The Nova Scotia Legislature

The House adjourned:
October 26, 2017.

HANSARD 09-4

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Charlie Parker

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

First Session

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
Gaming Corp. - KENO, Hon. G. Steele 73
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 45, RBC Multicultural Fest.: Organizers - Congrats.,
The Premier 76
Vote - Affirmative 76
Res. 46, Duke Awareness Wk. (09/20 - 09/26/09) - Acknowledge,
Hon. M. Moore 77
Vote - Affirmative 77
Res. 47, Celebrating Communities Conf. & Awards - Value,
Hon. P. Paris 77
Vote - Affirmative 78
Res. 48, Parnell, Mr. Walter: Death of - Tribute,
Hon. R. Jennex 78
Vote - Affirmative 79
Res. 49, Natl. Forest Wk. - Importance,
Hon. J. MacDonell 79
Vote - Affirmative 80
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
Bill No. 7, Trade Union Act, Hon. M. More 80
Bill No. 8, Provincial Finance Act, Mr. L. Glavine 80
Bill No. 9, Assessment Act/Municipal Grants Act, Hon. R. Jennex 80
Bill No. 10, Personal Property Security Act, Hon. R. Jennex 80
Bill No. 11, Provincial Finance Act, Mr. L. Glavine 80
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 50, Brown, Guy: Death of - Tribute,
Hon. S. McNeil 80
Vote - Affirmative 81
Res. 51, MacIvor, Jodi/David/Gracie - Fundraising,
Hon. K. Casey 81
Vote - Affirmative 82
Res. 52, Blinkhorn, Daniel: Bravery - Commend,
The Speaker (by Mr. C. MacKinnon) 82
Vote - Affirmative 82
Res. 53, Fisher, Darren: HRM Council - Election Congrats.,
Mr. A. Younger 83
Vote - Affirmative 83
Res. 54, EI Benefits - Terminally Ill Applicants,
Hon. M. Scott 83
Vote - Affirmative 84
Res. 55, Lucasville United Baptist Church - Anniv. (170th),
Mr. M. Whynott 84
Vote - Affirmative 85
Res. 56, Bruce GM - Progress Magazine Recognition,
Hon. S. McNeil 85
Vote - Affirmative 85
Res. 57, Sams, Adam - Golf Accomplishments,
Mr. K. Bain 86
Vote - Affirmative 86
Res. 58, Com. Serv. - Kendrick Rept.,
Hon. Manning MacDonald 86
Res. 59, Van den Hoek, Willem and Maja - Cheese Production,
Hon. K. Casey 87
Vote - Affirmative 88
Res. 60, Mar. Fiddle Fest. - Anniv. (60th),
Mr. A. Younger 88
Vote - Affirmative 88
Res. 61, Justice: Gov't. (N.S.) - Faint Hope Clause,
Hon. M. Scott 89
Vote - Affirmative 89
Res. 62, Eid-ul-Fitr - Importance,
Ms. D. Whalen 89
Vote - Affirmative 90
Res. 63, Connell, Peter: Berwick Sports Hall of Fame - Induction,
Mr. L. Glavine 90
Vote - Affirmative 91
Res. 64, Hike the Highlands Fest. - Success,
Hon. C. Clarke 91
Vote - Carried 91
Res. 65, Gov't. (N.S.) - Infrastructure Plans,
Mr. W. Gaudet 92
Res. 66, Dompierre, Bill: Death of - Tribute,
Ms. K. Regan 92
Vote - Affirmative 93
Res. 67, Bay of Fundy - New7Wonders Contest,
Mr. H. Theriault 93
Vote - Affirmative 94
Res. 68, Health - Diabetes Control,
Hon. K. Colwell 94
Vote - Affirmative 94
Res. 69, Holy Angels HS - Anniv. (50th),
Hon. Manning MacDonald 95
Vote - Affirmative 95
Res. 70, Alzheimer Soc. (N.S.) - Duck Derby,
Ms. D. Whalen 95
Vote - Affirmative 96
Res. 71, Cameron, Lena et al - Lawn Bowling Medal,
Ms. K. Regan 96
Vote - Affirmative 97
Res. 72, Muise, Judge Pierre Leon - Prov. Court Appt.,
Mr. H. Theriault 97
Vote - Affirmative 98
Res. 73, Ferguson, Lena: History of Porter's Lake - Publication,
Hon. K. Colwell 98
Vote - Affirmative 98
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY TO THE SPEECH FROM THE THRONE:
The Premier 99
Mr. A. Younger 107
Hon. C. Clarke 116
Adjourned Debate 136
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., Sept. 22nd at 2:00 p.m. 136
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 74, Beechville Baptist Church - Anniv. (165th),
Hon. W. Estabrooks 137
Res. 75, Smith, Daniel: St. Margaret's Ctr. - Recognition,
Hon. W. Estabrooks 137
Res. 76, Adams, Purdy: Berwick Sports Hall of Fame - Induction,
Mr. L. Glavine 138

[Page 73]

HALIFAX, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

Sixty-first General Assembly

First Session

7:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Charlie Parker

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Gordon Gosse, Hon. Wayne Gaudet, Mr. Alfie MacLeod

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We'll begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Finance.

HON. GRAHAM STEELE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today in my capacity as Minister responsible for Part 1 of the Gaming Control Act, which gives me the responsibility for the Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation.

[Page 74]

73

In March of this year the Gaming Corporation, through its agent the Atlantic Lottery Corporation, introduced a new game called KENO. It also introduced a new gaming platform for KENO into many bars and lounges throughout the province. When KENO was introduced, concerns were raised about the impact this new game and this new platform might have on at-risk and problem gamblers. I was among those who raised concerns at that time.

After being sworn in as minister, I undertook to gather information and to consult stakeholders about the future of KENO. I have now completed that task. What I discovered surprised me. I discovered, for example, that KENO had been under development for over a year before it was publicly announced, but no public input had been sought until after the gaming platform was already installed throughout the province and the game was ready to go.

I discovered also that the previous government had decided to keep to itself the social responsibility assessment concerning KENO. I asked the Gaming Corporation to release that assessment and they have done so. Although the social responsibility assessment was careful and thorough, concerns about KENO persist among some stakeholder groups. For example, concerns were expressed as recently as last week in the Cape Breton Post and The Halifax ChronicleHerald by representatives of community health boards in Cape Breton.

Even on its own terms, KENO has not been a success. Revenue has fallen 80 per cent below expectations with the result that KENO is actually losing money. In order for the game to have even the possibility of breaking even, further spending would be required for capital and marketing.

For all of these reasons, and after careful consideration, we have come to the conclusion that it is time to pull the plug on KENO in Nova Scotia. (Applause)

Pour toutes ces raisons, M. le Président, et après mûre réflexion, nous en sommes venus à la conclusion que le temps est venu de mettre un terme au KENO en Nouvelle-Écosse.

The Nova Scotia Gaming Corporation supports this conclusion and will instruct its agent, the Atlantic Lottery Corporation, to give appropriate notice to KENO retailers and withdraw from the game. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, good things can happen late in the day at Province House. It is a very, very good announcement. It's one that the Liberal Party spoke early and often in terms of not introducing KENO to our province. In fact, the game itself,

[Page 75]

the Manitoba experience spoke loud and clear that this should never have been introduced here in the province. In fact, it was one of those very unusual occasions where the Nova Scotia Lounge and Beverage Association did not want this game introduced, but we know that the previous government went ahead and tried this game.

I am pleased today because of the number of addiction centres, church communities, community health boards, and members of our community in Nova Scotia that spoke loud and clear about ever introducing KENO. I presented petitions here in the House so it is nice to see that their voices did not go ultimately unheeded. However, it comes down to a revenue generation factor perhaps more than a moral responsibility that we have to deal with gaming and gambling in the Province of Nova Scotia. In fact, it fell about 80 per cent below expectations. Much like the 15,000 problem gamblers in Nova Scotia, their revenue generation results in very little after weeks, months and years of gambling. So today we see the end of KENO and I'm pleased that it was something that the Liberal Party, along with many Nova Scotians, did not want to see in the first place and I thank the NDP Government for making the decision.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Yes, Mr. Speaker, I rise on behalf of my colleague, the member for Argyle, in response to the statement by the Minister of Finance here this evening. As anyone would know, in my jurisdiction I recognize that there are many revenue-generating activities government is engaged in - with some of them there is controversy, with some there is not. There are people who will talk about the activities of the Liquor Corporation and what types of sales and marketing efforts they undertake, as with gambling, whether formalized or community-based, there is a wide spectrum of debate, both those for or against.

Indeed, Mr. Speaker, while I am not somebody who likes casinos or the like, I do recognize that our society has gambling as a reality. Our society makes choices as to what they engage in, that we respect individual choice, but we also support those who are in need. But I also recognize, if I understand the information provided to me, that the revenue to date was about $700,000, about $1.6 million less than expected. There had been about $400,000 in prizes handed out and $40,000 to retailers, and the operating costs being somewhere around $200,000, but I also recognize that there are 180 locations around this province.

Not to get involved with the debate, the one thing the Minister of Finance has failed to address here and maybe we can ask this in Question Period, or he will address it another time, is the cost of breaking this and the cost to the taxpayers for a government that's worried about that stewardship. So the one thing that was lacking in the minister's statement here this evening is the details associated with breaking a contract. I'm assuming there is a contract in place. I'm assuming that like any contract, if you break that, there will be a cost to doing that.

[Page 76]

[7:15 p.m.]

While revenues may not have been to the level that was anticipated, and again not something I can comment on myself, I am also told that the estimated cost of eliminating this is $3.5 million. For a cash-strapped minister, I'm sure that next week he is going to articulate this in the budget to Nova Scotians, as well as many other things, but this action by this minister may also explain while Nova Scotians can see a massive deficit on the horizon, this is one of many anticipated actions by this government that they'll come to regret.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 45

HON. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the organizers of the RBC Multicultural Festival celebrated 25 years of promoting diversity and celebrating Nova Scotia's rich culture; and

Whereas this festival shows Nova Scotians the power of diversity to open minds and influence the future in positive and exciting ways; and

Whereas not only does celebrating and embracing diversity bring social and economic benefits to the province, it promotes openness to new ideas, experiences and creativity, creating a stronger Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the organizers of the RBC Multicultural Festival on another successful event and wish them continued success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 77]

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Labour and Workforce Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 46

HON. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Duke of Edinburgh's Award has a long-standing history of promoting excellence and achievement in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the award program encourages our province's youth to develop the leadership qualities of responsibility, self-reliance and compassion; and

Whereas September 20th through September 26th is Duke Awareness Week in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge the participants, leaders and facilitators of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award in Nova Scotia for their dedication and hard work, and wish them a successful Duke Awareness Week.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Economic and Rural Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 47

HON. PERCY PARIS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 78]

Whereas the 2009 Celebrating Communities Conference and Awards, taking place from September 23rd to September 25th, is celebrating 10 years of growing our province into a better place to live; and

Whereas the conference recognizes a high degree of community collaboration and engagement; and

Whereas from a field of 37 entries, 18 finalists all display creativity, innovation, an enthusiastic spirit, and stories of working together to achieve success and sustainable communities;

Therefore be it resolved that we recognize the value of the community leadership and hard work these communities demonstrate, including the dedication of Economic and Rural Development staff and the Colchester Regional Development Authority as hosts of the Celebrating Communities Conference and Awards, an event that is a key part of the province's community development policy.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Emergency Management.

RESOLUTION NO. 48

HON. RAMONA JENNEX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas many Nova Scotians were saddened to hear of the recent passing of Mr. Walter Parnell, President of the Nova Scotia Ground Search and Rescue Association and co-founder and treasurer of Yarmouth Ground Search and Rescue; and

Whereas Mr. Parnell's outstanding leadership and contributions to the reorganization of Ground Search and Rescue teams in our province, and his work to improve radio

[Page 79]

communication systems, interagency co-operation, and the sharing of best practices greatly enhanced Ground Search and Rescue capabilities in our province; and

Whereas Mr. Parnell was highly respected for his friendship and dedication and deeply valued by his community, the province, and the Emergency Management Office and all members of Nova Scotia's 24 Ground Search and Rescue teams;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize Mr. Walter Parnell for his selfless service to Nova Scotians and his outstanding contributions to Nova Scotia Ground Search and Rescue, and extend our sincere condolences to his loving wife Donna, his children, grandchild, and family upon his passing.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

RESOLUTION NO. 49

HON. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas National Forest Week is held every year in September to recognize the importance of forests to our province and the entire country; and

Whereas the week-long celebration helps Nova Scotians to recognize the importance of forests for providing our province with a strong foundation for economic growth and environmental protection; and

Whereas the theme of this year's National Forest Week is Canada's Forests: Strong Roots, Green Shoots;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House and all Nova Scotians recognize the importance of forests and the successful celebration of 2009 National Forest Week.

[Page 80]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 7 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 475 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Trade Union Act. (Hon. Marilyn More)

Bill No. 8 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 365 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Provincial Finance Act. (Mr. Leo Glavine)

Bill No. 9 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 23 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Assessment Act; and Chapter 302 of the Revised Statues of 1989. The Municipal Grants Act. (Hon. Ramona Jennex)

Bill No. 10 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 13 of the Acts of 1995-96. The Personal Property Security Act. (Hon. Ramona Jennex)

Bill No. 11 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 365 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Provincial Finance Act. (Mr. Leo Glavine)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 50

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 81]

Whereas earlier this Spring the Town of Springhill, and indeed all Nova Scotians, lost a political icon with the passing of Guy Brown; and

Whereas his dutiful service to our province included serving as Minister of Consumer Affairs, Housing and Municipal Affairs, Labour, Agriculture, and responsibility for the Workers' Compensation Board; and

Whereas regardless of his involvement in public life, whether it be as a minister, MLA, or mayor, Guy never forgot about people and the importance of serving in their best interest;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Legislature extend our sympathies to Guy Brown's family, his wife June and his sons Dale and Glenn, and honour his memory by ensuring that our actions respect the best interest of the public at large.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 51

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jodi and David MacIvor, along with their nine-year old daughter, Gracie, are tremendous ambassadors and fundraisers for the IWK Children's Hospital and numerous other charitable organizations; and

Whereas Molly's Rainbow began five years ago in memory of Jodi's and David's daughter, Molly, who journeyed to Heaven at only 20 months of age - a beautiful double rainbow appeared across the sky in Pictou County at the time of Molly's passing; and

[Page 82]

Whereas the MacIvor family continue to celebrate Molly's life through numerous initiatives that will bring joy and improved health to children and families in need - to date, over $20,000 has been raised and donated in Molly's name;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House extend their sincere appreciation to Jodi, David, and Gracie, for their tremendous spirit - their selfless efforts benefit countless individuals and make our communities a better place.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 52

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the honourable member for Pictou West, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a devastating fire destroyed the home of Sherry Blinkhorn of Loch Broom, Pictou County, on June 25, 2009; and

Whereas 15-year-old Daniel Blinkhorn was the first to awaken and escape outside, only to realize his mother was still inside; and

Whereas Daniel went back in through the smoke and flames and guided his mother to safety;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia Legislature commend Daniel Blinkhorn for his act of bravery and heroism in saving his mother's life.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, member, I appreciate that.

[Page 83]

There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

[7:30 p.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 53

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Halifax Regional Municipality held a by-election for District 6, East Dartmouth-The Lakes; and

Whereas the voter turnout was the highest of any HRM municipal by-election in recent history; and

Whereas seven candidates put their name forth to stand for election, each offering their ideas to the election debate;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Darren Fisher on his success in the municipal by-election of Saturday, September 19, 2009.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 84]

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

RESOLUTION NO. 54

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the federal government has committed to revisiting the policy around employment insurance benefits in this country; and

Whereas many Nova Scotians are applying for sick benefits as a result of not being able to return to work because of health reasons; and

Whereas on many occasions these applicants are individuals who are terminally ill and may never return to the workforce;

Therefore be it resolved that this Legislature encourage the federal government to change employment insurance benefits so that Nova Scotians who apply and qualify for employment insurance, and who are determined to be terminally ill, be extended the full term of employment insurance benefits and be treated the same as those who have lost their employment through no fault of their own.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville.

RESOLUTION NO. 55

MR. MAT WHYNOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Saturday, July 18, 2009, the Lucasville United Baptist Church celebrated 170 years of ministry and service to the community; and

[Page 85]

Whereas they marked this occasion with an anniversary banquet; and

Whereas the Lucasville United Baptist Church has provided community leadership and fellowship for the people of Lucasville and surrounding area for many years;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate the Lucasville United Baptist Church on its historic 170th Anniversary and extend very best wishes in their endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 56

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas as Bruce GM in Middleton has been recognized by Progress Magazine as the 2009 Number One Best Place to Work in Atlantic Canada; and

Whereas Bruce GM offers its employees plenty of flexibility to keep their work lives in balance with their family lives; and

Whereas this award is a testament to their leadership, corporate culture and commitment to attracting and retaining the very best employees for the job;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating the Bruce GM team for this outstanding accomplishment.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 86]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 57

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas if one golfer were to shoot three holes-in-one on the same course in a single round, the odds are forecast at one in 488 billion; and

Whereas the author of Astonishing But True Golf Facts says the odds of making three aces over five rounds is nearly 3 billion to one; and

Whereas Adam Sams defied all the odds shooting three holes-in-one over five rounds of golf at one of Canada's most famous public golf courses, the Highland Links, between September 11th and 15th;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs in this House of Assembly congratulate Adam Sams and make it a point that for any charity golf tournaments we are asked to be in next summer and an extra player is required, please keep Ingonish lobster fisherman Adam Sams in mind because after his feats between September 11th and 15th, I have no doubt he would be a welcome addition to any golf team in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 87]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South

RESOLUTION NO. 58

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas recent reports have cited 43 cases of abuse in residential care facilities over the last two years; and

Whereas the Minister of Community Services has not addressed this issue and has decided to rely solely on the previous government's review of one facility in the province; and

Whereas the NDP repeatedly called for the implementation of the Kendrick report to ensure that Nova Scotians with disabilities are being adequately cared for;

Therefore be it resolved that the NDP commit to doing what it said it would do in Opposition and implement the recommendations of the Kendrick report.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 59

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dragon's Breath Blue is an exceptionally unique cheese and one of many amazing cheeses developed at "That Dutchman's Farm" in Upper Economy, Colchester County; and

[Page 88]

Whereas farm owners Willem and Maja van den Hoek are attracting customers from around the world with approximately 15,000 people a year visiting the farm; and

Whereas That Dutchman's Farm is now part of Nova Scotia's Come to Life initiative and is also just one example of the numerous local food producers living and working here in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that Willem and Maja van den Hoek and their children be commended by all MLAs in the House of Assembly tonight for their diligent work in producing quality food products, especially the blue cheese, and wishing them nothing but continued success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 60

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Maritime Fiddle Festival is the longest continuously running festival in Canada; and

Whereas the Maritime Fiddle Festival celebrated 60 years in Dartmouth during the summer of 2009; and

Whereas the Maritime Fiddle Festival continues to present the best of old-time fiddling and step-dancing to local, national and international audiences;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Maritime Fiddle Festival on its 60th Anniversary and thank the many volunteers who have contributed to the festival over its 60-year history.

[Page 89]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

RESOLUTION NO. 61

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson has introduced legislation aimed to repeal the faint hope clause under Section 745 of the Criminal Code of Canada; and

Whereas under Section 745 of the Criminal Code, offenders can apply to a judge for parole after serving only 15 years after committing horrible violent murders; and

Whereas victims' families across Canada have had their lives shattered forever and often families are torn apart by the stress of losing a loved one to a murderer;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House support federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson and the Conservative Government in their attempt in repealing the faint hope clause from the Criminal Code and delivering meaningful justice to victims' families of violent murders.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 90]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 62

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas there is a growing Muslim community in Halifax Clayton Park and across Nova Scotia which is enriching our cultural life; and

Whereas Eid-ul-Fitr is a celebration associated with the end of the holy month of Ramadan and the end of the month-long fast; and

Whereas this year the religious holiday of Eid-ul-Fitr began on September 20th and included religious services and family gatherings;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly recognize the importance of this celebration and wish all Muslims Eid Mubarak.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 63

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the annual Berwick Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony took place June 6, 2009, celebrating local accomplishments in sport; and

[Page 91]

Whereas Peter Connell was inducted in this year's ceremony as a builder and an athlete in recognition of his talents; and

Whereas Peter was a dedicated athlete who excelled in various winter and summer sports and as a builder, recognizing the significant contribution he has made to coaching and the development of women's sport in the community;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the late Peter Connell's family on the legacy he left his family and community on being inducted into the Berwick Sports Hall of Fame as both a builder and an athlete.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 64

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hike the Highlands Festival runs from September 11th to September 20th, starting in White Head and concluding in Red Island, Cape Breton Island; and

Whereas now in its 6th year, Hike the Highlands allows participants to see first-hand some of the most stunning views and scenery imaginable, all while promoting a healthy and physically fit lifestyle; and

Whereas over the course of nine days, various workshops and performances take place and serve as further ammunition for one and all to see and explore the beautiful Cape Breton Island;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Assembly encourage all Nova Scotians to see the natural beauty and character that the Cape Breton Highlands have to share, and congratulate the Hike the Highlands Festival for its continued success.

[Page 92]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 65

HON. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia is in the midst of an economic downturn and our province is in need of some clear direction and definitive action; and

Whereas initiatives by government can often help to start infrastructure projects, leading to numerous economic spinoffs; and

Whereas the people of Nova Scotia have seen little to no action from this government on stimulating our economy through infrastructure projects, allowing important developments to remain in the lurch;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly urge government to inform this Chamber of its infrastructure plans and priorities immediately and table this plan in this House.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

[Page 93]

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 66

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bill Dompierre passed away August 9, 2009 after a courageous battle with cancer; and

Whereas for many years Bill was a devoted educator; however, his true passion was basketball, which he enjoyed coaching - both minor basketball and girls' high school teams; and

Whereas Bill was a well-respected resident of Bedford who was well known for his generosity of spirit and fun-loving nature;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House offer condolences to Kim Dompierre - Bill's wife of 30 years - and their two sons Christopher and Matthew, along with his extended family and many friends.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

[7:45 p.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 67

[Page 94]

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bay of Fundy was declared a New7Wonders finalist in Zurich, Switzerland on July 21, 2009, where it was identified by popular vote in a global campaign to declare the new seven wonders of nature; and

Whereas the voting continues online at votemyfundy.com throughout 2010-11 in this final and important stage of the contest; and

Whereas the Bay of Fundy is the only Canadian site and one of three on the continent to proceed to the final phase in this New7Wonders of Nature contest;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly recognize the Bay of Fundy for its natural wonder and hope that it continues to receive the accolades that it so well deserves.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 68

HON. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas according to the 2008 Nova Scotia Diabetes Statistics Report, prevalence of diabetes in Nova Scotia has increased by 20 per cent over the past five years with approximately one in 11 adults in our province living with the disease; and

Whereas those aged 20 to 49 years are 25 to 35 times more likely to suffer with complications associated with kidney and eye diseases compared to those without diabetes; and

[Page 95]

Whereas individuals with diabetes are two times more likely to be hospitalized and are more likely to have longer lengths of stay than people without diabetes;

Therefore be it resolved that this government acknowledge that investment made in diabetes control today will reduce future health care costs thereby resulting in a more sustainable health care system in the years ahead.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

RESOLUTION NO. 69

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame and the staff of Holy Angels High School are celebrating a special event on October 17, 2009; and

Whereas this event is marking the 50th Anniversary of the opening of the present Holy Angels High School; and

Whereas both the Sisters of Notre Dame and the teachers and students have contributed much to the community of Sydney over the past 50 years;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly extend best wishes to everyone involved in celebrating 50 years of academic excellence at Holy Angels High School and wish them best wishes in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 96]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 70

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia has been providing support for more than 15,000 Nova Scotians who have been diagnosed with dementia, along with their families and caregivers; and

Whereas on Saturday, September 19, 2009, the Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia held their 3rd Annual Duck Derby, an innovative fundraising event which saw more than 10,000 rubber ducks launched at Bishop's Landing in Halifax, for a race of a lifetime; and

Whereas today, which is recognized as World Alzheimer Day, an international report was released estimating that 35.6 million people worldwide will be living with dementia next year, a 10 per cent increase over previous global dementia prevalence statistics reported four years ago;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Alzheimer Society of Nova Scotia for a successful fundraising event this past weekend and acknowledge that a focus around early diagnosis of dementia is essential in order to reduce the enormous burdens on individuals, families, health care infrastructures and our economy.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 97]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 71

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lena Cameron, Vivian Conoran and Val Bechard represented Nova Scotia in the Canadian Senior Triples Lawn Bowling Championships held in Kitchener in August, 2009; and

Whereas the Nova Scotia women's team held a 5-0 record at the end of round robin play; and

Whereas in the final against Manitoba the women won a silver medal with a final of 13-10 in Manitoba's favour;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House congratulate Lena Cameron, Vivian Conoran and Val Bechard for their silver medal at the 2009 Canadian Senior Triples Lawn Bowling Championships.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 72

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future

day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 98]

Whereas Judge Pierre Leon Muise was sworn into office June 29, 2009, at the Digby Justice Centre; and

Whereas Judge Muise is Nova Scotia's first Métis judge; and

Whereas Judge Muise is also the first Acadian to serve on the provincial court bench and will conduct trials in French, serving in Digby, Annapolis Royal and Yarmouth;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Judge Pierre Leon Muise on his historical appointment as a provincial court judge and wish him well on this new endeavour.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 73

HON. KEITH COLWELL: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lena Ferguson, age 82, of West Chezzetcook, Nova Scotia, is a well-known community historian; and

Whereas Lena has been researching the history of West Chezzetcook, the Eastern Shore and other places since 1976; and

Whereas Lena has launched her first book, entitled History of Porter's Lake: a little breezy place: Amagunchech on September 6th, 2009;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly recognize and congratulate Lena Ferguson for her historical research and for writing this book which preserves the rich history of the Porter's Lake area.

[Page 99]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER: We will now resume debate on Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER: Well, Mr. Speaker, thank you very much. It's nice this evening to be able to join the debate in the Address in Reply. Thank you very much to my colleagues and thank you for the chance to be in my place this evening to formally address the members of the House for the first time as the first ever NDP Premier of Nova Scotia. (Applause) They're excited.

First, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate you, Mr. Speaker, on your appointment. I am certain that I am not alone in my confidence that you will rule over this House with patience and fairness.

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I would also like to acknowledge, as was done by the Leader of the Opposition and the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party, Her Honour Lieutenant Governor Mayann Francis for delivering the Speech from the Throne and the MLAs for Lunenburg and Guysborough-Sheet Harbour who moved and seconded the Speech from the Throne as read by Her Honour. (Applause)

Finally, I would like to welcome both the newly-elected and returning MLAs from all Parties. I think it is important to note that we are all working toward a common goal - making life better in this province.

Nova Scotians made history when they elected this government in June. Not only is it the first ever NDP Government in Nova Scotia but we also have the youngest member to ever serve in the House. I have no doubt that Mat Whynott will prove to be a valuable asset to this government and to his constituents. This government also boasts nine women, the highest number of females to ever be elected to the Nova Scotia Legislature. (Applause) Four of those members are also part of the Cabinet, holding such high profile portfolios as Health, Community Services and Education. I believe that more than ever, this government reflects the modern, diverse society in which Nova Scotians live.

The year 2009 has been a year of change for this great province. On June 9th, Nova Scotians decided that it was time to turn a new page. They elected a government with fresh energy and new ideas to make our province an even better place to live, to work, to do business and to raise a family. We intend to follow through on the commitments we made to Nova Scotians in hopes of improving life in this province.

There are countless Nova Scotians who have dedicated their lives to this same goal. Unfortunately this year, we had to say goodbye to several of those who truly left their mark on Nova Scotia and its people. A face we came to know and respect in this very room, Michael Baker. He loved this province and his constituents and he worked hard for both over a decade as he served as the MLA for Lunenburg. My heart goes out to his wife Cynthia and her two sons who recently returned from Nova Scotia Week in Scotland where a tree was planted in Michael's honour.

Government all mourned the loss of former MLAs, Dr. Bill Gillis and Guy Brown. Over his 28 years in office, Bill developed a fierce respect for the taxpayers' dollars and how they were used and I'm sure many of us will remember an editorial cartoon in the Chronicle Herald, which depicted Bill as a reckless spender as he ordered double cheese at his beloved Pizza Hut.

Throughout the 28 years representing the former riding of Cumberland Centre, Guy Brown was affectionately known as the people's politician and he will for certain be remembered that way.

[Page 101]

Many an MLA, as well as former Speakers of the House, benefitted from the sage advice of the late Art Fordham.

As the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, I can attest to the great sense of loss that came with Donald Marshall's death last month. An influential figure in aboriginal communities across Canada, Donald fought hard for treaty rights and has left an important legacy for generations of Mi'kmaq who will follow him.

Muriel Duckworth will be forever remembered as an ambassador of peace, defender of women's rights and a champion of educational development. Muriel's way of speaking was simple, plain and to the point. It was that honesty and plain-spoken style that moved Nova Scotians and Canadians. Frankly, we could all learn something from her example.

I'd like to take some time now to recognize another group of citizens whose daily contributions make life in my constituency of Cole Harbour truly pleasant. When I think of Cole Harbour one word comes to mind - giving. This is a community that is tightly knit by its strong sense of volunteerism. From the local schools to the churches, sports and heritage organizations, you would be hard-pressed to find another area where so many quiet heroes reside. Of course there are the obvious role models. A prime example is our very own hockey sensation Sidney Crosby. Born and raised in Cole Harbour, this young man has achieved great feats and touched the lives of so many people in this community and beyond. Just last month he brought the coveted Stanley Cup trophy to Cole Harbour, taking the time to share it with sick children, military families and the people of his home town. Sidney has never forgotten his roots and he returns home often to offer encouragement and support to the youth of Cole Harbour. He truly exemplifies what we as Nova Scotians want for our young people.

Cole Harbour is also about much more. It is the home of Cole Harbour Minor Baseball Association and the Cole Harbour Soccer Club, one of the fastest growing soccer associations in the province. These groups require countless volunteers to organize, coach, referee and car pool the hundreds of kids who take part every year.

More volunteers give their time to the Cole Harbour Bel Ayr Minor Hockey Association, which I'm proud to say boasts one of the largest minor hockey tournaments in the country. Next year the Joe Lamontagne Memorial March Break Tournament will celebrate its 29th year of providing young men and women of all skill levels a chance to compete, make new friends and learn some valuable lessons about sportsmanship and fair play.

[8:00 p.m.]

Of course, there is the Cole Harbour Minor Basketball Association. One of my old coaches told me one time that over the years basketball can both build and reveal one's

[Page 102]

character. I believe that is true. These sports clubs truly understand the importance of their volunteers and this sports club in particular every year recognizes several key contributors with the Rick Kirby Award for championing volunteerism.

Now it may still be early in the school year, but I feel it is important to recognize the students at the fine schools in Cole Harbour. Even when classes aren't in, these inspiring young people are taking part in activities throughout metro. Just this past July Auburn Drive High School's jazz band received a standing ovation for their stirring performance at the annual Atlantic Jazz Festival in Halifax. I want to wish the students at Auburn, Cole Harbour District High, and all the schools in my district, a safe and prosperous year.

Thanks to the hard work and dedication of the Cole Harbour Parks and Trails Association, our community has a beautiful provincial park right on its doorstep. Cole Harbour Heritage Park is 400 acres of pristine salt marshes and beautiful rocky coastlines. I encourage anyone who hasn't walked or cycled the park's half dozen trails to come and visit soon. Cole Harbour is rich not only in its scenery, but in its history, too. The Parks and Trails Association has helped preserve such cultural sites as the original home of George Bissett, a former justice of the peace and Cole Harbour's first county councillor.

Volunteers with the Cole Harbour Rural Heritage Society have also dedicated their time to protecting and raising awareness of the natural history of the area. One of the group's greatest accomplishments is the establishment of the Cole Harbour Heritage Farm, nestled right in the middle of the city. I once heard the late Halifax Fairview MLA, Eileen O'Connell, refer to the spot as a "little oasis of culture and heritage." It is truly that.

I am proud to say I represent a constituency with such a wealth of talented, generous people. I would like to recognize those people for all the work they do to make Cole Harbour the wonderful place it is to live and to raise a family. Too often their efforts go unnoticed and that is a shame - to those people I say a heartfelt thank you.

This government is committed to making life better and more affordable for families. Nova Scotians have put their trust and faith in this government to make positive changes over the next four years, and I will work hard to make sure that happens. Let it be known this government has and will continue to live up to its commitments. (Applause)

Over the years the NDP has focused on the issues that matter most to Nova Scotians every day: seniors in long-term care facilities being forced to sell everything they own for their health care; stimulating Nova Scotia's economy and creating good, secure jobs to keep our young people here at home; taking the HST off of basic home electricity; and limited access to quality health care because of emergency room closures.

These tough times call for genuine leadership, and in just three short months this government has already followed through on key campaign commitments that have improved the lives of Nova Scotians and their families. We implemented the new home construction

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rebate to kick-start the economy and to keep our skilled tradespeople here at home. More than 700 new homeowners have applied for a rebate of up to $7,000, sparking new construction projects and helping to maintain good paying jobs. I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, I was with members of the home construction industry just this weekend and they were saying how well this is working and how pleased they are to see it fully underway.

We were the first province to put in place hard caps on air quality and greenhouse gas emissions to ensure a cleaner, greener, more sustainable province by 2020. We had the pleasure of announcing last week a manufacturing tax credit designed to spur investment by manufacturers and processors. Manufacturers employ thousands of people, many of them outside of HRM. This credit will help jump-start manufacturing and processing in Nova Scotia, as we come out of a difficult recession.

Mr. Speaker, Dorothy Rice, chair of the Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters in Nova Scotia welcomed the tax credit, saying it will "boost productivity and increase employment throughout the province."

Also last week, my Minister of Economic and Rural Development announced an enhancement to the Nova Scotia equity tax credit. Now, at a time where gaining credit can be difficult, Nova Scotia entrepreneurs will have an easier time finding financing for the start-up and expansion of businesses, but that's not all we've done since June.

On September 13th, Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal Minister Bill Estabrooks, along with federal counterparts, announced nearly $100 million in infrastructure projects right across the province. Among other things, Mr. Speaker, that money will go towards 40 construction and repair projects on Nova Scotia's highways and bridges. Mr. Estabrooks announced 11 projects for HRM and 20 more for CBRM.

In partnership with the federal government and municipalities this government is improving communities and creating thousands of jobs. We said that we would maximize federal infrastructure dollars and that is exactly what we are doing. We said that we would help manufacturers and new entrepreneurs and that's exactly what we are doing. We said we would work to help skilled young people stay and build a life here and that is exactly what we're doing. We said that we would take the HST off basic home electricity and effective October 1st, that is exactly what we are doing - 200,000 Nova Scotians will benefit from the removal of the HST and another 200,000 will see further reductions in their electricity bills. (Applause) We won't stop there.

Nova Scotians expect governments to keep faith with their voters. People expect the platform to be the agenda of the newly elected or re-elected government. This government knows that every reasonable effort must be dedicated to honouring the trust that Nova Scotians placed in us on June 9th and I want to be very clear about this. For the NDP a promise made is a promise to be delivered. We will cover a portion of travel and

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accommodation expenses arising from out-of-province medical care and we will eliminate security deposits for seniors in long-term care facilities. We will undertake a five-year paving plan and improve road-building standards and we have started down the path of keeping emergency rooms open, taking the steps that I outlined in the election campaign.

The Minister of Health will soon be naming the province's first emergency room adviser. That adviser will provide the leadership and illuminate opportunities to make our health care system more accessible for Nova Scotians now and well into the future. This government has a plan to work with communities to address the core issues that are putting stress on our health care system - a plan that will be further strengthened when we start receiving feedback from our emergency room adviser. We will improve access to primary care and boost collaborative care with more nurse practitioners. We will make more effective use of prescription drugs and improve the focus on preventive care and disease reduction. Each of these steps will mean more Nova Scotians will receive care when they need it rather than waiting as their health gets worse.

This government is also working with businesses that are ready to invest in Nova Scotia. Just this morning, Mr. Speaker, I was at the Irving shipyard to celebrate its 120th Anniversary. The company recently announced a contract to build nine Coast Guard patrol vessels right here in Halifax. That means more than 150 good-paying jobs. Local companies will also have an opportunity to bid on $32 million in goods and services for Coast Guard work.

We are keen to work with the federal government and the Atlantic Provinces to advance the Atlantic Gateway strategy, providing better ways for Nova Scotia exporters to get their products to global markets.

I look forward to continuing to improve the relationship with the Aboriginal community in my capacity as the Minister of Aboriginal Affairs. Already I've met with many of the Chiefs across the province to hear their concerns and expectations of my government. The Executive Council will be meeting again with Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq Chiefs. Let me acknowledge that history was made a year ago when our predecessors held the first such joint meeting.

My government has also made progress when it comes to Intergovernmental Affairs. Since taking power in June I have attended several meetings with Premiers across the country, as well as governors from the New England States, to discuss issues important to all regions. Just last week at a conference in Saint John, I pledged to work with the other Atlantic Provinces and the United States on initiatives to advance the green economy. Nova Scotia has great promise when it comes to green energy. Already we are seizing that opportunity by approving the Fundy Tidal Power demonstration project.

Military Relations was particularly important to me because of the time that I served in the Canadian Navy. I know how important the Armed Forces are to the future, as well as

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the history, of this province. They are on the front line of Canada's sovereignty and security. The men and women of the Navy, Air Force and Army, and their families, have the respect and support of this government and this province. Therefore, this government is committed to supporting the aerospace and defence industries in Nova Scotia because we recognize the opportunities and jobs they will create.

Achieving all the things I mentioned will not be an easy task, but Nova Scotians did not elect me as a Premier because the job is easy. When my government took office, we commissioned an independent review of the province's finances and the truth is now out here. Reckless spending has put Nova Scotia on an unsustainable path. For years unreliable revenue sources like offshore royalties were pitted against rapidly rising and very reliable expenditures. The combination was a recipe for disaster.

We are now faced with a $590 million deficit for this year alone, a number which could balloon to as much as $1.3 billion in just three years if nothing is done. It's up to us, and to all Nova Scotians, to cover some major unpaid bills. There is no doubt that difficult decisions will have to be made to get the province back on track and we are developing a robust plan to confront Nova Scotia's physical challenges head-on.

This government has already taken steps to address the situation. We started with an independent review of the books to find out the true state of the province's finances. I promptly appointed a panel of experienced economic advisers to illuminate the options available to government. We expect the panel members to report back with their findings by the end of October, about the same time that the second phase of the financial review is due.

What is clear right now is that we are in a situation similar to what the Nova Scotia Government found itself in 10 years ago. We will have to amend the Provincial Finance Act to help deal with this problem, just as was the case in 1999. This is simply the responsible thing to do.

The fundamental problem with the previous government's proposal to amend the Act is that it was being dishonest about the actual state of the province's books. That government asked the Opposition to be complicit in its attempts to hide the truth from the people of Nova Scotia. I didn't think that was fair. We should treat Nova Scotians with respect and we should have the fortitude to present an honest picture of what has happened, not only in the previous budget years but this year as well. Nova Scotians know that debt and deficits are not the road to prosperity and that is why our goal remains to balance the next year's budget.

[8:15 p.m.]

This year's deficit number is a pretty clear indication that Nova Scotia is facing an extremely steep climb to get back on solid ground, a climb greater than anyone, except perhaps the previous government, knew or expected.

[Page 106]

I believe that balancing the budget is an essential goal. One of the most important NDP commitments, one my Party placed before the people, was that we live within our means. By following through on this commitment I believe that we can make this a better, more financially stable Nova Scotia.

As most of the people in this room know, I led the Official Opposition for many years. It is a role that I know well and one that I took very seriously. I recognize and appreciate how important it is in a democratic society to hold our elected officials accountable for the decisions that they make. That is how we keep government focused and responsible.

Just like myself, my colleagues across the floor have a job to do, and I expect them to do it well. At the same time, I believe it is important that the Parties put aside their differences and focus on why we're here: to address the needs of Nova Scotians. I'm open to hearing the Opposition's ideas. I look forward to working with all Parties to implement the initiatives that make life better for families.

I'm also pleased to have the support of such a professional Public Service that is dedicated to the best interests of our province. Their hard work will make a difficult job much easier.

Last week the Opposition Leader said it's clear that this government has a different standard for itself than it had for the previous government; that is true, and I believe it is a higher standard, and I recognize that we may not always meet it. I know that the quest for perfection can sometimes be the enemy of the good, and I am aware that we break new ground with each step.

As promised, we will live within our means. We have already taken steps to reduce the cost involved with running government. We shrunk the size of Cabinet to 12 members from 18, we're eliminating the $45,000 tax-free allowance for departing MLAs, and yesterday the Deputy Premier confirmed the two-year wage freeze for MLAs, political staff, and deputy and assistant deputy ministers. These are just a few examples of the types of decisions that will have to be made to get this province back on track, and it is true that Nova Scotians are expecting a plan.

During the campaign we had seven key commitments that we said we would follow through on to make life better for today's families. We would create secure jobs, keep emergency rooms open, ensure young people stay in Nova Scotia, take the HST off home energy, create strong communities, create more options for seniors, and live within our means. I stand by those commitments today just as much as I did during the election. These commitments are the basis for our plan to make life better for today's families - a plan that

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was presented in great detail last week in the Speech from the Throne, a plan that is already in motion. The budget that will be presented later this week will support much of that plan.

It all comes down to the seven key commitments I mentioned before. These commitments will create opportunities for young people to put down roots here. They will make it easier for families to get ahead and ensure that seniors have the security and the care that they need to enjoy life. They are commitments that will strengthen our communities, from Sydney to Yarmouth. They are commitments that will create and maintain jobs and spur on our economy as the world emerges from the recession. They are the commitments that will help us live within our means and get the province's finances back on track.

Nova Scotia is a province with great people and a great future, and the New Democrats have been given the opportunity to make sure that future becomes reality. To do that we need to follow through with the commitments that we made to Nova Scotians. This government will do that. We need to ensure we make the most of the opportunities we are handed and fight for the ones that we are not. This government will do that. We need to listen to the people we represent, as they are the reason we are here. This government will do that.

This is our chance to place Nova Scotia back on the map among the leading provinces in the country, and I look forward to the day when the people of this province can once again earn the respect and admiration of people right across the country by simply saying, "I am from Nova Scotia." Mr. Speaker, that is my hope for this government. Thank you. (Prolonged applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. RAMONA JENNEX: I would just like to introduce my daughter, Brianne Williams, who is in the gallery this evening. Brianne is a second-year student at NSCAD and she's able to be here this evening because she has a class until 7:30 p.m.. So, on Monday evenings, we'll probably be graced by her presence. Thank you for coming Brianne and I hope everyone here welcomes her. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome her and any guests we have here this evening. I recognize the honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Thank you. It's an honour and a privilege to stand before my honourable colleagues and represent the residents of Dartmouth East and indeed all Nova Scotians in this historic Chamber. It is a pleasure to serve not only with my colleagues in the Liberal caucus, of course, but also with every member of the House and in particular, the many I've known and worked with as a councillor who now sit on the government benches.

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I would like to take this opportunity to very sincerely congratulate the government on their victory. It was a long road to get where they are and they certainly deserve our congratulations and to you, as well, Mr. Speaker, on your election a few months ago.

The government faces extraordinarily high expectations from the public and one of the greatest of those expectations may be for the government to live up to the billing of being different in terms of how it handles the House and constructive criticism provided from the Opposition benches and increasingly from on-line forums. They will be in part measured on their success in this regard.

Before I get too far into my remarks respecting the Speech from the Throne, I would like to spend a few minutes to thank some people and tell the honourable members a bit about my constituency. As with all members, it was certainly an interesting journey for me to get to this point and I would like to publicly recognize the hard work and support of my good friend and campaign manager, Mr. Paul Carroll, who has been with me through two municipal campaigns and now one provincial election. His family no doubt suffered immensely through the election period and I thank them for their time as well.

Mr. Carroll actually deserves particular recognition tonight because on Saturday he added one more undefeated campaign to his perfect record with the overwhelming success of Darren Fisher in the municipal by-election to replace me on Halifax Regional Council. I'd like to offer my congratulations to Darren Fisher on his success Saturday night; he and his family are very excited to start their new journey and I am sure many members are familiar with Darren and his brother, as they own the Nic Nax General Store just over here on Granville Street. I've known Darren for a number of years and I'm confident he'll be an effective member on regional council, taking the seat I once held.

I also think members of the House should look very closely at the electronic voting success that the municipality enjoyed in that election. The turnout was very close to the turnout in the municipal general election and while, it's still too low by my standards, it is a substantial improvement over the history of municipal by-elections in Nova Scotia.

As for my own campaign in June, I'd also like to thank the efforts of my official agent, Ted Fraser. Mr. Fraser has known me for 30 years, since I was making mud pies with his daughter in Dartmouth East, but I'm reasonably certain he didn't realize the magnitude of the work involved when he first agreed to take on the task. I can assure members of this House there was probably no campaign that so exactly followed and knew every single letter and every single rule in that Elections Act, thanks to his efforts.

I would also not be here without the tireless efforts of so many other people, including Mr. Allan Billard, Mr. Terry Beard and Ms. Patti Tabor. Finally, I would be remiss if it did not thank my wife, Katia for her invaluable support in this endeavour, as many members can likely attest from their own experiences. I am certain she did not know what

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she was getting in for when I first joined Halifax Regional Council five years ago and then decided to run provincially this year. But, her support remained and I thank her for that.

Mr. Speaker, I could probably spend the remainder of my time thanking each and every person that worked on the campaign, but the honourable members would probably get very quickly bored with that. So, Mr. Speaker, (Interruption) it is my purpose to respond, if I can, to the Speech from the Throne presented by Her Honour, Mayann Francis. Now, I say if I can, because I found the speech wanting in many regards. I will give the government some credit, mind you, for being environmentally minded in the Speech from the Throne by recycling plenty of ideas from the previous government and keeping it short on substance, so it took less paper to produce. (Laughter)

Now, it was, of course, almost 251 years ago, to the day, when this Legislature first met on October 2, 1758 on the old courthouse just up the road at the northeast corner of Argyle Street at what was then Buckingham Street. Things were a bit different then, Mr. Speaker, there were no political Parties and the Speech from the Throne on the day, read by Governor Charles Lawrence, was less than two pages long. Mr. Speaker, I suggest a few of the responses of this year's speech probably don't come in under two pages. Yet the speech of 1758 was one of substance. It was a speech which, while very short, sought to set a direction for a newly established representative government. Nevertheless despite the many differences, it might surprise the House to learn that the issue of taxation, the nature of representation and the importance of agriculture and fisheries, which was almost ignored in this year's speech, and the powers of the Legislature are among the same issues we debate to this very day.

The Legislature, in its early sessions, unfortunately, was also discussing the issue of populating lands left by the expelled Acadians.

Je crois que nous sommes tous d'accord que le grand déragement fut un moment sombre dans l'histoire de notre province . . . Je suis heureux de voir notre province celèbrer avec fierté l'importance de la vitalité des nos communautés acadiennes et francophones. En effet, l'an passé la région municipalite de Halifax et plus particulièrement la région que j'ai l'honnneur de représenter à cette assemblée ont accueilli les finales des Jeux de l'Acadie pour la première fois en Nouvelle-Écosse. Je suis personnellement heureux d'avoir fait parti de l'équipe que a organisé cet événement très spécial. Permettez moi d'offrir mes féliciations aux nombreux bénévoles et particulièrement à messieurs Roger Arsenault et Keith Coughlan et madame Suzanne Roy pour leur grand dévoument et qui ensemble ont fais des Jeux de l'Acadie un franc succès.

Mr. Speaker, despite Nova Scotia's Acadian community being ignored in the Speech from the Throne, I hope the government will recognize the rich history of the Acadians and the unique legancy provided by the first Jeux de'l'Acadie and recognize the untapped

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opportunities for tourism, economic development and cultural development that are offered within these communities.

Mr. Speaker, Dartmouth East is home to one of the largest Acadian and francophone populations in metro as well as Bois Jolie and Ecolé du Carrefour schools. The French schools and the community centre there are rich with events and are always welcoming and I invite any honourable member to visit at any time.

Mr. Speaker, trade and commerce was also important in those early legislative days as they remain today and one significant focus at the time was the Shubenacadie waterway which, according to archeological evidence, had been used for almost 4,000 years by the First Nations communities as a transportation route across Nova Scotia. In 1794, Governor Wentworth was promoting the chain of lakes in Dartmouth and the entire Shubenacadie waterway as well as arguing for a plan to make the entire waterway of 115 lakes and rivers navigable. However, it wasn't until 1824 that a group of Halifax area merchants put a plan for the Shubenacadie Canal in motion. Construction would begin in 1826, a year that would become important in Dartmouth East as well as in many other areas of Nova Scotia that covered the constituencies of a number of honourable members, including some Cabinet members. The names associated with the canal project are names that have been recognizable to many Nova Scotians including Alexander Keith, Samuel Cunard and Charles Fairbanks.

Mr. Speaker, while the Shubenacadie Canal as a commercial transportation corridor was largely lost with the coming of rail, the importance of the canal remains both in my riding of Dartmouth East and, indeed, across Nova Scotia. Many of the hardest workers for today's Shubenacadie Canal Commission, such as Allan Billard, Bernie Hart, and Dr. John O'Connor are, in their own right, household names in Dartmouth and along the canal's route. Their efforts and the efforts of the entire commission to see the Shubenacadie waterway benefit in areas such as recreation, culture, tourism and agriculture are well respected.

[8:30 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, the canal is not only a key focus of Shubie Park in my own riding but of Lake Banook and downtown Dartmouth, which this summer hosted the largest sporting event ever held in Atlantic Canada - the International Canoe Federation Sprint World Championship. The honourable members of this Legislature should know that as much as we often hear of maintaining and celebrating our built heritage, this very important history associated with the canal is at risk daily.

Built heritage in this waterway which has been named a national engineering historic site is crumbling due to lack of funding from the province to this provincially mandated organization. Mr. Speaker, with so many government members - indeed Cabinet Ministers -

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representing constituencies that border this waterway, I am surprised that recognizing the long-ignored business plan of the commission and bringing the canal back into shape in time for its 200th Anniversary has not yet been mentioned by either this government or, in fact, the previous government.

It is also interesting that this government has not addressed a plan to make the preservation of heritage buildings in Nova Scotia economical, despite many members of what is now the government benches making quite a fuss at municipal council meetings while in Opposition. I wonder if the sudden silence on the issue by government members since switching sides of the House is indicative of how the government intends to address both the requests for further authority in this regard for municipal units as well as the non-building heritage assets like the canal.

Mr. Speaker, I hope and I trust that it's just because it is the early days of this government that causes this government not to address important cultural and historic issues like this.

In terms of the canal, I'll be looking to the government's upcoming budget and the plans of the Department of Natural Resources in anticipation of a plan. This House should further be aware that the commission is working with Natural Resources' staff on a national heritage waterways application, which is critical for the development of rural and urban areas along the waterway. I call upon the government to ensure that the application and the commission's business plan receive the necessary Cabinet support. There's a lot of work to catch up on with the canal before the 200th Anniversary in just a few years, and this work must begin now if we're not to lose even more critical heritage assets.

Mr. Speaker, the canal is certainly not the only important element of my district. Dartmouth East is host to Prince Andrew High School, which I might remind the honourable Minister of Education is still waiting for the often-promised but never followed through-with renovations, much like Dartmouth High School in her own riding. I look forward to what I hope by this point would be an announcement in short order detailing the commencement of work at these Dartmouth schools.

Mr. Speaker, not far from Prince Andrew High School is the Main Street Business Improvement District. The community has worked hard to create a plan that businesses and residents know will improve the area and move it forward, revitalizing it to face the economic and urban challenges of tomorrow. It is a good plan and one that was unanimously endorsed at a municipal level. I was pleased to lead the plan's development and its evolution, and indeed my own constituency office is located in the heart of the Main Street business district as a sign of faith and support for that quickly-growing and expanding area.

However, Mr. Speaker, it has long been a challenge in Nova Scotia that urban main street plans have difficulty accessing government grants and initiatives. Dartmouth's Main Street district is one that wants to move forward and is ready to move forward with

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environmental building design for new buildings and energy efficiency upgrades. The government needs to make the necessary changes that will support redevelopment opportunities for small and medium-sized businesses in areas such as Dartmouth's Main Street and the downtown business districts, as well as providing similar opportunities across the province from Truro to Cape Breton, Bridgewater, Digby, and Yarmouth.

Mr. Speaker, environmentally-conscious building techniques are happening very close to the Main Street business district, which could be emulated across this province if the government takes action saving energy, carbon emissions, and costs. But the government must take the necessary steps to enhance and promote those environmental technologies. I was recently the keynote speaker at the Canadian District Energy Conference, and many people expressed frustration that Nova Scotia has become one of the most difficult provinces for independent renewable energy processors to succeed in. This must change.

As a community success story, I draw the attention of members to the recently-opened East Dartmouth Community Centre. This was the first building constructed by HRM to a minimum LEED silver standard, and it's home to the Boys and Girls Club of East Dartmouth under the direction of John Burton, who is a tireless advocate for the children, the community, and indeed the centre itself. It enjoys strong leadership from the community, and I must recognize Mr. Simon Gillis, who chaired the centre's advisory board, and Mr. Karl Nightingale, who worked so very hard to raise the funds to complete the building. Many HRM staff, including Karen MacTavish, Kathy MacKinnon, Bogdan Hadlaw, and Terry Gallagher, also deserve special mention.

Now, Mr. Speaker, I know that that centre has been mentioned previously in this House and supported by all three Parties, but I raise it now as an example of the community working together to build a much-needed facility that serves the community and is managed by the community. As well, I think honourable members should be aware of environmental initiatives being taken, such as those at the centre that reduce our carbon footprint and put in place practical solutions for reducing energy consumption.

Mr. Speaker, these types of projects should be a regular sight in this province. That would be good for the environment, in our battle against climate change, would reduce operating costs for community facilities which are constantly coming to the province for funding, and would spur a new generation of jobs in this province that focus on sustainable green opportunities. I was very surprised not to see such a plan outlined by the government either through announcements or in the Speech from the Throne. I am putting the government on notice that I will be personally looking to the government to quickly deliver a plan that creates and focuses opportunities for green innovation and manufacturing - jobs that will be sustainable, provide numerous social and environmental benefits, and will place Nova Scotia as a world leader in green jobs and green innovation.

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Nova Scotia is well-positioned to be a world leader in green technology and this is an opportunity that will be lost if it is not harnessed now.

Here in the Halifax Regional Municipality alone we spend $1.3 billion a year on energy, and most of those dollars are exported. Why do we continue to allow this to happen, and where is the plan that will move Nova Scotians away from exported energy costs? Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Liberal Party I will be bringing forth ideas in the coming weeks to help make this province more self-sustainable on environment and energy issues. I hope the honourable Premier lives up to his recent commitments, as recent as his speech a few moments ago, to consider thoughtfully the ideas presented from this side of the House when those issues come forth.

I believe Nova Scotia's move to a more sustainable energy solution is necessitated by both environmental and economic realities. Expanding and supporting district energy projects, for example, is an easy opportunity to keep energy dollars in our home communities and, in the case of Nova Scotia, tap into innovation and expertise right here at home.

Just look across the harbour to the Alderney 5 project on the Dartmouth waterfront, that uses local technology and harnesses emission-free energy for cooling, to see just what can be done. The endless opportunities for geothermal in abandoned coal mines and other areas, if harnessed, would not only reduce the environmental footprint of this province but would provide sustainable, cost-stable energy for Nova Scotians, while supporting local innovation.

I am deeply concerned that this government seems to have paid little attention to the looming energy issues and the challenges of today's families, the very families this government says it stands for; in fact, they will face it increasingly if no action is taken quickly.

Although oil has slipped off a high of $150 a barrel, we, as a province, still need to design flexible and resilient energy infrastructure for the future. Mr. Speaker, it is my view that oil has reached, or probably surpassed, peak oil and the continuing rise in fossil fuel prices means that energy projects which focus on renewable resources will play an increasingly important role in the energy economy and will provide the only realistic, long-term opportunity to realize price stability in energy prices. We will quickly reach a point where such systems are far more consistent, reliable, and effective for business and residents in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I believe energy costs have already become the primary variable in the state of the world economy and Nova Scotia must position itself to prepare for that situation. Some of the leading innovations across the world in the area of district energy and green technology are happening here at home, yet they can't be harnessed here because of provincial regulation. We can and should be supporting local, made in Nova Scotia industry

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and innovation to make these projects happen, and we should be doing it in this session of the Legislature and not waiting for some future plan.

Why do we continue to create conditions that encourage Nova Scotia's great ideas and innovation to be harnessed and brought to market elsewhere in the world? Many well-skilled and trained engineers graduate each year from schools like Dalhousie University. These are people looking for exciting opportunities to change the world around them, opportunities that will put them on the cusp of new innovation. These are people who often are looking for that exciting opportunity that will keep them at home. Nova Scotia engineers enjoy a world-class education and abilities that are second to none. Innovation around energy, health sciences, and in technology, may provide us with the added benefit of keeping more young graduates in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, a comprehensive plan that ties our economy to supporting innovation in this province, to green technology, manufacturing and jobs, cannot wait any longer. Many people are nervous about the future of their manufacturing jobs in this province, and if the government truly wishes to provide long-term sustainability and a future for this province in the manufacturing sector then they will act quickly to focus support on economic opportunities that move this province forward as a world leader.

The province has not been terribly supportive of alternative energy fields thus far. For example, despite a 2003 provincial report recommending producers of cogeneration and renewable energy be allowed to sell directly to consumers, the regulations and legislation has still not been brought forward. Energy infrastructure that maximizes economic and environmental benefits in the local community must be a priority. These local economic solutions are particularly important to cities. Local solutions must not only be considered but encouraged. The government will need to pay special attention to the areas of the HRM and CBRM and with so many seats in the HRM, I know there are a lot of residents who are looking for the government to pay attention in the HRM in particular.

With half of the world's population living in cities, and the same factor applying here in Nova Scotia and three-quarters of the world's greenhouse gas emissions resulting from cities, we cannot possibly tackle the significant greenhouse gas reductions that this government and almost every government is now talking about, except perhaps Stephen Harper, without tackling energy infrastructure in cities. Our cities need to become energy-smart and more energy independent and they can only do it with the help of the provincial government.

You can imagine that given my thoughts on the issues I've discussed that I was sorely disappointed that despite the mover and seconder suggesting that the Speech from the Throne lays out a plan for this government, I, in fact, did not hear much of a plan at all when it comes to energy or environmental issues. What I did hear was primarily recycled Tory commitments and nothing about the green economy, our environment, energy stability or

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planning for a green jobs agenda, not a single word. Based on the Speech from the Throne, the government seems content to recycle the commitments of the previous Tory Government.

Now the only discussion in the Speech from the Throne on energy prices was the recently announced HST rebate on electricity, the rebate that economist Mike Bradfield suggests is a benefit for those who are not facing poverty. While it might be good political policy - and I'm certainly not suggesting there are many people who might not see a short-term benefit, at least until Nova Scotia raises their rates again with the fuel adjustment mechanism - this reduction does nothing to help achieve a better energy balance, it does nothing to stabilize energy prices and does very little to help advance the cause of poverty reduction in this province.

On the issue of poverty, I would hope that no member of this House would oppose measures to reduce poverty. Since 1997 I've been involved directly with Mel Boutilier in the Parker Street Furniture Bank, who many honourable members know. Mel, who has been a long-time friend and a supporter of mine, has probably achieved more than any government in the fight against poverty in Nova Scotia. The efforts of people like Mel, who was recently awarded both the Order of Nova Scotia and the Order of Canada, have made a real difference in helping Nova Scotians break the cycle of poverty. It is time for real action in breaking this cycle and I applaud the government for including this initiative in the Speech from the Throne, and I hope that all members of the House and I trust that all members of the House will support the government in any meaningful action to reduce poverty.

I was surprised to note, however, that the financial realities facing students in this province received very little mention. Since the government put so much faith in independent financial advisory panels, I trust the government will bring forth data which will support their position that a tax credit will provide a real motivation for a student to stay in Nova Scotia, despite the fact that many students already find themselves with many post-graduation tax credits due to their high loan burden.

Now, Mr. Speaker, I have some credibility on this issue having only recently paid off my student loans from Dalhousie University and the University of King's College. I think it's questionable how much benefit this new tax credit will provide to students when an effort would have more properly been spent and focused on reducing tuition costs.

The government must keep as many Nova Scotia students in this province for their education as possible. This is the first step to keeping them here after graduation from high school. This means tackling the high tuition rates with real meaningful action. It also means growing a creative and vibrant economy that embraces new ideas and innovation, an economy that excites young people. I was very surprised that the creative economy was completely ignored in the Speech from the Throne; the creative economy is certainly part of the solution to keeping graduates in Nova Scotia. This government must know the concern expressed by the arts community over the demise of the provincial arts council.

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[8:45 p.m.]

This government must know that we are being left behind in our support for cultural communities such as dance, film, visual arts and so forth ,compared to many other provinces. This is a shame and beyond being just a shame, it should be of great concern that we are falling behind in yet another area of our economy that is key to keeping people in Nova Scotia.

It is also the economy and cultural identity of Nova Scotia that excites immigrants and those who consider Nova Scotia as a home. I look forward to hearing the actions and plans this government intends to take to improve immigration to this province. We must make this province more than just a stopping place on the road west. If we do not address immigration and keeping our young people here, we will find ourselves quickly with a population whose demographics are simply unable to support the critical government services such as health care, education and tackling poverty.

In all the areas I've covered this evening, the first test for this government will be the provincial budget. Since there is little by way of a vision for the future of Nova Scotia in the Speech from the Throne, next week I expect to hear that vision in the budget. And make no mistake, the government cannot run away from a budget they have now had over three months preparing for. Leadership is about taking responsibility and taking ownership. The honourable Finance Minister will table a budget under his name and the brand of this government, this will be an NDP budget.

The government has already made some choices in terms of how the budget would be presented and by making those choices it has already determined it is their budget. So while the mistakes of the previous government cannot and should not go unrecognized, the budget will represent many of the government's own choices. One of those choices is to include the accounting of a future payment to universities in this year's budget.

The Minister of Finance, when he was in Opposition, was quite critical of such moves. In fact, when the previous government made the exact same move in 2008, the current Minister of Finance accused the then government of cooking the books like John Buchanan. Mr. Speaker, what I want to know is, based on the minister's own words when he was in Opposition and the exact same budget move was cooking the books then, is it cooking the books now and is the Minister of Finance suggesting the government's new way of doing things will be to emulate the previous government and the Government of John Buchanan?

I am sure I speak for many members on this side of the House when I say that we await with anticipation the first signs of the financial directions and the priorities this government intends to set with this budget.

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Mr. Speaker, in closing let me say I honestly did welcome hearing the honourable Premier speak recently in the media about hoping to create a working relationship with the Opposition and considering ideas brought forth by the Opposition. I have to believe that this might actually be true because the government has seen fit in recent days to extend the equity tax credit which was first created by a Liberal Government, and in the Speech from the Throne the government embraced the Liberal ideal brought forth by Pierre Trudeau of the just society. These are good Liberal concepts and I know our Party will be pleased to provide more good ideas as the weeks go on.

I don't just believe, I know we live in the best province in Canada and the greatest place on earth. We have a great opportunity here in Nova Scotia which must be harnessed. We can reach even higher as a province than we ever have before. We can turn our stumbling blocks into stepping stones. To reach this pinnacle it will take risk and great vision and the leadership of each of the 52 members of this Assembly. All politics is a calculated risk and no leaders of society have even achieved great things without risk and without the belief in what they are doing. We need such vision in this House over the coming months and years.

As a member of the Official Opposition, it is my duty to provide alternative ideas to represent the concerns of residents and provide constructive criticism. I will meet this duty in this House, but I will also provide support to the government for ideas that I feel move the province forward. I can safely suggest that I will not always agree with the government, as they might not always agree with me, but I challenge the government to consider that no person and no Party in this House has a monopoly on the truth and that all views are expected to be treated fairly.

We are here to make Nova Scotia a better place for tomorrow and for future generations. I look forward to the government's review of our suggestions to improve the province over the coming weeks, as well as the opportunity to review the government's plans for the future. I would like to thank the members of the House and you, Mr. Speaker, for my time this evening. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to rise in my spot here this evening to address this House, indeed all Nova Scotians, with regard to the reply to the Speech from the Throne that was delivered last week. I would echo with my other colleagues' comments that there are many historic firsts and you must acknowledge, respect and compliment that. At the same time we have to recognize the fundamental function of this parliament of Nova Scotia, that we come here, as was indicated by my colleagues, to try to find areas where you can find accommodation and compromise and support those ideas of the government that are good; to hold them accountable for the decisions they take that we find not in the best interests of Nova Scotians, or not good decisions period; but also that we be here to hold them accountable and provide equally other alternatives. We've just heard

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our colleague, the member for Dartmouth East, articulating some of the things he would see in his function here in this House as a member of the Opposition.

I too can say, as someone who was part of the government and now part of the Opposition, roles change, but the fundamentals of representing the interests of Nova Scotians and our constituents does not change, regardless of where you sit in this House. It is imperative that all of us bring that sense of duty and service here to the floor of this House. At times it will be very impassioned, at times it will be conciliatory, at times it will be comforting and at other times it will be nothing but confrontational, because that is the function of this House and the members who are elected to this House.

Mr. Speaker, as we move forward, building on 250 years of parliamentary democracy that we celebrated here, it shows this House's ability to be non-partisan and to act in the interest of promoting parliamentary democracy, celebrating everything that is great and diverse about this province, indeed, advocating for more public engagement in the political process and the process of governance.

That is, as you know, as part of that process - it's not an easy task. Nova Scotians and Canadians in general have turned away, for the most part, from parliamentary interest and that of governance. Part of that is what is government and what are governments doing to engage Nova Scotians? I know that as the days ensue and we get into the full ramifications of what will happen later this week with the budget and further discussions on bills, I very much feel that the parliamentary tradition of this great province will be alive and well and will echo through these chambers and these hallowed halls again to tell Nova Scotians that while governments may change, parliamentary debate and service to the people will continue.

I want to congratulate all colleagues who are either newly elected or re-elected to the House, regardless of where they may sit in this Chamber. I know that as a Progressive Conservative member of this House, I will comment on some of the responses to the government in what they viewed our performance to be and what I know to be the reality as sitting as a former member of government and now can tell them what we will hold them to. They talk about higher ideals and higher standards - indeed I look forward to that. Already, regrettably, we hear of double standards that are already occurring in this House. (Interruptions)

Mr. Speaker, my colleagues need not worry, over the course of the next hour I will provide you opportunity for the type of debate that we have come to know and enjoy here in Nova Scotia. But soon Nova Scotians will have endured close to 100 days of change and not necessarily change for the better. (Applause) As well, the self aggrandizing members of the government recognize that with change comes responsibility and obligation that we will hold them to account.

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Over the last 100 days I must say that I can stand in this House and wonder what has the government been doing other than trying to re-stamp or re-brand previous government initiatives, announce things that were decided by a past Cabinet and try to hold out there. There's a double standard that has occurred - a flurry of announcements that come into our e-mails of a government announcement here or there and taking credit for all these great things that the new government Cabinet Ministers are doing on behalf of Nova Scotians and at the same time having a Minister of Finance who stands and says the sky has fallen and like the great Jehovah will lift it up again because we are NDPers, -dippers (Interruptions) Well, he has quoted the scripture in this House in the past, the Minister of Finance, when he was in the Opposition.

Let me tell you, Nova Scotians will see justice served when next an election is held in this province, whenever that government will dare to call it and go to the polls because, Mr. Speaker, as you know (Interruptions) Yes, four more years of them having to listen to me stand up and defend the interests of the people from Cape Breton North, the Progressive Conservative Party, and all Nova Scotians. They can get ready for four more years of this person in this House defending the democratic traditions and actually holding them to account.

In less than four days I am just dismayed to see what has happened since the Speech from the Throne . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: What speech?

MR. CLARKE: Well, that's it. Or lack thereof - or what speech, as one of my colleagues says.

AN HON. MEMBER: The Lieutenant Governor had to come in for that.

MR. CLARKE: It's an awful thing to subject a Lieutenant Governor to.

They're already showing they're willing to test all Nova Scotians, regardless of what office they hold, to try to get through it. But again, since the election, what have Nova Scotians truly seen since the election that was precipitated on the need that they claimed to have clarity around the budget, a budget that had stimulus spending, a budget that provided for income tax and corporate tax returns to meet a balanced budget. While the Finance Minister and his spin doctors are trying to say that everything is wrong, there was a lot that was good.

We have already seen the flip-flop, Mr. Speaker, of a Premier, when in Opposition, saying he would honour those commitments, as a Premier who became Premier and said he would honour those commitments, yet in the Speech from the Throne says "almost" now. From a Premier who said I've shrunk the size of government because Nova Scotians need

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to have a government that is responsible, yet expands the capacity within government, so he is hiding the fact that he takes a Cabinet from 18 to 12, but doesn't come clear - and it has been that wishy-washiness over these ministerial assistants that, coincidentally, have been established and appointed with responsibilities, and over the course of the next four years we're going to be wondering what those ministerial assistants are doing (Interruptions) But they established ministerial assistants.

You know, Mr. Speaker, it is a failed attempt of hiding the fact they are growing government, that they are growing their interest to be political and move - and they did not discount that those assistants would use the resources of a minister's office. They haven't said that. What they did allude to in the public is, well, if it's needed and expenses and travel and maybe helping a friend out along the way, they haven't been clear about that, but they would suggest that there's some ideal that has been new and that this government has been accountable.

All I've heard, Mr. Speaker - and we're going to find out on Thursday - is a government that's already out of control with its spending, a government that is projecting a $590 million deficit when we, in the Spring, had a balanced budget for Nova Scotians. We look forward and we'll defend. So for a government that doesn't really want to stand up and fess up for their political promises, then go behind the veil of an independent audit, an outside review, because that's in the interest of the Nova Scotia taxpayer. Well, they spent $100,000, I think was the most recent amount they spent on this independent auditor when indeed, the Minister of Finance used to sit in the Public Accounts Committee and tell the previous government how much we should listen to the Auditor General, listen to the officials who are hired by Nova Scotians to do a good job for Nova Scotians - all of a sudden things shift.

Well, Mr. Speaker, I want to tell you we have a Minister of Finance who is hiding behind outside consultants who do not understand, like the Auditor General or the officials in the Department of Finance. So the question we're going to be looking to the Minister of Finance is, who does he believe? He doesn't take the word of the officials within the Department of Finance, the professionals who commit their career to do a good job on behalf of Nova Scotians, and a professional job at that. He doesn't believe that the Office of the Auditor General can do their job, because if he wanted a true audit he'd go to the Auditor General and give the terms of reference for what it is he wants to review, but instead we have terms of reference provided by the Minister of Finance who can't come and deal with things himself, who is looking for a back door in to blame a previous government for the insane budget deficit that he's going to bring forward later this week.

That doesn't wash with Nova Scotians. They're already talking in the coffee shops, Mr. Speaker, about the Minister of Finance. They're already noting the dubious nature upon the actions. So in the last 100 days, what has truly happened? What has happened in the last 100 days, a government "daze" of a different type. These members who are so caught up in

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the lights of the office, they're dazed by what it is that Nova Scotians elected them to do and they've counted up the days, going around trying to pat themselves on the back about a new brand of socialist democracy for Nova Scotia, and it's not the case. Nova Scotians are not fooled, they're not impressed.

[9:00 p.m.]

Indeed, it may be four more years that they're subject to this type of activity but, again, over those four years, the Progressive Conservative Party will stand up for the interests of Nova Scotia, defend our previous record in this House, and if that Minister of Finance and any government minister wants to get up and start the blame game, we will be here to defend ourselves and represent what it was we did, in an open and transparent manner for Nova Scotians. Apparently the Minister of Finance as well has eluded . . . (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The member for Cape Breton North has the floor and I would ask the members to respect when he has the floor.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

MR. CLARKE: Thank you Mr. Speaker. So the Minister of Finance goes out and spends $100,000 he says he doesn't have and that it's not possible for Nova Scotians to do, to get an outside opinion to agree with him as the reason why he has to come in with an oversized deficit for Nova Scotians, bearing expenses he complained about before but will now do himself, bringing in adjustments to the Financial Measures Act that he would have wailed against before, and then after he has done all that, if he hasn't had enough cover, oh, right, there's phase two of the audit trail. If that wasn't good enough, he has established outside experts to consult with him and the Premier as to how they can find a way in their academic way to get these experts to agree with them and somehow go out before some press conference and to say, my heavens, you know, manna from heaven has been presented by virtue of election of this government.

Well, Mr. Speaker, the dough is being taken away from Nova Scotians and the deficit in repaying those commitments, because the sky-rocketing promises of the New Democrats and the socialists in this province, Nova Scotians will be paying a very large price for it. Yet we have a Premier who talks about establishing decorum and gets up and his exact words, said the previous government was dishonest in communicating to Nova Scotians. Well, it's a two-way double-edged sword that indeed is wielded and, as you know, a two-sword length - probably for your benefit and maybe others - that we debate in this House but it is a double-edged sword that the New Democrats want to cut in one way and complement in another.

Mr. Speaker, they can't figure out where they're going yet. The reality is, probably as we'll see in the ensuing debates of legislation they're presenting - as though this great new

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government is coming in - probably is legislation that the government had, that it was working forward for the previous session of the House of which they were so desperate to call an election, so desperate to move past the economy and helping those who were out of work and making sure we continue on and put Nova Scotians in an election that would have happened later in the year after we continued to work.

They talk about stimulus spending, Mr. Speaker - and I want to compliment our previous Premier, Rodney MacDonald. Because of his work and efforts with the Government of Canada, we have a great many projects around this province that are putting Nova Scotians to work, but the question was they wanted to call that short for their own politics and we will always put the interests of Nova Scotians first as we move forward.

Mr. Speaker, when you look at the government's record - and we have lots of time. As the Minister of Finance says - on my questioning of Nova Scotians, I don't question the decision of the people. We all know the people are always correct (Applause) but we now know 100 days later the Minister of Finance is rarely correct and often will be proven wrong in this House. I'm glad to see the Minister of Finance has flipped roles. I look forward to the continuing dialogue across the floor because the Minister of Finance is going to have to talk a lot to explain about a lot of things that he's doing and boy oh boy, it is going to get accelerated and the heat will be on in this House because the government made promises at no end.

Mr. Speaker, we have dippers in this House and they're double-dippers because the NDP have promised on one hand - and they're doing it. Well, everyone knows nobody likes a double-dipper except the dipper themselves and Nova Scotians are stuck with double- dippers, as they would say, for the next four years because they'll do one thing on one hand and take credit for something on the other that they have not been part of. For instance, they say about their new direction and positive thinking about energy efficiency and renewable energy standards they put forward. They put out a standard of 25 per cent and then go to pay consultants and others to come up with what it is or how it is they're going to get to it rather than doing the research first and maybe then working forward to the solution that they should do.

They talk in the Speech from the Throne that every available tool must be used to foster economic growth. Well, we have ministers responsible for economic growth and Nova Scotians are wondering where they are. What are they doing? What is the Premier's direction? They have failed to do that in the last hundred days and I don't have much confidence in them in the next hundred because they have gone about - and the people are wondering where they are, other than they are nicely put together little quick fixes of past government initiatives that they try to take credit for while at the same time blame the previous government for the financial situation.

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The Minister of Finance is now trying to blame his own decisions on the previous government which won't work because as they go on about fostering economic growth, the people of Cape Breton are wondering where that is, where the ministers are, where the government has been, where the consultation has been. If it wasn't for this Progressive Conservative Party, Nova Scotians would be in a hard way right now because of the initiatives that they have not been able to come up with, the direction they have not been able to provide.

They talk about consultation and about this openness and transparency, Mr. Speaker, I actually extend an invitation to most of these ministers who happen to come to Cape Breton - if they have, maybe they stopped in for a picnic but nothing else to talk to people about - and they want to talk about an economic action plan for Cape Bretoners, I'd welcome that opportunity. In a hundred days we have not heard it. (Interruption)

Mr. Premier, the very first place you went to in Cape Breton, people don't realize, you must have left real quick and you didn't leave with any announcements for the economic action and stimulus for Cape Bretoners, I haven't seen that. You didn't settle with John Morgan, the Mayor of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, that you cozied up to and all of a sudden don't really know him anymore, at least the line doesn't ring. Yet ministers who come in to make an announcement of something, that indeed, Mr. Speaker, as the Premier would know, speaking through you, that ministers have gone in in a place.

The people of Cape Breton North are wondering what the government's action plan is to deal with the manufacturing sector. We know the Minister of Economic and Rural Development was in Cape Breton to announce a $280,000 commitment that was approved by the previous Progressive Conservative Government. We welcome that commitment, but he left without saying another word about the economy and the interests of Nova Scotians. We have not heard about the interests in the regional municipality from this government, what their plan is.

Mr. Speaker, as you know, there has been a great debate and there's one thing I have not disputed and that is the need and action for the Cape Breton Regional Municipality in principle with regard to helping out and advancing the economic agenda. As you know, there has been great disagreement over the means of doing that and we've always advocated that it would not be through litigation, but through negotiation. Yet we have a government that comes in and said they were going to do all that, but we haven't in a hundred days heard of that. Cape Bretoners are wondering where this government is. So while they may reference the fact that they've been there, maybe once, maybe the Premier can provide the House with details of who has gone to Cape Breton and what they've done for Cape Bretoners at a time of such economic uncertainty (Interruption) or anywhere in Nova Scotia, as my honourable colleague says.

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Nova Scotians are starting to say, where are they? In a hundred days, people are wondering what it is they are all about and they're now getting concerned of what their real agenda is all about and they're going to be forced into a massive deficit that they're going to try to repackage. (Interruption) Don't worry, we'll get to Transportation and Energy.

Mr. Speaker, it says government will continue to live up to its commitment. Again, Nova Scotians are wondering what they're truly committed to. (Interruption) Almost all - when they went from all to almost. So already the spin has started from the Premier's Office on down. Already the ministers have amnesia, already the ministers can forget about the regions of this province, forget that we're in such economic uncertain times and have no action plan for this province. (Interruption) Oh, we'll get to the ERs, too. We're going to go down the list because it's their Speech from the Throne and I must say, when reading it the first time I couldn't believe that this was actually a Speech from the Throne. A Ministerial Statement usually has a little bit more substance than this one does, Mr. Speaker.

They talk about honouring infrastructure, yet this summer when infrastructure was so important and they were talking about it and putting out the releases for what was committed, somehow I think it was $25 million went on the road - $29 million disappeared on the road budget for this province. I wonder where that went because there are a lot of Nova Scotian communities that could use the $29 million that disappeared when those contracts were let and yet again, Mr. Speaker, there was no definitive clear answer on that when the Minister of Finance or anyone in that Cabinet was asked about it.

It's amazing how things change from one side of the House to the other and, indeed, they do welcome the federal government's leadership in stimulating the economy during the worldwide recession and I do acknowledge and thank the Government of Canada who is recognized as a government for helping lead all of the G-20 nations to get out of recession as quickly as possible, which actually has an economic action plan that thankfully we as Progressive Conservatives provincially were prepared to invest in - not just take credit for as the NDP is trying to do, but indeed move that forward and the federal government's commitment continues.

When we see, indeed, Mr. Speaker, going forward as a Government of Canada, to make initiatives. Whether it's a home tax credit renovation - not announce a tax credit for new homeowners after the home is built as the case is with the New Democrats - but actually to incent people to get under work not work that was done. But that's part of, again, the disconnect this government has with the realities of where Nova Scotians are and what they expected from this government.

I'm also pleased when you see credit and the previous government were prepared to help support, the shipbuilding industry, nine parole vessels (Interruptions) patrol - don't worry, we'll get to parole as well, because the Minister of Justice is in my sights over there too. Don't worry, Nova Scotians have lots of questions for the minister of parole. But the

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nine patrol vessels, again, because the Government of Canada recognized the investment necessary, the Progressive Conservatives recognize the importance of investing in Nova Scotian companies as we have.

MR.SPEAKER: Order, please. I ask the members to please respect the member who is speaking. The member for Cape Breton North has the floor.

MR. CLARKE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My, how things change.

When I see that they're talking about immigration, which we all agree is very important and we all support the enhancement and increased immigration, but what we also have is a government that hasn't talked about the repatriation of Nova Scotians who would want to come home because they have no economic action plan, they have no vision or ability to do the things that would help accelerate economic development and job creation in this province.

I am very pleased that they're engaging the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq, that indeed continuing that is very important. As I said before, there are things that we're going to agree on that are good and we've all in this House, as well, as the Premier had indicated with military relations - I am very proud of all members and all Parties of this house that recognize the women and men in uniform that serve this country, for those that are peace officers that serve as peacekeepers around the world.

We have a great tradition here and that is one thing we do agree on and share in common so we'll acknowledge those initiatives and recognize the importance that they provide to us.

Then there are other things, such as health care. It wasn't so long ago, and I guess maybe just a little over a hundred days ago that they said they had a plan, a definitive plan. They campaigned on a plan, put it in all their literature, said they had it, had a plan. They said they had a plan. (Interruption) I'm not talking about your pamphlet. Your pamphlet was just as light as your plan because there is no plan. The reality is they campaigned saying they have a plan for Nova Scotians for emergency room closures. The Minister of Health is now painfully aware of that commitment because she talks now about a future plan and admits there was no plan by the New Democrats for ER closures in this province.

The government has failed Nova Scotians before they even started and crossed over that House because they made a commitment - if the Premier can say the previous government was dishonest, they made a dishonest commitment to Nova Scotians and led them to believe that indeed they had a plan they were going to present. They said it, they can't deliver it and the Minister of Health should get on her pins if that's the case and tell us what that plan is.

[9:15 p.m.]

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At the Northside General Hospital they'd welcome to see the Minister of Health show up and talk to them about her plan, the NDP plan for ER closures. The Cape Breton District Health Authority would love to hear from the Minister of Health about her plans for the district, the government's plan for proper health care delivery in that area, but the region is bereft of that. That is a failing of the Speech from the Throne, it's a failing of the government now of this day that has made commitments that it says it will honour and hasn't.

In fact, they are admitting they can't. They have to come clean with Nova Scotians on that plan. I can tell you the Northside General Hospital would love to see - the Minister of Health says, stay tuned. To what channel? They keep changing their plan all the time, depending on the day. They made a commitment to Nova Scotians and she went out to consult again, just like the Minister of Finance went out to consult to find some other opinion because the people in the system obviously don't know enough, the good men and women who work as civil servants. So they go around that process when they said they had a plan, they don't like that, well, we'll come up with a framework for the future.

Well, if that's going to be her plan versus definite action, for Nova Scotians, I welcome it. She says stay tuned, so I will take the minister at her word to stay tuned, that she has an initiative coming forward and Nova Scotians, from one end of this province to the next can expect to have their ER challenges solved immediately by this government because that's what they've committed and I expect they will provide immediate action. Yet we failed to see it over the last 100 days. The district health authorities have not heard about it over the last 100 days, the people of this province are wondering where they're at and supposedly, the Minister of Finance will have some magic numbers in this massive deficit he's bringing forward to try and buy their way through on some commitments they've made.

Their skyrocketing promises are coming with a skyrocketing deficit is what I'm hearing from the New Democrats across the way. If that's what it is, they're saying they're going to do all these things, deliver all these things and yet, can't do it, won't do it, but they will do it by increasing the debt load of future Nova Scotians because that's the way they've spun it. We'll be taking a close eye at what it is they've done, again, the double standards that they bring forward.

Then they talk about strong and safe communities and the way they want to go about it. I know as well there are people around Nova Scotia, municipalities, wondering where the commitment for the Boots to the Street program is. Where the Minister of Justice is going to be in honouring the commitments that have been there, in honouring commitments to municipal police services across this province to make sure the Boots to the Street program - I know in his own constituency, I'm sure when the Minister of Finance presents his budget he is going to honour the commitment of the two police officers that were committed to the New Glasgow Police Service. I know the Minister of Finance is going to do that because that's his own constituency.

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I know the Minister of Finance is going to make sure the Deputy Premier has the 10 policing positions that were committed to the people of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality. Again, they can't get their numbers right, it is seven police officers and three for the Safer Streets and Communities initiative. The Minister of Justice knows that, he has a 10 police officer commitment and I know he'll honour that through the Minister of Finance. I know that he is is going to take the concerns about the intelligence work within Nova Scotia in disarray , I know he's got all the answers through the Minister of Finance to solve those things.

But, there are communities looking - Springhill. Then, we know there are communities that are looking for this government through the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal to the Minister of Finance and the Minister of Justice with the correctional facilities that Nova Scotians are expecting to renew for the next generation. I know that those are priorities not of a previous government, of the current government, that they will honour as they said they would honour.

I can't see how any reasonable individual on any side of this House would not do anything but ensure that the Cape Breton Regional Municipality and Victoria County get those 10 policing positions - seven for the Cape Breton Regional Police Service and three for the Safer Streets and Communities office that is going to be there that was committed to, and that the people in New Glasgow, Springhill and around this province can see the commitment from this government. (Interruption)

Well, thank you, I will.

AN HON. MEMBER: Thanks for that moment of silence.

MR. CLARKE: I know you're not used to them, sir.

So, I know that the government's commitment to Safer Streets and Communities will not be unwavering when a budget comes forward. I can tell you that if those commitments that have been made, as the Premier said he would honour, to the communities, the 35 policing positions that were committed to by the government as it was done in every other previous year, that they will honour them. I actually believe they will do that.

But, if they don't, they're not going to have to worry about just this side of the House, they're going to have to worry about the citizens and the community and the law enforcement personnel, and those who support them, wanting to make sure that those commitments are delivered on.

Mr. Speaker, I know that in my own constituency, where the economic uncertainty has had a greater impact - as we know, we came though an election, I don't dispute going through an election, when again promises are being made on every front from the ER at the

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Northside General Hospital to people anticipating their energy rebates they're going to offer. Then we have the Northside Industrial Park, of which, that I am aware of, they have provided little or no leadership when it comes to dealing with Magna, to dealing with the pharmaceutical companies. Thankfully Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation and the community have shown a very keen interest.

Someone may laugh at hundreds of people being out of a job, but thankfully - and again another announcement they did - we understood that retraining was important and that's why, as a previous government, we were willing to invest in the employees at Magna, which the Minister of Labour and Workforce Development put out a release with regard to helping them. But again, another action that was taken immediately upon an issue coming forward as part of a global economic challenge.

Mr. Speaker, when we look at Marine Atlantic and its vital importance and the need for that transportation corridor to not just be viable but to grow, not only for our interest but that of Newfoundland and Labrador, when we see the energy gateway initiatives for the Atlantic Energy Gateway and the potential - there are opportunities for this government to do the right things, to ensure that they co-operate on the dredging of Sydney Harbour, the development of the Port of Sydney.

Nova Scotians and Cape Bretoners in this instance are looking for them to provide that leadership. Cape Breton University is looking to this government to move forward with regard to the Centre for Environmental Sustainability and initiatives there. I fully expect that the Minister of Finance has those interests in mind.

Mr. Speaker, I know that Cape Breton University and the Nova Scotia Community College have been at the foundation of many good programs and initiatives for not only learning, but also the economic vitality and the cultural diversity of our island. I know the Minister of Finance and his Minister of Education are going to provide Nova Scotians with the types of support they need, and that the Minister of Justice, as part of those positions that were mentioned before, is going to see that the CBRM gets the port policing positions that they require to be part of an effective port security and development strategy.

I know, Mr. Speaker, because they committed to it, that they are going to step up to the plate and continue to work on programs with the Cape Breton Regional Municipality. I'm glad that the Government of Canada and others are initiating programs to bring and pull the NDP to the table so that they may actually do something good in these areas.

Mr. Speaker, in terms of infrastructure support, the people of Cape Breton are looking for further development on top of the twinning initiatives that were put in place between the Northside and Sydney River, to see the types of streets, water, and sewer projects. They talk about a healthier, better future, a greener future. We hope that includes things like the sewage treatment that's really needed around the Sydney harbour.

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We know, as I said, that they're committed to making sure that economic diversity in our area and stability in those areas - in those sectors such as manufacturing - that they'll come forward, but we haven't heard the Minister of Economic and Rural Development, we haven't heard the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations, we haven't heard anyone, for that matter, say that those are priorities. Then again, I'll give the benefit of the doubt to the Minister of Finance, who is going to present us with a great budget, as he says, because something has to explain why he's going to $590 million in deficit to do that.

Mr. Speaker, I'm really glad as well, seeing their track record over the last 100 days, that indeed, the Northside Civic Centre is moving ahead, and that indeed, the community's aspirations and goals and the planning is all coming forward, the tender work is out there, that the Northside Community Pool is a partnership between all three levels of government. It will open this October for the health and well-being but also for the infrastructure and integrity on the Northside, because it has been a challenge for the community, that the community not-for-profits throughout the Northside in Cape Breton North and the northside in the Victoria area that have stepped up to the plate and have been there will see some benefit.

The not-for-profits in Cape Breton are very concerned about where this government is when its Economic and Rural Development, and Tourism, Culture and Heritage - where the government will be going. What we have seen since they've come is a drought with regard to supports for community groups. Again, I'm assuming that the Minister of Finance has great news to extend to one and all on budget day with regard to helping these groups.

Mr. Speaker, as we know, in supporting our district health authorities, that as the Northside General Hospital is now over 50 years old and the DHA sees a need to make sure it continues to reinvest in that, that the Minister of Health and the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal are going to work with the district health authority to ensure those facilities in the community are built on.

I'm sure, Mr. Speaker, they're going to continue to roll out long-term care beds for the community, for the nursing homes that we've seen - I know in my own area with regard to Northside Community Guest Home, as well as Miners Memorial Manor - when we've seen the implementation, the creation and construction of an Alzheimer's unit within the Northside Community Guest Home; another expansion underway; more assisted living underway; when we see things that are up, for instance, the Alderwood in Baddeck, a phenomenal new facility that government saw fit as the right investment to do, that this government - and I will stand here and credit them if they continue to work on the core infrastructure needs that support the human requirements that we see in our society - then we will give them the accolades that they deserve for doing that.

Mr. Speaker, we have seniors and low-income Nova Scotians who are also looking for housing supports, both for renovations as well as new construction. As the government

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would know, the Government of Canada, as part of the housing initiative, would have a number of things and while probably the ministerial assistants - because I know of co-op housing but we need core housing - so I may have to send them directly to the minister responsible for housing, of course, Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations, so she can ensure that, indeed, we continue to build on the good work that was being done, the renovations, the retrofits and the new construction that's necessary within Cape Breton to help further the community.

I believe if the government does these things, Mr. Speaker, and continues in a positive way, it also will resinate positively within the CBRM because obviously we've already seen the government's lack of ability to do that thus far. I will give it the benefit of the doubt thus far and in building on things that the government had done previously, I'm sure there are many ministers who reported this with regard to building on the emergency services providers fund that our previous government implemented and communities stepped up to the plate, supported their emergency service providers and have provided Nova Scotians with greater infrastructure, better service supports for those in need at a time when they are in greatest need.

Mr. Speaker, I'm sure the Minister of Finance is going to expand on that as Nova Scotians and service providers are hoping and expecting that he will do. In the ensuing days we'll be looking to where the government - not where they've been so far because there's not much of a track record to count on so far, as I indicated earlier, but where they're going to go. Indeed, a Speech from the Throne, as we know, is about broad strokes of the vision of a government and, indeed, no one can dispute a government wanting to do better and build on a good society and make it the best place to work, to live, to raise a family and do business. We're well familiar with the refrain in this House.

In so doing we have to look at the economic opportunities and we have to address some of the concerns that come forward, as I've seen, about a government and maybe the minister might want to tell the House if the cheque is in the mail with regard to, for instance, the Georges Bank study with the task force, because only one cheque arrived, but the other half of that commitment has yet to materialize in Southwest Nova with regard to undertaking a very serious study about a very important area and aspect of the economy and the eco-system that we have.

So maybe they will start elaborating and, of course, as you know, Mr. Speaker, in the days ahead during Question Period, it will provide us an opportunity, as members of the Opposition, to ask the government key questions on any number of initiatives. As I know, we've heard our colleague, the member for Dartmouth East, indicate where he's looking to go. We're looking to go in those directions, as well, in terms of a positive but it's difficult when you look in the Speech from the Throne itself and then you come back to a premise in the Premier's own speech, to say that the previous government was dishonest. Thus we go on with the parliamentary debate, but it's very difficult to suggest that any government - I

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don't assume that the Premier, his Cabinet and his caucus are in this House with dishonest intentions, and with untoward intentions either, for the people of this province.

[9:30 p.m.]

When the Premier of this province gets up and says that a previous government has been dishonest with Nova Scotians, then one has to question any of the sincerity in a document. One has to question what their real motivation is, but more importantly, it is a word that suggests to me the actions that will be coming to justify what they choose to do and will force on Nova Scotians.

I have been concerned, Mr. Speaker, that in this House, and we can have all kinds of debate on this, but you know when a Premier's office overrides any discussion at an Internal Economy Board about issues that are fundamental to this House, of which a committee of this House is formed, of which all three Parties have members and then a unilateral decision from the Premier's office to his House Leader is brought down.

Mr. Speaker, not to get into the merits or the debate of any amounts but to get into the premise that there wasn't even a full or fair discussion on that, just as much as we heard a statement by the Minister of Finance tonight about Keno. Indeed, not, talking about lack of consultation by the previous government yet not consult with the people who currently have those devices and the $3.5 million, now that we find out it is $3.5 to take the units out. (Interruption)

The Minister of Finance says, how do I know who he has talked to? Well, I guess that's right because under the secret veil, he did not stand in this House and tell Nova Scotians who he talked to, what he talked to them about and why the rationale for the statement, other than we're going to turf the machines out. Obviously the Minister of Finance is rather worked up right now but you know, he can get as worked as he wants tonight because I know Nova Scotians are going to be more than worked and perplexed when his budget comes down and it is trying to mask an agenda by the New Democrats, an agenda that isn't being honest to this House or to Nova Scotians. That's part of the fundamental basis of where we are.

The Minister of Finance says, how do I know who he has spoken to? Well, Mr. Speaker, he had an opportunity in this House tonight with a statement by the minister and failed to do, yet then will criticize a previous government for not doing it. Again, a double standard by the Minister of Finance who sat in Public Accounts Committee and wailed away and now hides behind the veil - a very thin veil, by the way - with regard to outside consultants and spin doctors to meet the new agenda of the socialist government coming in, trying to find its way over the next four years.

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That is why, Mr. Speaker, for the next four years this Chamber will resonate with the sounds of MLAs elected to the Opposition to hold that government to account. That too, Mr. Speaker, is a very exercise of what in some ways is the drivel that was presented. I feel badly for the Lieutenant Governor to have to spill over those words and say, they got to be kidding.

The public is not fooled, Mr. Speaker. The public is already aware, they're already questioning, they're already wondering, they've already been inflicted with almost 100 days of a government seeking a cause, a consultant to tell them where their blueprint to the future is.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. If the members want to have conversations amongst themselves, they can take them outside, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton North has the floor.

MR. CLARKE: Well, Mr. Speaker, I'm encouraged but in a different way. The New Democrats, obviously there's a chord that has been struck from the Opposition benches this evening in response to the Speech from the Throne. Obviously it is engaging them and we look forward to them actually telling Nova Scotians in a more fulsome manner, in a more open and transparent manner because the secrecy that has unfolded across the front bench and the government is disturbing to say the least.

Mr. Speaker, that is why, as we move forward, that is why as we look at the framework and, quite frankly and to be sincere, that's why for an historic moment of which we will acknowledge, for some aspects of it that are very historic and should be lauded and are notable, indeed, should be commended, that a government that came in with an historic mandate comes in with a Speech from the Throne and a direction that people are bereft of where it is that they are going and wondering what it is that this government is really up to. After 100 days, Nova Scotians thought the Minister of Finance would have been in with a budget, much sooner than 100 days in, plus, Nova Scotians thought that he'd have his act together because he said he knew everything and they had a plan, they had a plan for everything. They were going to implement everything that was good that the government did, but now it's almost.

Mr. Speaker, the now Minister of Finance sat in this House and asked why is the government dithering, why is it holding off? Yet he comes in and all of a sudden he needs time to reflect, he needs time to think, he needs time to get outside consultants to give an opinion because he doesn't trust what the civil servants of this province believe and know to be right and have provided in a full, open and transparent process. They're looking for a way - and what's disturbing about this Speech from the Throne is what's not in it, and that truly is detail for Nova Scotians to know where our government is going, not a government that's derailed itself in less than a hundred days.

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And speaking of rails, I surely hope that the Deputy Premier and his Cabinet will make sure the trains keep running on Cape Breton Island, that indeed the railway will continue to move forward because while others would have criticized an investment, we recognize strategic infrastructure. We have looked and have been, as a previous government, to where the future would be in the economy and we recognized we had to make investments of a day knowing that we were committed to the economic and social future of an island, but we have a government less than a hundred days comes forward with a Speech from the Throne that people don't know. It' s off-track, they've derailed themselves already - they have not provided Nova Scotians with tangible, concrete ideas, with definitive things that they as a government are going to do, other than implement almost all the previous government's commitments even though they committed that they would do the things.

Then all of a sudden they start spinning numbers, as I say, taking $29 million out at a pop. What are they doing with it? Well, I guess it's part of all the other initiatives since other people expected that spending to be concrete, to be committed to, yet they walk away from it. This is what my role in the Opposition is going to be - my role is to make sure that the interests of those of Cape Breton North, that those of Cape Breton and across this province that believe in the Progressive Conservative Party, that recognize that we as members of this House in the Opposition, we understand the message that Nova Scotians did give us, because we respect the decision of Nova Scotians and we will stand up for Nova Scotians when they were led to believe something and the opposite occurs, and we will always stand up for the interests of Nova Scotians and we will be presenting forward through our Leader, through our caucus, and through our Party, throughout Nova Scotia, alternatives and other policy actions the government should be undertaking.

I would hope that whenever the Premier sees fit to call for another Speech from the Throne, he might want to give it some more forethought and give the benefit to Nova Scotians of tangible things for historic government. Mr. Speaker, the now Premier stood in this House and said he has all kinds of experience in Opposition, which he did, and now he's going to have all kinds of experience in government, which apparently he doesn't because over the last hundred days he has not shown Nova Scotians what it is they are truly going to do, what it is they have done, other than take credit for the things that the previous government did without saying it was the previous government and then - there's a word in Cape Breton they use - but then blame the previous government for trying to figure out their financial mess that the Minister of Finance now finds himself in because he can't figure out where to go and, again, bring outside interests in to try and reflect and spin a new story that we're supposed to assume that Nova Scotians will accept.

We know that Nova Scotians, because we've heard them when we're in our constituencies, we've heard them say they promised lots of things, well, where are they? I do feel sorry because the Premier did say - and I agree he's had lots of experience in Opposition but there are new members of his government who are going to find out that a lot of promises were made, a lot of commitments were extended, and when they don't deliver

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on it they're going to find out from their communities where obviously they chose to vote another way, they're not going to be very happy and they're going to find out the full thrust of grassroots response to issues.

So for those new members of the House in looking at this Speech from the Throne, take note; take note because they have a government, again, that's coming out with what seems like a good idea with regard to home builders, with a tax credit, but if you already built your house we'll give you the money anyway. We were trying to incent new home construction, but we'll apply it back.

Then people are wondering with regard to where they're going with in-home support. They're saying, it's first come, first served; and a cap of $250. So the details are coming, bit by bit, by bit, known and noticed by Nova Scotians, and they're not happy with what they're seeing and they're looking to us as members of the Opposition to hold them to account.

Mr. Speaker, I hope I have been able in a small measure to indicate to the government that we will be looking at that. (Interruption) The Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal - thank you for reminding me, Bill. (Interruption)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, order. If the honourable member has a question, I would ask him to rise in his place and ask his question. (Laughter)

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

HON. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I was wondering if the member opposite would entertain a question.

MR. SPEAKER: Will the member entertain a question?

MR. CLARKE: Yes, I will.

MR. ESTABROOKS: For a point of brevity and, perhaps, some clarity, could you announce the results of the last election, how many actual votes you won by?

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, in true democratic tradition, to the honourable minister, enough to win and enough to return to this House and enough to speak up for the people of Cape Breton North and enough to tell you that you're already off track. There isn't going to be enough votes in the next election for that member who thinks he lives in paradise-paradis because he's over there saying everything is just diddly dee, diddly dum in Timberlea.

Well, maybe he can stand up and speak again. If he wants to start getting into that debate, I'll tell you, he raises a good thing, because the actual number that I won by this time was 164 votes. I'll tell you, I did know it when I was at the doorsteps. I understood what it was like to deal with the realities of governing and standing up and being truthful to people.

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I knocked on as many doors as I could get to, the same as the NDP candidate did in the area and did the time before that. What was the watershed historic moment by the Premier over there, today, that they came to power, the people of Cape Breton North when a member was going through unprecedented economic downturn, when the member for Timberlea-Prospect can say that he had over 300 people in the Magna plant thrown out of work, hundreds of others affected by it and having to deal with that, did he? No, he didn't.

Mr. Speaker, did he have a pharmaceutical plant, with people who were trained at the Cape Breton University that because of the downturn were out of a job? No, he didn't. Did he have an emergency room with a hospital that has provided, as I've said, over 50 years of care to the people of the Northside, did he have a hospital in his constituency that had to face the reality of ER closures even though his now-Premier, his Leader committed that they had a plan and that the Minister of Health acknowledges that she doesn't. Did he? No, he didn't.

Mr. Speaker, I want to tell you, that if he ever wants to come to Cape Breton North, and I would invite him to do it, because he is obviously out of touch, as I'm not surprised by a socialist member of the House, of what is really going on in the day to day lives of the people of Cape Breton North. Could I fight some of the promises, the skyrocketing promises that they were going to make. I wouldn't out of principle, because I understand what it's like to be responsible and responsive to the people and stand up whether you like what you hear or not.

The minister can come to Cape Breton North any time he wants to stand up to the people who have real questions for him about real issues affecting real people and I can tell the honourable member that when the next election is called in Cape Breton North the numbers will shift greatly. But you know what, I stood fast. As the people understood what it was the Progressive Conservatives were doing and what I was doing on behalf of the people of that riding. He wasn't around when the community groups needed people because they walked away. The same people are wondering where the Minister of Economic and Rural Development is in an area where with over a quarter of a million people travelling through it and to provide people with a $5,000 grant to go and try to provide tourism and culture initiatives. They were wondering where he is and how much is he not spending on the communities?

[9:45 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, if the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal ever wants to come down and have a lesson in what it is like to live in Cape Breton North, what it is like to deal with the real issues of real people looking for real jobs that he apparently is not worried about because in Shangri La Timberlea-Prospect, everything is perfect. But then again I'm sure if that member had a hospital, had nursing homes, had infrastructure, had communities trying to build rinks and do things, I'm sure the Minister of Transportation and

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Infrastructure Renewal had to deal with the very things he's overseeing, that were really intangible in his riding, he would understand the magnitude of a win.

Mr. Speaker, I do know during the campaign, when you're at the doorstep and people are listening to promises - supposedly honest ones, they're not dishonest as others would accuse the previous government as being - that those promises were real and that for some reason life in Cape Breton North was going to fundamentally change. The Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal is welcome to come down and deal with the real people, the real issues in the Nova Scotia that I'm part of. I don't know the one he lives in, or chooses to live in, but when he wants to - and, yes, the now-Premier was in Tim Hortons in North Sydney during the campaign, the day before the election he was in.

Do you know what, Mr. Speaker, he was letting everyone believe that he's in the same dream world as the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, that he was promising he had a plan for ERs and the Premier doesn't and didn't. That's the sad truth of it. The sad truth is when you want to question the decision of the democratic process, of 250 years of people deciding. Well, the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, the Minister of Finance, the Minister of Economic Development, Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations, the Minister of Health - if you would like to come in - the Minister of Justice, the Minister of Education, with all the things that are facing those people - and I will tell the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal there was no greater win than the one I had, but apparently on your historic moment coming to power as a socialist government, and again I'll end where I started.

We've got dippers here in Province House, double dippers and they're called the NDP. They'll take credit on one side and they want to say something else on the other and, again, nobody likes a double dipper except the dippers themselves and they're going to find out that no one is going to like the dippers come the next election. That's why we'll respond to the Speech from the Throne. That's why I'll respond to the constituents of Cape Breton North. That's why the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal is welcome to come to Cape Breton North and he will see the magnitude of what 164 votes was able to do for and by the people and they know that I'm staying in this House and trying to stop the likes of him from going down there and imposing this foolishness, this dream world that he has, on the people.

If the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal would like to know the percentage - because I followed the percentages, as I know the Minister of Finance does as well, Mr. Speaker - I know what it's like and I would like to tell that member what it's like to campaign. In 2001, I can tell you, if you want to talk polls, the member wants to talk things, we were 9 per cent when I started in a by-election; it got to 38 per cent, a little over that; the next election was 42 per cent and the next one just over 50 per cent. If he wants to know the percentages, I was back to 42 per cent in the numbers but 42 per cent was more than what they were due to get a seat. They don't have this seat. The Progressive

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Conservatives have Cape Breton North. The Progressive Conservatives know that the people of Cape Breton North believe in them and they've now seen the true face through a Speech from the Throne and the issues of the day.

So, again, whether it's the Premier and his front bench, or back bench, if they want to come down and talk about the issues of governing and want to talk fully and fulsome about this and have a true and honest debate, Mr. Speaker, I would welcome it but, most importantly, I welcome the confidence I have from the people of Cape Breton North, for the people of Cape Breton North, and I'll do it in these halls any time I can. Thank you very much. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Honourable member, I wonder, would you be interested in adjourning debate?

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I think my honourable colleagues would like us to ring the bells but I'll forego that and adjourn debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a motion to adjourn debate.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, the hour is late and everyone needs a good nap. We'll rise for the day and meet at the hour of 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m., where after regular business we will be calling Address in Reply to the Throne Speech.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is to adjourn until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[The House rose at 9:50 p.m.]

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NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 74

By: Hon. William Estabrooks (Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Beechville Baptist Church marks its 165th Anniversary (1844-2009); and

Whereas on September 27, 2009, the Beechville Baptist Church will be celebrating 165 years with two services; and

Whereas the guest preacher for this day will be Rev. Damon Gilyard from Corinthian Baptist Church in New Jersey;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the Beechville Baptist Church on their 165th Anniversary.

RESOLUTION NO. 75

By: Hon. William Estabrooks (Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Daniel Smith has provided valuable leadership in our community for many years, including his monumental commitment to the St. Margaret's Centre; and

Whereas it is only fitting that Danny Smith's legendary number 12 from his Tantallon Buzzards hockey uniform highlights the address of the centre at 12 Westwood Boulevard in Upper Tantallon; and

Whereas on Sunday, September 20, 2009, the original ice surface at the St. Margaret's Centre was named the Daniel Smith Arena;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Daniel Smith on the naming of the ice surface at the St. Margaret's Centre in recognition of his lifelong efforts.

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RESOLUTION NO. 76

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the annual Berwick Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony took place June 6, 2009, celebrating locals' accomplishments in sport; and

Whereas Purdy Adams was inducted in this year's ceremony as an athlete in recognition of his contributions during the 1930s to track and field as well as baseball; and

Whereas Mr. Adams was a dedicated athlete who excelled in various sports and was a source of pride and inspiration to his family and community;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Purdy Adams' family on the legacy he left his family and community on being inducted into the Berwick Sports Hall of Fame as an athlete.