Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD16-02

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



Third Session

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2016

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Elections N.S.: Chief Electoral Officer - Anl. Rept. (2015-16),
29
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1, Walk to Remember: Organizing Comm. - Congrats.,
30
Vote - Affirmative
30
Res. 2, Fire Marshal - Video: Creators - Thank,
31
Vote - Affirmative
31
Res. 3, N.S. Flooding/Water Shortage: Support - Confirm,
31
Vote - Affirmative
32
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 1, Tax-free Zone for Small Business Act,
32
No. 2, Basic Income Program Feasibility Study Act,
32
No. 3, Education Fund Protection Act,
32
No. 4, Workers' Compensation for Emergency Responders with
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Act, Hon. David Wilson »
32
No. 5, Economic Growth in Nova Scotia Act,
32
No. 6, Environmental Racism Prevention Act,
33
No. 7, Environmental Bill of Rights,
33
No. 8, Public Utilities Act,
33
No. 9, Municipal Government Act and Halifax Regional Municipality Charter,
33
No. 10, School Supplies Tax Credit Act,
33
No. 11, Wills Act,
33
No. 12, Voluntary Blood Donations Act,
33
No. 13, Employment Support and Income Assistance Act,
33
No. 14, Affordable Housing Act,
33
No. 15, Sales Tax Act,
33
No. 16, Fair Drug Pricing Act,
33
No. 17, Dental Health Care for All Nova Scotian Children,
An Act to Provide, Hon. David Wilson « »
33
No. 18, Labour Standards Code,
33
No. 19, Affordable Hearing Aids for Seniors Act,
33
No. 20, Labour Standards Code,
34
No. 21, Health Authorities Act,
34
STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS:
Reid, Donald R.: Order of N.S. (2016) - Congrats.,
34
Queens-Shelburne Vols. - Thank,
34
Coalition for Safe & Healthy Communities - Efforts Recognize,
35
Labatt: Water Donations - Thank,
35
Southwestern N.S. - Water Supply: Gov't. (N.S.) - Ensure,
36
Harvey, Clinton: Umpire Championship - Congrats.,
36
Fire Safety - Awareness,
37
Mother Earth - Province House Demonstration,
37
Cheema Aquatic Club - Cdn. Canoe Kayak Championships,
37
Hurricane Matthew: C.B. Vols. - Acknowledge,
38
Mun. Election: Candidates - Efforts Recognize,
38
"Nocturne: Art at Night": Curator/Bd./Vols. - Thank,
38
KCA Gr. 3/4 French Immersion Class - Red Cross Relief Efforts,
39
Yar. MLA - Firewood/Gas Shortage/Drought,
39
Lavoie, Kaiya & Joanne: Baking Init. - Congrats.,
39
Intl. Day of the Girl (10/11/16) - Recognize,
40
First Nations People: Legislature - Involvement,
40
Malay, Tanya - Commun. Volunteering,
41
MacIvor Fam. - IWK Fundraising,
41
Mun. Elections: African Nova Scotians - Voting Restrictions,
42
Myra, Craig/Chebucto Heights Elem. Sch. - Learners Support,
42
Nova Scotians: Taxation - Effects,
42
Climate Change: Prov. - Plan,
43
Jordan, Rebecca: Dancing Endeavours - Congrats.,
43
Women's Hist. Mo. (10/16) - Recognize,
44
Panuke Lake Cleanup - Vols. Thank,
44
Smith, Bernard F.: Knight of the French Natl. Order of the Legion of Honour
- Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
45
Hfx. Typographical Union/The Chronicle Herald: Gov't
- Dispute Resolve, Hon. David Wilson « »
45
[GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:]
Res. 14, Seasonal Influenza Vaccine - Importance Recognize,
46
Vote - Affirmative
46
[STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS:]
Mullins, William (Bill): Death of - Tribute,
47
Lun. Acad. Fdn./Vols./Staff: Dedication - Thank,
47
Liberal Gov't.: Taxation - Effects,
47
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS:
No. 1, C.B. Flood Victims - Disaster-Relief Funding,
48
No. 2, N.S. Teachers: Collective Bargaining - Status,
49
No. 3, Prem.: NSP Disaster Crews - Location Assignment,
50
No. 4, EMO - C.B.: Gov't. Support - Time Frame,
52
No. 5, Prem. - Carbon Pricing: Working Group - Options,
53
No. 6, Prem.: Cap-and-Trade System - Update,
54
No. 7, Health & Wellness - Nursing Homes: Cuts - Clarification,
55
No. 8, Agric.: Carbon Taxes - Ind. Effect,
56
No. 9, Bus. - Job Creation: Concrete Efforts - Timeline,
57
No. 10, Environ.: Approval Process - Min. Satisfaction,
58
No. 11, Prem.: Student Debt Forgiveness - Details,
59
No. 12, Nat. Res.: Mining Ind. - Fuel Tax Rebate,
59
No. 13, EECD: Hub Sch. Model - Parameters,
60
No. 14, EECD: Frank H. MacDonald Elem. Sch. - Renovation Info.,
61
No. 15, Fin. & Treasury Bd.: Bankruptcies - Increase Explain,
62
No. 16, Nat. Res.: Clear-cutting Plan - Update,
63
No. 17, Com. Serv.: Child Protection Serv. - Treatment,
64
No. 18, Health & Wellness: Operational Costs - Details,
65
No. 19, Bus.: Crisis Funding - Planning,
66
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
67
77
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., Oct. 18th at 1:00 p.m
84
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 4, Doctor Shortage: Liberal Gov't. - Admit,
85
Res. 5, Baker, Charlene - Saint Genevieve's Parish: Betterment
- Thank, The Speaker « » :
85
Res. 6, Crowell, Joyce - Saint Genevieve's Parish: Betterment
- Thank, The Speaker « » :
86
Res. 7, Mannette, Keith: Volunteerism - Thank,
86
Res. 8, Mannette, Donna: Volunteerism - Thank,
87
Res. 9, Gallupe, Cory: Volunteerism - Thank,
87
Res. 10, Outhouse, Donald: VON Tri-County - Support Recognize,
88
Res. 11, McNeil Liberals: Cost of Living Increase - Condemn,
88
Res. 12, Wedgeport & Dist. FD - Serv. Recognition:
Recipients Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
89
Res. 13, Penney, Melanie & Benjamin: Son - Birth Congrats.,
89
Res. 15, d'Entremont, Justine & Gilles : Son - Birth Congrats.,
90
Res. 16, Harris, Courtney/Blades, Mason: Son - Birth Congrats.,
90
Res. 17, d'Entremont, Jennifer & Adam: Son - Birth Congrats.,
91
Res. 18, Crowell, Kimberly/Boudreau, Christopher: Son
- Birth Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
91
Res. 19, Nickerson, Krista & Trevor: Son - Birth Congrats.,
92
Res. 20, Hiltz, Sarah/Atwood, Joshua: Son - Birth Congrats.,
92
Res. 21, Doucette-Williams, Suzanne/Williams, Jeff: Son
- Birth Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
93
Res. 22, Smith, Priscilla & James: Son - Birth Congrats.,
93
Res. 23, O'Connell, Becky/Cameron, James: Son - Birth Congrats.,
94
Res. 24, Goodwin, Erin/d'Eon, Jocelin: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
94
Res. 25, Swim, Kary/Goulden, Brandon: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
95
Res. 26, Reyes, Janine/Muise, Jonathan: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
95
Res. 27, Symonds, Kyla/Nickerson, Brett: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
96
Res. 28, Hopkins, Shadey/Brannen, Tyler: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
96
Res. 29, Nickerson, Nerissa & Jared: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
97
Res. 30, Harris, Whitney/Smith, Jamie: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
97
Res. 31, White, Jennifer/Newell, Jody: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
98
Res. 32, Nickerson, Jennifer & Robbie: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
98
Res. 33, Atkinson, Samantha/Goreham, Dominic: Daughter
- Birth Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
99
Res. 34, Jones, Melissa/Nickerson, Grant: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
99
Res. 35, Belliveau, Wendy & George - Anniv. (50th),
100
Res. 36, Surette, Irvin & Janet - Anniv. (50th),
100
Res. 37, Boudreau, Bernard & Myrtle - Anniv. (50th),
101
Res. 38, d'Entremont, Lloyd & Carol - Anniv. (50th),
101
Res. 39, Muise, Edgar & Pauline - Anniv. (50th),
102
Res. 40, Earle, Terry & Sharon - Anniv. (50th),
102
Res. 41, d'Entremont, Anne - Birthday (80th),
103
Res. 42, Ross, Bernice - Birthday (90th),
103
Res. 43, Amirault, Martha V. - Birthday (90th),
104
Res. 44, Dixon, Leta - Birthday (90th),
104
Res. 45, Ross, Norma - Birthday (90th),
105
Res. 46, Newell, Irene - Birthday (100th),
105
Res. 47, Thorburn, Annie - Birthday (100th),
106
Res. 48, Cole Hbr. Soccer Club - Anniv. (40th),
106
Res. 49, Mason, Gregory - HRP Long Serv. Award (25 Yrs.),
107
Res. 50, Kempton, Michelle/Mar. Race Weekend - Anniv. 5th,
107
Res. 51, Pepler, Nick - HRP Long Serv. (15 Yrs.),
107

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HALIFAX, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2016

Sixty-second General Assembly

Third Session

9:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Gordon Wilson, Mr. Keith Irving

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. We'll begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : As Speaker of the House of Assembly, I am pleased to table the Annual Report of the Chief Electoral Officer for 2015-16.

The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 1

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HON. JOANNE BERNARD « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Health and Wellness, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas every day a family in Nova Scotia experiences the pain of losing a child as a result of miscarriage, stillbirth, or neonatal loss; and

Whereas to honour those little lives lost, more than 500 parents and families will take to the streets in Halifax and Arichat to participate in the annual Walk to Remember; and

Whereas for parents and families, participating in this special day is a way to honour the memory of their babies and to share their grief with others who have experienced similar tragedies;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate this year's organizing committee for raising awareness of pregnancy and infant loss, and for putting together such a wonderful and meaningful event.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to make an introduction before presenting my resolution.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Permission granted.

MR. CHURCHILL « » : I'd like to bring the members' attention to the east gallery where we have Harold Pothier, a good Yarmouth boy who is our fire marshal for the Province of Nova Scotia - and please stand when I say your names - Kirk Janes, who is our very capable Manager of Corporate Policy at the Fire Marshal's Office, and we also have Frank Savage and his granddaughters, Kaley and Rebecca, who are the stars of our fire safety video, titled Don't Wait, Plan Your Escape, which is now available on the fire marshal's website. I'd like to thank our guests for being here. (Applause)

[Page 31]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 2

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this is Fire Prevention Week in Nova Scotia, a time to encourage everyone to check their smoke alarms and fire extinguishers and to be ready if a fire should happen; and

Whereas the Office of the Fire Marshal partnered with Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency and Communications Nova Scotia to create a video to help families plan and practise their escape from fire; and

Whereas this video is available on the fire marshal's website, and will be circulated to fire departments and other safety organizations;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the Legislature thank the staff at the Fire Marshal's Office, Communications Nova Scotia, firefighters, and community members who worked together to create this video that will help save lives.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Municipal Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 3

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 2016 has been a challenging year for Nova Scotia with the water shortage in the southwest and severe flooding in the eastern part of the province; and

[Page 32]

Whereas in both cases people have been helping one another, neighbours looking out for one another, municipal leaders helping those affected, volunteer organizations stepping up to assist, our dedicated EMO staff working around the clock, and our corporate partners donating needed materials; and

Whereas it is pulling together when things get tough through acts of generosity, kindness, and compassion that make Nova Scotia a great place to live, work, and raise a family;

Therefore be it resolved that the House commend everyone who has offered assistance during the water shortage and flooding, and confirm that we will do whatever we can as a province to support those affected.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 1 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 217 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Income Tax Act. (Hon. Jamie Baillie)

Bill No. 2 - Entitled an Act to Facilitate the Study of the Feasibility of Creating a Basic Income Program. (Ms. Marian Mancini)

Bill No. 3 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 240 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Judicature Act, to Protect Education Funds. (Mr. Tim Houston)

Bill No. 4 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 10 of the Acts of 1994-95. The Workers' Compensation Act. (Hon. David Wilson)

Bill No. 5 - Entitled an Act to Ensure Economic Growth in Nova Scotia. (Hon. Jamie Baillie)

Bill No. 6 - Entitled an Act to Address Environmental Racism. (Ms. Lenore Zann)

[Page 33]

Bill No. 7 - Entitled an Act to Establish an Environmental Bill of Rights. (Hon. Denise Peterson-Rafuse)

Bill No. 8 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 380 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Utilities Act, to Eliminate the Guarantee on Nova Scotia Power's Profit. (Mr. Tim Houston)

Bill No. 9 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 18 of the Acts of 1998. The Municipal Government Act, and Chapter 39 of the Acts of 2008, the Halifax Regional Municipality Charter. (Ms. Lisa Roberts)

Bill No. 10 - Entitled An Act to Amend Chapter 217 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Income Tax Act, to Provide a School Supplies Tax Credit for Parents. (Hon. Pat Dunn)

Bill No. 11 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 505 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Wills Act. (Hon. Sterling Belliveau)

Bill No. 12 - Entitled an Act to Maintain and Preserve Voluntary Blood Donations in Nova Scotia. (Hon. David Wilson)

Bill No. 13 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 27 of the Acts of 2000. The Employment Support and Income Assistance Act. (Ms. Lenore Zann)

Bill No. 14 - Entitled an Act to Ensure the Provision of Affordable Housing. (Ms. Lisa Roberts)

Bill No. 15 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 31 of the Acts of 1996. The Sales Tax Act. (Hon. Sterling Belliveau)

Bill No. 16 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 7 of the Acts of 2011. The Fair Drug Pricing Act. (Hon. David Wilson)

Bill No. 17 - Entitled an Act to Provide Dental Health Care for All Nova Scotian Children. (Hon. David Wilson)

Bill No. 18 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 246 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Labour Standards Code, Respecting Minimum Wage. (Hon. David Wilson)

Bill No. 19 - Entitled an Act to Provide for Affordable Hearing Aids for Seniors. (Hon. David Wilson)

Bill No. 20 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 246 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Labour Standards Code, Respecting Paid Vacation. (Hon. David Wilson)

[Page 34]

Bill No. 21 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 32 of the Acts of 2014. The Health Authorities Act. (Hon. David Wilson)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cumberland South.

REID, DONALD R.: ORDER OF N.S. (2016) - CONGRATS.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Donald R. Reid of Joggins, also known as the Keeper of the Cliffs, on being a recipient of the 2016 Order of Nova Scotia. Don was born by the cliffs that have shaped his life, leaving school at a young age to work in the mines. With no formal training in paleontology, he gathered an amazing collection of fossils which now forms the heart of the Joggins Fossil Centre.

Don's collection, 70 years in the making, catalogues the world's most complete fossil record of terrestrial life of the Coal Age, dating back 300 million years. His work was essential in securing the Joggins Fossil Cliffs' designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Mr. Speaker, it is a great honour to congratulate Donald Reid on this prestigious, well-deserved honour and thank him for his outstanding contribution to the community of Joggins and to our province over the years.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

QUEENS-SHELBURNE VOLS. - THANK

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : On behalf of the people of Queens-Shelburne, I want to offer a sincere thank-you to all those who are helping southwestern Nova Scotia through difficult times. After dealing with a rash of forest fires in the region, first responders have since been challenged by a record-setting drought. Municipal leaders, firefighters, ground search and rescue, local emergency management offices, countless volunteers, and many more, have dedicated their time and effort to help reduce the impact of these serious weather events on local communities.

Mr. Speaker, I ask all those who have not yet had the opportunity to volunteer their time and effort to consider doing so in relief of those who have been on the front lines for weeks and months.

[Page 35]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Preston-Dartmouth on an introduction.

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : I would like to introduce, in the east gallery, members of the Coalition for Safe and Healthy Communities for Preston, Mineville, Lake Echo, and Porters Lake. The members here today are Deb Day, who is the chairman of the organization; Jennifer Covey; Roger Day; Valerie Thomas; Mary Thomas; Richard Buggeln; Linda Mosher; Doreen Matthews; Kerry O'Hearn; and Spencer Colley.

I ask the House to give them a very warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Preston-Dartmouth.

COALITION FOR SAFE & HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

- EFFORTS RECOGNIZE

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : I would like to recognize the efforts of the Coalition for Safe and Healthy Communities for Preston, Mineville, Lake Echo, and Porters Lake, formed in opposition to a proposed HRM C and D materials processing facility for their communities.

The coalition presented thoroughly prepared briefs to Halifax planning and development, addressing the hazards and concerns of such facilities to these residential communities. The coalition addressed concerns regarding increased heavy vehicle traffic, environmental issues such as water and air quality, and the incompatibility of such facilities in a residential area. The coalition met and communicated regularly with residents of the community as well as their municipal, provincial, and federal representatives.

I applaud and congratulate the coalition for their thorough and professional approach to the completion of this inappropriate facility in the midst of a residential area.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

LABATT: WATER DONATIONS - THANK

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : This summer many Nova Scotians were affected by an unprecedented drought, especially those residents of Argyle-Barrington and Yarmouth County. It's been a time when Nova Scotians reached out to help their fellow Nova Scotians, and I thank them all for their help.

The people at Labatt Brewing, the parent company of Oland Breweries and Alexander Keith's Brewing, have a long sense of community and local responsibility. Labatt partnered with Nova Scotia EMO to bring over 80,000 cans of water to people affected by the drought conditions. The company employees made this generous gesture not for thanks, not for recognition - they did it because they saw Nova Scotians in need and they knew that they could help.

[Page 36]

It is my true pleasure today to stand and thank everyone at Labatt here in Nova Scotia for their exemplary corporate citizenship, and to all the members of the fire departments and EMO partners for making a difficult time a little easier for thousands of Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

SOUTHWESTERN N.S. - WATER SUPPLY: GOV'T. (N.S.) - ENSURE

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : The drought in southwestern Nova Scotia has caused water shortages the likes of which people have never seen. With the drought being so severe and many on dug wells, the rain we recently received has not been enough to restore the water table. With winter fast approaching, there is concern that wells will not be replenished before the cold weather hits, and this could have serious consequences for people who have long depended on dug wells for their water supply.

Mr. Speaker, if there is no plan in place, people could be at risk of being without water this winter, and I'm calling on the government to ensure that this concern is addressed.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester North.

HARVEY, CLINTON: UMPIRE CHAMPIONSHIP - CONGRATS.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, Clinton Harvey, 35, of Valley, Colchester North, teacher and vice-principal at Harmony Heights Elementary School, has been umpiring softball games for 21 years. He says he has umpired softball in most Canadian provinces but from July 11th to 16th of this year he had the pleasure of calling games in Montegranaro, Italy.

Harvey had the honour of being the only umpire selected to represent Canada at the European Softball Federation Men's Championship. Harvey loves the game but also enjoys the opportunity it has given him to meet so many people. The many hours he has given to the sport are responsible for presenting him with this special opportunity to enjoy another culture.

I would ask the members of the House of Assembly to join me in congratulating Clinton Harvey for receiving this prestigious honour.

[Page 37]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

FIRE SAFETY - AWARENESS

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : Mr. Speaker, October 9th to 15th is Fire Prevention Week. Although many people attribute Fire Prevention Week as a way to educate our children in the importance of fire safety, it is important for adults to pay attention as well. Fire Prevention Week acts as a reminder for everyone to check their smoke detectors and to refresh the family on the emergency exit plans, just in case of fire.

This week is the final instalment of a three-year theme on smoke detector safety. This year's theme of Don't Wait, Check the Date, brings awareness that smoke detectors do not last forever and should be replaced every 10 years. I urge everyone to keep fire safety proactive, not reactive, and to be safe.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

MOTHER EARTH - PROVINCE HOUSE DEMONSTRATION

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : I'd like to congratulate all the friends and allies of Mother Earth who came out to the demonstration at Province House yesterday to protest the Liberal Government's mishandling of environmental issues, ranging from glyphosate spraying, taking off 50 per cent clear-cutting caps, concerns about fish and spawning grounds in both the Avon and Shubenacadie Rivers, the green algae problem in Mattatal Lake, the Fall River quarry, stop Alton Gas and Northern Pulp emissions, clean up Boat Harbour and many other issues pertaining to the need to protect Mother Earth and the environment.

I just want to say that your voices were definitely heard clearly, both outside and inside the Legislature. Thank you, wela'lin, merci, this is just the beginning.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Waverley-Fall River-Beaver Bank.

CHEEMA AQUATIC CLUB - CDN. CANOE KAYAK CHAMPIONSHIPS

MR. BILL HORNE « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate Waverley's Cheema Aquatic Club for a strong showing at the Canadian Canoe Kayak National Championships held in Lake Banook in Dartmouth this summer. Cheema Aquatic Club captured 32 medals. The Waverley-based club won eight gold, led by two for Craig Spence, 18 silver and six bronze medals. Mark Wiseman picked up four silvers and a bronze medal.

Halifax Maskwa Aquatic Club won its first national championships in the field of over 40 teams. Cheema is globally recognized as a canoe/kayak club that provides opportunities for youth to achieve success at every level of athletics and in life. I wish them continued success.

[Page 38]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

HURRICANE MATTHEW: C.B. VOLS. - ACKNOWLEDGE

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge all the volunteers and professionals who gave so much of their time helping their neighbours during Hurricane Matthew. This past Thanksgiving weekend Cape Breton was hit hard by Hurricane Matthew with over 200 millimetres of rain being recorded in some places. Through all of this, many community groups, professionals and individuals went out in the rain and wind to assist their neighbours, some of whom needed their basements pumped out, others who just needed a warm meal due to the power outages.

I stand here today, Mr. Speaker, to congratulate and offer my sincere thanks to all of those who offered their help and showed the true Cape Breton spirit. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MUN. ELECTION: CANDIDATES - EFFORTS RECOGNIZE

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, on October 15th municipalities across the province will elect councillors to local government. As someone who has recently been a candidate vying for office, I can attest to the commitment required to do so.

Making the decision to run for public office is not an easy one. Those running in current municipal elections undoubtedly feel they can add a positive voice to political discourse.

On behalf of the NDP caucus I want to recognize the efforts of the current municipal candidates and wish them all the best on election day.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

"Nocturne: Art at Night": Curator/Bd./Vols. - Thank

MR. JOACHIM STROINK « » : Halifax is privileged to be home to some of the most gifted creative talents in all of Canada. Be it through fine arts, film, music, or theatre, Halifax's artistic community is thriving.

One of the greatest contributions to Halifax is Nocturne: Art at Night, which will be holding its ninth annual event tomorrow evening starting at 6:00 p.m. This completely free event, coordinated and run by a team of volunteers, showcases and celebrates the visual scene. All around downtown Halifax and Dartmouth, you will find hosts of galleries and public exhibits to view and experience creative talents that have such an impact here in our province.

[Page 39]

I would ask the members of the Legislature to join me in thanking and commending the members of the Nocturne board this year, curator Michael McCormack, and all of the other volunteers and artists who make Nocturne one of the great creative showings anywhere in Canada.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

KCA Gr. 3/4 French Immersion Class

- Red Cross Relief Efforts

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : On June 23rd, Madeline Umlah, Lily Rogers, and Lily Hare, students of a Grade 3 and 4 French immersion class in Kings County Academy, presented $382.35 to the Red Cross to support relief efforts in Fort McMurray, after the devastating wildfires in May. These three young students started raising money on the playground and then spoke with their teachers and principal about their endeavour. The principal made an announcement at school, and their teacher, Jessica McAleer, got involved. Before long, the whole class was involved, and numerous fundraisers were in progress. These young students took it upon themselves to help others in need, and this should be applauded.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

YAR. MLA - FIREWOOD/GAS SHORTAGE/DROUGHT

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, in just three years, on the Yarmouth MLA's watch, we the people have witnessed both a firewood and gasoline shortage. When residents of southwestern Nova Scotia ran out of water this summer the minister responsible for the Emergency Management Office, who just happens to be the same member for Yarmouth, was missing in action until the eleventh hour. As we review the Yarmouth member's report card for dealing with shortages, it is my hope that the Premier does not - I repeat, does not - put him in charge of air quality.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hants East.

LAVOIE, KAIYA & JOANNE: BAKING INIT. - CONGRATS.

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Mr. Speaker, Kaiya Lavoie is a young woman who loves to bake. Despite having spina bifida and being combined to a wheelchair, she has become an entrepreneur doing what she loves. Together with her mother Joanne, they have started a new business called Two B GFree. They bake gluten-free, chemical-free goods which are available at the Funky Farmgate Farmers Market in Enfield. Items can be pre-ordered and picked up at the market. To give back to their community, they have created baskets with a selection of goodies, the proceeds going to a local family in need of a specialized wheelchair.

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It warms the heart when individuals are able to overcome personal challenge, find a way to fill a need, become self-sufficient, and also give back to their community.

I would like to congratulate Kaiya and Joanne for their initiative and wish them continuing success.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

INTL. DAY OF THE GIRL (10/11/16) - RECOGNIZE

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : I rise today to acknowledge that October 11th was the International Day of the Girl. It is imperative that we reach females at a young age and encourage them to dream big and not to settle for less just because they are girls. They must be encouraged to seek education opportunities, to speak up for themselves, and not to accept antiquated attitudes about females in positions traditionally thought to be only for males. Confidence must be instilled early in a girl's life so she has the tools to combat advertising that chips away at her self-image and ability to challenge stereotypes. When females are able to capitalize on education and employment opportunities, entire families and communities benefit.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE: LEGISLATURE - INVOLVEMENT

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : As the member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River, I represent the Millbrook First Nation community, a strong Mi'kmaq community with rich history and culture. This month is Mi'kmaq History Month. As members of the Nova Scotia Legislature, we have the opportunity to promote nation-to-nation dialogue in our constituencies. With events happening across the province, there are countless occasions for Nova Scotians to gather collectively to raise awareness both of past injustices stemming from colonial experiences of the treaties which are living treaties, and of ways to reconcile and respect indigenous peoples in the future.

Yesterday I had the privilege of introducing a young Mi'kmaq woman, Michelle Paul, to the Legislature. It was a pleasure to see her eyes light up every time she saw something to do with her First Nations people here, and we noticed that there should probably be more of those things in the Legislature.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Time has expired for the member's statement.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Eastern Shore-Tracadie.

MALAY, TANYA - COMMUN. VOLUNTEERING

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize an outstanding individual, Tanya Malay. Ms. Malay is a lifelong resident of Sheet Harbour who juggles being a mother of two, having a full-time day job, and having a husband who works away from home. Tanya has been a dedicated volunteer for the Sheet Harbour Lions Club for almost a decade, and was the first woman to join this community organization. In the past, she has served as secretary for the Lions Club and as chairperson for the Seaside Festival, which is held every August.

Just recently, she dedicated 94 hours of her vacation time to ensure that the festival was another huge success. I want to thank Tanya for her unrelenting dedication and love for her community. It is truly an inspiration. It's folks like her who volunteer who truly make our communities and province a better place to live.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

MACIVOR FAM. - IWK FUNDRAISING

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, out of tragedy came one of the happiest days of the year for the MacIvor family. When Molly died as a result of a car accident shortly before her second birthday, it was at that exact moment that a rainbow was seen and photographed. As the first anniversary birthday drew closer, her mother knew that she wanted that day to be filled with happiness and lots of kids running around.

With family and friends, they turned their backyard into a place filled with fun and games, which has ballooned into an annual event that offers unlimited fun, food, and games at no charge. From the money raised through contributions each year, they have now totalled over $70,000 that they've provided to the IWK for other children's causes. Molly's Rainbows is truly a testament to an extraordinary family.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MUN. ELECTIONS: AFRICAN NOVA SCOTIANS

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- VOTING RESTRICTIONS

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, I commend volunteers across Nova Scotia seeking election or re-election to school boards. I also wish to raise a concern about equity.

In accordance with the Education Act, African Nova Scotians may choose to vote for the African Nova Scotian school board representative. This then precludes them from voting for the representative for their electoral district. In Halifax Needham, where an African Nova Scotian mother and community leader is one of just two candidates for School Board District 5, many residents have to pick between two relevant ballots.

I believe African Nova Scotians should have the right to vote on both ballots, as surely the intent is to amplify their voice and vote in order to address historic and systemic racism within the education system.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Armdale.

MYRA, CRAIG/CHEBUCTO HEIGHTS ELEM. SCH.

- LEARNERS SUPPORT

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to acknowledge one of my constituents, Mr. Craig Myra. This Fall, Craig began his first year as principal at Chebucto Heights Elementary in Armdale. Craig grew up in Halifax, and he and his wife are raising their three wonderful children in our community.

Craig's career within the Halifax Regional School Board has been an accomplished one. He taught at St. Patrick's Alexandra and Rockingstone Heights, served as vice-principal at St. Joseph's-Alexander McKay, and just finished two years as the principal of William King Elementary. Throughout this time, Craig has inspired and supported a great number of our students. Indeed, Craig was previously recognized as CTV Atlantic's Maritimer of the Week for his excellence in teaching, his compassion for his students, and his dedication to youth mentoring outside of school hours.

Recently, Craig and I discussed his vision for Chebucto Heights and how we can work together to support all learners. I can tell you that his passion is immediately evident. I look forward to supporting Craig and Chebucto Heights Elementary School.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

NOVA SCOTIANS: TAXATION - EFFECTS

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, Liberal times are tough times here in Nova Scotia. Families are spending more on taxes than they do toward shelter, food, and clothing combined. Nova Scotians pay some of the highest provincial income taxes in the country and are punished again with the highest provincial sales tax in Canada. Too many families live paycheque to paycheque and cannot afford to save for their future.

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Now Nova Scotians face the threat of carbon pricing, which will drive up the price of gas, food, and other goods. The government has taken more money out of the pockets of hard-working families and has nothing to show for it. Too many Nova Scotians are worse off today than they were when the Liberal Government got elected and, Mr. Speaker, that's a shame.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham on an introduction.

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, may I introduce someone in the west gallery? I am pleased today to introduce Nancie De La Chevotiere, a teacher at Halifax West High School, whose passionate interview on CBC Radio has helped to inform the people of the province of the problems in our classrooms and why teachers are standing up for high-quality public education.

I ask my colleagues in the House to join me in welcoming Nancie. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

CLIMATE CHANGE: PROV. - PLAN

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, in recent months Nova Scotians have been made all too aware of the potential effects of climate change. Residents in southwestern Nova Scotia have been dealing with a record-setting drought that has dried up wells for the first time in 50 years.

In Cape Breton they are recovering from the effects of Hurricane Matthew which has caused serious damage to homes, businesses, and public infrastructure.

Mr. Speaker, as a province we need to plan for climate change. In readying ourselves for extreme weather there will be associated costs but there will also be opportunities for job creation. Recent events in Nova Scotia demonstrate that turning a blind eye to climate change will not make it go away.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

JORDAN, REBECCA: DANCING ENDEAVOURS - CONGRATS.

HON. MARK FUREY « » : Mr. Speaker, this summer I had the opportunity and honour of watching the talented Rebecca Jordan perform at the Nova Scotia Royal International Tattoo. I've known Rebecca for many years and was thrilled to hear that she had been selected as one of the Highland Dancers in this year's event. With her friend and mentor, Angela McKinnon, Rebecca has pursued her love of dance and has worked incredibly hard to become a dancer worthy of participation in international events.

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I'd like to take this opportunity, Mr. Speaker, to acknowledge and congratulate Rebecca Jordon on her stellar performance at the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo and wish her the very best in her future endeavours. Keep dancing, Rebecca.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

WOMEN'S HIST. MO. (10/16) - RECOGNIZE

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize October as Women's History Month. Women have made great strides and yet have so far to go to reach gender equality.

An annual report about the best cities in Canada for gender equality, conducted by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, shows that Halifax fell five positions, to number 10, from 2015 to 2016. The wage gap shows that women earn just 71 per cent of what men earn. It also shows that Halifax has higher poverty rates than the national average, with more women than men living below the low income measure.

Mr. Speaker, more work must be done to close the wage gap between genders and to assist women to become more financially stable.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hants West.

PANUKE LAKE CLEANUP - VOLS. THANK

MR. CHUCK PORTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize Christie Ross who took the initiative to organize a massive clean-up at Panuke Lake in West Hants during our recent drought. With the lake at the lowest level it has been in many years, it was a shame to see the debris and garbage that had been dumped or left behind.

Christie organized a group of volunteers who spent many hours over a period of several months, clearing barrels, lawn chairs, plastic jugs - and even a car engine that had been there for more than 20 years - from the lake floor.

Volunteers of all ages were available to help and there was even a dump truck and an excavator at the end, to aid in hauling everything away.

It was great to see the community spirit come alive to facilitate this clean-up. I'd like to thank Christie and the many volunteers who have made Panuke Lake a great place for fishing and community gatherings again. Their determination and perseverance is greatly appreciated.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

Smith, Bernard F.: Knight of the French Natl. Order

of the Legion of Honour - Congrats.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday, August 31st, at a ceremony at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 155 in Wedgeport, MP Colin Fraser presented Bernard F. Smith a medal marking his rank as Knight of the French National Order of the Legion of Honour, on behalf of the French Government.

Mr. Smith was only 19 years old in 1941 when he joined the Canadian Army, and three years later he took part in the D-Day landings in Normandy, France. He is the fourth member of Legion Branch 155 to receive the Medal of Honour. Other recipients are Alcide LeBlanc, Wesley Spinney, and Vernon Doucette.

It is an honour to extend congratulations to Bernard Smith for receiving this prestigious honour, and thank him and all veterans for their exemplary service to our country.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

HFX. TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION/THE CHRONICLE HERALD:

GOV'T. - DISPUTE RESOLVE

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Members of the Halifax Typographical Union, some of our region's best journalists and content creators, have been pounding the pavement and demanding a fair labour agreement with The Chronicle Herald management for 266 days now.

The residents of Sackville-Cobequid, like many Nova Scotians, are worried that we might lose this outlet entirely if these skilled professionals do not return to work soon. They would deeply miss the quality journalistic content that they have come to expect when they pick up their paper from the front porch in the morning. I've said it once, and I'll say it again - this dispute has gone on far too long. We once again call on this government to support and facilitate a fair path forward for both parties.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. TERRY FARRELL » : Mr. Speaker, I would seek the unanimous consent of the House to revert to the order of business, Government Notices of Motion.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Is it agreed?

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It is agreed.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

RESOLUTION NO. 14

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the flu sends thousands of Nova Scotians to doctors, clinics, and emergency departments every year; and

Whereas Nova Scotians can help protect themselves and others, especially those who are at high risk like pregnant women, children, the elderly, and chronically ill, by getting a flu shot; and

Whereas the seasonal flu vaccine is available for free from family physicians or nurse practitioners through clinics offered by Public Health, from most pharmacies across the province, and some workplaces;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House recognize the importance of the seasonal influenza vaccine and encourage Nova Scotians to get their flu shot.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We will now revert to Statements by Members.

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

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Mullins, William (Bill): Death of - Tribute

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to sadly acknowledge the passing of a great community member, Mr. William (Bill) Mullins of Louisbourg.

Bill was a kind-hearted, community-driven man known to many as the "man in the hat" giving introductions at the Louisbourg Playhouse where he donated much of his time out of love for the building and the people who performed there. When he was not at the playhouse, Bill could be found around the S&L Railroad Museum fixing something or just greeting visitors and sharing a story and a laugh with them.

I stand here today to recognize Bill Mullins, a man who gave everything he could to his community and a man that I am very proud to be able to say was my friend.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg.

Lun. Acad. Fdn./Vols./Staff: Dedication - Thank

MS. SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : Mr. Speaker, when the Lunenburg Academy closed its doors in 2012 to make way for the new Bluenose Academy, there was some question as to what would become of the 200-plus-year-old building. Four years later, the heritage property is at 85 per cent capacity, housing a variety of tenants from financial planner to art studios, sea schools, and a genealogical society. The public library is also on the move to the academy. It has taken more than $1 million and probably about as many volunteer hours, but the transformation from school to multi-use cultural space is complete. Though in the heart of many it will always be a school, the changes to the academy have allowed for the community to retain some sense of ownership of the building and with much of the space still accessible to the public.

I wish to congratulate the volunteers and staff, particularly those of the Lunenburg Academy Foundation for their dedication and hard work.

MR. SPEAKER « » : This will be a short one. The honourable member for Kings North.

Liberal Gov't.: Taxation - Effects

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, this Liberal Government is gouging hard-working Nova Scotians. We learned this week that Nova Scotians are paying 17 per cent more in taxes than they paid just four years ago. Not many of those people got 17 per cent raises in that time; not many of those people feel that the services they receive from this government are 17 per cent better.

The Liberal carbon tax pricing threatens to increase the tax burden on hard-working families by another $1,250. It's no wonder so many of the people we represent are finding it hard to make ends meet.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for Statements by Members has expired.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

C.B. FLOOD VICTIMS - DISASTER-RELIEF FUNDING

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : My question is to the Premier. While we're talking about the cost of living today, thousands of Cape Bretoners are assessing the damage from the devastating Thanksgiving floods. For many, insurance won't cover the tens of thousands of dollars in damage. Some people's homes will have to be demolished. They lost cars, furniture, appliances, and clothing. On top of that, they've lost personal and family photos and heirlooms. My question is, is the province going to provide disaster-relief funding to the people of Cape Breton?

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I was in the community, Mr. Speaker. I was in Glace Bay, I was in Sydney, and I was in Eskasoni to look first-hand at the damage that had taken place for these individuals. I spoke directly to them. My colleagues who are from Cape Breton are home today working with those individuals. Minister MacLellan will be taking federal Minister Goodale through the area to have a look. We will be triggering a disaster-relief program with the national government.

We are also working with Cape Breton United Way to make sure that we deal with the emergency funding at this point. Many people were completely taken out of their homes. Everything was lost. They're living in hotels. We want to make sure that those families recognize that the people of Nova Scotia are standing with them, and this government will stand with them.

MR. ORRELL « » : We know that the need is now. Many people have been forced to stay in hotels and eat in restaurants all week. The CBRM has put up $25,000 in initial relief to help those who are in need now with their hotels and everything. There is already over that much in private donations as well. Will the Premier agree to match the humanitarian efforts of the CBRM and the people of Cape Breton, and encourage his federal cousins to do the same now?

THE PREMIER « » : We've been working with the Cape Breton United Way. We'll have more say about that, Mr. Speaker. But I want to ensure the honourable member and the good citizens of Cape Breton that their provincial government will be standing with them not only in the short term but in the long term.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

N.S. TEACHERS: COLLECTIVE BARGAINING - STATUS

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : My question is also for the Premier. On October 4th, Nova Scotia teachers rejected a tentative agreement for a second time. Contract negotiations are about options. They are about give and take. To be successful, both sides need to stay at the table. The Premier has been quoted in media saying, "No arbitrator, no third party will determine what a collective agreement will be in this province," and "The financial package that was on the table is non-negotiable," and that non-monetary concerns like working conditions would not be part of the contract. I will table those documents. My question for the Premier is, please clarify what this means for the collective bargaining process with teachers.

THE PREMIER « » : Our government sat down with two different executives of the Nova Scotia Teachers Union and came to tentative deals. There was a lot of give and take at that table. As you know, Mr. Speaker, there was a very different package put on the table by the government. We moved on that. We made adjustments. There were improvements made by the executive of the day. They went out to teachers twice, who said no.

As part of the collective bargaining process, as he should know, there is no right to binding arbitration for teachers. They have the right to strike. That's something they're looking at as a group.

But I'm telling you, since coming into government, Mr. Speaker, after devastating cuts in the classroom, we've continued to invest. We put caps on classes and hired math mentors and mental health clinicians. Do we know there are more things that need to be done in the classroom? Of course we do. We're going to work with classroom teachers - and that doesn't have to happen at the bargaining table. My office and the minister's office are always open to improve the learning environment for students and the working environment for teachers.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : In December 2015, the Liberals passed the Public Services Sustainability (2015) Act, otherwise known as Bill No. 148. It proclaimed this piece of legislation would impose a four-year wage pattern on 75,000 public servants, including nurses, teachers, and social service professionals. The NDP is opposed to this bill. Now there does seem to be some confusion in the government about how their own bill would impact teachers in this province.

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In a radio interview on October 7th, the Premier said Bill No. 148 will not apply to teachers. My question to the Premier is, if Bill No. 148 does not apply to teachers, why are they mentioned 11 times in this bill alone?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 148 applies to arbitration and it puts parameters around arbitration that the arbitrator has to deal with the financial money that is on the table.

We have put a fair offer on the table. There is no more money, Mr. Speaker. I don't know where the honourable member thinks I can find it. He is standing up asking me to invest in classrooms to improve the working conditions and the learning environment; they'll stand up again on another question, asking us to invest in long-term care; and they'll stand up on another question asking us to invest in every piece across the province, at the same time providing the most generous wage packages in the country.

We cannot continue to do both. We have provided what I believe is a fair wage pattern, at the same time investing in the learning environment and working conditions for teachers.

Can we do more in terms of improving the learning environment? Of course we can. We'll continue to sit down, but all the money is on the table that we have to settle a collective agreement.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, in the CBC article the Government House Leader for the Liberals promised that in the event of a strike vote the government would "ensure that public services are maintained regardless of any type of labour disruption."

Mr. Speaker, will the Premier tell Nova Scotians if this means this government plans to proclaim Bill No. 148?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for his hypothetical question. It is my hope that there will be no disruption in terms of in the classrooms. We are not looking for a strike; we don't want a strike. We're working with classroom teachers across this province to improve the learning environment. We're going to continue to do so, but teachers will make that decision and the union will make that decision on what they believe is next for them.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

PREM.: NSP DISASTER CREWS - LOCATION ASSIGNMENT

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Tens of thousands of Cape Bretoners have suffered through long power outages because of one of the worst storms in recent memory. The warning signs were clear but Nova Scotia Power saw fit to send 10 crews to the Grand Bahama instead of staying home to deal with a very real local disaster.

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Nova Scotians pay among the highest power rates in the country. The Premier had lots of tough talk for Nova Scotia Power during the last election but it appears that his bark was worse than his bite.

Does the Premier believe it is reasonable to send crews away when there was a pending disaster here at home?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I want to thank the Minister of Energy who has been working extremely hard to ensure that we stabilize energy rates in this province.

When I was in Cape Breton, the mayor and members of the community were talking about the response that had come in. There were crews from around the region who came in and responded to the needs of those communities.

Would we have preferred to have the power back on in the next hour? Of course we would, but there are a lot of hard-working people on the ground who are ensuring that life gets back to some level of normalcy in the short term. We're going to stand with the people of Cape Breton to make sure that we improve in the long term.

MR. MACLEOD « » : There's more bark but no bite.

Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia Power exists to serve Nova Scotians, period. For the power company to think it's acceptable to send crews to another part of the world while we're anticipating a storm that is disastrous is wrong. Nova Scotia Power still has guaranteed profits and Nova Scotians still pay the highest power rates in the country.

My question to the Premier is, will the Premier intervene today and ask the URB to review the power company's priorities when it comes to Nova Scotia, seeing how we pay high costs for this utility?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question and I want to thank all those who have come to the aid of Nova Scotians and come to the aid of Cape Bretoners, not only in offering support and working, going down there and tree-trimming and putting power back on, but the many people from across Canada who are wanting to contribute financially to ensure that those who were hardest hit have the support and can get life back to normal.

It's wonderful to see the country and the province come together, Mr. Speaker, when a community disaster - I want to recognize the good people of Cape Breton who, when Fort Mac was in trouble, they came to the aid of the people of Fort Mac. Let me tell you, the country noticed and the country is not ignoring the fact and they will come to the aid of Cape Breton.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

EMO - C.B.: GOV'T. SUPPORT - TIME FRAME

MS. LISA ROBERTS « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Emergency Management.

This week Cape Bretoners were hit hard by the remnants of Hurricane Matthew. The damage was widespread and left few residents and business owners unaffected. As they file insurance claims and wait to hear what this government plans to do to alleviate the situation, many require rapid financial assistance. One week after Albertans were evacuated due to forest fires earlier this year, NDP Premier Rachel Notley and her government put pre-loaded debit cards in the hands of the hardest hit.

So I ask the minister of emergency management, it has been five days, when can affected residents expect to have government support in their hands to meet their urgent needs?

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Of course, all of us here in the House keep our thoughts and our wishes with those people in Cape Breton who have been absolutely devastated by this weather event. We have immediately sent resources into the area, human resources, to support people, help them coordinate, and ensure that the efforts on the ground are suitable for a response. We are working on a plan as we speak to ensure that those most grievously affected are fully supported by all levels of government.

MS. ROBERTS « » : Given that Nova Scotia is set to confront more severe storms, forest fires, and droughts, as our climate changes, it seems strange that this government has cut spending to the Emergency Management Office this year.

So I ask the minister, why would this government cut funding to emergency measures?

MR. CHURCHILL « » : When it comes to climate change, that's obviously a concern for all levels of government. Currently, our municipalities are required to ensure there is a climate change plan in place when they're looking at development and planning in their various municipalities. Government is very focused on ensuring we're able to respond to the needs of our community members when they're in need. When we had the water shortage in southwestern Nova Scotia, we acted immediately to ensure that there was potable water and facilities open for water for daily use. When we're looking at this terrible flood, a lot of resources were poured into Cape Breton to ensure that things were being coordinated on the ground and that people were getting the information that they needed. That work will definitely continue.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM. - CARBON PRICING: WORKING GROUP - OPTIONS

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : My question is to the Premier. Mr. Speaker, we now know that the government and the Premier quietly formed a working group on carbon pricing at the Department of Finance and Treasury Board over a year ago. That didn't stop the Premier from acting surprised when the federal government announced carbon pricing for all Canadians, including Nova Scotians.

Nova Scotians are very worried about what carbon pricing will do to their already high cost of living. I'd like to ask the Premier if he can tell Nova Scotians today, what option is his working group on carbon pricing considering here in the Province of Nova Scotia?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, there was no secret about the fact. I think any good government would bring all the tools they have; they would bring all the expertise they have in government and reach out if they need some extra advice to deal with an issue we knew was coming. We were surprised, and I was surprised, that the national government made the announcement that they did on the day they made it. We had been working with the Department of Environment to look at what we believe is a fair solution for Nova Scotia. We have laid out a couple of options. We're continuing those negotiations. I'm encouraged by what I'm hearing from the national government, but I've made it clear to the national government and to all Nova Scotians that this government will not be imposing a carbon tax.

MR. BAILLIE « » : A good government would be open and transparent with the people of Nova Scotia about what it itself, our provincial government, is considering. They formed a carbon pricing working group over a year ago. We're finding out about it now, and Nova Scotians are wondering how much more carbon pricing is going to cost them. It risks our jobs; it risks our livelihoods; and it risks driving up the cost of living even higher.

I'd like to ask the Premier, will he release the terms of reference or any other documents that tell Nova Scotians what options the carbon pricing working group of Nova Scotia is considering, today - will he tell Nova Scotians and show them in writing what they're working on?

THE PREMIER « » : I want to thank the honourable member for the question. It's wonderful to hear a Progressive Conservative Leader finally recognizing that climate change is an issue and that we all have a role to play in it.

I want to thank the hard-working Nova Scotians who have led the country in GHG reductions across Canada. I made it very clear to the national government that that effort needs to be recognized, the work that we've been doing in this province. We believe we have a solution to help not only a further reduction in greenhouse gases in this province, but also to help the national government achieve its overall carbon reduction. We're going to continue to negotiate that, Mr. Speaker, and before any changes are made, we will make sure we communicate that to Nova Scotians.

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MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hope that when the Premier is patting himself on the back for Nova Scotia's good record on reducing emissions and putting in place strong regulations on climate change, he is actually taking credit for a Progressive Conservative initiative that this Party brought in, which caused real reductions in carbon emissions without taxing Nova Scotians more. That initiative was done in concert with promoting a growing economy and real jobs as well as carbon reductions.

I'd like to ask the Premier, since he won't show Nova Scotians what he's really up to with his carbon pricing working group, will he confirm today that he's at least asked them to consider the jobs and the cost of living and the economic impact of carbon pricing on the Province of Nova Scotia?

THE PREMIER « » : First of all, I want to correct something for the honourable member. I wasn't taking credit for it. I was giving Nova Scotians credit for it - something the honourable member might want to think about once in a while. It's not about him. It's about Nova Scotians. That's why we're in this place.

Furthermore, Mr. Speaker, the record of those two governments (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The honourable Premier has the floor.

THE PREMIER « » : It's good to hear the member for Pictou East finally standing up for his Leader. He spent all summer going behind his back. (Interruptions)

I want to say something, Mr. Speaker. Under those two Parties, power rates have risen 62 per cent in this province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: CAP-AND-TRADE SYSTEM - UPDATE

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, if the Premier wants to make it about the people of Nova Scotia, he can be direct and honest with them right now about what his working group is up to. He says no carbon taxes will come from the people of Nova Scotia, but he knows full well that cap-and-trade would also cost the people of Nova Scotia more.

Will he tell the people directly today that he is not looking at imposing a second form - a hidden form - of tax on the people of Nova Scotia by introducing a cap-and-trade system?

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THE PREMIER « » : The only hidden tax that was put on Nova Scotians was done by that Party when it came to power rates.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, it was the Premier who told Nova Scotians, when he was running, that he was against the efficiency tax on our power bills - only to get into office and make it a hidden tax instead of getting rid of it altogether. It is the Premier who likes hidden taxes. He proved it when he took the efficiency tax, which was at least open and transparent, and hid it within our power bills.

Now he says he's against carbon tax, but he won't deny that he'll look at a hidden form of carbon tax called cap-and-trade carbon pricing. Is he going to do cap-and-trade carbon pricing to drive up the costs for Nova Scotians, yes or no?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member. I want to congratulate the Minister of Energy for the tremendous work he's doing to stabilize energy rates across this province. Neither one of those two Parties can stand up in this House and say they've stabilized energy rates. All they can say is that they've grown by 30 or 40 per cent under their watch.

Let me be clear. This government will stand up for Nova Scotians. We know we have a role to continue to help the national government achieve its carbon pricing, and we will do so. We will do so in a fair, thoughtful way, and we will communicate that to Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

HEALTH & WELLNESS - NURSING HOMES: CUTS - CLARIFICATION

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, over the summer my caucus released a detailed breakdown of the Liberal cuts to nursing homes and residential care facilities that was obtained through a freedom of information request. Through conversations with nursing homes around the province, it became clear that the numbers we were given were incomplete and that the cuts were much worse - in some cases, almost double.

For example, documents that government provided said that Saint Vincent's Nursing Home in Halifax was $65,000. The administration at the facility said it was actually $128,000. Can the minister explain the difference between the numbers the government provided us and the actual cuts reported by long-term care facilities across the province?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : What I'm pleased to tell Nova Scotians, Mr. Speaker, is that we now have over $800 million invested both in long-term care and in home care in this province. We are now working to look after our seniors where they want to be looked after. What we're hearing, first and foremost, is to get the care they need in their own home, and our plan is working and effective in that way.

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MR. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, for those listening at home or in the gallery, that's a prime example of not coming close to answering the question.

The government provided us information about the cuts they made on nursing homes and care facilities across the province. When we fact-checked that with the facilities, those numbers were wrong, they were inaccurate, and they did not provide the accurate information.

What is the government hiding? Why would they not tell us, through freedom of information if they want to be a transparent and open government like the Premier said before the election, why were we given on set of numbers which were completely untrue, Mr. Speaker?

MR. GLAVINE « » : I know in terms of what was presented, we had a 1 per cent cut in the previous fiscal year, 1 per cent this year. What has been provided to the Opposition through the Freedom of Information Officer is an accurate picture of the cut for 2016-17 fiscal year.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings North.

AGRIC.: CARBON TAXES - IND. EFFECT

MR. JOHN LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture. The Federation of Agriculture represents 2,400 farm businesses representing all aspects of agriculture in our province. The vision of the federation is for a sustainable future for our farming communities in Nova Scotia and a profitable and competitive one.

My question for the minister is this: Will the minister admit that Liberal carbon taxes will put our agriculture industry at a competitive disadvantage?

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : Indeed, it's an important question. I think the Premier has already answered the question on that. Thank you.

MR. LOHR « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm not sure what to think about that answer. I'm not sure I heard the Premier clearly on that.

Last Spring, the Federation of Agriculture wrote the government and asked that the Liberal Government exempt Nova Scotia agriculture from any future carbon tax pricing - and I will table that letter. The letter said that additional costs of carbon pricing will impact farmers, increase the price of their products, will prevent new farm businesses from seeing Nova Scotia as a viable place to do business – and we know that is what happened in British Columbia, Mr. Speaker.

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Mr. Speaker, my question for the minister - and I hope I will get a more substantive answer - will the minister commit today to giving farmers and consumers a break by exempting agriculture from any carbon tax?

MR. COLWELL « » : Thank you very much for the question. I'll refer that to the Premier.

THE PREMIER « » : Just in case the honourable member missed it earlier, British Columbia has introduced a carbon tax - I made it clear that this government will not be introducing a carbon tax in this province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

BUS. - JOB CREATION: CONCRETE EFFORTS - TIMELINE

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Business.

Too many Nova Scotians are struggling to make ends meet. Robert Hunt, a partner with Grant Thornton, said most people aren't living extravagant lives, they simply don't make enough money to keep up with the cost of living. Job losses in Alberta's oil industry have also hurt many Nova Scotians - they moved back home, and they have either lost their EI or it is running out and they have nowhere to turn.

We need to know: When will the minister take concrete action to create jobs so people can get ahead in this province?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : I thank my colleague for the question. I think the terminology used, the concrete component of her question is critically important. We are laying the foundation for economic growth, Mr. Speaker. We are creating an environment where businesses can be successful.

The business community has told us, as government you have to get out of the way and let us lead. We're working with the government to create that foundation, that concrete foundation, and the private sector is stepping up.

MS. MACFARLANE « » : I thank the minister for his answer. We also need the government to step up, too. We know there are too many young Nova Scotians who are struggling in this province; on average, 1,200 to 1,300, somewhere in their 20s, are leaving the province on an annual basis and they are going to other provinces to find work - I'll actually table that stat.

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Worse yet, those who often stay are underemployed. We often go into places like Tim Hortons, McDonald's and we see tons of people in their 20s with an X ring working. The Halifax Partnership reports that more than 40 per cent of employed university degree-holders, ages 25 to 34, work in jobs not even requiring a degree.

How many of our best and brightest young people do we have to lose before the minister comes up with a real plan tailored to this age group?

MR. FUREY « » : One of the responsibilities within the Department of Business is to align government Crown agencies and government departments along economic growth strategies and visions. Mr. Speaker, this government is doing that. There are 1,500 new youth employed in the civil service through a number of government programs. The Graduate to Opportunity program is one example. We've eliminated the requirement for two years of experience for new graduates. Those continue to grow numbers of youth employment in government, and we'll continue with that strategy, laying a concrete foundation for success.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

ENVIRON.: APPROVAL PROCESS - MIN. SATISFACTION

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : My question is for the Minister of Environment. A growing number of Nova Scotians are raising concerns about the current environmental approval process. Fishers, First Nations, quarry opponents, and many more have recently expressed frustration about this issue. Unfortunately, it seems many are losing faith in this process, as we saw yesterday with the protesters. I'd like to ask the minister if she is satisfied with the process and believes that it's working in the best interest of Nova Scotians.

HON. MARGARET MILLER « » : Certainly the environmental approval process is very intricate. We deal in facts and science-based evidence when making any approvals. I think that we really do have a good process, and we'll continue with that.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, groups and individuals who have gone through the process, however, are raising questions about their ability to meaningfully participate. People have concerns about many aspects of the process, from access to information, to notice requirements, to consultation. These concerns, if unaddressed, threaten the credibility of decisions made by the minister. I'd like to ask the minister if her department would consider making changes to the environmental approval process.

MS. MILLER « » : The environmental approval process is very detailed and very important, certainly. Part of that process allows any group to come forward with any information that they can present as part of the environmental approval moving forward. Every group does have the opportunity to bring any evidence forward, and that will all be considered in any decisions that are made.

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MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

PREM.: STUDENT DEBT FORGIVENESS - DETAILS

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : My question is for the Premier. In yesterday's Throne Speech, the government made the very interesting statement that if a student finishes their university degree in four years, their provincial student debt is forgiven. That got the attention of students. I had a lot of calls last night. Students want to know when this started and where they apply. I'll ask the Premier today, where do students apply to have their provincial student debt forgiven?

THE PREMIER « » : It's one of the first acts this government did, Mr. Speaker. We recognized that unlike the former NDP Government, which is talking about free tuition across the board, we were going to recognize those hard-working Nova Scotians who achieved a four-year degree and that we would forgive the Nova Scotia student loan portion of that. I would encourage them to reach out to the Department of Labour and Advanced Education.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Many people think it's just the interest, but apparently today it's the principal and interest on that. Maybe the Premier can table some analysis of how many students have taken advantage of this because clearly not many students know about it. Maybe the Premier will table for the House how many students are taking advantage, what the cost has been, and how it has helped them.

THE PREMIER « » : There is no interest, Mr. Speaker, we did away with charging interest to student loans. Again, I would encourage any student out there who has graduated with a four-year degree to reach out to the Department of Labour and Advanced Education through that process. If the honourable member has names and he wants to forward them to the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education, I'm sure she would be happy to facilitate that through the department.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

NAT. RES.: MINING IND. - FUEL TAX REBATE

HON. PAT DUNN « » : My question is for the Minister of Natural Resources. This Liberal Government promised to give members of the Nova Scotia mining industry a fuel tax rebate in its 2015 budget. The industry pays $2.6 million in gas tax. Since then this government has backed away from the promise, and a survey of mining association members shows that miners worry that the promise may never be kept.

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My question to the minister is, will the minister give members of the mining industry a straight answer today - will miners get the promised fuel tax rebate?

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : The mining industry in Nova Scotia today is enjoying an extreme renaissance. We have three active mine programs going on in the province: Moose River, an excellent project scheduled to come on stream next year with over 100 people working there as we speak today, of which 98 of them are Nova Scotians; we have Donkin looming in the background; and we have the mine at Dufferin Mines coming back on stream. Our mining industry is in great shape in this province.

MR. DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, that's a David Price curveball. I was looking for a fastball. (Interruptions)

MR SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Pictou Centre has the floor.

MR. DUNN « » : Again, Mr. Speaker, I was looking for a straight answer, like a fastball, right down the middle of that plate. But anyway, moving on here, members of Nova Scotia's mining industry used 16 million litres of gas per year. A carbon tax of 7 or 11 cents per litre would cost the industry about $1 million more and obviously kill jobs.

My question to the minister is, will the minister reassure members of Nova Scotia's mining industry that they will be excluded from the Liberal carbon tax?

MR. HINES « » : I must say that our great friends in the mining industry are close partners of developing Nova Scotia and creating economic development, and we value that relationship greatly. If the member opposite was listening, he would have heard what our Premier said about carbon taxation. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

EECD: HUB SCH. MODEL - PARAMETERS

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : The hub school model is an opportunity to use innovative partnerships to keep education and children in the heart of their communities. These schools become a focal point for community activities.

Now despite having dedicated volunteers, broad community support and well-developed plans, there has been not one community able to get a hub school approved yet because they say it is impossible under the parameters set by the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development.

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Now my question for the minister is this, I know she has been spoken to and that she has finally said she is open to changing the parameters - so would she please tell the House today what exact actions she plans to take?

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : In response to the question, when the whole notion of hub school was contemplated, it came when the NDP were in power. They started talking about hub schools, had no idea what the definition was, had no idea what the criteria should be, but thought that everybody should have one.

The first step we took as a government was first of all to identify and define hub school and then to set the criteria. We are currently working through that process.

MS. ZANN « » : At a recent meeting of the Human Resources Committee, Bob Fowler, the chairman of the province's School Review Committee, told us that if we truly want hub school models, if we want to try one, there probably needs to be some sort of transition process.

Mr. Speaker, the year before that, in 2015, Mr. Fowler said the province wasn't showing leadership on the file. So far the Education and Early Childhood Development Minister and Premier have left rural communities to fend for themselves instead of providing the necessary supports to get the hub model moving in Nova Scotia.

My question for the minister is, could she please just tell Nova Scotians today what she and her government will do to put support in place for hub schools in this province?

MS. CASEY « » : I'd like to remind the member and all members in the House that the decision about hub schools and the proposal that a community brings forward does not come to the minister, it does not come to the Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. It comes to the school board, because it is a partnership and a proposal has to be supported by the school board. I do not see them; it's not in the legislation for me to review them. It certainly is a responsibility of the communities to work with their school boards, and the final decision about hub schools and whether the proposal is accepted or not is one from the school board.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

EECD: FRANK H. MACDONALD ELEM. SCH. - RENOVATION INFO.

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is also for the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. The renovations at Frank H. MacDonald Elementary School in East Pictou are something that the community desperately needs. The community wants them; it has been a high priority for the school board and on their list for the last couple of years. I know we have a capital budget that will probably come up over the next couple of months. I wonder if the minister can give a little bit of hope to the people of the communities that maybe this renovation may finally start to take place.

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HON. KAREN CASEY « » : To the member opposite, my answer was the same in a question that was asked in the previous session - I believe it gave some hope. It certainly is clear that we will be announcing any capital projects in the Fall; that's the normal time of year when the capital projects are announced. I have indicated to the member opposite that Frank H. MacDonald is certainly a high priority for the board, they have identified that. We know there is a transition plan that does involve closing a large school, accommodating kids in a smaller school, and making the necessary renovations so that it can accommodate a junior high population. I would ask the member to stay tuned.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I do thank the minister for that. It is a priority for the board; it's also a priority for the community because it's a necessary renovation. Kids are really deserving of this and so are the families. So since it's a priority for the board, it's a priority for the communities, and I think I'm hearing it's a priority for the department - I will stay tuned on that one. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

FIN. & TREASURY BD.: BANKRUPTCIES - INCREASE EXPLAIN

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board. Personal bankruptcies in Nova Scotia - 5,500 Nova Scotians have filed for bankruptcy this year. That's up 37 per cent in 2016, which is the highest rate in the country. Insolvency trustees point to Nova Scotia's poor economy as a result of a reason for these bankruptcies.

My question for the minister is, if this government's plan to grow the economy is working, why do we see evidence that it is not working in these increased bankruptcies?

HON. RANDY DELOREY » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the member for the important question. Impacts of such events in a person's life, personal bankruptcy, is certainly a very concerning experience to go through for any individual. With respect to the circumstances for each individual that is facing the situation nationally, the changes that have affected the economy, particularly in the resource sector, have affected many Canadians right across this country. People in Nova Scotia were not immune to that. Thank you.

MR. MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, yesterday in the Throne Speech we heard something that appears positive on the surface, and that is the government offering a down-payment assistance pilot program to get more Nova Scotians to be able to own homes. Certainly on the surface it sounds good, but did we not learn any lessons from the housing crisis a few years back in the stock-market crash in 2008?

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When people buy homes and can't afford them, they soon discover they have to pay property taxes, they have maintenance costs, they have to purchase home insurance, and they have to pay interest on a mortgage. If this government has thought this through, I will ask the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board, how would a 1 per cent increase in interest rates affect his monthly family budget?

MR. DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I do thank the member opposite for his question. I think if I heard him correctly, what he has just done is indicated his support for the federal Liberal Government's recent changes to mortgage rules. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

NAT. RES.: CLEAR-CUTTING PLAN - UPDATE

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Natural Resources. On May 8, 2015, the member for Yarmouth, who was then the Minister of Natural Resources, stood before this House and told us that the province was on track to reduce clear-cutting to no more than 50 per cent of all harvests. Just over one year later, Nova Scotians were shocked to hear that the current Minister of Natural Resources announced the government was stepping away from the 50 per cent target set out in the Natural Resources Strategy. My question for the minister is, if we were on track just a year ago, why has this plan been derailed?

HON. LLOYD HINES « » : I want to assure Nova Scotians that we have taken the halfway point in our strategy to take a look at and realign our strategy perhaps. There has been no decision to take the action that he is talking about. We have listened to Nova Scotians, and we're following science-based decision-making. The fact is that full-tree harvesting in Nova Scotia accounts for less than 4 per cent of the total harvest in the province.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, please allow me one more pun. Apparently, the minister can't see the forest for the trees.

The Natural Resources Strategy is a result of extensive consultation over a long period of time. It is not simply a policy, a document, of a former government. Since the minister's announcement, our caucus and the NDP constituency offices have received plenty of correspondence from Nova Scotians who were disappointed by this government's decision.

We know the level of in-depth consultation that was undertaken to establish the 50 per cent target. I ask the minister, who did he consult with in deciding to step away from such a target?

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MR. HINES « » : Again, I'm very proud of the transparent process that we have in the department for consulting with Nova Scotians. We have the forest viewer, and I would invite members to go online and look at the proposed cuts, where they are in Nova Scotia, and when they are going to occur. This is the first time that's available in Nova Scotia. That's transparency. That's telling people the truth.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

COM. SERV.: CHILD PROTECTION SERV. - TREATMENT

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : First of all, I want to acknowledge the need to make changes in the Department of Community Services. Second of all, I want to acknowledge the need for children to be protected within our society.

I have been working with a family now for about a year. They are involved in child protection services. I have had numerous conversations with them, and I feel that there is a need to go a little bit further in their case. But with all that has been done, I don't think family healing is really taking place.

I know that part of the mandate is to make sure that families are healing properly. My question to the minister is, how can we as a political body ensure that families are being treated in a healthy way rather than in a derisive way?

HON. JOANNE BERNARD « » : I thank my colleague for that very thoughtful question. I know he's very passionate about child welfare, as am I and many people in this House.

It is a very difficult time when children are taken into care and families are in crisis. We have to understand as politicians and as people in this House that we have a responsibility to protect children in Nova Scotia and across the country. They are our most vulnerable citizens. There are experts who work within the department and within government who assess the needs of every family that comes into contact with the government. Protecting children and making sure that they're supported and that families are supported is always a priority, and we will continue to make it a priority.

MR. HARRISON « » : I would like to offer something. When I was in palliative care at the hospital, there was a team, and we would meet every so often. We would take that situation and bring in all the people who were involved in it. I'm wondering if it would be possible, every couple of months or whatever, to have the team of psychologists and therapists and Community Services - everyone involved in the case - sit down and say, what do we need to do next for this family? Is that a possibility?

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MS. BERNARD « » : Case conferencing, which is what you're referring to, actually does happen within the Department of Community Services and child welfare. It is made up of the professionals that you just mentioned. One of the reasons why it was so important to upgrade the Children and Family Services Act is to make sure that we get to families before a period of crisis to make sure they are supported before children are taken into care.

This government has invested incredibly into child welfare across this province - $2 million a year for family resource centres, over $1 million just last year to take parenting journeys from 12 to 27 sites in Nova Scotia. Those are the tools, those are the techniques we have in our arsenal to really help families before they get to a point of crisis.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

HEALTH & WELLNESS: OPERATIONAL COSTS - DETAILS

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health and Wellness. On Wednesday we learned from the Auditor General that the Nova Scotia Health Authority had to take $7 million from a restricted fund to cover operational costs such as payroll, this despite the fact that the Department of Health and Wellness owed the Health Authority over $70 million. On top of this, the Auditor General pointed out that the Department of Health and Wellness came in $31 million under budget last year.

I'd like to ask the minister, how could this possibly take place under his watch?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to say that we advance every two weeks over $60 million for operations. We all know - or maybe we don't - that there's in fact a considerable amount of invoicing back to the department, especially during the transition to the one Health Authority and that's where the $70 million factor came in for 30 days, 60 days, maybe some even at 90 days.

What we really need to be celebrating is that the Health Authority, in its first year, not only looked after the $29 million deficit that was on their books, they also came in at $31 million under, for a $70 million saved in the first year of operations.

MR. DAVID WILSON « » : What we can't celebrate is the work of the Department of Health and Wellness and the minister and this government. They had to take money and funds from a restricted fund to cover operational costs, so it doesn't matter if they give $50 million a month, $60 million a month, $70 million a month, they didn't have enough money to make payroll. How can that happen when the government says they are here trying to streamline operations and the Health Authority has to remove money from restricted funds?

I'd like to ask the Minister of Health and Wellness - we hear of some of the crises in health care right now - has the government paid back the $70 million, and will we see the Health Authority having to dip into restricted funds to cover operational funds in the future?

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MR. GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to inform the member opposite, who has asked a good question, that these funds have been repaid. Also we accept, and NSHA fully accepts, the recommendation of the Auditor General. Again I would point out, look at the extremely strong work being done by the Health Authority because there is more good work to be announced that the Health Authority is doing.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Northside-Westmount.

BUS.: CRISIS FUNDING - PLANNING

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Business. The Canadian Payroll Association reports that 59 per cent of Atlantic Canadians are now living paycheque to paycheque. Furthermore, 33 per cent of Atlantic Canadians will find it hard to come up with $2,000 in case of emergency. We see this today in Cape Breton. When we're faced with a crisis, families have fewer and fewer choices because of how the province has managed our economy.

My question to the minister is, what specific steps has the Liberal Government taken to prevent Nova Scotians from having to make this devastating choice?

HON. MARK FUREY « » : It has really been a change in discussion, and the attitude towards economic growth. We know that the former strategies couldn't work. We've had extensive discussions within government and outside of government. We've brought the private sector into government to lead those discussions, and things are changing.

I'll give you one example, Mr. Speaker. A small business in my community, an electrical company, looking for an opportunity to grow, reached into their employees and raised $1 million to build an expansion to hire more people and provide employment opportunities to Nova Scotians. This is happening across the province. It's a change in discussion; it's a change in attitude. We have turned the corner, and there's a bright, prosperous future for this province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for Oral Questions Put by Members to Ministers has expired.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

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GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to continue on where I left off yesterday in my Address in Reply. I'm going to do a quick time check on my remaining time. I've got a lot to cover. Perhaps while that's going on, I'll begin.

Yesterday the weakest Throne Speech in our nation's history was tabled here in the Legislature. It's hard to believe that the government brought the Lieutenant Governor here to this House when they had so little to say. In fact, I think the government owes the Lieutenant Governor an apology for bothering him, when he could be out meeting Nova Scotians, to bring him here to read a speech that was so thin on any vision, on any plan, even on addressing the most basic problems of our province - whether it's jobs, getting the cost of living down, hiring more doctors, or addressing our mental health crisis. In 16 pages, barely a mention of these major issues that the people of Nova Scotia expect us to be working on here. That's why I say to you that we really have the weakest Throne Speech ever delivered.

If you need more proof, today - the first day after the Throne Speech - the government didn't have a single bill to bring to this House. They gave us 45 days' notice that we'd be coming into session. If they had any idea what they wanted to do, you'd think we would see the agenda rolling out here today, Mr. Speaker. Not a single government bill with all that notice. It tells me, and I think anyone watching, that the government has no idea where to take the province, no idea where to take jobs and the economy, and no ideas on what to do about our health care system, on doctors. They are making it up as they go along.

Perhaps that's why they wanted to try to wipe the slate clean with the new Throne Speech yesterday. A lot of good legislation was wiped away when the government prorogued the session and brought in the new Throne Speech. That's why we are so busy here in Opposition, introducing and reintroducing real business for this House to consider, whether it's bills on the Ivany goals, which obviously they've shredded on the government side; bills on mental health, to get adolescent mental health supports into our schools; bills to get more doctors, particularly into rural areas like Cape Breton or Weymouth; or bills to protect a family's education savings from bankruptcy so that children are not penalized for the sins of their parents. Even, God love them, the NDP brought in a few bills today to put on the agenda.

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Only the Liberal Government, the ones responsible for bringing business to this House, had nothing new to bring to the Legislature today, Mr. Speaker. As you know, and as I hope people who are watching the proceedings know, that means that for today and for the start of next week the government will have no business on the floor of the Legislature.

We will, of course, continue to debate the Throne Speech, but we're debating the weakest and thinnest Throne Speech in history - perhaps the weakest Throne Speech in the history of the British parliamentary system - for day after day while all these real issues go unresolved, or even unaddressed.

They're trying to wipe the slate clean, and no wonder. The slate was full of an awfully long list of mistakes and errors and stumbling on issue after issue that have hurt Nova Scotia families, that have cost Nova Scotians their jobs in some cases, in other cases their quality of life - no wonder they wanted to wipe the slate clean. What the government missed is that when you try to wipe the slate clean, as any teacher will tell you, if you don't write something new on the chalkboard, then the old stuff still shows through.

The fact is that this government's record has been one of stumbling from mistake after mistake, from venturing into important areas, whether it's Pharmacare or our nursing homes or our film industry, without understanding how they really work, without listening to what the people who work there every day - or live there, in the case of nursing homes - actually experience - and bullying in and trying to make changes, but actually making things worse.

Another good example of a giant mistake: they brought in a statute of limitations that was meant to protect engineers and accountants and others who get sued when they make mistakes, but they didn't think through what they were doing. At first they actually provided protection for sexual predators as well, and for people who are accused of awful sexual assaults, especially on young boys and girls. They were extending protection to them as well. It was only through the work of the member for Inverness from the Opposition PC caucus that they finally found the error of their ways.

But there are too many examples where they made mistakes that hurt people that remain mistakes that continue to hurt people to this day. These are the people of Nova Scotia that the government forgot in their Throne Speech yesterday - or left out of their Throne Speech.

Let me give you an example. Bill VanGorder is a strong advocate for Nova Scotia seniors. He is chair of the Canadian Association of Retired Persons for Nova Scotia. He was called in to the Department of Seniors and the Department of Health and Wellness and asked about Pharmacare. In good faith, he gave his own opinion about how important it was, only to find out later that government was jacking up Seniors' Pharmacare premiums, in some cases by 200 per cent, without regard for seniors' ability to pay. He was taken completely by surprise.

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When the government said they had consulted with Mr. VanGorder and others, he felt betrayed. He lost any trust in this government to manage an important part of our health care system like the Pharmacare Program. The government tried to make it up to Mr. VanGorder by promising they would consult with representatives of seniors this year, in the coming months, to quote the Minister of Health and Wellness, "from one end of this province to the other," before coming forward with changes for the next budget.

Well, we know they're working on that next budget now. We're now well into October of this year. Those consultations have not happened. No wonder seniors who rely on the Pharmacare Program have lost all trust in the government to look after their interests. No wonder they lost all trust in this government to look after their interests when it only came out under questioning in this House that the government's own analysis, which they kept to themselves, showed that 8,000 to 15,000 seniors would drop out of the Pharmacare Program because of the premium cost and go without their medicines altogether - and this government was prepared to accept that, in the interest of getting more money in their pockets.

There is nothing in the Throne Speech to restore that faith, that trust of seniors in this government on a program as important as Pharmacare, which is a very important part of our Medicare system. Mr. VanGorder wasn't mentioned in the Throne Speech. His groups that he represents weren't mentioned in the Throne Speech. They have lost all trust in this government.

They continue to leave seniors un-consulted. They continue to leave seniors wondering what is going to happen to them next, whether in their pocketbooks or in their ability to afford the medicines that they need.

That's one example, and you can be sure that we will be bringing to this House, over and over, the voice of seniors who rely on that Pharmacare Program before the next budget comes out, to make sure that they are not attacked again for financial reasons by a government that doesn't care if thousands of them have to drop out of the program and go without the medicines they need.

The Throne Speech had nothing to say to the thousands of Nova Scotian seniors who are living in the nursing homes of the province - and, I might add, nothing to say to the family members, the sons and daughters and grandsons and granddaughters who care very much about the conditions that they live in, particularly the food that they are provided with, the dignity of life that they expect and deserve, Mr. Speaker. That group of people, seniors in nursing homes and their families, left behind by this government.

In fact, people like Trudie Helmke, Howard Bonnell, Bob Ennis, all residents at Northwood Nursing Home, just a few kilometres from this House, who spoke up very bravely about how in just the last few years since this government came to power that the quality of life, the dignity that they expect to be treated with, has declined. That Minister of Health and Wellness, this government they sent letters to most of the nursing homes of the province instructing them to cut their budgets, leaving them with no choice but to cut important things like the quality of the food that they serve to our seniors, the number of nursing and other care staff that are on the floors to help seniors that have extra needs.

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Those jobs are being cut; that quality of life is being cut; and those food budgets are being cut as we speak. But, for Trudy Helmke and Howard Bonnell and Bob Ennis, the government has nothing to say to them, because rather than actually help them out they're content to try and wipe the slate clean and move on.

It is not fair to move on from seniors in nursing homes who are now eating three meals a day capped out at $5.60 in many cases, and this is not only (Interruption) The Minister of Health and Wellness should get out of his office and see what's going on because I can tell you High-Crest nursing home in Springhill, the exact same thing is going on; all the MacLeod Group homes, exact same thing going on because of his letter to them directing them what to do; and the GEM homes, the exact same thing going on. This is going on in nursing home after nursing home after nursing home.

The Minister of Health and Wellness only cares if it makes the media. Northwood made the media - the others may be suffering more quietly, but they are suffering nonetheless. And rather than blame Northwood for speaking up, he should actually see what's going on in the other nursing homes of the province because - you know what? - he should take that letter back; he should put that part of the budget back in place; and he should show our seniors and their families that it is not okay with him that they are being forced to feed our seniors on $5.60 a day. It is wrong. There is no cut or savings that is worth it to force our parents and grandparents into that kind of daily indignity. But he is not going to do that - he already had his chance; he already said no, those cuts will go forward, seniors will get what they get, they'll be happy to have it.

Let's call it what it is, Mr. Speaker. In nursing homes, including Northwood, they are now telling us they can't afford fresh fruits and vegetables - they can't even buy fresh tomatoes at current pricing. God help a senior in a nursing home if they'd like a fresh, healthy meal because instead they are forced to eat from the cheapest options – and I can give you one that was very meaningful to me in my own tour around.

We are now seeing seniors in nursing homes who have noticed that even their mashed potatoes are substandard and, when you look into it, you find out they're not getting real mashed potatoes anymore. Because of the minister's letter instructing them to cut, they get those powdered mashed potatoes that some of us remember from our own childhoods. I certainly do. They're God-awful. I still can't even think about a powdered mashed potato today.

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I see the minister chuckling. I hope that he knows what he's actually directing our nursing homes to serve to our seniors and how easy it would be for him to stop that with the stroke of a pen if he wanted to.

For Trudie Helmke and Howard and Bob, for all those seniors who know something has gone horribly wrong in the last few years about the quality of life that is provided them in our nursing homes, the government may not want to talk about it anymore. They might want to wipe the slate clean on their horrible record of the treatment of seniors. We are not going to let that happen. We're going to hear a lot more in this House about why the government is okay with what they have done to seniors on Pharmacare and to seniors in our nursing homes.

I know over here we looked all through the Throne Speech for some signal that the government finally gets it, that finally we would see real action on one of the great health care crises of our time. Every family in this province is dealing with mental illness, either directly or as a caregiver, as a worried parent, as a worried son or daughter of a grandparent. For three sessions of this House, we have brought forward ideas, solutions, and plans to begin to address this massive issue, only to be turned away by the government, by the Premier himself and by the Minister of Health and Wellness. What do we get in this Throne Speech? About one line where the government pats itself on the back for the amount of money it is spending in mental health. It doesn't say whether that's up or down. The fact is, it's a cut from previous spending in mental health - of all things cutting mental health delivery spending at a time when the need is so great.

We keep giving them chances, session after session, to do something meaningful in mental health delivery. Yesterday, we found out there's still no plan. There's no public inquiry to bring everybody together to address this issue. There's no new spending or investment in mental health. There's nothing new for our classrooms in mental health. There's nothing new for our seniors who are slipping into dementia and the caregivers who look after them.

They have wiped the slate clean on any attempt to provide real relief from mental illness. We continue to push the government to take this great issue seriously. I want to do that again today with this opportunity in the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

No one could make the case more eloquently for the need to invest in our mental health delivery system than a family that has dealt with it, particularly a mom who has lost a son. Mr. Speaker, I want to share with you and the House an obituary that appeared in the Valley papers a year ago. I suspect the Minister of Health and Wellness knows this situation.

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A woman named Laura Fowler lost her son Jackson to depression a year ago. I met Laura. She was one of the bravest moms you could ever meet because Laura decided, after she lost her son to the mental illness of depression, that she was going to write an obituary that was direct, truthful, and blunt about what happened to her son. Mr. Speaker, you can just imagine a mom writing her 20-year-old son's obituary and being very clear about why she lost him. She says, in her words, I think the most eloquent and the most powerful things about why we need to move to make real improvements in our mental health system. I will share that with the House, and then I will table this.

Jackson Fowler, age 20, from Kingston. "Jackson sadly struggled with mental health issues; most dominant was his severe depression for many years of his short life. With the love of his family, he tried all available avenues for support and various out reach programs; but with the lack of proper resources "the system" was fleeting at best and sadly he fell through the cracks. Jackson struggled daily to make his happier days last, but on this fateful day he lost the fight to keep his deep darkness at bay and the pain of his struggle to stop. Seeing no other solace from his pain, he had sadly chosen to end his own life, Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015. He did not do this out of selfishness or of a need to hurt anyone; he loved us all and knew that he was loved. We were what was keeping him together; yet it wasn't enough and he needed more, but there was not enough help available here to do that. . . . Depression is not something to "shove under the carpet" it needs to be recognized and dealt with accordantly (sic) and with compassion. So many people of all ages, suffer from depression and don't know where to turn for help without the stigma of judgment. In Jackson's memory it is time for that to change!

Mr. Speaker, I'll table that and I'll encourage every member to take a moment and reflect on a mom who chose to write that and share it with the world in the hope that real improvements could be made to our mental health delivery system.

Mr. Speaker, I have said this over and over, and I want to say it again. I implore the government to bring to this House real investments, real reform, a real plan to ensure that every Nova Scotian who is a sufferer of mental illness and every caregiver who struggles to help them gets covered, gets the help they need, gets the medications they can have to make their life better, gets the counselling we have today that can take a struggling person and put them back on the road to healing and good mental health.

Mr. Speaker, bring that plan forward and we will support anything reasonable that reaches that objective. All I ask is that when we bring them forward instead of turning them down on the spot because they came from the Opposition, which is what has happened time after time in this House, pass it. If it takes some financial investment to make our system whole in this province, we'll support it. Bring it here.

This is one of the greatest health care challenges of our time. We are proud, as Canadians, of our health care system overall, despite the many challenges and stresses and strains that we see in it. We want it to cover mental illness as well, starting with prevention and early identification and early intervention in our schools and spreading across this province to everyone. Cover everyone, Mr. Speaker.

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If the government is truly hung up on the cost of such an ambitious solution to mental illness, I can only point out that you have the Official Opposition's support. I truly believe that with the modern medicines we have available, the modern counselling we have available, that the benefit of turning around struggling lives, young or old, facing down mental illness, the benefit of getting them the help they need and putting them back on a path to healing and good mental health, far outweighs the cost. It is the right thing to do.

Mr. Speaker, I'd just like to finish that part of my remarks by thanking Laura Fowler, a grieving mother, for having the courage to write that obituary, having the courage to share her pain with the province, having the courage to put in words what too many people can barely stand to even think about. Let's actually honour Laura Fowler and her son Jackson in the way she asks, in return, by actually dealing with the mental health crisis we see all around us.

Mr. Speaker, over the course of the summer we have continued to hear from Nova Scotians who do not have a family doctor. Alexander MacMillan from Pictou County is such a person. Alexander MacMillan lost his family doctor last February. His primary health care needs are now only provided at the emergency room or a walk-in clinic, and I'm going to tell you in a moment why that is such a tragedy.

First of all, Alexander MacMillan, like tens of thousands of Nova Scotians, heard the government, heard the Liberal Party, when they were campaigning and promised a doctor for every single Nova Scotian. Now, more often than not, when they call a doctor's office, Alexander MacMillan, like so many Nova Scotians, hears the same message: we're not taking patients at this time.

Mr. Speaker, I can tell you, you talk to the doctors of this province who know the extent of the problem - you can also talk to the employees at their practices, like the ones who answer the phone every day. One such person who works for Dr. AJ - who has been very eloquent in the pages of the newspapers, among other things - has told us that she is not sure she can take it anymore when the phone rings, knowing that it's likely to be someone asking to have a family doctor. They can't accommodate everyone. They are maxed out.

Dr. AJ practises here in Halifax, but - and here is how bad the situation is now - her clinic gets calls from Cape Breton, from Pictou County, from the South Shore, from Yarmouth and the Valley, from people so desperate, so in need of family medicine, that they are willing to drive hours and hours to the city to find a family doctor.

We know there are families even in Halifax that either are on waiting lists or are told that even the waiting list is now full and can't get a family doctor. They are going to our walk-in clinics - a band-aid solution at best, a band-aid the minister wants to rip off by limiting doctors' ability to even see patients in walk-in clinics, making the situation worse, and they end up in our emergency rooms.

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People like Alexander MacMillan deserve to have a family doctor, Mr. Speaker. They heard the Liberal promise and they see that it is now broken.

Let's be clear about what family doctors do. They get to know their patients. They can do preventive health care to stop chronic situations from getting worse, to prevent acute illness from setting in. Alexander MacMillan is in chronic pain and he needs very strong medication to manage that pain so he can get on with his life. That chronic pain medication is prescribed by his family doctor. He hasn't had a family doctor since February. He has to resort to the walk-in clinic, like at Sutherland Harris, except that has been closed down. What does he have left? He goes to the emergency room to get a prescription filled, waiting hours and hours, triaged with people with everything from car accidents to broken limbs, and now with literally thousands of other fellow Nova Scotians who also have family-related, primary medical needs, who are being driven to the emergency rooms.

This is a failure of management of our most basic parts of our public health care system by this government. Instead of addressing it in the Throne Speech and bringing forward a plan to get family doctors into the communities that need them, the government has nothing more to say. They want to wipe the slate clean. They want to move on. Well, Mr. Speaker, you can't move on from Alexander MacMillan. You can't move on from the 5,000 people in Weymouth who are without a family doctor. You can't move on from the tens of thousands of people in Cape Breton who are without a family doctor. We need more family doctors.

The government has the resources to make this happen, yet they choose not to. They point to the Health Authority. The senior vice-president of the Health Authority has said, well our plan is five to 10 years away. Tell that to Alexander MacMillan. Tell him, as the Minister of Health and Wellness and the government would say, sorry; I know what we promised. I'm sure that's awful for you, but we have this new Health Authority, and they'll have an answer in five or 10 years.

That's not good enough. That is not good enough.

Speaking of Liberal campaign promises, in our travels across Nova Scotia this summer, when people talked about jobs, the economy, and how things are going, one thing that comes up over and over again is that this is a beautiful province. It is, and I think we all agree on that. It's a beautiful province, but it's getting very expensive to live here. That is the voices of the people of Nova Scotia telling us here in the Legislature that they are struggling to meet the everyday cost of living. They're struggling to pay their bills.

Too many people are without jobs. The government has no jobs plan. People who have jobs - some families where there are two jobs and two paycheques coming in - still wonder, why is it that, at the end of the month, we aren't getting ahead? Why is it, after we pay the mortgage and the car payment and the power bill and the grocery bill and the daycare bill, we aren't getting ahead?

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In places like Hammonds Plains and in Sackville and in Truro and in Baddeck and in Amherst, there are families that have done everything that we've ever asked of them. They've gone to school. They got a good education. They went out and found jobs, and they're working. They're having kids, which is great. They always thought that when they did that, they would get ahead in this province, that they would have a few dollars to save for their own retirement or for a family vacation. Many, many, many of those families are wondering why, after all that effort, they're struggling to pay the bills.

You know what? They hear from their friends who they went to school with, who they graduated with, who are out West in Alberta or in Saskatchewan or in Ontario or wherever, that the taxes are lower, that the services are better, that the paycheques are higher. They wonder, should I do that as well? We can't have that, Mr. Speaker.

The cost of living in this province is a real issue. It is our taxes. It is our power rates. It is the cost of getting around, commuting to work, buying a home, heating your home. Yet the Throne Speech is silent on the cost of living. The government does not control all of those things, of course, but they can do something about some of them.

Take our sky-high taxes, for example. Just the day before yesterday, the Auditor General confirmed for all Nova Scotians that the tax burden per person in Nova Scotia has gone up $850 over the last number of years, $1,700 in a family - money that is not there for a family vacation, money that is not there for child care, money that is not there to save for a dignified retirement.

The government promised in their last election that they were going to study the tax system to make it better for people. Well they did do the studying, but our taxes kept going up and they have nothing more to say for it now. They want to wipe the slate clean on that promise as well.

They also promised they were going to bring our power rates down and that has not happened. They are up 3 per cent and they are going up another 1.5 per cent every year from now until 2020, when they are expected to go up by 6 per cent more. In case the government thinks that Nova Scotians have forgotten about their power promises, I can assure them that it comes up again and again as a real cost-of-living issue here in Nova Scotia.

For the government, which told them that they'd save $40 million in total because they were going to get rid of the efficiency tax, the shell game of hiding it in our power bill instead is not lost on Nova Scotians; they are smarter than the government gives them credit for. Nova Scotians are now starting to look up in the phone book where these competitors to Nova Scotia Power are that they were promised, so they can start to buy cheaper power from a competitor. Well do you know what? In Nova Scotia there are none, the monopoly is still there. If you are frustrated by your power bill you still have nowhere else to turn, despite what the government promised. This is a real cost-of-living issue.

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Rather than move on, as the government wants to do and wipe the slate clean on that promise as well, the government continues to have a chance to actually give people some relief on their power rates. Every session since the last election, and before, we have brought forward bill after bill to get rid of the guaranteed profit of Nova Scotia Power and force that company to earn their money the same as everybody else, through reasonable prices and good service. And yet, the government refuses to do anything about it, Mr. Speaker.

As long as the cost of living goes up, Nova Scotians are going to be looking for solutions to give them some relief on their taxes, as I mentioned, and on their power bills. As we saw from the Throne Speech yesterday, the government has nothing to say about it.

Mr. Speaker, one thing the government did mention in their Throne Speech is that they see there are Nova Scotians - presumably young Nova Scotians - who can't afford to buy a home and they want to presumably lend them the money to do that. Imagine a student graduating with $80,000 in debt on their student loans, looking for months and months for a job, finding that the job market is very weak. Yes, they would like to have a home, of course they would, and own it. The government's answer is, well we'll lend you more money, just driving them further into debt.

Why the government wants to get into the housing market is beyond me but if their answer is sorry, there's no job that pays you a decent living, sorry that our economy is so weak and we have no plans to kick-start it, sorry you can't afford to buy a house after you've paid your daily bills but we'll lend you some money on top of your student debts and put a Band-aid over that problem.

Mr. Speaker, let me just tell you, the best home-buying strategy that a government can bring in is a decent plan to create jobs. That's how we get young people into homes, and a decent plan to bring the cost of living down on their taxes and their power rates, where they actually can save up the down payment on their home, like many of us in this House had the ability to do when we were buying our first home because there was a job there at a decent level of pay to allow us to do that. Let's get back to that time.

Sorry, how much time do I have left, Mr. Speaker? Two minutes? Okay.

In my remaining few minutes, let me just say that, so far, the only action the government has taken on jobs that people can point to is to destroy jobs like those of the thousands of Nova Scotians who relied on the film and television and creative industry for their livelihoods. The fact is, they were making money, they were buying homes, they were saving up for their down payment, and they were having children and investing in the province. Now they've had the legs kicked out from under them by this government.

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Who has the government helped really? We now know who they've cost their livelihoods and their quality of life, but who have they helped? Well, the Liberal candidate from Pictou West who lost got a job, without any qualifications and without any competition, as the Chief Protocol Officer. That's a job that the government created. We now know that one of the people in the Premier's inner circle was given the green light to write her own job description to secure a job for herself without any competition, no other Nova Scotian need apply. For the first time in our province's history, we had a deputy minister who actually worked on a personal services contract to avoid Nova Scotia taxation, of all things, with Premier McNeil's okay. Now the government watches while $300,000 of taxpayer money is spent to send our richest Nova Scotians to school in Boston while our own tuition goes up.

No wonder they want to swipe the slate clean, but the slate is not clean. The slate is very dirty with a lot of mistakes and a lot of scandal. That's the real story of the Throne Speech.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party.

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : It's certainly an honour and a pleasure to address the Speech from the Throne. I just want to share with you some of the words from yesterday's Throne Speech, "We have come together today in this historic house, the oldest Legislature in the country, located on the traditional territory of the Mi'kmaq Nation, with whom we share a history and a common goal - to build a strong and great province." I think those are appropriate words to begin this speech.

Since coming to office, this government has been focused on one thing: its fiscal plan. The government has been committed to this plan at all costs. They would like us to ignore the negative impact of policy choices associated with this plan over the last three years. Mr. Speaker, I can tell you, we certainly will not.

In the Spring, the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board announced this year's budget which was accompanied by celebratory desk-thumping by the Liberal MLAs. Really, Mr. Speaker? The policy choices of this government have eroded our health care system, stranded the impoverished, forced workers to pack up and leave this province, and increased student debt, and the list goes on and on. Is this cause for celebration and back-patting? I believe not.

This Speech from the Throne further ignores the negative impact of policy choices of this government over the last three years. In Opposition, we are here to hold the government to account, and I can assure you we will. As I move through this response, I remind those across the aisle that this is no time for congratulations.

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The Throne Speech states that we have to strengthen our health care system. We all certainly agree with that. After three years of this government, there is a lot of work to be done. Since the government took office, ER closures have increased dramatically. As the MLA for Queens-Shelburne, who has documented ER closures at Roseway Hospital in this House, I know this all too well.

The Throne Speech states, "This government continues on the path to meet its goal of a doctor for every Nova Scotian," yet what was once primarily a rural issue has now become a province-wide issue under this government.

This government has spent years picking fights with health care workers and making cuts to the system. Doctors who may wish to practise in Nova Scotia will undoubtedly do their homework on the current state of health care in this province. I'm afraid they may not like what they see at this point in time.

The Throne Speech states, "Long-term care continues to be a priority for this government," yet the Spring budget cut more than $3.4 million from the operating budgets of long-term care facilities, impacting patients and staff. The government also eliminated all non-emergency capital funding for long-term care facilities. This is not a cause for celebration.

The Throne Speech states "experts have confirmed that income and employment impact people's health and lifestyle." Given this government's track record on these issues, this is worrisome. Job numbers are down while food bank usage is up. Numbers recently released by Stats Canada show that there are over 2,400 fewer jobs in the province compared to last year at this time. Furthermore, government has opposed our caucus' call for a meaningful increase in the minimum wage.

Meanwhile, Mr. Speaker, since 2013 we have witnessed 7,500 more people using food banks - a 20 per cent increase since the government took office. I'll repeat that: a 20 per cent increase since this government took office. In 2015, one-third of food bank users were children. Again, this is not a cause for celebration.

The Liberal Throne Speech says that the government has "made it a priority to ensure that more Nova Scotians have access to affordable housing," yet in the Spring this government walked away from the Bloomfield affordable housing project after two and a half years of stalling. Last year this government underspent on housing subsidies by just over $3.5 million. It underspent on housing renovations by $1.5 million, despite needs across our province. This government's record on these issues speaks for itself, and again, I emphasize that this is not cause for celebration.

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The Throne Speech states that the government "is acutely aware of the importance of retaining our youth," yet while other provinces are actively trying to reduce the debt load on post-secondary students, this government took the cap off tuition, increasing the financial burden on all students. Taking the cap off tuition has resulted in students facing the largest tuition fees increase in over a decade. Stats Can data clearly shows that under this government, tuition fees are increasing more rapidly than anywhere in the country. Not surprisingly, the population of Nova Scotians between the ages of 15 to 24 continues to decline under this government.

Mr. Speaker, the NDP caucus wants to make post-secondary education more affordable for students. We believe the first step on this path is to eliminate tuition at community colleges. The Throne Speech states that the government listens to teachers, but teachers are currently telling a different story. The government continues to tout all that it is doing to improve the education system, but teachers on the front lines feel that they are not being heard, and I repeat, not listened to. Our caucus is encouraging the government to stop patting itself on the back for what it has done and truly listen to the teachers and what they are saying. Listening has not been a strong suit for this government.

Again, the Throne Speech says, "We are better, and we are stronger, when we work together." Yet time and time again, individuals and groups have come forward, criticizing this government for failing to partake in meaningful consultation prior to making policy decisions. From fishers to First Nations to forestry workers, Nova Scotians are speaking out about a government that does not listen. Again, this is not a cause for celebration.

The film industry is all too aware of this government's track record on consultation. The Throne Speech says that this government will "help grow the creative economy by partnering with the film industry." Mr. Speaker, the film industry is still trying to recover from having their industry gutted by one swoop of this government's pen. And we are to believe that this government's comments in this speech are genuine?

It is important to remember that the policy choices that this government has made over the last three years have not been without consequences. The austerity agenda of this government has eroded the health care system and placed increasing pressures on our most vulnerable citizens. To carry out this agenda, it has shown an unwillingness to work with Nova Scotians on the issues that matter most. This is not a cause for celebration.

One of the interesting notes that I've seen personally in the last few weeks is the province's negotiations for a better deal on carbon tax. I say, I was shocked to learn that the Minister of Environment simply walked away from the table. There is one particular quote or phrase that I use many times. We're talking carbon tax here, but when you're not at the table, you may just be on the menu. I'm deeply concerned about the actions of the minister. The Minister of Environment's presence at the federal table has certainly brought up a number of concerns regarding the carbon pricing, and she simply insisted on walking away from that particular table.

[Page 80]

Mr. Speaker, I can assure you that the NDP is proposing that any carbon tax scheme needs to work for Nova Scotia. It must fulfill several criteria. It must outline that any price on carbon must be to reduce greenhouse gases, produce energy security for low-income and middle-income families and people living in rural areas investing in transitioning to green energy, and aim at a local job-creation plan. The NDP hard caps on greenhouse gases should be recognized as a success across our beautiful country of Canada.

I can assure you, Mr. Speaker, by walking away from the table, we may just be on the menu.

Also what is troubling in the last few months or days is nursing home layoffs, such as in Middleton, Nova Scotia - actually, in the Premier's home riding, if I'm correct. These layoffs that have been announced in nursing homes have certainly brought my attention to this issue. It's troublesome. I could name a number of them: Hammonds Plains, Halifax, Dartmouth, Antigonish, and Port Hawkesbury. When these cuts are announced to staff who

give health care to our most vulnerable, I can assure you - this fits in with the theme of this speech - it is not a cause for celebration.

Mr. Speaker, I can assure you that many Canadians will be watching the sports channel tonight. Forgive me if I watch too much sports, and I draw some similarities to this government, but they may be in the last inning of their term. In the last inning of their term, you can make a list of mistakes, and you can blow a lead.

I'm making reference to the present Liberal Government. It's our job, as the Opposition, to point out misplays. We do not have video recordings to go back and bring it down into slow motion. But if we did have access to this technology, I can assure you of some of the misplays of this term and the earlier innings of their ball game, the misplays dealing with the Film Tax Credit, Pharmacare. I recall a promise by this Premier assuring that every Nova Scotian would have a doctor in Nova Scotia. You can use the analogy of a baseball game, or you can use analogies of real life. They have not fulfilled their mandate, and it is our job to bring these particular issues forward. I suggest to you that these are misplays, and these are out of line. They would be called out by anybody who suggested a doctor for every Nova Scotian - and we see people struggling to get their health care issues addressed.

Mr. Speaker, these are no more than broken promises. To me, it is something that needs to be taken very seriously, and there should be more emphasis and more discussion in this House.

I'm concerned, as I said here, just reviewing my observation, that this may be a very short session. I've got to be perfectly honest here. There is an outside chance that there may be a snap election in the next few days. That hasn't been erased from my thought process.

[Page 81]

What has happened here in this particular speech is that there hasn't been enough emphasis on the major issues that are addressing the population of Nova Scotia. I think it's up to us, our duty and our challenge, to bring these points forward forcefully. I think you'll see this as we address the Throne Speech.

Mr. Speaker, again I point out the ER closures, I just want to emphasize, in Digby, in Shelburne - Roseway has not gone away - in Lunenburg, in Cape Breton. To me there's a lack of attention on that front when we're dealing with these very serious issues that affect the most vulnerable in Nova Scotia. Again I repeat, it comes under the theme that this is not a cause for celebration.

The Throne Speech will lead you to believe that this government is continuing on its path - and I may not have the wording correct here, the direct quote from the Throne Speech - that they are going to have a doctor for every Nova Scotian. Well if you're on the path in the work you have done in the first three years, I want to suggest to this government, you have lost your way. All you have to do is look at the district health authority. There's one issue that I can quickly bring out . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I'd like to remind the honourable Leader in the House of the New Democratic Party not to refer directly to members opposite by using the word "you."

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : It's my first day on the job, Mr. Speaker. Forgive me. Thank you very much for your wisdom, and I'll make note of that. The point that I was trying to make regarding the hospitals in the plan, or the so-called plan, that this government had.

If I can back up to 2015, the Minister of Health and Wellness came to our Town of Shelburne and announced with great fanfare - and I was there - it was a good announcement that they actually had a plan to have doctors in the ER in Roseway Hospital and this was going to roll out in a month's time. I said yes, it's too good to be true. Who can't support that? The reality is, and you saw me in the last session, it was not just Roseway Hospital, it was certainly right across Nova Scotia that it was a growing concern and it was spreading from rural Nova Scotia to Halifax.

It's a province-wide issue, crisis now, I suggest, and what's ironic about this whole thing is that several weeks ago, Mr. Speaker, the Premier made another announcement that we're going to have nurse practitioners across Nova Scotia to fill the void of some of these areas that may not have doctors, another plan. But what was interesting in that announcement about nurse practitioners was that there were no timelines. Is that an interesting coincidence? I suggest to you if this is the path that we're on it's not working and we need to get there and address this issue in a more serious manner.

[Page 82]

If I can just move on here now to the teachers, and I think it was made reference to today in some of the questions that were asked in Question Period, that the teachers simply feel that they are not listened to. The government and teachers - I can personally put this out here on the floor - this government and the teachers need to come back to the bargaining table to get a deal. Again, I'll use the quote, "if you're not at the table chances are you may be on the menu." In my limited ability of the Legislature and Bill No. 148, I simplify it as simply no more than a heavy club. The presence of this Bill No. 148 gives the atmosphere, it tries to take away the bargaining rights of workers - and this is the atmosphere that these people are trying to reach an agreement. And, I suggest strongly, as the ministers may leave the Chamber today and have an opportunity to reflect over the weekend I ask you with all sincerity to suggest that this government return to the bargaining table and perhaps in the next few weeks this government would have a change of heart.

The 2016 Throne Speech recognized and identified Nova Scotians who rallied around one another to help those impacted by wildfires and more recently with those dealing with the flood waters and specifically, especially in Cape Breton, and again I point out that there were a number of very good questions in Question Period today concerning the issues regarding the flood in Cape Breton. However, not one word or recognition on the drought or the dry wells in southwestern Nova Scotia this summer.

Mr. Speaker, I suggest to you that the EMO office, the minister who was missing in action was not visible in that particular drought in southwestern Nova Scotia until the eleventh hour - and you can look at the press releases when the Opposition Parties brought this issue forward is when the minister first appeared on the scene. What's interesting to note is that in this Throne Speech there was an absence of addressing this particular issue, which is a serious issue. To me, there are roughly over 1,000 dry wells in southwestern Nova Scotia. I do not have the official numbers, but I can assure you just by putting together different municipal numbers that that would be a fair ballpark analogy.

Mr. Speaker, these weather events - the meteorologists say on their local news that this is not the norm. These weather events are something that are going to be in our future for some time to come. I do not see a plan, there was no recognition of this in the Throne Speech and again I bring it to your attention that this is not a cause for celebration.

Mr. Speaker, you know as I move through my speech here I want to take a few minutes now to recognize and celebrate the staff and our CAs that we have behind our particular members of the Legislature in our Party. I know that the sacrifices and the commitments they have made, their good job to give me notes and to make us all look good in this House, I want to recognize that. They are there to make sure we hold the government accountable and I appreciate that. To me, that is an example of a cause to celebrate. I want to point out that politics is a team sport and we need a team effort to make sure we hold this government accountable. I can assure you that we'll do everything possible.

[Page 83]

Mr. Speaker, as I move through my speech here I felt it appropriate to identify and welcome back my colleague, the member for Chester-St. Margaret's. I want to point out that she was out the last session because of some personal medical leave and I look forward to her presence back here, but I can assure you this may be a good example that maybe on the Liberal side it may not be a cause for celebration, so I welcome her back, the member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

Mr. Speaker, it is interesting also that we are joined this particular session by a rookie - again these baseball analogies simply will not leave my vocabulary. The member for Halifax Needham brings her youthfulness and her energy and she holds the critic areas of African Nova Scotian Affairs, Communications Nova Scotia, Housing, Immigration, and Municipal Affairs. Now for us that is a cause for celebration.

To me, the polls during that by-election - I've got to be honest here, my support for polls has been consistent since I've been in this House. I think Winston Churchill summed it up and I never get the wording right on this each time I use this line - Winston Churchill suggested that there's only one good use for polls, and the dogs have understood that for years.

What I want to make reference to is that the polls during the by-election in Halifax Needham were simply saying that the Liberals were in that race. Now in my observation there was something going on to do with talking about seniors in nursing homes and long-term care and the member for Halifax Needham had the right message. I'll leave it up to the people of Nova Scotia to decide. To me, again, this is a cause for celebration, to have the member for Halifax Needham join our team.

Mr. Speaker, I have a little quote on my dresser bedroom stand and I want to read it now because I really believe that we could have an impact on this particular sitting government. The little quote is something I've carried there for a number of years now, it is by Margaret Mead and it goes like this: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." I really, truly believe those words are powerful and we can actually make a difference in the best interests of all Nova Scotians.

Now, Mr. Speaker, I just want to have a few more words in my closing remarks. I find it deeply interesting, the irony, how I got to this point, this stage in my life, the affairs and the events that seem deliberately contrary to the effects or the often amusing outcome. I'm referring to the irony of my political life, which started roughly 15 years ago. I once stood as a rejected candidate for the sitting Liberal Government, and my career has gone in a different direction. I find the irony in that to be something of interest. Today I stand as the Leader in the House of the NDP of Nova Scotia. I look forward to this session, and I look forward to holding this government accountable. I find the irony in that interesting, how events can change, and one never knows.

[Page 84]

In closing, I talked about all the different causes for celebration. Mr. Speaker, you've heard many examples, and I'll just end on my political career. That may be a cause for celebration.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : That concludes the government's business for today. We will meet again on Tuesday, October 18th, from the hours of 1:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. Following the daily routine, we will continue in Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now rise to meet again Tuesday at 1:00 p.m.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House do now rise to meet Tuesday, October 18th, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay

The motion is carried.

The House now stands adjourned until Tuesday, October 18th, at 1:00 p.m.

[The House rose at 12:02 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

[Page 85]

RESOLUTION NO. 4

By: Hon. Alfie MacLeod « » (Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas thousands of Nova Scotians do not have a family doctor and are losing hope of finding one; and

Whereas the Department of Health and Wellness spent $5,755 per person last year but thousands of Nova Scotians aren't getting the services they need; and

Whereas doctors in Nova Scotia are so demoralized that a respected Cape Breton physician publicly called for a public inquiry;

Therefore be it resolved that the Liberal Government admit that there is a critical doctor shortage in our province and that too many Nova Scotians are not getting the health care services they deserve.

RESOLUTION NO. 5

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Charlene Bonang is a long-time resident of East Chezzetcook and has been active in her community in numerous volunteer roles; and

Whereas Charlene has been a parishioner of Saint Genevieve's Roman Catholic Parish in East Chezzetcook; and

Whereas Charlene has helped in many aspects of parish activity, including but not limited to fundraising, Eucharistic ministry, reader, Sunday School teacher, liturgy, and Parish Council;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Charlene Bonang for giving her time and talents for the betterment of those who are served by Saint Genevieve's Parish.

RESOLUTION NO. 6

[Page 86]

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Joyce Crowell is a long-time resident of East Chezzetcook and has been active in her community in numerous volunteer roles; and

Whereas Joyce has been a parishioner of Saint Genevieve's Roman Catholic Parish in East Chezzetcook; and

Whereas Joyce has volunteered countless hours as a Sunday School teacher, reader, and musician in the parish choir;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Joyce Crowell for giving her time and talents for the betterment of those served by Saint Genevieve's Parish.

RESOLUTION NO. 7

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Keith Mannette is a long-time resident of West Chezzetcook and has been active in his community in various volunteer roles; and

Whereas Keith has been a member of the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department for 30 years; and

Whereas during these 30 years Keith has assisted the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department with firefighting, fundraising, and treasury and has been on the executive committee;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Keith Mannette for giving his time and talents for the safety of the area residents that are served by the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department.

RESOLUTION NO. 8

[Page 87]

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Donna Mannette is a long-time resident of East Chezzetcook and has been an active volunteer for many initiatives in her community; and

Whereas Donna has been a member of the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department for 10 years; and

Whereas during these 10 years Donna has assisted the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department with firefighting, fundraising, and administrative duties and has been on the executive committee;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Donna Mannette for giving her time and talents for the safety of the area residents that are served by the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department.

RESOLUTION NO. 9

By: Hon. Kevin Murphy « » (The Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cory Gallupe is a resident of Porters Lake and has been active in his community in various volunteer roles; and

Whereas Cory has been a member of the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department for five years; and

Whereas during these five years Cory has assisted the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department with firefighting and fundraising;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in thanking Cory Gallupe for giving his time and talents for the safety of the area residents that are served by the Chezzetcook and District Volunteer Fire Department.

RESOLUTION NO. 10

[Page 88]

By: Hon. Zach Churchill « » (Municipal Affairs)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on May 14, 2016, the 46th VON Tri-County fundraising walk took place in Yarmouth; and

Whereas Yarmouth's Donald Outhouse has participated in the annual walk for 42 straight years; and

Whereas this year Mr. Outhouse raised approximately $2,600, an amount which was more than half of this year's fundraising total:

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly recognize Mr. Donald Outhouse for over four decades of support to VON Tri-County and for being an inspiration of generosity and health to his community.

RESOLUTION NO. 11

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Official Opposition)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas since 2013, there are 5,100 fewer people working in Nova Scotia and the labour force has shrunk by 11,300 people; and

Whereas Nova Scotians are paying 17 per cent more in taxes than they paid just four years ago; and

Whereas a Liberal carbon pricing scheme will increase the price of everything Nova Scotians buy and cost an average family about $1,250 each year;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly condemn the McNeil Liberals for driving up the cost of living and making it harder and harder for Nova Scotians to make ends meet.

RESOLUTION NO. 12

[Page 89]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the volunteer fire departments in rural Nova Scotia are the lifeblood of their communities; they often risk their lives to protect the lives of others; and

Whereas on Sunday, September 25, 2016, the Wedgeport and District Volunteer Fire Department held their annual banquet at their fire hall in Wedgeport; and

Whereas Grant d'Entremont and Paul Deveau were honoured for five years of service; Justin Cottreau for 15 years of service; Carl Harris for 20 years of service; and Scott Crosby for 25 years of service; as well as with Jane Mary Doucette, Michelle Crosby, and Joyce MacIsaac for 15 years of service in the Ladies Auxiliary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Grant, Paul, Justin, Carl, Scott, Jane Mary, Michelle, and Joyce, for being honoured by their peers and recognized for their years of service, and thank them for their dedication to protecting the lives of the people of Wedgeport and surrounding communities.

RESOLUTION NO. 13

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things—wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 27, 2016, Melanie and Benjamin Penney welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Melanie and Benjamin on this miraculous event in their lives, and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 15

[Page 90]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things—wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 23, 2016, Justine and Gilles d'Entremont welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Justine and Gilles on this miraculous event in their lives, and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 16

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things—wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 17, 2016, Courtney Harris and Mason Blades welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Courtney and Mason on this miraculous event in their lives, and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 17

[Page 91]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things—wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 4, 2016, Jennifer and Adam d'Entremont welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Jennifer and Adam on this miraculous event in their lives, and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 18

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 27, 2016, Kimberly Crowell and Christopher Boudreau welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kimberly and Christopher on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 19

[Page 92]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 27, 2016, Krista and Trevor Nickerson welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Krista and Trevor on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 20

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 18, 2016, Sarah Hiltz and Joshua Atwood welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sarah Hiltz and Joshua Atwood on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 21

[Page 93]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 6, 2016, Suzanne Doucette-Williams and Jeff Williams welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Suzanne and Jeff on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 22

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on April 2, 2016, Priscilla and James Smith welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Priscilla and James on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 23

[Page 94]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on March 30, 2016, Becky O'Connell and James Cameron welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Becky and James on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 24

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 26, 2016, Erin Goodwin and Jocelin d'Eon welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Erin and Jocelin on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 25

[Page 95]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 26, 2016, Kary Swim and Brandon Goulden welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kary and Brandon on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 26

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 24, 2016, Janine Reyes and Jonathan Muise welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Janine and Jonathan on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 27

[Page 96]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on July 19, 2016, Kyla Symonds and Brett Nickerson welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kyla and Brett on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 28

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 28, 2016, Shadey Hopkins and Tyler Brannen welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Shadey and Tyler on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 29

[Page 97]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 22, 2016, Nerissa and Jared Nickerson welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Nerissa and Jared on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 30

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on June 19, 2016, Whitney Harris and Jamie Smith welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Whitney and Jamie on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 31

[Page 98]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on May 27, 2016, Jennifer White and Jody Newell welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Jennifer and Jody on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 32

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on April 27, 2016, Jennifer and Robbie Nickerson welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Jennifer and Robbie on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 33

[Page 99]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on April 27, 2016, Samantha Atkinson and Dominic Goreham welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Samantha and Dominic on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 34

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas a new baby is like the beginning of all things - wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities, author Eda J. LeShan wrote; and

Whereas on April 10, 2016, Melissa Jones and Grant Nickerson welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Melissa and Grant on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 35

[Page 100]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas anniversaries are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of two individuals united as one; and

Whereas it was once said that a marriage anniversary is the celebration of love, trust, partnership, tolerance, and tenacity - but the order varies for any given year; and

Whereas on October 1, 2016, a very special occasion took place when Wendy and George Belliveau of Woods Harbour celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Wendy and George Belliveau on this remarkable milestone in their life together, and wish them many more happy years.

RESOLUTION NO. 36

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas anniversaries are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of two individuals united as one; and

Whereas it was once said that a marriage anniversary is the celebration of love, trust, partnership, tolerance, and tenacity - but the order varies for any given year; and

Whereas on September 17, 2016, a very special occasion took place when Irvin and Janet Surette of Sainte-Anne-du-Ruisseau celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Irvin and Janet on this remarkable milestone in their life together, and wish them many more happy years.

RESOLUTION NO. 37

[Page 101]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas anniversaries are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of two individuals united as one; and

Whereas it was once said that a marriage anniversary is the celebration of love, trust, partnership, tolerance, and tenacity - but the order varies for any given year; and

Whereas on August 27, 2016, a very special occasion took place when Bernard and Myrtle Boudreau of Belleville celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Bernard and Myrtle on this remarkable milestone in their life together, and wish them many more happy years.

RESOLUTION NO. 38

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas anniversaries are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of two individuals united as one; and

Whereas it was once said that a marriage anniversary is the celebration of love, trust, partnership, tolerance, and tenacity - but the order varies for any given year; and

Whereas on August 20, 2016, a very special occasion took place when Lloyd and Carol d'Entremont of Lower West Pubnico celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Lloyd and Carol on this remarkable milestone in their life together, and wish them many more happy years.

RESOLUTION NO. 39

[Page 102]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas anniversaries are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of two individuals united as one; and

Whereas it was once said that a marriage anniversary is the celebration of love, trust, partnership, tolerance, and tenacity - but the order varies for any given year; and

Whereas on July 30, 2016, a very special occasion took place when Edgar and Pauline Muise of Hubbards Point celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Edgar and Pauline on this remarkable milestone in their life together, and wish them many more happy years.

RESOLUTION NO. 40

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas anniversaries are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of two individuals united as one; and

Whereas it was once said that a marriage anniversary is the celebration of love, trust, partnership, tolerance, and tenacity - but the order varies for any given year; and

Whereas on July 27, 2016, a very special occasion took place when Terry and Sharon Earl of Glenwood celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Terry and Sharon on this remarkable milestone in their life together, and wish them many more happy years.

RESOLUTION NO. 41

[Page 103]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on July 16, 2016, Anne C. d'Entremont of Lower West Pubnico celebrated her 80th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 80 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Anne on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 42

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on September 17, 2016, Bernice Ross celebrated her 90th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 90 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Bernice on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 43

[Page 104]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on August 11, 2016, Martha V. Amirault of Lower West Pubnico celebrated her 90th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 90 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Martha on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 44

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on June 26, 2016, Leta Dixon celebrated her 90th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 90 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Leta on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 45

[Page 105]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on August 1, 2016, Norma Ross celebrated her 90th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 90 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Norma on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 46

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on April 22, 2016, Irene Newell celebrated her 100th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 100 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Irene on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 47

[Page 106]

By: Hon. Christopher d'Entremont « » (Argyle-Barrington)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas birthdays are an occasion for family and friends to gather together to celebrate the life of an individual; and

Whereas on July 13, 2016, Annie Thorburn celebrated her 100th birthday; and

Whereas to have reached 100 years of age and continue to be active and share all the memories gathered over your lifetime with your loved ones is a wonderful reason to celebrate;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Annie Thorburn on reaching this milestone in her life and wish her many more happy birthdays and continued good health.

RESOLUTION NO. 48

By: Ms. Joyce Treen « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cole Harbour Soccer Club celebrated their 40th Anniversary on Friday, August 19th; and

Whereas they have been an important and intricate part of the recreation and sport offered to the community of Cole Harbour; and

Whereas they celebrated this anniversary with a community BBQ, complete with games and fun for the family;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating the Cole Harbour Soccer Club on their milestone and wish them many more.

RESOLUTION NO. 49

[Page 107]

By: Ms. Joyce Treen « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Staff Sergeant Gregory Mason received his 25-year Long-Service Award this Fall; and

Whereas he has served on the Halifax Regional Police and provided a service of keeping the public safe and crime prevention; and

Whereas it is members like Gregory Mason and his fellow officers that give the people a sense of security within our province;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Gregory Mason on his 25-year Long-Service Award.

RESOLUTION NO. 50

By: Ms. Joyce Treen « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Maritime Race Weekend celebrated its 5th year on September 16th and 17th; and

Whereas Michelle Kempton and her team have been bringing thousands of race participants to Eastern Passage each September; and

Whereas she and her volunteers put in countless hours to organize and pull off an event of this magnitude;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate Michelle Kempton and Maritime Race Weekend on its 5th Anniversary.

RESOLUTION NO. 51

By: Ms. Joyce Treen « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sergeant Nick Pepler received his 15-year Long-Service Award this Fall; and

[Page 108]

Whereas he has served on the Halifax Regional Police and provided a service of keeping the public safe and crime prevention; and

Whereas it is members like Nick Pepler and his fellow officers that give the people a sense of security within our province;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Nick Pepler on his 15-year Long-Service Award.