacKay has told Nova Scotians, we don't have a choice when it comes to equalization. We are now permanently locked into the new O'Brien formula which includes a cap on how much money the province will receive from its offshore revenue before equalization is clawed back. Furthermore, the federal government has refused to honour Clause 4 of the Accord which allows the agreement to apply to the equalization formula of the day. This is not the Atlantic Accord that John Hamm and Paul Martin signed. The 2005 Atlantic Accord is not "alive, well and better than ever."

Mr. Speaker, the Atlantic Accord is dead. It's time for the Prime Minister to start treating this province with the respect we deserve and it's time for our Premier to stand up for Nova Scotians and demand this respect. (Applause) We have lost our long fight over the Atlantic

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Accord, but Stephen Harper has agreed to strike an arbitration panel to determine the issue of Crown share payments that were guaranteed to Nova Scotia in the 1986 offshore agreement. I recognize this panel's recommendations are not binding on the federal government but I personally believe some money will arrive and when it does, we must remember that this money has already been spent. It has been spent four times over in four different ways by John Buchanan. When that cheque arrives, I want the Premier to place that money directly on the debt where it belongs. (Applause) Not only is this the fiscally responsible thing to do, it is the right thing to do.

Nova Scotians are reasonable people and they want their laws and regulations to be reasonable and there is nothing reasonable about gas regulation. Nova Scotians are not going to use more gas because the price is fair. They are going to put that money to better use. The proof is in. Gas regulation has been bad for Nova Scotia. A bad idea doesn't improve with time. It has cost each one of us and it costs each and every time we fill our gas tank, but Liberals didn't just complain about a bad idea. We presented a constructive solution - one that is good for all Nova Scotians.

Nova Scotians pay among the highest price for gasoline in the country. This session we will introduce legislation to scrap regulation and reduce the motive fuel tax by four cents a litre. We will also be introducing legislation to establish a watchdog to protect consumers from unfair gas prices. (Applause) This is about fairness. It is also about competitiveness. The Premier is allowing Nova Scotia businesses to suffer. Gas stations are closing. They are literally watching their customers fill up in New Brunswick and there is nothing reasonable about gas regulation.

Yesterday, the Premier attempted to convince Nova Scotians that his government has a new vision for this province. He told us that the economy of our province is healthy and strong but the record speaks for itself. Nova Scotia was the only province to experience a decline in the growth of jobs last year. Nova Scotia is projected to experience the lowest export growth of any province or territory over the next year. Over the five-year period of 2002 to 2006, Nova Scotia experienced the lowest growth of real GDP of any province. Simply put, Nova Scotia is not keeping pace with the rest of the country. In fact, we are lagging behind.

This government has abandoned our primary industries, the very industries that built our economy - fishing, farming and forestry. Yes, the economy of today is different than it was even 10 years ago but we cannot forget about the economic backbone of rural Nova Scotia. Our hog farmers are in a state of crisis. They can't afford to sell their hogs because they would be forced to take a loss and they can't afford to leave the industry because their debts are so high.

The province's fishing processing plants are closing and moving to other provinces. Our lumber mills are closing and if the current rate of closures continues, they will be all gone

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in 10 years. The industry has been asking for a forestry management plan but this government year after year fails to act. We understand that no government can be all things to all people but the Progressive Conservatives have failed after eight long years in power to seize on the great economic potential of this province and its people.

Opportunity is knocking and the development of the Atlantic Gateway will allow Nova Scotia to develop our transportation infrastructure and seize upon a full range of national and global opportunities. In October, our provincial government signed a memorandum of understanding with the federal government and the Governments of New Brunswick, P.E.I., Newfoundland and Labrador, to collaborate on the development of a gateway strategy within three years. We're talking about developing a strategy within two years.

This is unacceptable. We need to recognize our tremendous potential as a province and proudly take our place in the federation, and we are still lagging behind and two years is two years too long to wait.

The Premier spoke about infrastructure improvements in the Speech from the Throne. There are communities in this province that won't have access to broadband Internet by 2009. This is unacceptable.

There are bridges in this province - some in my own riding - that are crumbling. This is unacceptable. Throughout Nova Scotia there is an aging infrastructure that needs to be upgraded or replaced - not just pavement, but schools and hospitals. There are literally hundreds of Nova Scotia businesses that found the courage to innovate and enter the new age of the global competitiveness. They are helping to build a stronger Nova Scotia and I say it is time for our government to follow suit. (Applause)

We need to be leaders and not followers. It is time to seize upon the tremendous geographical advantage and become leaders in renewable energy. It is time to take advantage of our tremendous system of universities and colleges, and become the research and development capital in Canada when it comes to renewable energy. Let's open our arms to the world and seize the opportunities provided by a knowledge economy and global trading patterns. That's competitiveness, that's the winning attitude and we must reclaim it if we are to proudly take our place in the world. The Liberal caucus will not abandon our proud tradition of optimism and determination.

Mr. Speaker, our caucus has consistently offered practical, common-sense solutions to the issues that matter most to Nova Scotians because that is what reasonable people do. In the coming weeks, we will be introducing legislation to create a fairer, greener, safer, more competitive and more compassionate Nova Scotia because that's what Liberals do. (Applause)

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I look forward to a productive session. Thank you, Mr. Speaker, merci beaucoup. I will adjourn debate until the wishes of the House Leader. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. That concludes the government's business for the day. I move that the House do now rise to meet again on Monday at the hour of 7:00 p.m. and that the House hours be from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Government business will continue with the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne and if we get to the business of government bills, we'll be looking at calling Bill No. 12, the Evidence Act and Bill No. 13, the Probate Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is that the House do now rise to meet again on Monday at the hour of 7:00 p.m.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[The House rose at 11:42 a.m.]

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NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 36

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Wood's Harbour Mosquito R Navigators went undefeated to become Nova Scotia's Provincial Champions on September 1st and 2nd, 2007; and

Whereas the Navigators took their first win of the tournament against the Springhill Fence Busters by a score of 12 - 11. The Navigators took their second victory against the Inverness Ravens with a score of 12 - 9; and

Whereas the Navigators won against the Eastern Passage Sharks by the score of 12-0 and in the fourth game they beat the Shelburne Bashers 15 - 2. The Navigators took the provincial victory against the Shelburne Bashers by a score of 12 - 11;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the Wood's Harbour Mosquito R Navigators for winning the championship games and for being recognized as Nova Scotia's Provincial Champions in competitions played on the weekend of September 1st and 2nd of 2007.

RESOLUTION NO. 37

By: Hon. Rodney MacDonald (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 17, 2007, I had the honour to attend the grand opening of the new location for The Candy Shop in Port Hastings; and

Whereas the shop - which started business in the area in 2004 - is becoming one of the most popular retail and tourist attractions in Atlantic Canada; and

Whereas The Candy Shop's unique experience and commitment to success has earned them the reputation as the best confectionary store in Atlantic Canada;

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Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Peggy Ann Bosdet and her staff at The Candy Shop on the grand opening of their new location and wish them well as they continue to sweeten our province through entrepreneurial excellence.

RESOLUTION NO. 38

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas firefighters and their families make a huge contribution on a daily basis to our citizens throughout Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the job of a firefighter and fire department auxiliary requires extreme training, fund raising and many hours away from home and family; and

Whereas on Saturday, November 24, 2007, the community of Westchester will gather to honour these heroic men and women;

Therefore be it resolved all members of this Legislature extend our sincere thanks and congratulation on a job well done.

RESOLUTION NO. 39

By: Ms. Marilyn More (Dartmouth South-Portland Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas swimmer Sarah Taggart of Dartmouth participated in the 2007 International Children's Games in Iceland; and

Whereas Sarah achieved some personal bests including 11th in the 200 IM, 15th in the 400 Freestyle and 19th in the 100 Freestyle; and

Whereas this promising athlete competed on two relay teams, finishing 10th in the 4x100 Free Relay and 11th in the 4x100 Medley Relay;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Sarah Taggart for her excellent swimming results during June 2007 international Children's Games in Reykjavik, Iceland and thank her for being a great Nova Scotia ambassador.

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RESOLUTION NO. 40

By: Ms. Marilyn More (Dartmouth South-Portland Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas swimmer Will Meredith of Dartmouth participated in the 2007 International Children's Games in Iceland; and

Whereas Will also competed in the East Coast Championships in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador where he achieved 100 per cent personal best times; and

Whereas this promising athlete finished with four top 10 finishes in the Age Group Nationals in Montreal;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Will Meredith for his excellent results during the summer of 2007 at the International Children's Games, the East Coast Championships and the Age Group Nationals where he won the Bronze Medal in the 50 M Butterfly and wish him well in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 41

By: Ms. Marilyn More (Dartmouth South-Portland Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hugh Smith of Dartmouth is one of 14 athletes from the Halifax Alta Gymnastics Club representing Nova Scotia in Japan November 3-4, 2007; and

Whereas these gymnasts will be competing in the prestigious Moonsalto Cup in Kyoto; and

Whereas this was Hugh's first international competition which required considerable training, fundraising and cross-cultural awareness;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Hugh Smith for representing Nova Scotia in japan's 2007 Moonsalto Cup and wish him well in his future gymnastic career.

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RESOLUTION NO. 42

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sarah Balish, a Grade 9 student of Lockeport Regional High School, was chosen to play basketball for the provincial team through Basketball Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Sarah will be travelling to British Columbia to compete in the Nationals; and

Whereas Sarah was one of 12 picked out of 42 students throughout the province;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Sarah Balish on her athletic accomplishments and best wishes and continued success with her athletic goals.

RESOLUTION NO. 43

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Robert of Shelburne County, Nova Scotia has volunteered for the past 30 years a the Roseway Manor, Sandy Point, Shelburne; and

Whereas Robert founded the musical group "Friendship Singers" who perform gospel music and piano tunes for Manor residents; and

Whereas Robert volunteers for various functions, banquets, special events and Christmas season functions. He spends time acquainting, encouraging and building special friendships with residents;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Robert MacKay as a devoted faithful volunteer. He demonstrates compassion and charitable kindness and is especially treasured by the Roseway Manor staff and residents.

RESOLUTION NO. 44

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

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I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Robyn Atwood, who attends Lockeport Regional High School, was a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor's Medal presented by the Honourable Mayann E. Francis on May 24, 2007; and

Whereas Robyn has achieved high academic standing. She was awarded with the class Spirit Award and is a member of the Green Wave Honours Club. She is a class representative for student Parliament and is an active member of the Yearbook Committee as well as volunteer for Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentoring program; and

Whereas Robyn is a member of basketball, soccer, track and field teams and she volunteers "working the clock and doors" at home basketball games. Her community work involves volunteering with the Canadian Cancer Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Big Bike Ride, Terry Fox Run and Roseway Manor;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Robyn for the recognition and wish her continued success in all her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 45

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Roddy Conrad of Shelburne County has volunteered for over 21 years in his community; and

Whereas Roddy served as president of Shelburne Minor Ball for over 10 years, 4 years as president of Shelburne County Minor Ball Association and 3 years on the board of directors; and

Whereas Roddy has organized basketball camps for the last five years, he also helps coach Shelburne County Minor Hockey and has spent 14 years with the Jordan Fire Department. Roddy has coached bowling for two years after participating in a Youth Bowling Program;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly commend Roddy for being a valued, cheerful volunteer and for supporting youth and community. He is greatly appreciated for his hard work and dedication. Good luck in any future endeavours.

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RESOLUTION NO. 46

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Candace Henneberry took home the First Place Soapbox Derby Trophy on Saturday, July 14, 2007; and

Whereas the annual derby was held by the Shelburne Parks and Recreation Department and was sponsored by the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 63; and

Whereas a total of eleven participants registered in the junior division of the soapbox derby, Candace beat Riley Harlow for the first time in three years;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulates Candace Henneberry on her first place win, and best wishes participating in future soapbox derby competitions.

RESOLUTION NO. 47

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the White Point Golf Club hosted its annual two-man Invitational Golf Tournament during the Father's Day weekend June 16 and 17, 2007; and

Whereas Ryan Dixon of River Hills Golf and Country Club was presented with the Championship Trophy; and

Whereas Ryan and his partner, Aaron Nickerson, had the total winning score of 124 for both days which gave them a seven- shot victory over other competitors;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulates Ryan Dixon for his win at the White Point Invitational Golf Tournament and best wishes for future athletic competitions.

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RESOLUTION NO. 48

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Devon Gregory took home the Third Place Soapbox Derby Trophy on Saturday, July 14, 2007; and

Whereas the annual derby was held by the Shelburne Parks and Recreation Department and was sponsored by the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 63; and

Whereas a total of 11 participants registered in the junior division of the soapbox derby - Devon was awarded the trophy for the most innovative soapbox derby design;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulates Devon Gregory on his third place and most innovative design winnings, and best wishes participating in future soapbox derby competitions.

RESOLUTION NO. 49

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Shelburne Regional High School Grade 12 students worked to plan and organize a 30-hour famine on April 27 and 28, 2007; and

Whereas the purpose of the famine is to raise money that is used by World Vision to purchase food for needy families; and

Whereas 72 students participated and $2,309 was raised to buy food for underdeveloped countries;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly commend the participants of Shelburne Regional High School for their hard work and dedication in their quest to raise money for starving people around the world.

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RESOLUTION NO. 50

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Shag Harbour Incident Society Museum celebrated the opening of the museum on Saturday, June 16, 2007; and

Whereas the museum chronicles the October 4, 1967, incident in which an object that many believe was a UFO that crashed in the waters off Shag Harbour; and

Whereas the Barrington Municipal Warden, Louise Halliday, officially opened the museum with a ribbon-cutting ceremony;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulates the Shag Harbour Incident Society for their enthusiasm and hard work to preserve the history of Shag Harbour, and best wishes for future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 51

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sally Swaine of Shelburne County is a Special Olympian athlete who attended the Winter Games in Shearwater on March 2 to 4, 2007; and

Whereas Sally and the curling team played five games and won all five games, proceeding to the gold medal game; and

Whereas the curling team won the gold medal on Sunday, March 3, and will represent Nova Scotia at the Canadian National Games in Quebec City, 2008;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Sally Swaine for her great sportsmanship and dedication to the game as a team player, and good luck and continued success in your athletic future.

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RESOLUTION NO. 52

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Robbie Kenney of Villagedale, Shelburne County, has volunteered for the past 20 years for the Municipality of Barrington and the Town of Clark's Harbour; and

Whereas Robbie is a long-standing member of the Barrington 7E Fire Department and Island Barrington Fire Department, and he has served as a safety officer in extrication competitions and he is trained as an amateur radio operator; and

Whereas Robbie has volunteered for the Ground Search and Rescue for 13 years and has served as a coordinator with the Emergency Measures Organization for nine years;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly commend Robbie Kenney as a valued and much-appreciated volunteer - he has demonstrated he is committed to risking his life for the safety of the community, along with his expertise, courage and reliability in responding to alarms.

RESOLUTION NO. 53

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Richard Clark from Barrington Passage, Shelburne County, participated as a junior student council representative at Barrington Municipal High School; and

Whereas Richard was involved in the last two federal election campaigns; and

Whereas Richard received the Paul Levy Memorial Award from Peter MacKay, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Premier Rodney MacDonald, and Scott Armstrong;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulates Richard with his involvement with politics, and best wishes for future career endeavours as well as future political elections.

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RESOLUTION NO. 54

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Rhylie Nickerson of Barrington Municipal High School was awarded first prize, for the Roseway Literacy Prize on Thursday, June 14, 2007, by the Arts Council for the Junior Division; and

Whereas Rhylie submitted her poem Never Rollerblade in the Dark While Playing Limbo, winning the Roseway Literacy Prize which is named in honour of Roseway Publishing of Pleasant Point, Lockeport; and

Whereas the ceremony took place in Mike Thorbourne's Grade 8 English Class of Lockeport High and was presented by Susan Hoover and Peter Healy, who formed the winning committee;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulates Rhylie for her accomplishment in winning the Roseway Literacy Prize, and best wishes for future writing endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 55

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nick Dixon was the winner of the annual Frog Hopping Race at the Woods Harbour Day's activities on June 8 to 10, 2007; and

Whereas adults and kids registered 58 web-footed entries for the event to determine the fastest frog; and

Whereas competitors excitedly encouraged their frogs to the six-foot finish line - five Dixon family cousins competed against each other and in the final heat Nick took home the gold;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Nick Dixon for his achievements in winning gold at the annual Frog Hopping Race, and best wishes in the selection of future speedy frogs.

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RESOLUTION NO. 56

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Morgan Harlow, a student at Lockeport Regional High School, competed in seven events during the provincial track and field meet; and

Whereas Morgan came out as one of the top intermediate male athletes, coming in second for the 200-metre long jump, triple jump, 4x100 relay and 4x400 relay; and

Whereas Morgan came in third for the 400 metre and fifth place for discus;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Morgan Harlow on his athletic success and extend best wishes for future athletic endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 57

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas McGowan Lake Fish Hatchery marked its 20th year of operations with a July 8th open house near Caledonia, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas a large crowd of local residents and Shelburne County anglers attended and thanked the stocking program implemented by the hatchery; and

Whereas almost a million fish are raised yearly to ensure the future of trout fishing - speckled brook trout, sea-run trout and brown trout are released in many lakes of western Nova Scotia, a region with many acid-stressed lakes and streams;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly thank the staff at the McGowan Lake Fish Hatchery for their commitments to the restocking program in Shelburne County and extend best wishes for a continued successful fishery.

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RESOLUTION NO. 58

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mary Phillips of Clark's Harbour, Shelburne County, represented the Town of Clark's Harbour at the Provincial Volunteer Dinner in Halifax on April 10, 2007; and

Whereas Mary was nominated by the Seabreeze Rebekah Lodge No.24 where she has been a member for over 65 years, and she also volunteers for the Red Cross and canvasses for the Canadian Cancer Society; and

Whereas Mary has sewn more than 1,000 head wraps to provide comfort for cancer survivors, is an active member of the United Baptist Stone Church - being recognized as treasurer for 40 years, choir member and WMS;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Mary Phillips and thank her for her continuing community service and to extend to her best wishes for the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 59

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Linda O'Connell of Shelburne County was the top fundraising individual for the Southwestern Nova Scotian Relay for Life Cancer Society Fundraiser; and

Whereas Linda raised $2,670 on her own for the Relay for Life which took place Friday night, June 15, 2007, and ended Saturday morning, June 16th - a total of $151,108 was raised; and

Whereas 69 teams from Yarmouth and Shelburne Counties joined together and 781 people and 250 cancer survivors participated in the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Linda O'Connell for her dedication and participation in the Relay for Life as a celebration of life.

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RESOLUTION NO. 60

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Manu Poire of Shelburne County purchased her first bike at the age of 24, taking her first trip to the Cabot Trail in Cape Breton, and then going across Canada in 2002; and

Whereas Manu's enthusiasm for motorcycles led her to join the all-females riders group, Motor Maids Inc., the oldest women's motorcycle riding club in North America, in 2003 and was made district director for the Atlantic Provinces shortly after the group granted the Atlantic area as a district in 2007; and

Whereas Manu travelled 12,000 kilometres from Shelburne to Idaho to represent the Atlantic Provinces at a convention which consisted of meetings, banquets and a rally of 200 women dressed in matching uniforms who paraded through the Town of Idaho;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Manu Poire for her enthusiasm for motorcycles and for uniting women in promoting motorcycle interest in Shelburne County.

RESOLUTION NO. 61

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Logan Harris who attends Shelburne Regional High School was a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor's Medal presented by the Honourable Mayann E. Francis on May 24, 2007; and

Whereas Logan maintains an academic average of 87.3 per cent and is actively involved with On the Move Leadership Program and is a class representative for student council and a valued member of his school's soccer and badminton teams; and

Whereas Logan volunteers with the Recreation Department organizing youth sports, day camps and Take the Roof off Winter Events Program, and he hopes to complete a kinesiology program to become a sports conditioning specialist;

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Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Logan Harris for the recognition and wish him continued success in all his future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 62

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mallory Munroe of Lockeport Regional High School was awarded the third prize for the Roseway Literacy Prize on Thursday, June 14, 2007, by the Arts Council for the Junior Division; and

Whereas Mallory submitted her poem ,Why I don't have my Homework done, winning the Roseway Literacy Prize which is named in honour of Roseway Publishing of Pleasant Point, Lockeport; and

Whereas the ceremony took place in Mike Thorbourne's Grade 8 English class of Lockeport High and was presented by Susan Hoover and Peter Healy who formed the winning committee;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Mallory Munroe for her accomplishment in winning the Roseway Literacy Prize and best wishes for future writing endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 63

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Laura Keeler who attends Shelburne Regional High School was a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor's Medal presented by the Honourable Mayann E. Francis on May 24, 2007; and

Whereas Laura maintains an academic average of 92.3 per cent and is actively involved with the Health Heart Action Team, is a member of On the Move Leadership Program, participates in track and field, badminton, softball, basketball and is a captain for the senior girl's soccer team; and

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Whereas Laura hopes to receive a sports scholarship to attend university where she will pursue studies in sport medicine;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Laura Keeler for the recognition and wish her continued success in all her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 64

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kay Goreham of Woods Harbour, Shelburne County, received an honorary award for 25 years of service on March 10, 2007; and

Whereas the awards were given at the second annual Shelburne County Mutual Aid Supper held at the Woods Harbour Fire Department and a turkey supper was hosted by the Woods Harbour Ladies Auxiliary; and

Whereas Councillor George El Jakl presented the award on behalf of the Woods Harbour Volunteer Fire Department for 25 years of service as past treasurer;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Kay Goreham for her dedication to the fire service and also her hard work and devotion by serving the Woods Harbour Fire Department as past treasurer.

RESOLUTION NO. 65

By: Mr. Sterling Belliveau (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kaitlyn Anne Harris who attends Barrington Municipal High School was a recipient of the Lieutenant Governor's Medal presented by the Honourable Mayann E. Francis on May 24, 2007; and

Whereas Kaitlyn is a school mentor for Big Brothers/Big Sisters and is a representative for student council, a member of the special events and anti-bullying committees as well as the Youth Action Team; and

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Whereas Kaitlyn participates in track and field, has earned several awards for two consecutive years for being the most valuable player on her soccer and basketball teams and she enjoys horseback riding, swimming and travelling;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Kaitlyn Anne Harris for the recognition and wish her continued success in all her future endeavours.