Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD14-31

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Kevin Murphy

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



Second Session

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS:
New Glasgow Farmers Market - Expansion,
2568
Firewood - Crown Land Access,
2568
World Diabetes Day (11/14/14)/Natl. Diabetes Awareness Mo. (14/14),
2568
Firewood Shortage - Awareness,
2569
Snowfall Preparation,
2569
Henderson, Sharon - Rotarian Award (2014),
2570
Discovery Ctr. - Awards Ceremony,
2570
Maritime Bldg.: (New Glasgow) - Demolition,
2570
Estey, Sylvia/Smith, Cindie - 100 Women Who Care Prog.,
2571
Barneys River Ladies Aid - Mem. Tree Planting,
2571
Seltzer, Paul - Mahone Bay Volunteering,
2571
Salvation Army Corps. (Pictou Co.),
2572
Politics: Women - Encourage,
2572
Select Nova Scotia Cookbook
2573
Flemming, Donna - EXIT Realty Award,
Ms. B. Maguire
2573
Hfx. Drum Fest. - Alderney Landing Theatre,
2573
Maguire, Brendan - Courage to Give Back Award,
2574
Antigonish Winter Parking Regulations,
2574
Black, Ellie - Commonwealth Games Performance,
2575
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 6, Petroleum Resources Act
2576
Adjourned debate
2586
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS:
No. 355, Prem. - Power Bills: Savings - Update,
2586
No. 356, Prem. - Nurses: Gov't. Respect - Ensure,
2587
No. 357, Health & Wellness - Flavoured Tobacco: Ban Removal
- Scientific Reason, Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
2588
No. 358, Health & Wellness - Flavoured Tobacco Exemption:
Lobbyists - Contacts, Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
2589
No. 359, Fin. - Big Tobacco: Conversations - Min. Confirm,
2590
No. 360, ERDT - Gov't. Policies: Bus. Growth - Effects,
2591
No. 361, Health & Wellness: Long-Term Care Beds - Plans,
2592
No. 362, Fin.: Broten Review - Printer,
2593
No. 363, Health & Wellness: Boys HPV Vaccinations
- Min. Stance, Hon. David Wilson « »
2593
No. 364, Justice: Retroactivity - B.C. Supreme Court Decision,
2594
No. 365, Nat. Res. - Deer Population: Agric. & TIR Mins
- Consultation, Mr. L. Harrison »
2595
No. 366, Environ.: Amherst Waste Water Disposal - Health Risk,
2596
No. 367, Justice - Youth Crime: Reduction Progs.,
2597
No. 368, TIR: Public Hwys. Act - Snow Shovelling,
2598
No. 369, LAE - MOU Table: Students - Inclusion,
2599
No. 370, EECD - Frank H. MacDonald Sch.: Conversion
- Min. Support Confirm, Mr. T. Houston « »
2600
No. 371, Environ.: Third Party Complaints - Investigation Process,
2601
No. 372, ERDT - Nova Star: Winter Berth - N.S. Costs,
2602
[GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:]
[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:]
[No. 6, Petroleum Resources Act]
2604
2605
Vote - Affirmative
2609
No. 64, Limitation of Actions Act
2609
2609
Motion to recommit bill to CW on Bills
2609
2609
2617
2618
2621
2623
2624
2625
Motion defeated
2626
2627
2628
2629
2631
2632
2637
Vote - Affirmative
2641
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., Nov. 18th at 1:00 p.m
2642
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 906, "Flag on the Play" - The Coast Award (2014),
2643
Res. 907, Leslie, Megan - The Coast Award (2014),
2643
Res. 908, Ecology Action Ctr. - The Coast Award (2014),
2644
Res. 909, Lion's Head - The Coast Award (2014),
2644
Res. 910, Agricola St. Brasserie - The Coast Award (2014),
2645
Res. 911, Julien's Patisserie Bakery & Café - The Coast Award (2014),
2645
Res. 912, Agricola St. Brasserie - The Coast Award (2014),
2646
Res. 913, Salvatore's Pizzaiolo Trattoria - The Coast Award (2014),
2646
Res. 914, Dee Dee's Ice Cream - The Coast Award (2014),
2647
Res. 915, Ace Burger Co. - The Coast Award (2014),
2647
Res. 916, Field Guide Restaurant & Bar - The Coast Award (2014),
2648
Res. 917, enVie - The Coast Award (2014),
2648
Res. 918, The Coastal Café - The Coast Award (2014),
2649
Res. 919, Tarek's Café - The Coast Award (2014),
2649
Res. 920, Menz & Mollyz Bar - The Coast Award (2014),
2650
Res. 921, Smith, Marina - The Coast Award (2014),
2650
Res. 922, Finer Things - The Coast Award (2014),
2651
Res. 923, Cyclesmith - The Coast Award (2014),
2651
Res. 924, Peak Audio - The Coast Award (2014),
2652
Res. 925, Mayfield, Sarah - The Coast Award (2014),
2652
Res. 926, Evolve Fitness - The Coast Award (2014),
2653
Res. 927, One Block Barbershop - The Coast Award (2014),
2653
Res. 928, Lydia K - The Coast Award (2014),
2654
Res. 929, Hope Blooms - The Coast Award (2014),
2654
Res. 930, The Doppler Effect - The Coast Award (2014),
2655
Res. 931, Legere, Stewart - The Coast Award (2014),
2655
Res. 932, Joudry, Shalan - Bk. Launch,
2656
Res. 933, Ross, Shawn - Athletic Accomplishments,
2656
Res. 934, Hankinson-LeGard, Dianne - Rotary Pres. (1st Female),
2657
Res. 935, Olsen, Jillian - Gulf of Maine Coun. on
Marine Environ.Award, The Premier « »
2657
Res. 936, MacMichael, Elizabeth - Remarkable Senior Award,
2658
Res. 937, Bridson-Pateman, Caitlin: Queen Annapolisa (82nd)
- Congrats., The Premier « »
2658
Res. 938, Cress, Cecelia: Queen Annapolis Royal (2014)
- Congrats., The Premier « »
2659
Res. 939, Lewis, Rachel - Hawboldt Environ. Studies Bursary,
2659
Res. 940, Bourque, Cody - Bowling Achievement,
2660
Res. 941, Oakey, Charlie - East. Passage: Support - Thank,
2660
Res. 942, Tufts, Elle/Elle Dance Acad. Dancers - Dedication,
2661
Res. 943, Legere, Capt. Ola: FD Serv. (25 Yrs.) - Congrats.,
2661
Res. 944, Belanger, Chief James: FD Serv. (20 Yrs.) - Congrats.,
2662
Res. 945, Elle Dance Acad. - Dance Quest: Dancers' Accomplishments
- Congrats., Mr. I. Rankin « »
2662
Res. 946, Gorey, Adrianne & Mike/Drive 'er Assoc./
Lakewood Sound - Big Sample Award, Ms. P. Eyking « »
2663
Res. 947, Franklin, Jill & Dan: C.B. Entrepreneurial Spirit
- Congrats., Ms. P. Eyking « »
2663
Res. 948, Big Spruce Brewery: N.S. Impact - Recognize,
2664
Res. 949, MacAskill, Noah - Equestrian Success,
2664
Res. 950, Seniors Youth Time Bank Prog.: Youth/Seniors
- Recognize, Ms. P. Eyking « »
2665
Res. 951, Henneberry, Capt. Harold - Birthday (100th),
2665
Res. 952, Gray, Shauna - PSC: Long-Serv. Award (25 Yrs.)
- Congrats., Mr. B. Maguire « »
2666
Res. 953, Burkey, Marina & Nelson - Anniv. (50th),
2666
Res. 954, MacLellan, Robert - PSC: Long-Serv. Award (30 Yrs.)
- Congrats., Mr. B. Maguire « »
2667
Res. 955, Shannon, Dr. Andrea - Acad. Achievements,
2667
Res. 956, Shamsuddin, Nuriya: Multiculturalism - Congrats.,
2668
Res. 957, Hfx. North West Trails Assoc.: Efforts - Congrats.,
2668
Res. 958, Al-Arz Pita Bakery: Success - Wish,
2669
Res. 959, Yummy Deli - Success Wish,
2669
Res. 960, Hair Design Ctr. - Success Wish,
2670
Res. 961, Last Game Store - Success Wish,
2670
Res. 962, Cutting Garden - Success Wish,
2671
Res. 963, Kwacha House - Success Wish,
2671
Res. 964, Cromwell, Allyson - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2672
Res. 965, Richard, Hannah - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2672
Res. 966, McKay, Talis - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2673
Res. 967, Rafuse, Ryan - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2673
Res. 968, MacCallum, Marissa - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2674
Res. 969, Redmond, Kendra - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2674
Res. 970, Morris, Jermaine - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2675
Res. 971, Birru, Hannah - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2675
Res. 972, Kozhani, Dafina - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2676
Res. 973, Jenkins, Brianna - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2676
Res. 974, Marriott, Alex - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2677
Res. 975, Gaudet, Marcel - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2677
Res. 976, Smith, Justin - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2678
Res. 977, Clearly, Brionna - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2678
Res. 978, Melanson, Lauren - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2679
Res. 979, Castro, Juls - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2679
Res. 980, Ellsworth, Dustin: Commun. Outreach Endeavours
- Success Wish, Ms. P. Arab « »
2680
Res. 981, Tiwari, Lal - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2680
Res. 982, Hafez, Mohammed - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2681
Res. 983, Savory, Anthony - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2681
Res. 984, Day, Lia - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2682
Res. 985, Campbell, Lou-Ann - BUILD Prog.: Effort - Recognize,
2682
Res. 986, House of Halal - Success Wish,
2683
Res. 987, MacPherson, John & Ethel Ann: Boston Christmas Tree
- Donation, Hon. R. Delorey « »
2683
Res. 988, Antigonish Town & Country Library: Creation
- Residents Thank, Hon. R. Delorey « »
2684
Res. 989, St. F.X. X-Women's Rugby Team: Natl. Title - Congrats.,
2684
Res. 990, Perry, SSgt. Anthony Arthur: RCMP Long-Serv. Award
- Congrats., Hon. R. Delorey « »
2685
Res. 991, England, Sarah - Antigonish C of C Award,
2685
Res. 992, MacKay, Jamie/Sacred Temple Tattoo & Design
- Antigonish C of C Award, Hon. R. Delorey « »
2686
Res. 993, Peters, Emma - Antigonish C of C Award,
2686
Res. 994, DeCoste Electrical & Ventilation -
Antigonish C of C Award, Hon. R. Delorey « »
2687
Res. 995, McCarron, Coun. Owen: Antigonish Co. Mun. -
Long-Serv. Award (20 Yrs.) - Congrats., Hon. R. Delorey « »
2687
Res. 996, MacPherson, Coun. Jack: Antigonish Town
Long-Serv. Award (10 Yrs.) - Congrats., Hon. R. Delorey « »
2688
Res. 997, Chisholm, Liz: Antigonish Town Long-Serv. Award
(10 Yrs.) - Congrats., Hon. R. Delorey « »
2688
Res. 998, Deveau, Coun. Remi: Antigonish Co. Mun. -
Long- Serv. Award (10 Yrs.) - Congrats., Hon. R. Delorey « »
2689
Res. 999, MacDonald, Donnie - Antigonish Co. Mun
Long-Serv. Award (10 Yrs.) - Congrats., Hon. R. Delorey « »
2689

[Page 2567]

HALIFAX, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Sixty-second General Assembly

Second Session

9:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Kevin Murphy

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Ms. Margaret Miller

MR. SPEAKER » : Order, please. We will now begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

STATEMENTS BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

New Glasgow Farmers Market - Expansion

[Page 2568]

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, there is great news for small local businesses in Pictou County: the New Glasgow Farmers Market is expanding. The expansion will include a 60' x 60' building with natural light and heat. This will accommodate 43 vendors year-round. The existing dome will continue to operate on a seasonal basis.

The Farmers Market is home to many vendors, including crafters, primary food producers, and food vendors. This expansion is made possible with investments from the Town of New Glasgow, the Municipality of Pictou, and the recent announcement from Central Nova MP Peter MacKay, of federal funding in excess of $250,000. This announcement supports some of the goals contained in the Ivany report by supporting the agricultural industry, entrepreneurs and small businesses. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

Firewood - Crown Land Access

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, this may be one of my last times this session to rise and raise the issue of firewood shortage and access to Crown land for Nova Scotians to have recreational and commercial use of. It is my hope that all MLAs have a better understanding of a flawed, clumsy permitting system which leaves wood suppliers little access to Crown land. By many members' statements, it has been repeated many times that the Bowater lands were purchased for the public to have more access for recreational and commercial use.

Finally, it is my hope that the Minister of Natural Resources reflects on this session and makes the necessary changes to a flawed, clumsy permitting system. To be continued. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I have to remind the honourable members for Yarmouth and Timberlea-Prospect that there is some unparliamentary chatter going on here to my right. I'll ask you to keep it down.

The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

World Diabetes Day (11/14/14)/

Natl. Diabetes Awareness Mo. (14/14)

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, an event celebrated across the world as a month to educate and raise awareness about type 1 diabetes. The theme for this year is "You don't know the half of it."

Type 1 diabetes has both a visible public side and a second private, invisible side. The public side, the one that everyone sees, is physical, treatment-focused and often showcases few visible signs of struggle. Throughout the month, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation will share inspiring videos of Canadians from across the country for all Canadians to see.

[Page 2569]

Today, November 14th, is World Diabetes Day. The theme this year is healthy living in diabetes, and will focus on the importance of starting the day with a healthy breakfast.

I urge all members to mark World Diabetes Day and National Diabetes Awareness Month to raise awareness about a disease that affects nine million Canadians. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne.

Firewood Shortage - Awareness

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, at this time, I wood like to thank all MLAs and all Parties for their attention in regards to the issue of firewood shortage in Nova Scotia. (Applause) It is my belief that as MLA for Queens-Shelburne I have been somewhat successful in bringing this issue of firewood shortage through members' statements, using this as a tool. I do this to bring awareness of the importance of the energy sources valued by many Nova Scotians.

Collectively, through my 60-second statements, I have raised awareness about a flawed, clumsy permitting system which many Nova Scotians want reviewed. I feel most MLAs may look at firewood in a different way from now forward. Thank you, and certainly have a warm winter. I look forward to the Spring session. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

SNOWFALL PREPARATION

MR. ALLAN ROWE « » : Mr. Speaker, the first snowfall of our winter season is actually expected later today, and I would like to take this opportunity to remind residents across Nova Scotia to take precautions for this long winter ahead. I urge residents to prepare their homes adequately for winter by removing lawn items, any other planters and such, which could get in the way of snowplows, trimming back any overhanging branches from their property, and as well ensuring that salt and sand is on hand to help reduce ice on pathways or stairways.

Of course, it's also important to remind residents to prepare their vehicles, changing over to winter tires as well, to ensure for safer driving. I also want to remind Halifax residents that the overnight parking ban actually comes into effect on December 15th this year. With that, Mr. Speaker, I hope all Nova Scotians stay safe and warm this winter. Thank you.

[Page 2570]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

Henderson, Sharon - Rotarian Award (2014)

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate a true friend, Sharon Henderson, on being named 2014 True Rotarian of the Westville club for her dedication and leadership. Sharon is currently past-president and very deserving of this honour. Sharon has always been a leader and a cheerleader in all things Rotary and is a great example of a true Rotarian. She lives her life by the Rotary model, "Service Above Self."

It is a true honour to have this opportunity to congratulate Sharon on receiving this richly deserved recognition. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

Discovery Ctr. - Awards Ceremony

MR. BRENDAN MAGUIRE « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to talk about the Discovery Centre's upcoming awards ceremony. November 20th will mark the 12th Annual Discovery Awards that recognize academic, business, and community for their outstanding work that has helped make Nova Scotia a leader in science and technology innovation.

It is with great pride that I speak about Robert MacDonald from J.L. Ilsley High School. Robert has been chosen as this year's recipient of the Youth Award. I am pleased that the Discovery Centre recognizes the important role of our youth in science and technology innovation and honours this recognition through the Youth Award.

I ask the members of this House to join me in congratulating Robert on this award and wish him all the best in the future. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

Maritime Bldg.: (New Glasgow) - Demolition

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, an old landmark on Provost Street, New Glasgow, the tallest building in the town, will soon be a vacant lot. The roof is now off the Maritime Building, as crews continue to demolish the seven-storey building located in the downtown core of the town. The removal of this building will cost the town $1 million, as opposed to $3 million to redevelop the property. At seven storeys tall, the Maritime Building has dominated the New Glasgow skyline since it opened in 1915. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

[Page 2571]

Estey, Sylvia/Smith, Cindie - 100 Women Who Care Prog.

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, Sylvia Estey and Cindie Smith are the Truro Chapter co-chairs of 100 Women Who Care, a new concept in fundraising that gives away more than $10,000 to a non-profit organization in Truro and surrounding area. Individual women or groups of women donate $100 each and three non-profit societies have five minutes to make a vocal presentation on how they would use or benefit from the donation, without the use of technology or handouts. After the presentation the members vote for the charity that will receive the donation.

I'd like to congratulate Sylvia Estey and Cindie Smith for introducing this innovative 100 Women Who Care program to the Truro area, and wish them great and continued success in the future.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

BARNEYS RIVER LADIES AID - MEM. TREE PLANTING

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize and thank the Barneys River Ladies Aid who recently paid tribute to three fallen RCMP officers from the Moncton shooting this past summer. Three maple crescent trees have been planted at the Barneys River Presbyterian Church in honour of these officers. These trees will grow strong and tall and be a reminder of how the most tragic events can unite people from near and far and that out of the darkest days we join together for a better tomorrow.

I am proud of the people from this small community who wanted to pay tribute to those who gave their lives and do it in a way that portrays beauty, strength and growth. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Lunenburg.

SELTZER, PAUL - MAHONE BAY VOLUNTEERING

MS. SUZANNE LOHNES-CROFT « » : Mr. Speaker, today I'd like to take time to recognize one of Mahone Bay's foremost volunteers, Mr. Paul Seltzer. The Seltzers - Paul and Susan - have been a wonderful addition to the community. From the local chamber of commerce to musical entertainment, their abundant offerings of edible delicacies and participation in numerous festivals and local events have not gone unnoticed. Last evening Paul was honoured, in the face of his retirement, at the Mahone Bay Centre, one of his most passionate volunteer interests. I consider myself fortunate to have sat on the board of directors and served as secretary during Paul's tenure. During that period his leadership encouraged active participation and commitment by all board members. Paul led through example and could be found doing tasks or following through on projects which spanned far beyond the scope of the job of the chair.

[Page 2572]

Paul, I hope as you retire and have time to reflect on your accomplishments, you will be more than satisfied that you have accomplished your vision for the Mahone Bay Centre. I thank Paul and send many blessings on his retirement. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

Salvation Army Corps (Pictou Co.)

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, for the past 129 years, the Salvation Army Corps of Pictou County have been providing year-round essential services of emergency groceries, transportation, shelter, clothing, and counselling to thousands of clients throughout northeastern Nova Scotia. The program becomes a reality through programs such as the Red Kettle Campaign during the holiday season. That is why this organization is seeking volunteers to supervise the red kettles that will be located throughout the county and province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

POLITICS: WOMEN - ENCOURAGE

MS. PAM EYKING « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to remind the government of the importance of encouraging women to enter politics. First, I would like to acknowledge the 14 women members who have been elected MLAs and serve in this Chamber. I'd also like to acknowledge the five honourable members who serve as Cabinet Ministers. Federally, Nova Scotia has only one female MP, out of 11, and only one female senator.

Across Canada, only 26 per cent of MPs and 38 per cent of senators are women. Municipally, Nova Scotia has seven female mayors out of 35, and 90 out of 377 councillors are female. Our First Nations communities in Nova Scotia have three female chiefs out of 13, and 17 of 93 council positions on band councils are held by women.

These statistics from the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women are indicative of the work that we need to do to achieve gender parity in the political realm. I encourage members to invite women to participate in constituency work, to visit the Legislature, and to have their voices heard. I ask this government to continue to support programs that empower and educate women on the roles they can play in our province and to acknowledge the role that women play in the success of our province. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

SELECT NOVA SCOTIA COOKBOOK

[Page 2573]

MS. JOYCE TREEN « » : Mr. Speaker, supporting our local farmers and food producers is an act we take great pride in. Nova Scotia is known for its quality of agricultural goods and we are fortunate to live in a province with readily available fresh food.

Nova Scotia can now cook delicious food using local ingredients and recipes from the new Select Nova Scotia cookbook. The Minister of Agriculture and the Minister of Communications Nova Scotia launched the cookbook, Local Food and Local Chefs Select Nova Scotia 2014 Recipe Collection, which features 21 recipes by nine Nova Scotian chefs. The cookbook demonstrates how easy it is to buy local food, including tips on how and where to find these products. The cookbook is part of a marketing plan and expansion of Select Nova Scotia to encourage more Nova Scotians to buy local. The goal is to …

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for the member's statement has expired.

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

FLEMMING, DONNA - EXIT REALTY AWARD

MR. BRENDAN MAGUIRE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to take a moment to recognize Halifax Atlantic's own Donna Flemming. Donna is a close friend of mine, but she also just recently won EXIT Realty Metro Agent of the Month award, at the same time also celebrating her one-year anniversary with EXIT Realty.

Donna is someone who is a strong member of our community. She has given back in multiple ways to our community, including volunteering for the oldest Christmas parade in metro - that is the Spryfield Christmas parade - and she is the current president of the Long Lake Association. I would like to give her a big warm thank-you - and everyone in the House, give a big, warm thank-you for Donna - for winning Realtor of the Year and for all that she does for our community. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

HFX. DRUM FEST. - ALDERNEY LANDING THEATRE

MR. ALLAN ROWE « » : Mr. Speaker, if perhaps you or anyone else is looking for a good beat this weekend, the Alderney Landing Theatre is hosting the Halifax Drum Festival, a festival which started actually yesterday. It is going to be a display of local talent that promises to have something for everyone.

There's more to this festival than just listening to the beat, however; there's an opportunity to learn and to play along as well. There are going to be workshops available that will teach everything from the basics to the more advanced instructions. Percussion enthusiasts will get the opportunity to enjoy a clinic by Kris MacFarlane, whom you may know, of course, from Great Big Sea. He'll be giving a master class on drumming. Acts appearing on the main stage will include Middle Eastern and Korean drum groups, all showcasing drumming traditions from various cultural backgrounds. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

[Page 2574]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

MAGUIRE, BRENDAN - COURAGE TO GIVE BACK AWARD

MR. JOACHIM STROINK « » : I would like to take a moment to congratulate fellow member Brendan Maguire, who has been selected as Awards Ambassador at the upcoming ninth annual Courage to Give Back Awards. The awards are in support of Family SOS, a non-profit, child-centred organization directed toward building strong and healthy families. This annual fundraising event formally recognizes extraordinary individuals in the community who have overcome personal adversity and have inspired others by giving back to their communities.

Brendan was elected as the MLA to represent Halifax Atlantic in the October 2013 election. He is also committed and a busy volunteer, lending his time and talents to the HomeBridge Youth Society and Phoenix House. Brendan serves on the boards of …

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I have to remind the honourable member not to refer to other members directly by name.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto has the floor.

MR. STROINK « » : The member for Halifax Atlantic serves on the board of several community organizations, such as Chebucto Connections, Sambro Island Lighthouse Heritage Society, and the Urban Farm Society, and in the Loop Association. I want to congratulate the member for Halifax Atlantic on his success and contributions on behalf of the Party.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Antigonish.

ANTIGONISH WINTER PARKING REGULATIONS

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Just picking up on what my colleague, the member for Dartmouth South, said with respect to the winter weather that's coming upon us, I'd just like to draw the members' - particularly those watching and those public members watching from Antigonish - that the Town of Antigonish recently announced their dates for the winter parking regulations. Those overnight parking bans will be going into effect from the dates of December 1, 2014, to April 15, 2015.

[Page 2575]

So again, just one more reminder that with winter weather upon us, I'm sure other jurisdictions across the province will be implementing similar bans. I encourage motorists to keep that in mind.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

BLACK, ELLIE - COMMONWEALTH GAMES PERFORMANCE

MR. JOACHIM STROINK « » : Ellie Black, the 2012 Olympian from Halifax, recently attended the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland. Ellie is an 18-year-old Dalhousie student from the Halifax Alta Gymnastics Club who qualified for all four individual apparatus finals. She came away from the Commonwealth Games with a silver medal in the vault and a gold medal with her performance on the balance beam.

Ellie, like many other Nova Scotians, has worked tirelessly to reach the top tier of the sport. On behalf of all members of the Legislature, I want to congratulate her on her performance at the Commonwealth Games and wish her all the best in future competitions.

MR. SPEAKER « » : In the absence of any more members' statements, we will have a word from the honourable Government House Leader. (Laughter)

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

HON. MICHEL SAMSON » : Well now, a word. Which word should I choose this morning?

Mr. Speaker, with the consent of the House, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third Reading.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is that with unanimous consent of the House, we will revert to third reading of Bill No. 6.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 6.

[Page 2576]

Bill No. 6 - Petroleum Resources Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Can I ask how much time I have left in my hour?

MR. SPEAKER « » : You have 43 minutes, sir.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : Forty-three minutes? We're good. We should be able to get to Question Period on this one.

As I started off last night in talking about Bill No. 6, I wanted to sort of bring forward the recommendations that had been held within the Wheeler commission report. I want to spend a little time in how they got to it during that process.

Of course, over a set amount of time, the Wheeler report commissioned by the previous government went out to do some consultation, and in doing that consultation they staged it in a bunch of different ways: go out and consult on water resource, then go out and consult on community involvement, and then go out and consult on the technology of fracking, and just continue to bring it on.

Mr. Speaker, what continued to happen during that time, what the Wheeler commission was really trying to do, was to get information from the public but also to try to inform the public on what hydraulic fracturing really is. We hear the negative connotation when you say "hydraulic fracturing" it has turned into a bad word when it comes to environmental standards across North America. Quite honestly, it maybe shouldn't have that connotation.

If you really spend time trying to understand the technology itself, the amount of work that goes into hydraulic fracturing, drilling, what kind of environmental standards that industry is held to, I think we would realize that it is getting a bad reputation when it really doesn't deserve it.

The technology itself in its simplicity is that as the well is drilled into a formation and the drilling into that formation is one that is done under strict regulations and strict requirements on how those bores are done, how those bores are encased in cement and into a casing way beyond the water table - and I can't start quoting distances below the surface - but as those casings are shoved into the ground or drilled and then filled with cement and then the rest of the drill goes down into the shale formation, once all of those things are done and once there is an indication of whether there is a resource there, whether there's gas there, the company will then make its decision on how to frack it.

That's where we get into the problem of trying to understand what high-volume hydraulic fracturing, what that definition really is. It's only at that point that the company really knows exactly what it is going to be doing, or at least can do the research on what it's going to be doing. What happens at that point, and I guess this is where the high-volume fracking comes from, a high volume of water in cases of hydraulic fracturing - propane is used in New Brunswick by the way - there's a high volume of liquid that has additives, and I don't know what the additives are, that's again one of the problems that we need to identify or that the companies need to identify and need to change.

[Page 2577]

Water, some kind of lubricant, a lot of times there is sand or a particulate that's added to it as well. For a time there were radioactive items that were put in for tracking. As we know, when we go and get a CAT scan or another kind of scan a lot of times they put some kind of radioactive dye into us in order to truly show us where our veins are or where we're running into problems maybe, so when we're having cardiac issues there's a dye that's put in there for that CT scan.

Well, it's the same thing happening with the hydraulic fracturing process. I think they're doing it differently now, but at that time when they were putting that radioactive stuff in it so when they fracked they could actually have a better representation of where the cracks were going - so the water goes down, lubricant, the sand, particulate, maybe other trace elements in order to track it and then it's put under a tremendous amount of pressure and the idea is that it's going to crack the bedrock, shale formation, to try to liberate the gas that's held within it.

The sand is there to keep those cracks open, the lubricant is just simply to get the sand into its place. Then through pressure, there's pressure below the surface, the pressure for the most part pushes that water back up to the surface. Then it's supposed to be disposed of in a safe manner, which is where we run into another part of the problem and another part of the research that needs to continue to go on to find out what to do with that fracking water.

That's the fracking process as I understand it, as I've been informing myself on how these things work. If there's gas in that particular area, what is going to happen is they are going to do that a few times. Today, through its technology, oil well, gas well drilling allows them to do laterals. When they do laterals, they will specifically take a pad that, of course, needs to go through - we'll look at the recommendations in a bit, but the pad, again, is regulated pretty specifically. From that pad, a number of wells are drilled, so they go down and then they go out.

I know the member for Kings North spoke about it on a couple of occasions, on how many wells could be within this pad. I think he said there were 15 of them on his friend's farm in Alberta. So they go down, they go out, so that there's not this pickpocket of wells all around our landscape.

Actually, it's kind of funny - just to move off that for a bit, someday, go grab Google Earth and have a look at Nevada and New Mexico where they didn't have those regulations, or at least that technology was not available to them. What you see is, here's one drill head, and then almost in a grid, you see the other drill, you see the other one and it goes on like that.

[Page 2578]

If you look at Alberta, Alberta is not like that - maybe in a couple of places where the older technology is in place, but where there's new technology in place, there's one head, and then you could be kilometres and kilometres and kilometres away before you ever find another head. Those are all connected via pipeline in order to get into the grid.

The point is that as the Wheeler commission was going on, that's the kind of information that I think they wanted to try to disseminate; that's the kind of information that they really wanted the public to learn and understand, and I'm sure that there was way more information. I am making it a lot simpler because of the time that we have to present this third reading speech.

But what was happening, instead of people coming to try to learn about hydraulic fracturing, to try to understand the basics of it, to understand that those casings do go down past the water table, that they are built to a very rigorous standard, that their failure rate is very, very, very low - to even look at the statistics that are across the world, but more specifically in the United States - that their failure rate is extremely low, which brings us to talk about the risks that are identified within the Wheeler report as well.

What is acceptable risk to a community? There's nothing in this world that is without risk. That's a tough debate and tough discussion to have. There will be some kind of adverse effect somewhere because of bad regulation or bad technology. The example that I have been able to find, that I've researched, more specifically to the Pennsylvania experience - I forget the number of wells that are drilled and fracked in Pennsylvania, but it is in the thousands - and I forget what it is; I think there were one or two wells that have failed.

When you go back and find out why they failed, they failed because of bad regulation; they were drilled at a time before the state really took hold of that resource and said, here's what we're going to try to build around it; and bad companies, bad companies who cheated to get that well drilled. I think that if we now take our experience with the offshore, if we look at the stringent regulations that we have, the quality of companies that are doing that business, I think that we can have a tremendous level of comfort that it will be done correctly.

Again, to me that is Drilling 101, that's Fracking 101, and how these things go out. We've said that we want to see where those formations are. We think there should be more work done on identifying what that resource is and to identify how big that resource is as well, because that number changes from the time we started trying to identify it to today. The numbers that are used within the Wheeler report start in 2001, I believe, or maybe even prior to that. Those are 13-year-old numbers. They have been updated to a certain point but because there is no activity in drilling in Nova Scotia, there is really no real-world identification of what that resource truly is, so of course there needs to be work done on that one, Mr. Speaker.

[Page 2579]

So going to the recommendations, and I thought for the benefit of the House, that maybe we could go and make sure they are part of our public record. I will table this document when I'm done, which is starting at Page 324 of the Wheeler report on hydraulic fracturing, basically a part of that conclusion.

By the way, I did want to identify this as well, and you'll see that as I submit this document for the record, "conclusion" is actually spelled wrong on the Wheeler report. I don't know if you noticed that, it's actually kind of funny, it's "conclusion" with a "tion" - it's a conclution, I don't know if "conclution" is a real word, but I think there's a typo here that has not been identified for the public record, which I find kind of funny for such an important document.

So the contingent general recommendations which begin on Page 325 of the report, "If at some point in the future communities and the Province wish to proceed with seismic testing with a view to permitting exploration for unconventional gas and oil resources using hydraulic fracturing, the following recommendations would come into play:" and I'm not going to read them word for word, as much as I would like to do that to make sure they are part of our record, but I am going to go through them. Like I said, there are 30, so I don't have enough time in my 40 minutes left, or my 20 minutes left now - 20 minutes goes by that quickly, I'm just having such a great time.

Number one: "If new knowledge persuades communities to welcome the prospect of examining the potential benefits and costs of developing unconventional gas and oil resources then seismic testing for the purpose of pursuing exploration using hydraulic fracturing would proceed only when full, prior, and informed community consent…" So again, we're getting into the community consent recommendations of the report.

Really, the second one is just a secondary point which talks about how community consent might be found within it - baseline monitoring, health and social environmental impact assessments, detailed lifecycle assessments and negative climate change impacts, risk reduction, participatory planning and adaptive management frameworks, bond and insurance protections in the event of damage, so all those things to be done up front before a well would be drilled or fracked, where we need to find further work. Neither one of those two recommendations, so far, says ban hydraulic fracturing in the province.

The next one is "Contingent Specific Recommendations… Health and Environmental Impact Assessments". There are 12 recommendations within those ones. It really talks about how, "Government and regulators should increase their capacity to plan, commission, interpret, and act on the results of" health assessments and environmental assessments, so to take the ones that we have done and see how they possibly can be applied on a context of drilling, hydraulic fracturing in the province.

[Page 2580]

Baseline studies, it talks about how, "Government should review, revise and monitor standards for environmental exposures (chemical and radiological) and environmental nuisance (noise, odour, vibration…)" We know that as something is drilled or this kind of industrial development is going on, of course there's a lot of noise and dust and vibrations that go along with it. It is how to mitigate it or how to work with communities to get through that.

I thought this one was great, number five, "Companies should be obliged to place records of all chemicals used in hydraulic fracturing." I think I spoke a little earlier of what things go into the water in hydraulic fracturing. Wouldn't it be great if we knew exactly what it is because what happens is that different companies have proprietary recipes - I guess you would call them - of what goes into a hydraulic fracturing liquid.

Traffic management plans for those communities: We know that as hydraulic fracturing comes to our communities, they might impact a certain area, a certain amount of roads, so of course that has to be taken into consideration as well.

Setback distances, I talked about that - when a pad is drilled, hopefully for 15 different wells going in 15 different directions, so that the impact on a larger piece of property or forest or projected place even, so that you can sort of skim it off into one spot so that the impact in that area is very low. From the report:

"Appropriate set-back distances for hydraulic fracturing well-pad placement should be determined to reduce exposure to industrial materials and nuisance (light and noise) to levels which are acceptable to communities. Set-back distances should be informed by exposure risk assessments through community engagement."

I think a good example of a regulation that maybe failed is the one that was drilled in Inverness, near Lake Ainslie. I think the biggest issue that that community had was the proximity of that drill head to the lake. Had there been good regulations on setbacks, maybe that might have been mitigated and maybe some of that project could be going forward.

Working with Health Canada "… to establish environmental and occupational standards for the management of NORMs and incorporate these into regulatory and monitoring processes …" So again, developing real guidelines on how hydraulic fracturing should happen in the province.

Of course, "A process for baseline health, social, economic, and ecological status assessment and monitoring for people living, working, attending school, taking recreation (e.g. hunting and fishing)" - of course, a lot of these things happen in the woods too - "or playing in proximity to industrial activity …" All of these are very good recommendations on how the government should proceed.

[Page 2581]

Calling on the government to "… develop and adopt an appropriate methodology to link and track environmental, social, economic, and community health status monitoring in order to properly assess short term, long term and cumulative risks and any new mitigation strategies and regulatory approaches required by unconventional gas and oil development through hydraulic fracturing."

"Government should apply an equity lens to its monitoring of the economic, social, community health …" So all of these are sending the government out or should be sending the government out to put together a very stringent piece of regulation that will allow this development to go forward. Again, in all of those - I mean, like I said, there are 12 of them under that heading. Not one of them says, ban hydraulic fracturing in the Province of Nova Scotia.

"Emergency Preparedness … The Government of Nova Scotia should work with relevant municipalities …" just in case there is an incident or how to plan for it, no differently than the work that I did in the community of Surette's Island when we were replacing the bridge. What happens if something fails? The case that we worked on, the emergency preparedness there, is what if the old bridge failed before the new bridge was put in place? Thank goodness, and knock on wood, nothing happened during that time, but the community was prepared, as communities should be prepared, for a possibility of some kind of failure during the process.

I think the one that we hear the most of, which ends up having four recommendations, works around the water resource management, because I think the biggest criticism that hydraulic fracturing continues to receive is the amounts of water that are required to do the fracking. If you're doing one well, you can recover that water and do another well, but at some point you need to continue to add water to it. And then what do you do with the water resource afterwards?

The Wheeler report recommends four items. Again, it's baseline testing, which I think is important for everything. What is your water before you get going on a process like this? Additionally, it wants hydrologic and hydrogeological modelling of the watershed that you would be taking your water out of. I think the experience in a number of places is that there is such a large quantity of water that the aquifers are being drained of their resource - not the fact that there's a contamination between the well and the water source, but just the fact that they're taking too much water out of those aquifers. So put a piece of regulation in that requires the companies to take all the water back out of those drill heads, to make sure we recuperate as much of that water to be reused again, so that once you start using it you are not having to add to your fracking liquid in order to continue to do that.

[Page 2582]

I'll take a little side on this one. The reason we see alternate products being used in fracking today, like propane - Corridor in New Brunswick is using propane. Of course, propane is highly volatile; it is a dangerous substance; it's something we don't want to release into our environment; and it's expensive. So for those four reasons, it is incumbent on the company - for a bunch of reasons, not just environmentally, money is there, too - they have to recuperate all that propane out of that drill to be used again, because it is expensive stuff. So if you put a piece of regulation around when you use the water, we need to realize that water is expensive as well.

"CSR15: Consistent with the Activities Designation Regulations, water requirements for hydraulic fracturing for the purpose of unconventional gas and oil development would require proponents to pay for a comprehensive groundwater and/or surface water technical analysis." So you get the companies to do that.

"CSR16: A water safety plan should be developed to ensure transparency and understanding of operations and processing chemicals used." Again, making it available for everybody for see. Keep it as transparent as you possibly can.

"CSR17: Full transparency and prior regulatory approval of all procedures and requirements for wastewater disposal and/or treatment and discharge to open waters or other disposal should be in force before any exploration or development of unconventional gas and oil resources occurs through hydraulic fracturing." So it's no different than the problem we're having with the Kennetcook or the Debert water that is sitting there, now, the debate that we're having in Amherst. All these things are happening, for the most part, separately from government. So we have Amherst that is now saying, well, our system can accept this product and be able to filter it.

I think if the government worked to put a good set of regulations together on this one, worked with the industry in order to make it happen, this would make it all more palatable. So out of those four recommendations, none of those said, ban it and don't go forward.

"Industry Best Practices" - of course, there is a lot of opportunity to look around the world to see what other people are doing. This has been happening for so long now that we can see the progression of good regulation, of good companies, of good technology that has gone from something that was safe, I think, to something that is really safe.

Looking across the world, looking at the experience in Alberta and in Saskatchewan, might not be the best example for us because of geology. Geology dictates a lot of the things that happen when it comes to hydraulic fracturing. But the Pennsylvanias, and at this point the Quebecs - there are a whole bunch of other experiences that I think we can look at and learn from, and quite honestly, steal their best practices and make them ours, make them relevant to our environment.

[Page 2583]

"Government Best Practices" - I think this is where the minister and his department have the biggest role to play. Many of these things have the Department of Environment involved. Some here, of course, are municipal issues that have the Department of Service Nova Scotia and the Department of Municipal Affairs involved in it. The Department of Labour and Advanced Education is all over this as well, because it's an industrial issue and we want to make sure that the workers who are going to be involved in it are going to be kept safe.

This is CSR19: "Government would need to create certainty through developing clear policies, legislation, and regulations in advance if it ever intends to develop its unconventional onshore gas and oil resources through hydraulic fracturing. These should be set within consistent policies and strategies for all upstream resource development. Adequate funding must be committed to supporting these regulations, and a sufficient number of qualified persons must be assigned to monitor and enforce these regulations."

I think that's probably the best recommendation that's held within this document, the one that sort of goes to our argument that a ban is not the right thing to do. Recommendation 19 is the right thing to do, making sure government is ready for hydraulic fracturing should it happen in the province, not to just ban it and hope that it's never going to happen in the future.

CSR20 goes with it too: "Government must ensure that its monitoring and enforcements activities are accessible through a public database and that expectations are fully understood in order to avoid future contestation of regulations by developers of unconventional gas and oil resources through hydraulic fracturing."

I think those are probably the two most important recommendations that are held within this report. Government has the duty to get it ready. The minister and the Premier assure us that this is exactly what they're doing, but I think they're doing it backwards. They're banning first and doing the work later when really you should just go out and do the work. I think that would be the prudent thing to do.

Then we get into "Liabilities of Developers" and there are six recommendations there that really talk to should something go wrong and how the government reacts to it, how the proponents themselves react to it and how communities are protected by it. They "… must be able to discharge their full liabilities for harms caused to people, fauna, flora, or the environment consistent with governmental assessment of risks, and there should be adequate liability coverage that prevents the transfer of excessive costs to the public purse." They need to require "to post a restoration bond commensurate with the potential costs of 'worst case' restoration needs."

CSR23: "Government should determine how it will fund clean-up, remediation or other harms where a surety has expired or where no single operator can be identified as the source of harm through the development of unconventional gas and oil resources using hydraulic fracturing."

[Page 2584]

I think one of the examples of how it can go bad on the Pennsylvania side of things is one of the problems they had - there was an unidentified wellhead that was sitting close to another one. You had one company doing its work and when it fracked or flared, I don't know which, down the road there was a wellhead that was not listed on the government's list and that one popped. This company ended up having to remediate and take care of a previous company's mistake. Through bad regulation, or no regulation, that was allowed to happen.

I don't expect that to happen here, I think if we do the work correctly and we do the work upfront these things won't happen, but liability is there nonetheless.

CSR25: "… adequate provision to support community involvement in participatory planning and adaptive management activities, including their involvement in economic diversification strategies to avoid dependency on the unconventional gas and oil industry." So again, it's not the be-all and end-all, it's an opportunity for our communities, it's an opportunity for people to work here in Nova Scotia, but we shouldn't be completely dependent on it either, there should be a requirement for those communities to do what it does best, whether it's other resources or other manufacturing."

CSR24: "Developers of unconventional gas and oil resources using hydraulic fracturing must expect punitive fines for violations of regulations and under-reporting of system weaknesses or breakdowns …"

Then we get into CSR27, which is Participation in Benefits. "The government of Nova Scotia should develop a policy of benefit allocation from the activities of the unconventional gas and oil industry e.g. royalty sharing to ensure that communities affected by development receive adequate compensation for risk and costs and tangible benefits in terms of community health and social investments …"

I think that's something we talked about a number of times when we went to communities, that the municipality hosting a gas play would receive part of those royalties, or a part of those royalties, for hosting it. It's a great idea, there is CSR27.

There are CSR28 and CSR29, which specifically talk about the Mi'kmaq community and how you work with them in order to respect their rights, their ownership of this resource as well. "The Province must ensure that it engages in a consultation process that is fully responsive to the nature and extent of the Mi'kmaq's inherent and constitutionally protected Aboriginal rights in the event that exploration or development of unconventional gas and resources using hydraulic fracturing ever occurs in Nova Scotia."

CSR29: "Time and effort must be devoted specifically to allow the Mi'kmaw community to deliberate and conclude their discussions with respect to the recommendations in this Report. Aboriginal communities should be supported in developing further capacity and expertise in assessing all issues of specific concern raised by the development of unconventional gas and oil resources using hydraulic fracturing through a method that is endorsed by Aboriginal communities and provide full access to independent advice."

[Page 2585]

And then the last one, which is CSR30, which is an important one - I know the minister has talked about this too - is the permission to proceed: "Defining Community and Community Permission to Proceed." So what is the community? Because a lot of times everybody seems to have their hand in it, so is it a municipality? Is it a town? Is it community or is it landowner? Determine what that is and then determine how to proceed with that, as well.

Some of those are actually in the first recommendations as well. It shows up again here in CSR30, and I'll read that again as it is and then finish up with this. "The province must work with the municipalities, Aboriginal leaderships, and other community-based organizations to define mechanisms through which community opinion on the development of unconventional gas and oil resources may be defined and voiced. The Province should also work with communities to develop a process for determining the level of community support for hydraulic fracturing for the purpose of developing unconventional gas and oil resources. Community 'permission to proceed' should presumptively be a pre-condition for hydraulic fracturing to proceed and should be clearly defined."

That is the 30th recommendation. They are all in the document, the report of the Nova Scotia Independent Panel on Hydraulic Fracturing, which we, of course, call the Wheeler report. They range from Pages 325 to 330, so through five pages it lines up a whole bunch of what the report means, or how the report should be implemented, and the work that government and communities should be undertaking to make sure that things are done correctly and things are done safely when it comes to hydraulic fracturing.

Mr. Speaker, nowhere through this does it say that we should ban it or we should put a moratorium on it, or we should outright say no. What it says is that we've got a lot of work to do. We've got an awful lot of work to do. The department has a lot of work. This minister and successive ministers will still have a lot of work to do when it comes to this particular issue.

What we have is a ban that's in place that we believe says no to the industry, and some of the things that this says - that further work that needs to be done can be done by industry, will not be done by industry, it will be done by government - maybe - or others on the taxpayers' dime. They'll be doing the research. I don't know if the government's willing to do drilling itself in order to find out what those resources are, how those things should work, or testing specific recommendations within it. That is the challenge that we have with Bill No. 6 and how it bans the issue right out.

[Page 2586]

I know there are a few minutes left on this one and I know Question Period is coming up, and I do want to make sure that we do come back to debate the remainder of this bill. We are going to be having a vote on it today and I look forward to that, but in the meantime, I would like to adjourn debate on Bill No. 6 for Question Period.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is to adjourn debate on Bill No. 6.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS TO MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

Prem. - Power Bills: Savings - Update

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. Last year during CBC TV's Leaders' debate in the election, the Premier promised Nova Scotians that they would save $42 million on their electricity bills in the first year of a Liberal Government. Now we know that's simply not going to happen. At least $35 million is simply being deferred to another day, and government officials are down at the URB as we speak, trying to push more rate increases into the future with interest.

I would like to ask the Premier, can he update the House on the new number of savings Nova Scotians can expect on their power bills next year?

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, what Nova Scotians can expect is that on January 1st the NDP electricity tax, known as the efficiency tax, will be removed from every power bill across this province. It is the position of this government that that money belongs in the pockets of ratepayers, not shareholders.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, what we know is that the efficiency charge is not being saved. It's simply being deferred to another day. It's at least $35 million this year, and it's going to pop right back onto our power bills in the future, plus interest. There's almost $100 million in fuel surcharges that the government is trying to push into the future, plus interest at a rate of 7.8 per cent. All of that is going to go into the pockets of Nova Scotia Power, not the ratepayers of Nova Scotia.

I'd like to ask the Premier, how is paying 7.8 per cent interest to Nova Scotia Power making ratepayers better off?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. I take great pride in telling Nova Scotians that this government is keeping its commitment by removing the efficiency tax. That money belongs in the pockets of every ratepayer. It is my hope that all members of this House will stand with ratepayers and ensure that that money belongs and stays in their pockets.

[Page 2587]

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, it's all our hope that this House, all members, will stand with ratepayers, but the fact of the matter is that the money the Premier is referring to is going to end up in the pockets of the shareholders of Nova Scotia Power, plus interest compounding at the rate of 8 per cent at some future date, maybe as early as April 2015. Not even the NDP allowed that to happen under their watch. Not even the NDP allowed that.

It turns out Nova Scotia Power is even better off under the Liberals, at 7.8 per cent interest, than they ever were under the NDP. I will ask the Premier, can he explain why Nova Scotia Power is going to make more money plus interest under the Liberals than they did under the NDP?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Energy will respond.

HON. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, first of all, the deferrals were much higher under the NDP. Secondly, I don't know why it is that the Leader of the Official Opposition thinks ratepayers should be paying money instead of getting the $33 million that they overpaid to Nova Scotia Power last year back in their pockets to reduce the deferral. Instead, the Tories want to get more money out of ratepayers. I just don't understand.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Acting Leader of the New Democratic Party.

Prem. - Nurses: Gov't. Respect - Ensure

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is for the Premier. As the Minister of Health and Wellness has indicated, our province has more nurses than the national average, and that's something we should all be very thankful for. But if we fail to treat nurses with the respect they deserve, this can change pretty quickly.

My question for the Premier is, what steps is the government taking to ensure that nurses in our province feel respected by this government?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to assure the honourable member that as I travel this province talking to nurses, they appreciate the work this government is doing. They appreciate the work that the Minister of Health and Wellness is doing in terms of ensuring that we streamline the health care system, that we ensure we protect their bargaining rights, and at the same time ensure that any savings are plowed into front-line health care.

[Page 2588]

MS. MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, it has come to my attention that since nurses have lost many of their democratic and collective bargaining rights under this government, not all nurses are feeling respected; in fact, it has come to my attention that 50 nurses in the Capital District Health Authority have initiated the process to leave by January 1, 2015. So my question to the Premier is, what steps is his government taking to ensure that the strained relations between his government and nurses in the former Capital District won't lead to nursing shortages that will have a negative impact on patient care?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to assure the honourable member that this government continues to respect the work that nurses do. It's why this government brought in legislation to protect their right to bargain. We wanted to make sure at the same time we were protecting an essential services piece of legislation, unlike the former government that stripped the right to strike from paramedics, took away their entire rights.

This government respected the collective bargaining process but we also have to make sure that we protect Nova Scotians and that they deserve to have essential services health care in this province from one community to the other. I can't speak specifically about the 50 nurses the member is referring to but I can tell you that the nurses I speak to across this province have one thing on their mind and that is their patients before them.

MS. MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, nursing shortages lead to cancelled surgeries, higher rates of overtime, burnout, and many other problems that have a direct impact on patient care. It's very simple, my last question is, why isn't the Premier taking any action on what could be an impending nursing shortage at the Queen Elizabeth hospital?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I'll ask the Minister of Health and Wellness to respond.

HON. LEO GLAVINE » : I'm pleased to say that we started yesterday consulting with nurses on the new nursing strategy, the very area that the former government took money from developing. We started a consulting process with nurses across Nova Scotia yesterday and they will be part of how that is shaped and making sure that Nova Scotians have sufficient nurses in this province for the future.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

Health & Wellness - Flavoured Tobacco:

Ban Removal - Scientific Reason

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : In a February column, that he penned himself, the Health and Wellness Minister seemed clear when he wrote, "Healthcare is the largest expenditure in Nova Scotia. Some drastic measures have been undertaken and are seeing continued and positive results, such as the dismantling of one of the largest burdens on our system: smoking."

[Page 2589]

Yet in less than two weeks of introducing Bill No. 60 on a subject he previously felt so strongly about, the Minister of Health and Wellness gutted his own bill by removing the ban on flavoured tobacco. With the exception of organized lobbyists, no one has suggested that flavored tobacco should be exempted from an immediate plan. So my question is, what scientific fact changed the minister's mind about the dangers of tobacco, flavoured or otherwise?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : I think the honourable member was present yesterday when I indicated very clearly that a ban on flavoured tobacco will take place on the same day as the bill that will pass this session and we'll make sure that the youth of our province are protected from the scourge of Big Tobacco.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : I mean the facts are clear, we've heard it many times in this House over the last number of days, tobacco has been known to be dangerous for years. The Province of B.C. successfully imposed costs on imperial tobacco for the harmful effects of tobacco and the health care costs that result, costs that the minister himself called a burden just a few shorts months ago in that article. Here is another widely accepted fact that flavoured tobacco is a new tool for hooking kids on smoking. Who from the pro-tobacco industry convinced the minister that flavoured tobacco would be safe while the minister consults on widely accepted facts?

MR. GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I think I've indicated very clearly my views, our government's views, and the views of the Department of Health and Wellness, on how we feel about Big Tobacco.

Health & Wellness - Flavoured Tobacco Exemption:

Lobbyists - Contacts

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Nova Scotians, including the Canadian Cancer Society, have been trying to find some logic in the decision of the Minister of Health and Wellness to exempt flavoured tobacco, along with flavoured e-juice, for further consultation. I mean we've asked question after question, we've spent hours of debate to find out how this view could have changed 180 degrees. The answers have been unsatisfactory.

What communications - and we're probably going to FOIPOP this one as well - so what written or oral communications has he had, or any member of his office undertaken to receive, from lobbyists representing the industry with an interest in tobacco sales since becoming Minister of Health and Wellness?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, one thing I can tell the member opposite is that we brought in a bill that is directed at improving the health of all Nova Scotians but, in particular, the youth of our province.

[Page 2590]

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : On October 24th the minister introduced Bill No. 60, flavoured tobacco would be banned unless specifically exempt by regulation, and eleven days later the minister removed the ban on flavoured tobacco altogether.

On October 16th, Liberal campaign chairman Chris MacInnes registered to lobby the government on behalf of the industry that sells cigarettes themselves. What meetings or communications of any kind has the minister - or his office or the Premier's Office or whatever - had with Mr. MacInnis - or at Mr. MacInnis' request - in the matter of tobacco?

MR. GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, you know when we were putting this bill together we consulted with Doctors Nova Scotia, the Canadian Cancer Society, our department under Dr. Strang - we had absolutely no contact, no conversations with Chris MacInnis.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Acting Leader of the New Democratic Party.

Fin. - Big Tobacco: Conversations - Min. Confirm

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board. Two days ago my office was contacted by an out-of-province company, a consulting firm, calling to ask for a meeting with myself, as the Finance Critic of the NDP, to meet with their clients, Rothmans Benson & Hedges, Big Tobacco, later this month.

Mr. Speaker, it seems unlikely to me that I would be the only elected official in this province to be contacted by Big Tobacco for a meeting, so my question to the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board is this: Has the minister or any members of her department been approached by big tobacco companies in the past six months for an opportunity to raise the concerns of Big Tobacco?

HON. DIANA WHALEN » : Mr. Speaker, I have not been contacted by Rothmans or any of the others. Only yesterday I went through all the lists of requests for meetings and invitations, there was nothing of that sort in it, so I have not heard anything about this.

MS. MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, I realize that many members of the government are naive enough to believe that Big Tobacco isn't lobbying people in their government, but I'm not naive around this - I know very well that there are efforts underway. So Big Tobacco, according to the Minister of Health and Wellness, has had no conversations with the Premier, with himself or any other members of the Health and Wellness Department?

I want to ask the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board: Will she reassure Nova Scotians that members of her department will not meet with Big Tobacco representatives regarding contraband cigarettes, flavoured tobacco, or any other matters the tobacco industry wants to lobby around?

[Page 2591]

MS. WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, I do find it a little odd that it would be the NDP that have been contacted by Big Tobacco and we haven't. I think this is something that certainly needs to be watched and I'd like to know why they might be meeting. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

ERDT. - GOV'T. POLICIES: BUS. GROWTH - EFFECTS

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Economic Development. Earlier in the month we learned that Halifax fell from 17th to 38th on the Canadian Federation of Independent Business list of places to do business in our country. Most recently we also learned that 27 per cent of mining companies surveyed by the Mining Association of Nova Scotia anticipate decreasing their number of employees in the coming months. Many companies are feeling less optimistic now than they did at the beginning of the year. My question is, with the evidence piling up, will the minister admit that this government's policies are preventing Nova Scotia businesses from growing?

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, the exact opposite is what is happening. We are hearing from business saying how pleased they are that we have a government that's doing exactly what it said it would and that it's taking the cheque book away from Cabinet, and has instead placed it's confident in business leaders and community leaders through independent boards to be able to make investments on their behalf.

It's ironic that the Critic on the other side would talk about lack of confidence in the mining industry in Nova Scotia. I would say to her, wait for the next couple of weeks and months to see exactly how the confidence will be shown in our mining community under the leadership of our Minister of Natural Resources

MS. MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, respondents to the Mining Association of Nova Scotia's survey said:

"… the general state of the economy is the biggest obstacle their business faces with government regulation being a close second. Producers, who employ the largest number of people in the industry, said government regulation is their biggest challenge.

The industry's policy concerns include a 75 per cent hike in claim staking fees… an unnecessarily difficult regulatory regime for prospecting and exploration; and the high cost of operating in Nova Scotia."

[Page 2592]

I can table that, Mr. Speaker. When will this government get out of the way of job creators and begin creating the winning conditions for job creation?

MR. SAMSON « » : Speaker, since the premised on the mining industry, I would refer to my good friend, the Minister of Natural Resources, to respond.

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Nova Scotia is on the cusp of some very exciting mining opportunities, Mr. Speaker, and one of the reasons for that is because, for the first time in 25 years, we have a government that is reviewing the Mineral Resources Act, reviewing the regulatory framework for that industry, and we're going to bring forth changes that are going to make Nova Scotia a very competitive jurisdiction when it comes to mining.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

Health & Wellness: Long-Term Care Beds - Plans

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : On Wednesday, while trying to explain the 80 per cent increase in the home care wait-list, the Minister of Health and Wellness told a reporter that he was concerned about the present list, but it's a transitional time for the government to move from nursing homes being built to delivering more care in the home. When asked by the reporter to clarify if the Health and Wellness Minister really said the province is not going to add any more long-term care beds? The minister indicated - no more beds, but we'll replace those that are needed, and those that were on the priority list prior to the last election.

I'd like to ask, can the Minister of Health and Wellness confirm for all members of this House that he will not be adding any additional long-term care beds to our province?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, we said very early on that our government would transition to more care in the home - that's where, through surveying, well over 90 per cent of Nova Scotians said that they preferred to stay and receive care there. We will be proceeding with replacement of those homes that are now at the point of needing to be replaced.

MR. WILSON « » : Well, I have to say, Mr. Speaker, it's not working well - an 80 percent increase in the wait list for home care over the last six months.

Last year, I was pleased to hear the announcement of plans for a new 25-bed long-term care home for the Sisters of Saint Martha, and a 42-bed for the Birches home for special care in Musquodoboit Harbour. Can the minister confirm whether he plans to open both of these facilities so that those seniors can remain in their communities when they enter a long-term care facility?

[Page 2593]

MR. GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'd like to thank the member for the question and to update the House and also those who are concerned about those two facilities. They are now before the Treasury Board to be finalized. There are obviously complications with Bethany, it's not a straightforward build, but what I can assure the member opposite is both those facilities will get underway and, hopefully, completed during our term in office.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

Fin.: Broten Review - Printer

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Finance and Treasury Board. Can the minister inform the House when Ms. Broten's tax report was sent to the printer and how long it is supposed to take to print?

HON. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, there seems to be a great deal of interest in the tax and regulatory review and I'm delighted to see that. I can also assure the House that I'm very anxious as well to get a copy of that in my hands. I'm not sure it's at the printer even yet. What I had said - and I might add I had checked Hansard from the last couple of weeks in earlier questions - I said it was being prepared for the printers, that charts and graphs were being added, that it was being proofread, that it was being checked to see that it was readable and understandable. All of that is being done now, so that's the preparation for sending it to the printers as I understand it.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that answer. My reading of Ms. Broten's contract is to say the work was supposed to be done by the end of October. My question for the minister: Is Ms. Broten's report late at this stage or not?

MS. WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, as I've said before, Ms. Broten's work is done. She has completed all of her work and it's at a stage now of ensuring that the document is correct, that we have made no mistakes, that's it's all laid out well. I have not seen the document. I understand others are working on that now as we speak and it will be ready within this month. I've promise it will be delivered within the month of November.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

Health & Wellness: Boys HPV Vaccinations - Min. Stance

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, earlier this session my colleague and friend for Sydney-Whitney Pier asked the Minister of Health and Wellness about providing HPV vaccine to boys and young men. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommends this to prevent some types of face and neck cancer. Recently Alberta and P.E.I. have followed this advice and began vaccinating boys as well as girls.

[Page 2594]

I'd like to ask the Minister of Health and Wellness: Could the minister please tell us what his position is on vaccinating boys in Nova Scotia against HPV?

HON. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm sure I can speak for all members in this House when I say we hope that the member for Sydney-Whitney Pier is making good progress in his recovery. (Applause)

I know that this is an issue very close to him now, one that we have conversed about, one that I have set the department in motion to take a look at what costs this would be, what number of young people in Nova Scotia could be positively impacted by this, and I know we'll have further details on this very shortly.

MR. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the minister's comments on that. The cost of vaccinating girls against HPV is less than about $700,000. The cost to vaccinate the boys would be, I would presume, about the same or even maybe a little bit less. It's an investment worth making to prevent someone in the future from receiving a diagnosis of cancer.

I'll have to ask the minister on behalf of my colleague: Will the minister commit today that in the upcoming budget for 2015-16 it will include funding for vaccinating boys against HPV?

MR. GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, for the benefit of the House, we know that particular vaccine can be given over a much longer period, even into adulthood to be effective. Perhaps the member opposite has given me a suggestion as to where we can put some of the $5.5 million savings that we will have from restructuring.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

Justice: Retroactivity - B.C. Supreme Court Decision

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice. In a recent newspaper article the Minister of Justice said, "To retroactively change the balance of different people's rights, this is not something that's been done in Canada."

However, I wonder if the minister is familiar with the 2005 decision by the Supreme Court of Canada where the Province of B.C. sought to recoup damages from Imperial Tobacco for harmful effects of tobacco smoke. The Supreme Court decision was, "Except in respect of criminal law, the retrospectivity and retroactivity of which is limited by s. 11 (g) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, there is no requirement of legislative prospectivity embodied in the rule of law or any provision of our Constitution."

My question is, was the Minister of Justice aware of the Supreme Court of Canada case or did she misspeak in the newspaper interview?

[Page 2595]

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Thank you to my colleague for that question. Again, this is a complicated issue in law. It is one that I've attempted to address to the honourable member when I addressed his concerns later and when I spoke to the media, and what I will do at third reading is definitely have those answer for him. Thank you.

MR. MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, Barry Sutherland is a survivor of sexual abuse who doesn't understand the Minister of Justice's logic. He doesn't understand why the minister would deprive him of the same rights she is willing to give others in civil law that may be sexually assaulted in the future. Will the minister explain to Mr. Sutherland why she will treat him differently than any present victim of sexual abuse?

MS. DIAB « » : Again, my role as the Attorney General is to look at the law and look at the legislation that we're introducing and ensure that it's applied uniformly to all victims of crime and all individuals in the Province of Nova Scotia. I can't speak to any individual cases; I'm not privy to those and it would not be proper for me to speak to those cases and I can't speak to what could possibly happen in the future. Everybody has the right to litigate in civil action. Anybody can file a lawsuit, anybody can file one today or tomorrow; that is not up to me to make those decisions.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I just want to remind the member for Inverness that it is not the duty of any member of this House or any ministers to answer specific question on cases or questions related to individual circumstances. I'm just throwing it out there.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

Nat. Res. - Deer Population: Agric. & TIR Mins. - Consultation

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : My question is for the Minister of Natural Resources and because I have such a soft spot for animals, this is a lose-lose question. In an article in The Chronicle Herald this August, the Department of Natural Resources indicated that in some regions deer herds have grown sustainably. The article also noted that Colchester is one county where deer numbers have climbed substantially and that "… there have been numerous complaints from farmers about a higher number of deer causing problems with crops."

Increasing deer herds are a concern for both motorists and farmers if not kept under control. So my question for the minister is, has he consulted with the Minister of Agriculture and the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal regarding problems posed by the deer population?

HON. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : I thank the member for the question. Yes we have, the Minister of Agriculture and I met with the Federation of Agriculture to discuss these issues early on in the summer, perhaps before the summer. We've come up with some various activities that we are pursuing to address the herd population from a population control perspective and from a fencing and protection perspective of the farmers.

[Page 2596]

What we've done in the Department of Natural Resources is in the areas where those deer populations have increased, we've either had open deer season this hunting season or we've increased the amount of doe licences, Mr. Speaker, and by addressing the doe population in particular, that's the best way we can control the populations in those troubled areas.

MR. HARRISON « » : You just answered my second question. So the minister has actually looked at the hunting season and will increase the number that can be harvested in that period of time.

MR. CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, we have already done that for this hunting season, which is still ongoing right now. There are two hunting districts that have open hunting season on deer, those are the areas that have the highest deer populations and areas like Highway No. 101, down in the South Shore-Yarmouth area, we have doubled the amount of doe licences in those particular areas, to deal with the deer population, to make our roads safer and to support our agriculture sector, which has been experiencing difficulties because of this.

I will add, Mr. Speaker, that when it comes to these decisions, we do stay focused on the science and on the information that our wildlife biologists provide us when it comes to the population. I think we've moved forward in a reasonable and fair way that protects our communities from these pests, in some circumstances, and protects our drivers on the roads.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

Environ.: Amherst Waste Water Disposal - Health Risk

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Town of Amherst indicated that they have asked the Department of Environment to host an information session about the proposal to have treated fracking waste water disposed of in the LaPlanche River. I've been in contact with the concerned citizens there who are hoping they can finally get the full picture of what is being proposed.

My question for the Minister of Environment is, does he believe this project is an environmental health risk to the people of Amherst and their surrounding waterways?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for the question.

[Page 2597]

This is a question with respect to a project that I haven't received a formal application with respect to it, so I don't have the details myself with respect to the details and the technical nature of the details of the proposal being discussed between the Municipality of Amherst and other stakeholders who are looking to dispose of this water.

What I know about that project is primarily what others know, that they are in discussions with AIS to dispose of the water, but the actual details of it, I can't comment on because it hasn't been brought formally to the department.

MS. ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, as I said, the Town of Amherst has asked the Department of Environment to host the information session about this proposal. The people of Amherst don't really want to be just consulted on this issue, they want to be engaged - they want to see a democratic process employed where they are able to ask questions and interact with decision makers. So how will the minister ensure that the upcoming information session with his department will both engage and inform residents about this project, and will the minister commit to attending when they set a date so that he can hear first-hand about the concerns that residents have?

MR. DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, thank you again to the member opposite for the question.

I'd just like to clarify - I recall being notified that a request has come into the department to my attention from the municipality in Amherst. The specific nature of that request is not to talk about the project, because the Department of Environment is not engaged or involved in the project. What the specific nature of the request was if the Department of Environment would come to the community to help discuss the technical aspects of what we know about the product being proposed to be disposed of there - not the overall product, but of the water itself and to provide information.

Mr. Speaker, I would suggest that what we are looking at and considering with respect to responding to that request is similar to public information sessions that took place in the member's area earlier in the year, January, again in I believe April-ish. And yes, I was there, and if scheduling permits, I would certainly be happy to join my colleague, the member for the region, in Amherst.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou Centre.

Justice - Youth Crime: Reduction Progs.

HON. PAT DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Justice. One of the major objectives of police in Nova Scotia is working with youth to reduce their participation in crime. As an example, Constable Ken MacDonald of the New Glasgow Police Department is very active with youth across Pictou County.

[Page 2598]

My question for the minister is, what are the measures, programs and approaches used by the Department of Justice to reduce crime within the youth population?

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, it's indeed a very, very good question and I think it's one that leads to what was started yesterday in Question Period. Justice and policing partners, whether it's the policing in different cities or municipalities or our partners, the RCMP, meet on a monthly basis with various committees and not only do we discuss youth but we discuss all Nova Scotians.

In terms of youth, as I said we meet on a monthly basis, various justice officials in the public safety sector and all our policing partners.

MR. DUNN « » : Mr. Speaker, several Nova Scotian youth have court-imposed curfews as part of their conditional sentences. My question through you to the minister is, what are the checks and balances that are in place to make sure youth are complying to the terms of their conditional sentences?

MS. DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, our police work very much with our probation officers and with other partners in the community and through those measures and through the assistance of the courts as well. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

TIR: Public Hwys. Act - Snow Shovelling

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal. We have been told by meteorologists to expect some snow throughout Nova Scotia today. Under Section 34 of the Public Highways Act, it says, "All physically fit male persons between the ages of sixteen and sixty… are required to work with their shovels on the highways during the winter whenever the highways become impassable from snow …"

My question to the minister is, can we expect the minister to follow the law of the land and shovel the highway if needed?

HON. GEOFF MACLELLAN » : Mr. Speaker, I want the member to know this is good legislation, this is relevant legislation and not only for myself, I expect all Nova Scotian males to get out there with their shovels and help out on the highway, we need the support.

MR. HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, the Act goes on to say that anyone who "… fails to comply with this Section, he is liable to a penalty of not less than five dollars nor more than ten dollars …" It's fair to say that these penalties have not kept up with inflation so my question for the minister is, can the minister inform the House whether Ms. Broten was instructed to review this penalty as part of her review?

[Page 2599]

MR. MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I think through that legislation we're going to have to shovel a lot more than snow here in the Legislature, but certainly it is important legislation. We'll take it under advisement and we'll check things out. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Acting Leader of the New Democratic Party.

LAE - MOU Table: Students - Inclusion

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education. This Fall student leaders learned that the Liberal Government was excluding them from this year's negotiations around the memorandum of understanding with universities for the first time since 2005. Student leaders say the new consultation process the minister has put into place does not make up for losing their place at the MOU negotiating table and they fear this is being done so changes can be made to the MOU that will negatively impact students. My question for the minister is, in light of the concerns that the students have expressed, why won't she allow students to have a place at the MOU table as they've had in the past?

HON. KELLY REGAN » : Mr. Speaker, I welcome the honourable member's question because there is no MOU table. They can't be at it because there is no MOU table. Thank you.

MS. MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, the minister very well knows that the MOU will shortly be renegotiated and there certainly will be an MOU table, and for the first time since 2004 there will be no student observers at that table. This government doesn't have a consistent approach when it comes to public consultation. We've seen the failure so many times - failure to properly consult or to consult after they have made decisions.

So my question to the minister is very simple: if she truly cares about consulting students and involving them in the MOU process, why will she not allow them to sit as observers when the MOU is negotiated?

MS. REGAN « » : I welcome the honourable member's questions. In fact, Mr. Speaker, my deputy or I or senior staff have met with student groups seven times in recent weeks. In fact, students have had eight sessions during the consultation where they were able to share their views. In the past, when students were at the MOU table, they were there as observers only, and in fact, now they will not only have opportunity for input at every stage of negotiation of the MOU but it won't just be one representative from CFS and one representative from Students Nova Scotia. In fact, every president of every student union is invited to those sessions. (Applause)

[Page 2600]

We're about to do more consultation. We've done a telephone consultation and we're doing online consultations, and students will be involved in those as well.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

EECD - Frank H. MacDonald Sch.:

Conversion - Min. Support Confirm

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : My question is for the Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development. Earlier this year, the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board voted to turn Frank H. MacDonald Elementary School into a Grade P to 8 facility. This was absolutely the right decision, and it has the full support of the community. It's the best way to keep the school community together.

So my question for the minister is, does the minister support the conversion of the Frank H. MacDonald School into a P to 8 building?

HON. KAREN CASEY » : Some people may recall that probably eight years ago there was a review done of the grade configurations within the province, a cross-country review to see which grade configurations would best enhance student learning. The results of that were that a P to 8 grade configuration was preferred, and since that time there have been opportunities in the province to bring schools together to create that environment. East Pictou and F.H. are one of those examples.

MR. HOUSTON « » : I thank the minister for that answer. There certainly is an expectation in the community that the Frank H. MacDonald school will undergo these renovations in order to best accommodate the increase in students, but some in the community are wondering what the status of the beginning of these renovations is.

Does the minister have any reason to believe that these renovations are in jeopardy, and can the minister provide information on when the community should expect to see these renovations at Frank H. MacDonald begin?

MS. CASEY « » : I have shared this information with the member opposite, and I will share it again now for the full House. The decisions as to which schools will be renovated, what projects will be put forward for funding, is a decision that's made by the school board. Those are submitted to the department on an annual basis, and I would encourage the member to talk with the School Advisory Council and with the elected board member to ensure that if it is a priority of the community, it does become a priority of the board.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

[Page 2601]

Environ.: Third Party Complaints - Investigation Process

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Mr. Speaker, yesterday I asked the Minister of Environment how many complaints have gone uninvestigated since his new pilot program was launched. He was unable to provide me with an answer, but I see that his staff were able to provide The Chronicle Herald with a bit more information. According to the article, 20 anonymous tips have been received since the new rules have been in effect, so 20 complaints have gone uninvestigated. The article also goes on to state that the pilot project doesn't apply to "… incidents that would require immediate or emergency response."

Mr. Speaker, can the minister please explain to us how, if they aren't even investigating anonymous complaints, his department can determine if something requires immediate attention?

HON. RANDY DELOREY « » : Mr. Speaker, where to begin? We have only so much time to answer this question, but …

AN HON. MEMBER: It's an important question.

MR. DELOREY « » : Well it is an important question, but I guess the nature of the response could provide a lot of information with respect to how the department operates and how we assess and triage requests that come through, not dissimilar to many other departments or emergency services with respect to how one identifies - I guess for the benefit of the member opposite, I'll try to shorten it up by using an analogy. Perhaps the member could question how 911 responders identify whether something is an emergency or not.

MS. PETERSON-RAFUSE « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, if they will not take the tip, how do they know what it's about and if it's immediate? Look at Crime Stoppers and the anonymous tips that they take every day. In his response to me yesterday during Question Period, the Minister of Environment explained that he decided that this would be a pilot program "rather than rolling out bad policy and bad initiatives across the province of Nova Scotia." And I'll table that.

Mr. Speaker, I'm going to ask the minister, why is he only forcing the bad policy on people of the western region of our province?

MR. DELOREY « » : I guess, perhaps taking that response out of context, the member opposite misses the point. What I'd indicated there was that the notion of proceeding with pilots was that if it ends up having problems or concerns with it, if it ends up being bad policy, we would rather have it done in a contained or a smaller area rather than putting it out across the province at once, so that we can learn as we go through the process, Mr. Speaker.

[Page 2602]

What I can advise the member opposite is that when people do call in, she's made some assumptions with respect to the fact that we take no information when anonymous information is brought forward to the department - I'd like to ask the member opposite if she'd thought through the process of how we would identify whether something is anonymous or not if we don't actually answer the call.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou West.

ERDT - Nova Star: Winter Berth - N.S. Costs

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism.

Within hours yesterday after Question Period, we learned that the ferry Nova Star found a new berthing location and will depart this Saturday for Florida. Can the minister give us an update on what this move will cost Nova Scotia taxpayers?

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, in fact there is an intention for the vessel to leave the Port of Yarmouth on Saturday, due to concerns with the local lobster fishing fleet. It has not been confirmed as to where the vessel is going to be placed. What I can inform the member is that, last night, I had the opportunity to meet with Mr. Chan from STM, who are the owners of the vessel, to discuss some of the challenges that we have faced in our first year of operation, and to look for some partnership with the owners of the vessel to assist us in ensuring that this ferry service remains for the long term.

MS. MACFARLANE « » : I thank the minister for his answer. Earlier this week, in a Chronicle Herald article, the minister was quoted saying it is possible the government would be on the hook for the ship's winterizing costs if the company can't find a run. We know they haven't found a run; we know there's a lot involved in winterizing a ship that size. I'm just wondering, has he any idea approximately what this is going to cost Nova Scotia taxpayers?

MR. SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, we are doing everything possible to ensure that Nova Scotia taxpayers don't have to pay any more than absolutely necessary to ensure that that vessel is available for the ferry service next year. We've met and spoken with the Governor of Maine. Last night, as I indicated, we met with the owners of the vessel. We are getting the message from Nova Scotians that they are happy to have that service in place and that we want to continue that service. I would simply ask the member to encourage the Leader of her Party to work with us to ensure that that service remains in Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens-Shelburne

HON. STERLING BELLEVEAU: My question is for the Minister of Natural Resources.

[Page 2603]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for Oral Questions Put by Members to Ministers has expired.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, since we don't have the transcript from Hansard during Oral Question Period, the member for Argyle-Barrington made mention of a Chris MacInnes, who he indicates registered to lobby on October 16, 2014, and I believe the House Leader mentioned that it was to lobby on behalf of Big Tobacco.

I'm just wondering if the House Leader for the Official Opposition could confirm whether or not he did indicate that the document he tabled was proof of lobbying on behalf of Big Tobacco?

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Specifically, I said that he was registered to lobby the government on behalf of the industry that sells cigarettes, so just for clarification on that.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I'm going to rule this as not a point of order but a disagreement of facts to be clarified at a later date amongst the two members.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, on a new point of order, the document that was tabled by the House Leader for the Official Opposition actually does indicate that there was a registration made by Chris MacInnes on October 16, 2014, on behalf of the business group m5. It goes on to say that the description of the lobbying activities is assistance relating to issues of concern to the members of the Atlantic Convenience Store Association.

It goes on to say, Mr. Speaker, that the subject matter of the lobbying is for small business and the subject matter of the lobbying is related to issues of taxation …

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. This is not a point of order, this is a clarification of facts. We'll now move on to the order of business, Government Business.

[GOVERNMENT BUSINESS]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

[Page 2604]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 6.

Bill No. 6 - Petroleum Resources Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, I know I have only a few minutes left. (Interruption) Seven? Well, I'm not going to take the seven, so if the minister gets into his seat, we'll be all set.

I think it is basically summed up. I mean, I tried to keep my speech today to the Wheeler commission, the document that was presented to the minister back on Labour Day weekend, somewhere near there, where we took three days to come up with a bill that bans hydraulic fracturing in Nova Scotia.

Again, we've said it time and time again, over and over again here, members of our Party echoing what we're hearing from different organizations across the province, business organizations, community members, that say the banning, the idea of a ban is not beneficial or helpful to the future development of an industry like this, even though it could be in the future. We know it's 10 years down the road, even if everything went well and they didn't ban it and they had to do the work to get it ready, it could be off into the future by another 10, 15 years. Who knows?

We believe that the fact that you're saying you are not open for business sends the wrong message for a possibility of good jobs for Nova Scotians. So I'll table the document that I did. Again, it was the Wheeler report, Pages 324 to 330, which are the majority of the recommendations all held in one clean place that all talk to that. Not one of those recommendations say to ban hydraulic fracturing in Nova Scotia.

I know the minister will have a wrap-up, so it will be interesting to hear what he has to say. But also, just to put everybody on notice, there will be a bell ringing on this one, because we do want to have a recorded vote on Bill No. 6. I'm sure that will happen subsequent to the minister's wrap-up speech. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Energy.

HON. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm going to speak for just a few minutes on this before we vote, in part because I think a lot of what I said in opening the debate on this doesn't necessarily bear repeating. I did just want to address a few things.

[Page 2605]

First of all let me say that I have either been here to listen to, or have read everything that's been said by members of …

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I would like to remind the honourable minister that he can only speak in reply once debate has been closed.

MR. YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, it's Friday, it's snowing and we all know we need to go get our shovels so we can go shovel the highways. I didn't bring mine today, so I'm trying to make things a little more rapid so I can go home and get my shovel.

There are a couple of things I just want to address. As I've listened and/or read the things that, for example, the Opposition has spoken to it's amazing to hear how the things they are suggesting we do, are exactly what we are doing. What this seems to center around is whether they particularly like the bill or they don't like the bill.

I've heard it suggested that we should just not issue permits. We're not Venezuela; we don't just randomly not issue permits. In fact, I have had a number of businesses in the oil and gas industry come to me and say doing so would actually be the single worst thing you could do in this province.

At the beginning of this debate I raised the issue, and the advice that we had received from legal services and so forth and the analyses of various people and not one person has actually challenged that or argued with that - the fact that there is no regulatory authority currently in the province that would allow us to not issue permits without bringing in legislation such as this. It is essentially a situation that we either issue permits without doing the work that's necessary or we bring in this legislation and do the work that's required.

The member for Argyle-Barrington went through the list of recommendations from the Wheeler report - every single one of them, we actually gave an update on recently in terms of how we're working to address each one of those in different ways. The onshore atlas, for example, allows communities to know exactly what the potential is there. The research and testing will allow us the opportunity to responsibly address the onshore potential.

I want to quote from Dr. Wheeler - there's been a lot said they did not recommend a moratorium or a bill, and that's true, but they also didn't recommend not doing it. He says "he reminded people that the panel is not recommending action one way or the other and it's up to the government to decide what happens next." And I'll table a bunch of these in a second, I'm going to quote repeatedly from a few.

There have been a number of panelists come out and say various things. For example, panel member Mauro said "this is exactly what we suggested should happen and I think the minister has made a decisive and bold decision respecting the democratic process." Another panelist just came out last week, publishing an editorial again saying this is what the panel recommended. In fact, Dr. Michael Bradfield actually noted that some of the economic analyses that the Official Opposition has been using from the report are actually flawed and pointed out how they're flawed. I'll table it so people can read it later.

[Page 2606]

He pointed out that the estimates in the report estimates royalties are at 50 per cent of total company costs. In Nova Scotia the royalties are only 10 per cent. So there are a number of issues in the report which obviously need to be addressed so we know what the real numbers are. I've tabled information which shows there isn't even agreement over where we have coal gas versus shale gas. There are a number of those issues.

One of the things that I have heard from industry and it's a bit frustrating is they have lumped this in with all onshore development. I have heard in particular from a project in the Stellarton area, some investors who are actually particularly upset about the issue of somebody saying onshore is closed when in fact there is major investment going on there.

In an article, "The quest to make history", to make history, Mr. Speaker, with potentially the first commercial onshore project in the province - it's happening with East Coast Energy. They have already spent $6 million; they are flaring at the moment. I'll be tabling that as well.

Mr. Speaker, there is one question that I was hoping I would get the last half of in Oral Question Period at some point - we didn't - which was this low-volume, high-volume thing. I want to table a document from Pennsylvania because I think it is an important question that the honourable member didn't feel he got a reasonable enough answer to and I do think it's important that he has that, so I'm going to table it from another jurisdiction. Low-volume vertical fracking has been done for decades, that is actually conventional oil and gas. Low-volume fracking is done in conventional oil and gas.

High-volume hydraulic slick water fracturing was a process developed first by Range Resources in 2003. It's only 11 years old, Mr. Speaker, which is why we hear some of the issues.

Mr. Speaker, the last thing I am going to table just before I wrap up is from the federal government's report on the environmental impacts of shale gas extraction. They note that in addition, many individuals and groups in Eastern Canada have expressed concerns about what they perceive to be inadequate government oversight and readiness. They do not believe their governments have the capacity to regulate the industry effectively and protect the environment while maximizing economic opportunities.

Mr. Speaker, I'm going to table all that and just wrap-up by saying that in 2007 we did it the Tory way, now we're going to do it the responsible way. In 2007 we had a government that allowed hydraulic fracturing in shale formations in this province without updating the royalty regime, so if we had it at the moment, you actually would get no revenue out of the royalties because of the way the wells peak. They did it without putting in place the environmental controls and the well casing controls. The provincial Tories did it without having a plan to deal with waste water and here we are, seven years later, with 30 million litres of waste water we can't get rid of. Even with the test that the Minister of Environment has approved with Lafarge, they can only use at maximum capacity five million litres of that in a year. That's from three wells that weren't even producing wells.

[Page 2607]

Mr. Speaker, those are the kinds of things that need to be addressed before you allow this process. The Tories are suggesting that you don't pass this bill, you just issue the permits, because if you don't pass the bill you are legally obliged to issue those permits; you do that before having those things in place. We tried that one seven years ago and taxpayers in this province are still paying the costs for the irresponsibility of that decision in allowing that, without having the process in place. Not only that, but in 2007 they didn't even start having their Department of Energy or Department of Environment begin addressing those issues, while that work was going on.

Mr. Speaker, we are going through every single one of those recommendations not only in the Wheeler report but also in the Council of Canadian Academies. We have been meeting with municipalities and we have been meeting with First Nations. May I remind this House that the Supreme Court recently ruled on what that duty to consult now means in Canada and we are meeting that test.

Mr. Speaker, we are respecting the request and decision of the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities. We are respecting the request of the Assembly of First Nations. We are doing the work on the atlas. We are doing the work to make sure that we understand the issues, that we address them, and that Nova Scotians can then decide if they are comfortable with it. That is the responsible way to do resource development in this province, to ensure that all Nova Scotians benefit.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I will close debate. I know we're going to have some bell-ringing and I look forward to the vote.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 6. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye.

There has been a request for a recorded vote.

Ring the bells. Call in the members.

We will ring the bells for one hour.

[11:05 a.m.]

[Page 2608]

[The Division bells were rung.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Are the Whips satisfied?

We'll now conduct a recorded a vote on Bill No. 6, and once again I would ask for complete silence for the entire duration.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[12:05 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. Colwell Mr. MacLeod 
Mr. Churchill Mr. MacMaster 
Ms. Bernard Mr. Dunn 
Ms. Regan Mr. Baillie 
Mr. Samson Mr. d'Entremont 
Mr. McNeil Mr. Orrell 
Ms. Whalen Ms. MacFarlane 
Mr. Glavine Mr. Houston 
Ms. Casey Mr. Harrison 
Ms. Diab  
Mr. Younger  
Mr. Horne  
Mr. Hines  
Mr. Stroink  
Ms. Arab  
Mr. Delorey  
Mr. Ince  
Mr. Farrell  
Mr. Gordon Wilson  
Mr. Rankin  
Ms. Miller  
Mr. Rowe  
Mr. Maguire  
Ms. Eyking  
Ms. Lohnes-Croft  
Ms. Treen  
Mr. Gough  
Mr. Jessome  
Mr. Irving  

[Page 2609]

Mr. Corbett  
Ms. MacDonald  
Mr. David Wilson  
Ms. Zann  
Ms. Peterson-Rafuse  
Mr. Belliveau  

THE CLERK » : For, 35. Against, 9.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 64.

Bill No. 64 - Limitation of Actions Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. LENA DIAB « » : I move Bill No. 64 be now read for the third time.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

MR. LARRY HARRISON « » : I move that Bill No. 64 be not now read a third time, but that the order be discharged and the bill be recommitted to the Committee of the Whole on Bills for the purpose of reconsidering Clause 22.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, this is a subject we've talked about at length already. There are people suffering in the world around us, and I was thinking. Last night I went for a walk to clear my head and I saw a man on the street and he was looking for money and I would say he was probably in his 50s or 60s. I could tell he seemed to be feeling a bit nervous and maybe he was dealing with an addiction, for all I know.

I can tell you, after hearing stories about people who have been sexually abused, when I see people on the street now, I think a little bit more deeply about it. I suppose many of us have judged people we see on the street as - oh, they're just looking for money to get their fix. But I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, I look at things a little more deeply now knowing that some of these people might be broken inside, maybe due to sexual abuse. I can't imagine what it's like to go through that and how that can affect somebody, especially if it's something that happened to them as a young child, when they were innocent, when they didn't know what was going on, and somebody took advantage of them.

[Page 2610]

Mr. Speaker, survivors have suffered. They have been abused. Some of them have been through the justice system; some of them have lost, and that would make me angry if I was them, but credit to these people for being stronger and even stronger than many of us here could be. Some of them are used to getting the short end of the stick in this province and I think of victims in the Fenwick MacIntosh case. We all know about that. Some have never come forward and some never will, after seeing what happened there, because they would see that as only more suffering.

This bill, Mr. Speaker, as we discussed before in Committee of the Whole, when I attempted to make an amendment to it on Clause 22, this bill purports to eliminate time limits on when victims of sexual assault and domestic violence can bring a claim forward. Presently a victim has two years from the time they become aware of the injury of harm. This is something we support, something I've come out publicly supporting, as soon as I saw the bill.

We believe knocking down any barriers that prevent survivors from taking action is the right thing to do; however, upon closer inspection of the bill - and we know when we see bills in the Legislature, Mr. Speaker, many of us are not lawyers but we do read through them, we get used to reading them; we get used to understanding what the clauses mean. But sometimes you have to take a closer examination of what the bill is actually saying, and we did that and we learned that lifting of time limits only applied, under the way this bill is presently put before this House, on the way it is being voted on in this House, this bill only lifts time limits in the case of people who were assaulted after this bill comes into effect, or those who were assaulted in the past but have not yet become aware of the injury or harm.

Mr. Speaker, this bill will do nothing, the way it is right now, for those Nova Scotians who were aware of their assault more than two years ago but have not yet brought forward a claim. All members of this House know how devastating child sexual abuse is and the time it takes for a victim to become strong enough to come forward and to confront their abuser.

Mr. Speaker, many people carry the secret with them, not telling anybody including their spouse. They keep it a secret, and that of course, we know, gives power to the one who abused them, and that power can be broken when they break the secret. I would never call for anyone to come out publicly and talk about their abuse. That is up to the person it has happened to, but I know from speaking with professionals who have counselled people who have been through these situations, if they're able to break that secret to just one person it can help them tremendously and to break the power of the person who abused them.

Mr. Speaker, these are some of the things I think about when I look at this bill and look to see that there is something missing. There is a hole in this bill, and what I mean is there is no opportunity for somebody who has come forward in the past to go after the person who abused them. That is why we have put forward the amendment, which the government voted down, but we harbour some small hope that perhaps they've consulted some more with their legal counsel, and perhaps they see that this hole does exist and we will all work together to close it today.

[Page 2611]

Mr. Speaker, the amendment we proposed in Committee of the Whole eliminates time limits on when victims of sexual assault and domestic violence can bring a claim forward - no matter when the assault took place, no matter when the victim became aware of the assault, and no matter when a victim is ready to come forward. Each individual's experiences and reactions are unique to that individual. This legislation should send a message to each survivor that they have the right and the ability to bring a claim forward. We ask the government and all MLAs to support this amendment and provide legal choices for all survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence in our province.

Mr. Speaker, when making a ruling in the Chair, you will often say it's a disagreement by two members, and what we may have here is a disagreement by two schools of legal thought. However, I don't think it's that complicated.

The Charter of Rights and Freedoms does not apply to civil cases. The Supreme Court of Canada has said so. I point to a clear case that originated in British Columbia and went all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada in 2005.

The province sought to recoup damages from Imperial Tobacco for harmful effects of tobacco smoke and the linked cost to the province to treat tobacco-related illness. Imperial challenged the law on the grounds that it was beyond the jurisdiction of the province, and therefore unconstitutional. They also challenged that it was retroactive, which is exactly what we're talking about here, and which is exactly what we're trying to correct by putting this amendment forward.

Imperial initially won, but then the decision was overturned on appeal. The Supreme Court of Canada found that the B.C. legislation was, in fact, constitutional and that in civil law, unlike criminal law - which is an important distinction that lawyers would be able to understand quite quickly - retroactivity and retrospectivity are fair ball.

Mr. Speaker, the legal counsel that we've received is that this is very straightforward and there should be no confusion about it, and that it's easily solved with this amendment. To provide further evidence on this, I will read from the Supreme Court of Canada's decision from 2005:

The Act does not implicate the rule of law in the sense that the Constitution comprehends that term. Except in respect of criminal law, the retrospectivity and retroactivity of which is limited by s.11 (g) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, there is no requirement of legislative prospectivity embodied in the rule of law or in any provision of our Constitution. Nor does the Constitution, through the rule of law, require that legislation be general in character and devoid of special advantages for the government (except where necessary for effective governance), or that it ensure a fair civil trial. In any event, tobacco manufacturers sued pursuant to the Act will receive a fair civil trial: they are entitled to a public hearing, before an independent and impartial court, in which they may contest the claims of the plaintiff and adduce evidence in their defence. The court will determine their liability only following that hearing, based solely on its understanding of the law as applied to its findings of fact. That defendants might regard the Act as unjust, or the procedural rules it prescribes as unprecedented, does not render their trial unfair.

[Page 2612]

Mr. Speaker, we hear that this doesn't exist in Canada. However, comparable legislation that is retroactive exists in Ontario, in British Columbia, in Saskatchewan, and in Newfoundland and Labrador. With this amendment, if we vote for it, it can exist in Nova Scotia.

The minister has said that to retroactively change the balance of different people's rights is not something that has been done in Canada. We have to ensure that not only does legislation balance the different rights of different individuals in the province, but that it's also one that will likely withstand Charter challenge.

Yet, as I've just indicated, the Supreme Court of Canada has already rendered a clear decision on this very issue. It has ruled that if the retroactive effect of a Statute is clearly expressed, it is valid. The court also noted that retroactive Statutes are not uncommon. The legal counsel - and it's no secret - the person I have been in touch with, I've heard of him before; I've never spoken with him before but I have spoken with him about what we are speaking about today. His name is Jonathan Rosenthal. He is a Toronto-based criminal lawyer and professor adjunct at Osgood Hall Law School. He is the national legal spokesperson for a group called Beyond Borders. If anybody was to say - and I even considered it myself - is this a lawyer who is looking to profit on this? This is a lawyer who has done pro bono work, free work, to help victims of sexual assault and sexual abuse.

This is somebody that is doing this in their free time because they want to do the right thing. I will quote Mr. Rosenthal:

"It is difficult to conceptualize any justification for allowing child abusers to avoid facing compensation claims from those whose lives were damaged or destroyed by their actions. If the legislation is not corrected before it becomes law, Nova Scotia will be protecting historical sexual predators."

[Page 2613]

That's pretty black and white. There is no reason not to include this amendment other than to protect the perpetrators. This amendment is absolutely necessary so that there is no statute of limitation whatsoever for victims of sexual assaults.

When I spoke before in Committee of the Whole, I referenced a high profile case that is being discussed widely across the country. I'm not going to mention names, but one of the women involved in this case didn't want to come forward because she thought that too much time had passed since the assault she endured. When she heard a police chief explain on television that there is no statute of limitations on sex assault cases, she felt that she should come forward.

We wonder why. Why wouldn't you come forward right away? Well, she said: When you go through a trauma like that, you're not interested in going out and telling strangers and having judgments, you just want to go home and you just want to forget about it.

We have to be mindful of that. We have to understand that and show some compassion for that so that when that person does feel like they can come forward that they have an avenue. This bill, without this amendment, is not going to help that person if we pass it the way it has been passing through this House. I have never seen the measure we have taken here before in the five years since I've been elected. The measure we have taken is to try to put this bill back into Committee of the Whole so that we give the government members another chance to vote for the amendment - a second chance. I think that's being reasonable.

I ask the members to think about the survivors of sexual assault that were with us here in this Chamber a couple of weeks ago, who stood in your member gallery Mr. Speaker, who showed their faces to the public as survivors. They have been receiving tremendous amounts of support from people all over the province and beyond the province and an overwhelming amount of support from within our own community, the Strait area.

Many people have heard the stories in passing over the years and wondered if it really happened. I can tell you when these people came forward and came here to this Legislature - I speak about Bob Martin and Garnet Boudreau, and I also speak about the other names that were read into the historical record of this Legislature that evening - they came out and spoke loudly for everyone who has ever been assaulted or abused sexually. They were heard.

Everyone in this House gave them a standing ovation for their bravery. That was one thing that I think that we did positively in this province for people who suffer, and have suffered sexual abuse and violence. We as an institution, the province, stood up and applauded them for their bravery and recognized that what was done to them was wrong, it was not asked for and it was not their fault.

[Page 2614]

Mr. Speaker, I ask you, why would we pass a bill in this Legislature that would pull that into question by saying to somebody who was assaulted or abused in the past, no, you can't take your abuser to task for that because it happened in the past? Why don't we empower those people, like we did on that night when we recognized them here? Why don't we give them a little power back?

Consider what it was like for them as young boys, in the cases I've been speaking about here, to have their power taken away from them? Why won't the members of this House give those people their power back? Why not? Mr. Speaker, the members will have a chance to do that, if we put this bill back in the Committee of the Whole and we put the amendment forward, and the members support it. (Applause)

I know we've had a lot of bell ringing in this House. I know it's been frustrating for everybody. Believe me, it's not always as satisfying as it might look. But for me, and I know people have questioned it and I'm sure, to the public, it looks ridiculous, for me, every time I saw the bells ringing, all I could keep thinking about was this bill and the hope that by delaying it by whatever ridiculous means possible, it would give the public a chance to learn about this amendment and why it is needed. (Applause)

For me, that's why the bells were ringing. And because when this bill came forward I came out publicly - and you can all see that, it's in the record, you can Google it - I came out and supported this bill. But when you find out that there's a hole in it and there's something wrong with it, what other choice do we have, Mr. Speaker? If the House is going to sit around the clock, until midnight every night, what other choice do we have but to try to stall things so we can talk to people?

There were a lot of conversations I was having, Mr. Speaker, that were going back in and out of the Chamber here, where I was talking to Mr. Rosenthal. I was speaking to other groups who were very surprised because they were told - they didn't realize this, either. I haven't heard a lot from those groups, and I'm hoping they will come out and say something publicly.

That's why those bells were ringing, for me. I was glad to see things delayed because the more we can slow this down so we can have a chance for people to understand what's going on, so this just isn't rushed through, like this - that's why the bells were ringing, for me, Mr. Speaker.

I've tried to be very reasonable about this. I know that the minister knows that I've contacted her before I put this amendment forward. I believe my heart was in the right place. In fact, I didn't even care if I got the credit for putting the amendment forward; I just wanted to see the thing fixed. I would have the satisfaction of knowing, going home and telling those people that I know who have suffered as boys from sexual assault and abuse that we got it fixed. That would have been enough for me.

[Page 2615]

But I did put the amendment forward, and it was voted down. I made people aware, as I said. We've been trying to pass word to the media as of course we would do on any, and to groups that would be interested in this matter. Do people care? I hope so. What I would like is for more attention to be paid to this so there is greater understanding.

Mr. Speaker, I just don't know what more I have to do to be reasonable. This case to me seems very cut and dried, and unless the minister is going to get up and offer other case law that refutes the very obvious case that I've put on the record here today, I don't understand why this bill is being put forward in the way it's being put forward.

Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, in Nova Scotia we don't have a very good history of dealing with sexual abuse and sexual assault. Now I've mentioned the Fenwick MacIntosh case, a very high-profile case - it was not made a priority by the Crown for some unknown reason and Fenwick MacIntosh got off on a technicality. He was over in India, you can read about it on the Internet, you can read about what he was doing over there, and if we had stopped him here those young boys in India wouldn't have suffered what they suffered.

What is the result of us not getting him, Mr. Speaker? Well I'm going to read his profile on the Internet. Mr. Mack, he calls himself - sounds quite affectionate, doesn't it? This is his profile:

"Mr. E. F. MacIntosh is a graduate of the Canadian Airforce College of Navigation and Telecommunications. 'Mr. Mack' has spent a lifetime in navigation and telecommunications engineering, with the last twenty years in Senior Management positions.

He has also authored several scientific papers on various aspects of Telecom and ITT, including the efficient use of spectrum.

'Mr. Mack' recently retired from the Telecom industry and began to pursue an understanding of the complex International Spice Industry.

He is a senior director of The Spice Journal."

I'd like to add one in, Mr. Speaker « » : Mr. Mac will sexually assault your child if you do not know his history and you let him ingratiate himself with you family, like he has done so many times before to hundreds of other young boys.

That's who Mr. Mac is. Why aren't we doing something about that? The justice system failed, he is free, and if we change this bill with this amendment we allow those victims to go after him and take him down financially. Who wouldn't want to do that? Vote on it today. Vote on it today. (Applause)

[Page 2616]

Mr. Speaker, I'm going to table a photo of him. We can see where he's dyed his hair - you can actually see it in the coloured version; unfortunately it's a black and white version that I'm tabling.

Mr. Speaker, I'll go to another case, something that happened yesterday at sentencing, another example in this province. The Crown attorney in Nova Scotia said not to bother pursing this matter - imagine if we listened to that? It was a Crown attorney from Ontario that had to be brought in to file charges. Another example of how the justice system in this province just kind of let things go. There are a lot of people angry about that, Mr. Speaker, and a lot of people wondering why.

Maybe I shouldn't have mentioned that name here in the House. I know there is mixed opinion on that; I know some of her family members waged a campaign against the publication ban. We'll let them decide. But the point being, the Crown Attorney involved in that case from this province essentially gave up, and a Crown had to be brought in from Ontario.

What we're coming down here to is - I know the minister said that, simply put, we can't bring to life a claim that has already died, but the reality is that with this legislation only criminal law does not allow retroactivity. What we're talking about here is civil law, and this was stated by the Supreme Court of Canada. The question we have to ask ourselves is, why would we protect historical sexual predators?

This bill says when you can sue. We in this Legislature can choose when. Make the amendment, and we can allow "when" to cover any period of time. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, we are lawmakers. A lot of us may wonder what our job is when we become elected as an MLA. A lot of us run for many different reasons. Many people in the public wonder what we do the rest of the time, when the Legislature's not sitting. We all know that we're busy all the time with all kinds of matters in all kinds of situations everywhere we go, but when we sit in this Legislature, we are lawmakers. That is our job.

I also believe it is our job to listen. This seems very clear to me, with the evidence I've presented that members, when they vote, should know what they're voting on in this case. We are lawmakers. We get to decide. That is our job. We can leave the courtroom to the judges and to the lawyers, but when it comes to making the laws that they interpret and that they rule on, our job is to make them.

There are all kind of examples of retroactive legislation. The question becomes, are we going to be fair to all victims of sexual assault and sexual abuse, or just people going forward?

I cannot support this bill the way it is. I know I've come out publicly in support of it. I cannot support it the way it is, and I won't support it the way it is. I ask the members to allow this to move back to the Committee of the Whole so that we can look at this clause, so that we can have the clause amended, so that we can fix this bill.

[Page 2617]

Mr. Speaker, if people ask why I will not be supporting this bill, they can look at the record here and see why. I'll have no problem telling them that I felt that this bill was not right the way it was, and it is my hope that they will understand why.

The whole reason why we need to make this amendment is the reality for survivors of sexual abuse and sexual assault, the reality being that many times, in many cases, they hold the secret fast. That is why we need to do this. If we don't understand that and we don't make the amendment, then I think we're failing those people.

Mr. Speaker, my final word goes to the survivors. I can simply say that we cared and we tried.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Just before we move on to our next speaker, I am obligated to read the following notice.

In his comments just now the honourable member for Inverness inadvertently uttered the name of a young lady with respect to whom the court has issued a publication ban on her identity. Out of caution, I am going to instruct our Hansard not to print that name and to make such change as the Editor considers necessary to have the sentence reflect what the honourable member was intending, without using the specific name. For that we do apologize and we will correct that.

The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River.

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I've already spoken on this bill in second reading but I do want to stand here in my place and have it go on the record that I support the member and his amendment. I think he has spoken from the heart. He has looked into this directly and spoken to people that this affects.

Mr. Speaker, I can't help but wonder why, if Bill No. 60, the tobacco bill, can be withdrawn and have more people consulting about it and then do another bill later on, I don't understand why we can't do the same thing with this. This is a very important issue to many people. As the member for Inverness did report, there are many people in our society today who have not come forward, who have not been able to deal with in the time that they are allotted. Going back retroactively would certainly help a lot of people have the bravery and the courage to, perhaps, come forward.

The other thing I'd like to say is that consultation is so important, as we know. We keep hearing about that and there are so many people who would like to have a say on this matter. I would suggest that it would be wonderful if the government members could, in fact, take this into consideration when they vote. When I first got up on my feet, as did the member for Inverness, we both thought it was a really good idea. Then we looked into it further and found there are flaws in the bill.

[Page 2618]

I want to keep it short today but I want to reach out and say to anybody who is listening and paying attention to this that, again, as somebody who is a survivor of sexual assault themselves, I know that it's very, very difficult to deal with and it's very, very difficult to come forward and report. So if we could give these people a little bit of help in doing so and show that we support them and we believe in them and make it easier for them, then I think that we, as a government, are doing our jobs. With that, I will take my place.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I first want to say how much I am thankful to the previous speaker, the member for Truro-Bible Hill-Millbrook-Salmon River from the NDP who spoke in favour of what the member for Inverness is attempting to do. Even more so than that, I do want to say, again, how proud I am of the work that the member for Inverness has done on this issue. (Applause) His dogged determination on behalf of some of his constituents probably - maybe absolutely - but on behalf of all Nova Scotians who want to know that they have the ability in law to make a claim whenever they choose to do that.

Mr. Speaker, he has been on this issue for a long time. He has used every step in this legislative process to make his point. He has done it honourably. He has done it in a non-partisan fashion. He has approached government members, including the responsible minister, with his suggested amendments. In other words, he has done exactly what Nova Scotians would want of an elected member and here he is today, as we're in third reading, speaking to a motion to recommit so that there's another chance to try and get this bill right. I'm very proud of him and I suspect all members are in their own way, no matter how they're going to vote in the end.

Mr. Speaker, yesterday in this Chamber the magazine Canadian Parliamentary Review was handed around. It's not one I jump to read as fast as I can when it comes around but sometimes it's interesting and sometimes its timing is interesting and I'll tell you why. There is an article in this month's issue, which I'll table in a moment, entitled The Importance of Debating Major Social Issues in Parliament, and I would encourage all members to read it when they have a moment; I know it just came out yesterday.

Some may say this is not a social issue, it's a legal issue or a legal process issue or a system issue. I think the member for Inverness and others have made the point very clearly that there are an uncountable number of fellow Nova Scotians who very much see this as a social issue. An issue of being recognized for the wrongs that have been done to them, an issue of an opportunity to be heard in court and to be certain to get a fair and impartial hearing and that justice may well be rendered at the end. It's an opportunity for healing, which often only comes with legal recognition of the wrongs that have been done. This is a social issue as much as a legal issue.

[Page 2619]

Let me just quote for you one paragraph from this article:

"Parliaments, at their best, are capable of creating exceptional forums in which to conduct in-depth examination of major social issues, in a calm and non-partisan manner." Exactly as the member for Inverness has done. "Such initiatives should take place more often" - in my view and the view of the author - "because they give rise to the kind of broad-based consensus that fosters social progress. They also enhance the image of Parliament, which is too often seen as an arena for partisan debate."

That is the opportunity that is before us today to have this Parliament, this Legislature, rise above partisan debate, take on a major social issue by way of consensus and therefore elevate the purpose of this House. I'd like all members to reflect on that and I encourage them to read the article. I will now table it, Mr. Speaker.

I just mentioned that this is both a legal issue and a social issue. The reason that it's important is that I do recognize that the minister, her department, her officials, the array of legal experts that the government has at their disposal may well have advised government members that there's nothing more that can be done. Mr. Speaker, we have contrary legal advice on this side of the House that says yes, it can absolutely be done. The member cited references from the Supreme Court of Canada that say it can be done.

Each side can continue to lawyer-up to infinity to try and make their case. Mr. Speaker, I'm going to suggest to you that because this is more than just a legalistic issue, that it is a social issue, that looking at it only from the legal point of view is not enough. Sometimes when your lawyers give you their advice and they tell you what you can't do, it is our job in this House to actually turn that around, look beyond the legalisms, look at the social implications of what's going to happen and actually instruct, here is what we want to accomplish, go find a way.

I actually believe everyone in this House wants to accomplish the same thing in this case. I know we got into some heated debate the last time this bill came before this House so let me be clear: I truly believe everybody wants to do the same thing here, which is to find a way to make true what the member for Inverness is advocating. That victims of sexual crimes, of abuse, as children or otherwise, are treated the same in law whether what happened to them happened years ago or is going to happen tomorrow.

If we all want to make that true, then let's not just keep lawyering up on both sides, let's actually instruct that that's the intent of this Legislature, that we all want that same thing, that we all came to a consensus and tell them to find a way. You'd be amazed what legal mountains can be moved when a Legislature speaks as one in common aim to make things better. That's what we're trying to do here again and again and again today. The member for Inverness brought forward a reasonable amendment. Much like on other bills, there are reasonable amendments that have come forward and have been rejected. Well, if we had to pick one for the government to accept, if they would just take one, if that's what they said - we'll only do one - this would be the one. That's how important this is. This would be the one. That's why we're here again.

[Page 2620]

I know that there are members here who think that tools like a motion to re-commit are simply some kind of obstruction, tactic, strategy, bell-ringing exercise. And sometimes they are, Mr. Speaker. As we know, sometimes they are. But you know, in our great parliamentary tradition, these kinds of tools like motions to re-commit were put into the Rule Book for a reason, and that reason wasn't simply to enjoy an hour of bell ringing. They were put there for a reason, and the reason is that there are times when it makes sense to re-commit a bill and allow it to be amended, and the vote that we're going to have - I just want to remind everyone right now - is not even a vote on the bill yet. It's a vote on whether to re-commit it and make it better. That's what we're being asked to vote on in a few moments.

Now, how can anyone vote no to making a bill better? For those who are partisan and see it as, well, that's an Opposition amendment, so by virtue of that alone, it shouldn't be considered, I ask them, when you look to the member for Inverness, look right through him and see the people whose voice he is actually expressing today. That's how we should look at amendments like this. Who is he speaking for? Not who is speaking, necessarily, but who is he speaking for? He has been speaking very eloquently for hundreds or thousands of our fellow Nova Scotians, young and old. That is what he has been doing.

I made this point before, but I just want to reiterate it. The government has their legal opinion, we have our legal opinion, and they differ. So rather than use that as an excuse not to make the bill better, let's flip that argument around and say, why take the chance? Why take the chance that the government opinion might not be the only one? Why not bring in the amendment when we re-commit the bill, and pass a better bill, and then let the legal chips fall where they may from there? Why not? Then we'll have done our job as legislators. We haven't taken a chance that the member for Inverness and his lawyers might have had a good point all along. Why not do that, Mr. Speaker? That's the point of a motion to re-commit.

The member for Inverness spoke about a known case in this province, the Fenwick MacIntosh case. We all know that through an error in process, through a loophole, that man is free when he should not be free, and that the almost uncountable numbers of his victims see that. They've been let down once already.

Now, I'm not going to say that anyone wants them to be let down again, because I truly don't believe that. But for those victims of his and for the others that are yet unknown and unnamed who have been victims in the past, we have a chance to let them know that they won't be let down again. We have a chance to let them know we're plugging holes in our legal system, in our social system, that we learn from these errors and we make the law better and we move on and we move up and we move forward. That's really what the motion to re-commit and the amendments that the member wants to see take place is all about.

[Page 2621]

Mr. Speaker, in other words, the member for Inverness supports the motion to re-commit, as I do, as we do, because he wants to give the government a second chance to make a better bill, a second chance to pass a bill with all our support, as that article about Parliament at its highest envisions. But it's not really about us, is it? He also wants to see a second chance for victims of sexual abuse and other crimes, other wrongs that were done to our fellow Nova Scotians, a second chance for them so that they will know they are not artificially stopped from pursuing their legal claims, no matter when the wrongs were done to them. This is a second chance for them, too, both known and unknown.

So let's speak with one voice. Let's tell those who actually write the laws and the regulations and the legal opinions that the elected members in Nova Scotia, on all sides, want all victims treated equally in law; they want a way found to make that happen. That's why we should vote for the motion to re-commit and bring those amendments in one more time and support them too. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. TIM HOUSTON « » : Mr. Speaker, it's an honour to rise today and speak to this motion to re-commit the bill back to Committee of the Whole on Bills. Really, it's a rise in support of my friend, my colleague, the member for Inverness who has done so much work on this bill, done so much investigation. This is a bill that when introduced seemed like a good piece of legislation. Lifting the limitation of action on those who are victims of sexual or domestic violence is something this caucus supports. We supported that right from the start, when the minister brought it forward. But with further investigation, our colleague in this House, the member for Inverness, found out that lifting the limitations only applies to those who are victimized after the passing of the bill.

Mr. Speaker, I have to say that to me, as a person, that doesn't seem fair. It doesn't seem fair that this legislation would apply only to people who are victimized after the passing. I think this is an unintended consequence but the bill, a bill designed to lift the limitations of actions, actually limits the attempts to lift the limitation of actions. Now if you can follow that, it doesn't make sense.

I think it's a loophole that existed in a well-intentioned piece of legislation. It's a loophole that has been discovered by people devoting the time and energy to reviewing the legislation, to talking to stakeholders and that's a good thing. The work the member has done on this is a good thing to find this loophole and bring it forward in a very professional and courteous manner. That's what we can do in this House.

[Page 2622]

I know the minister has said that this bill is an attempt to balance the rights. If this motion to reconsider the amendment is defeated, I will be left wondering whose rights are we trying to balance? Because in my mind, and in the mind of my colleagues on this side - and I know in my friends across the way - if it's a question of the rights of victims and the rights of perpetrators of sexual violence, we in this House should stand every single time and tip the scales in the favour of victims. That's what we're trying to do with this amendment. We're trying to fix a loophole, to put those scales in the appropriate balance.

In this House our deliberations should always result in legislation that reflects the true spirit of justice and equity to all people. We should particularly be looking out for our most vulnerable and protecting our victims from re-victimization. That's what we're trying to do with the amendment to this bill. Victims of sexual violence don't begin healing on a timeline. When they feel ready, when they feel strong enough, they come forward - if that's their wish, because not everyone does come forward, either. That doesn't apply to that process of feeling ready and feeling strong enough and coming forward, and that doesn't apply only to future victims. It applies to all victims, no matter when they were assaulted.

A defeat of this amendment - if this amendment is defeated a second time, if the amendment won't even be considered a second time, by defeating this motion to return it to Committee of the Whole, then I worry that that defeat will leave victims wondering why their rights, their experiences, are treated so differently. We have a chance here today to fix that, and I sure hope we will. I sure hope we'll give it consideration, because we have people all around the province who, for whatever reason, have given up hope, given up hope on themselves, and there are a variety of reasons why that could be.

I know the member spoke about people that he sees on the streets who are maybe asking for change or whatever, and we all often wonder, when we have time to wonder - because we're often busy and about our way and walking down the street - but I'm sure we all occasionally do stop and wonder how that person got there. What happened? What's their story? Every single one of them has a story, and many of them, we learn as time goes on, their lives have been disrupted and turned upside down by some type of sexual assault at some point, maybe in their youth, and they've given up hope.

But when they get hope back, Mr. Speaker, when hope is returned and they seek justice, we don't want them to find themselves in a situation where there is no hope of justice for them and they should return to hopelessness. That's not the message we should be sending. We recognize that it may be many years before somebody reaches out for justice or for help, and it could be a variety of things that cause them to reach out. Some person might have reached out to them.

We have some legislation before this House that we have concerns with for different reasons. We spoke about Bill No. 60 and the tobacco, and in response the minister has tried to assure us that he understands our concerns and he will deal with them. He will deal with flavoured tobacco.

[Page 2623]

In this situation, maybe if we don't deal with it today, maybe we'll hear the minister stand up and saying that the minister hears us, the minister accepts it, and that the minister will fix it. Maybe, Mr. Speaker, that's the best we can hope for today. I don't know how this is going to turn out, but it's a legitimate concern and it can be fixed by this House. If this House votes this amendment down twice and walks away, that's one heck of a message to send to these victims. I hope this House doesn't do that.

It takes time for people to become aware of the abuse and when they do become aware, we want to make sure we've given them their power back. We can give them their power back and give them their hope back, if we take away the limits for sexual assault and domestic abuse. We can take that away today and empower those people. We can send the message that somebody who was assaulted yesterday or last year has the same value and has the same rights to us as someone who will be assaulted tomorrow. All those people do have equal value.

I will close with some words from my friend and colleague, the member for Inverness, quite simply, "It can be done and it should be done." Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Before we move on, I just want to provide some clarification that we're going to be voting on the motion as read for reconsideration of Clause 22 of Bill No. 64 that was as presented earlier, just a slight clerical error in that. I'm advised by the Clerks that the bill that was passed at second reading was renumbered as Clause 23 in Law Amendments Committee so I ask for unanimous consent of the House to alter the motion we're currently debating, accordingly, to reflect the proper labelling of Clause 23.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

MS. KARLA MACFARLANE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hadn't planned on getting up to speak to this bill but as I was sitting here listening, I wrote down a few notes. I realize how delicate and complex the subject matter is, it's not an easy subject to discuss anytime. I believe that right now I'm feeling very perplexed about this bill because as I sit here I'm wondering, when we come to work we shouldn't have to leave our hearts at home. That's what I feel like we're doing here today with this bill.

Whenever we try to avoid or escape the difficulties in life, we tend to short-circuit the process of where we're intending on going. We delay our growth and we delay productivity and sometimes we end up creating something worthless because of the denial and avoidance of the path we've chosen. Today I just feel like this bill is going to end up being worthless unless we decide that we want to protect all victims. All victims who deserve to have closure, to have peace of mind of the experiences, the unfortunate, unnecessary experiences that they have gone through. What people fail to realize, I believe, is that all achievements are eventually surpassed, all records are broken, reputations fade and tributes are forgotten but I can stand here and assure you that the pain from being sexually abused never goes away.

[Page 2624]

We have an opportunity to fix this bill, get it right and for all of us in this Chamber to feel very proud of that. I know that Nova Scotians expect more and they deserve better. I believe that they're realistic in their expectations and I believe that our Party, standing here along with the NDP, believes that our elected officials can do better. I just hope that we will reconsider, stand back, take a deep breath and really think about what we're doing here and how it will affect the victims. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sydney River-Mira-Louisbourg.

HON. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm much like my colleague, the member for Pictou West. I really hadn't intended to stand up today and speak to this bill, as important as it is. I thought my colleague, the member for from Inverness had done a great job on bringing forward the issues.

I look around and I think and wonder how many of the other people in this Chamber are thinking, you know, there are decisions we've made in the past that we've said, oh my goodness, if we had a chance to do that over again, I'd do it differently. Well, Mr. Speaker, we have a rare opportunity here today with this bill, with this motion. We have a chance to actually do something that we would have done differently in the beginning; we have an opportunity to help those who have felt that the system has let them down; and we have an opportunity to give them an opportunity to have faith in the system, to regenerate that faith so that people can say when I do come forward with my concern it does mean something to the people that make the laws in the Province of Nova Scotia.

When people are ready to vote on this motion to bring it back for more discussion in Committee of the Whole, I hope they think about the fact that, indeed, we're giving hope back to individuals who have lost faith in the system of justice in the Province of Nova Scotia, who believe that people don't care about them. I, having had the opportunity to get to know my colleagues on both sides of the House over the past year, know that the people here do care. They are sincere in what they're trying to do, and this is an opportunity for us all to have that sober second thought and, indeed, look at this and do what is right for the people that asked us to come here to give them good governance and good hope. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle-Barrington.

[Page 2625]

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : I too just want to stand for a couple of moments supporting my friend and colleague from Inverness on this one, to try to get that amendment done to the bill.

A lot of times we stand here, and I think we try to politicize everything, that it's our idea, or your idea, or whatever it is. And I know the member for Inverness also said it in his speech, too - let's just do the right thing by adding in these pieces or putting in a timeline that actually makes sense, because by restricting people who have been sexually abused, the time limits are far different than we would expect. By the time you realize that wrongdoing or admit to that wrongdoing, and then finally move on to telling someone and then actually bring it through to the courts, a very long time can go by. I don't think restricting that is the right thing to do, or even saying that you basically create two different levels where the people that have sort of realized but haven't come out, versus those who, in the future, will realize and come out, that their time limits are different.

Again, this is not by any stretch a delay tactic in the House. This is simply a final kick at the can, if you will, to try to get all of us to try to do the right thing because, again, - you know, many times we talk about the dueling legal cases and trying to lawyer-up, one versus the other, and I think there's enough information that has been presented by the member for Inverness on this one that it does require that second look,

What I can say, again, is that it's not our intention to hold this up very long. We do want to have a recorded vote on this. That'll give us another, I would say, another bit of time to consider and think about it. I do hope there is going to be some movement on behalf of government - and with those few words, I thank you for the opportunity to speak on this bill.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 64.

There has been a call for a recorded vote on the amendment to Bill No. 64.

AN HON. MEMBER: No, the motion to recommit.

MR. SPEAKER « » : On the motion to recommit, sorry - to recommit Bill No. 64 to the Committee of the Whole on Bills.

Ring the bells. Call in the members.

[1:15 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Are the Whips satisfied?

[Page 2626]

We'll now proceed with the recorded vote on the motion that Bill No. 64 be recommitted to the Committee of the Whole on Bills for purposes of reconsidering Clause 23. As always, I would ask for your co-operation to have complete silence for the entirety of the vote.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[2:15 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. MacLeod Mr. Colwell 
Mr. MacMaster Mr. Churchill 
Mr. Dunn Ms. Bernard 
Mr. Baillie Mr. Samson 
Mr. d'Entremont Ms. Whalen 
Mr. Corbett Mr. MacLellan 
Ms. MacDonald Ms. Diab 
Mr. David Wilson Mr. Younger 
Ms. Zann Mr. Horne 
Ms. Peterson-Rafuse Mr. Hines 
Mr. Belliveau Mr. Stroink 
Mr. Orrell Ms. Arab 
Ms. MacFarlane Mr. Delorey 
Mr. Houston Mr. Ince 
Mr. Harrison Mr. Farrell 
 Mr. Gordon Wilson 
 Mr. Rankin 
 Ms. Miller 
 Mr. Rowe 
 Mr. Maguire 
 Ms. Eyking 
 Ms. Lohnes-Croft 
 Ms. Treen 
 Mr. Gough 

THE CLERK « » : For, 15. Against, 24.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is defeated.

We'll go back to third reading of Bill No. 64.

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING]

[Page 2627]

[Bill No. 64 - Limitation of Actions Act.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, I guess people have made their decision.

I'm going to read from something we listened to when we came in here this Spring, on Page 4 from the Speech from the Throne: "Sexual violence is an important societal issue that affects us all. The complexity of improving services for victims and preventing sexual violence from occurring requires the support and efforts of all Nova Scotians. In the year ahead, a sexual violence strategy will be launched."

It sounds like a great idea, Mr. Speaker. I remember when I read it, but I wonder how survivors and victims of sexual assault and sexual abuse feel today with the vote that has just been cast, after giving the government a second chance.

I'm not going to speak at length. I have said what I have said, and if I can't convince the government members with what I have said, then I never will be able to.

In the future we'll sit again in this Legislature and I'll have an ability, as a member, to put forward a bill to amend this legislation. Perhaps in time, with pressure on the government, they may relent. I'm very curious to see what the minister will say in her comments on third reading.

There is one other gentlemen that I'm going to mention about here. His name is Alvin MacInnis. Alvin has given permission and has spoken with his family about this. His life is pretty broken, Mr. Speaker. He would be somebody that could sue somebody like Fenwick MacIntosh for a twofold purpose: to perhaps put MacIntosh in such a state that he can't travel the world with his spice company, and also to perhaps get some small shred of justice in return for not getting any justice when the Fenwick MacIntosh case was thrown out on a technicality.

I just want to tell you where Alvin is today. Alvin lives in Edmonton on the street. He cannot keep a job. He has been sleeping under a bridge overpass to keep the snow off of him, and he's addicted to alcohol. He does temporary jobs. People may hire him for a few days at a time, and his state in life is - he doesn't have a lot of quality of life, Mr. Speaker, it was taken from him a long time ago when he was boy, when he was sexually abused.

Mr. Speaker, when I see the Speech from the Throne and see those words that are written there about supporting Nova Scotians, and they're going to have a sexual violence strategy, but we can't in this Legislature even allow victims of sexual violence to go after the people who assaulted them. To me there is great inconsistency in that. But my conscience is clear. I know how I voted, and what more can be said, really?

[Page 2628]

Mr. Speaker, I am curious to hear what the minster will say and I guess the unfortunate thing is that I won't be able to get back up and speak again on it and that's kind of ridiculous, actually, that I can't but that's the way the rules are; I'm not going to question the rules. So I'm not really able to give a rebuttal. We'll wait to see what the minister says, and in fact, I could rebut some of the things she said already but why tip my hand? There will be lots of chances to discuss this publicly and all I can say is we'll have to see where it goes. But I can tell you right now that come the Spring sitting of the Legislature, I will be putting forth this same amendment as a bill here in this Legislature.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : In some ways it's hard to follow the previous speaker and about the gentleman he talked about. I don't know whatever we would do in this House if the government had agreed with sending the bill back. These are people who have been broken and I think we all agree that we must, as legislators do something to help them. I'm going on the record right now in saying that in essence this Party will support Bill No. 64 but the issue with this bill that we would have, although we will support it, is it's as much as what's not in it. It's kind of a half-measure bill.

The fact is that while I may agree with the Progressive Conservative Party on many of the issues, there are issues in here of relevance that we should pass and that's the conundrum we find ourselves in. We could vote against this. And there are some good things in this bill. So that's where we find ourselves today. I would have hoped that the minister, the government, the Premier, would have brought in a more fulsome bill than this that would have really given more comfort to the afflicted and used a longer arm to reach back.

I heard the minister on many occasions talk, both in this House and outside the Chamber, about doing a type of bill like this retroactively and to use a phrase, I guess we're Statute-barred in some ways, but I would think, you know, at some point, whether the case put forward by the member for Inverness and legal advice he has received, and his Party has received, whether that could have been looked at, and being able to give some weight to it, whether that advice would be contradicted or upheld, we would have liked to have seen it.

But we're beyond that point now. The point in our debate now is do we support what's in there - and my colleague, the member for Sackville-Cobequid will have some more to say, I'm sure, later on, about what I would call the front end of this bill, and that's to do around insurance and so on, who the real winner on that bill is - and, make no mistake, it's the insurance companies. But there are some issues around that.

So, Mr. Speaker, it is a sad day - and this is not pointed at the government, to say that the people who sit in those benches are bad people. It's a sad day when we hear members and they're relaying stories of broken citizens of this province because of sexual abuse. Whether it's at the hands of a trusted family friend, if it's at the hands of someone in authority, or a family member, it's nonetheless devastating to everyone.

[Page 2629]

We as a society pay those bills. We pay those bills, so to speak, in lost opportunity. I don't know what could have been afforded Mr. MacInnis' life had he not had these instances foisted upon him as a young man, what he could have become. It's a life lost, Mr. Speaker.

I don't think there's a person in this House who doesn't regret what happened to him - what he could have been. I would wish, again, that the government would have taken a longer look at this but, nonetheless, it hasn't.

So with those few words, Mr. Speaker, it is with great sadness when you hear these stories told to us today - I look across the way and I don't see a group of people who are uncaring. I think they are, by all estimations, the same as the rest of us in this House, caring people. I just wish that they had seen the ability to put this forward.

We see Bill No. 60 coming up for third reading - these issues where we could take a little time and study issues and so on. But the government has a majority; it will pass. There are some issues in this bill that we support, and our caucus is not going to vote against a bill because of what's not in it. We will support what's in it and we would hope that, in the coming months, the government could broaden its scope on this bill, whether they agree with the Inverness member - as he said, he was bringing an amendment forward - whether they agree with that or whether they can strengthen this, if there was some way that we could reach back and, in some little way, make those people as whole as they could be.

That would be my wish. It's not going to happen today; it's not going to happen in this bill, but we implore the government to use common sense, to respect the rights of Nova Scotians and go back, study what's not here today, and do the right thing. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, a lot has been said on this bill already. I don't intend to rehash old ground but I do want to point out something important and that is that this House has lost the ability to pass an important bill with all-Party support. I heard the NDP House Leader say that with great reservation they are going to support the bill because there are some things in it that they are supportive of. You know, we face the same dilemma in a way in the PC Party as they do: A bill with an obvious hole, an obvious flaw, obviously imperfect, once again is before this House and we are asked to vote yea or nay.

That has been a recurring theme here, in this session in particularly, in the last few weeks of this session. We have bills with obvious flaws - some the government admits to, some they don't - and yet rather than seek to perfect them and do something all together, we now on third reading, having exhausted every possible way of making a bill better, are asked to decide yea or nay.

[Page 2630]

Well Mr. Speaker, I respect the decision of the NDP in this case but we have come to a different conclusion. We ae tired of being asked to support legislation that is flawed, that leaves people out, that is wrong. When there are some good things in a bill and a government knows there is something missing and still won't listen, refuses to make it better and will knowingly pass a flawed bill, we're tired of that. We see it in the tobacco bill, we see it in the transportation bill around graduated licensing, and we see it more than ever in this bill, the Limitation of Actions Act.

Mr. Speaker, the member of Inverness said he has a clear conscience, and so he should. No one has spoken more elegantly than him, time after time after time, on the need to make this bill more inclusive and involve and include and cover people who are going to be left out, and so he should. (Applause) And he didn't just start when the bill was introduced - at the start of this session way back in September, his Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne is where he first raised this issue and brought it to the attention of everyone present and everyone outside this Chamber who cares about issues like this, and then repeatedly thereafter.

Even today, Mr. Speaker, when Law Amendments was done and Committee of the Whole was done and the only tool left was to recommit the bill, or try to, even that lever got pulled to try and make the bill better. So he has a clear conscience and so he should. He's done all he can.

Mr. Speaker, faced with a flawed bill, I can see how an Opposition member might say well it's better than nothing but what is different is we're faced with a flawed bill where they know it's flawed, where we've pointed it out, where we gave them three times, at least, the chance to make it better. We are not going to support a flawed bill any longer, not when we know we would act differently on the government side and make sure that a bill that included everybody who has been victimized in this way is the expressed will of this Legislature. This is no longer a bill of the House of Assembly because it does not have all Party support. It is a Liberal bill. The minute a party refuses to hear from any other side, it is theirs alone.

Mr. Speaker, I know the spinning that will go on when this bill comes to a final vote and we vote no, so let me just be very clear. We agree absolutely that victims of sexual violence - victims of crime of such a hideous nature, no matter how old or young they are, no matter how long ago it happened - that they should have an unlimited ability to go after the perpetrator. We don't mean that only some of them should. That's the difference. And so we vote no.

We are missing an opportunity today in this House to elevate the debate beyond the partisan and up into that great place that this House should aspire to be, where a consensus on the will of the people of Nova Scotia through their elected representatives to cover everybody in this case can be done. We are missing that opportunity.

[Page 2631]

Since that opportunity is going to be missed, we're not taking part in a half-measure. Half-measures are exactly that: they are half-measures. When no measure is the only alternative, a half-measure might be supportable. But when doing the whole job is right there to be had and you still choose a half measure, then that is not right and it is not worthy of support.

I mentioned earlier that there is an important role for legislators to play. I just want to share with the House in these last few minutes an important observation from a dear old friend of mine who sat in this place, Jane Purves, who was asked to explain - as a woman, in this case specifically; it's in the booklet that we all have, Votes for Women - about her role in this House and what she learned. Here's what she said:

"If women have the time and the ability they should get involved whether it is the school board, ABCs, or as MLA. The thing I have learned that I didn't know is how important it is to have ordinary people. If you left the running of society to the machine of government it would be a living hell. You need the touches of ordinary people or you'd just end up with systems and no room for humanity."

I couldn't agree more, and that's really what we're voting on today. That's our role. God rest her soul. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Community Services.

HON. JOANNE BERNARD « » : Mr. Speaker, I've been listening quite diligently to members from the opposite side. I want to commend the member for Inverness for his passion and for his commitment to this very serious, critical issue that faces thousands of Nova Scotians each day. (Applause)

I'm one of those ordinary people that the Leader of the Official Opposition referred to. I worked with women and children who have been touched by sexual violence for close to 13 years in two different organizations. Quite frankly, with all due respect to the Leader of the Official Opposition, this bill isn't about you. It isn't about anybody in this Chamber. It is about the people who have lived and experienced sexual abuse during their lifetime - either as children, as teenagers, as adults.

I listened to the amendment. I asked questions. I spoke informally and formally to lawyers in both my personal and professional life. I came to the conclusion, as they did, that this amendment would weaken this bill - that it would be challenged, that they would not win, and in many cases, with my experience of talking with women who have gone through the justice system - and we've seen a great example of it yesterday, of how the system is sometimes there not to help them and they feel can often fail them.

[Page 2632]

I would never want this bill - which has been worked on for eight years and is far overdue in this province, and every advocate, including myself, who has fought for this bill - not to go through or to set up false expectations for victims of sexual violence. (Applause)

I am supporting this bill not as a Liberal, not as a Minister of the Crown. I am supporting this bill as a woman, as someone who has worked on behalf of women and children who have been sexually abused. This is a good bill, it is a solid bill. It should not be political. I have a clear conscience and I will vote proudly for this bill. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to stand for a few moments to speak on another aspect of this bill. I appreciate the comments of my colleagues on the amendment that was trying to put through earlier in the session and also on moving it back to see if we could improve legislation.

I think really, as I look around the room today, as I look around at the members here on the Opposition, there's a lot of experience. There are seven former Cabinet Ministers, two former Speakers of the House, MLAs who have years and years of experience. They have the opportunity to talk to organizations, to talk to constituents, to try to find out what's good and what's bad. Many of the members here have been in government, have been in Opposition and recognize that when you bring something forward, it affects people's lives and you would hope it is always towards the positive, to improve their lives, so there's a lot of experience on the Opposition benches.

I don't think at any time during the debate that I've heard that any of the Parties have been trying to make this a partisan issue. I think we have all tried to make sure that when we bring up any issue or talk around what we believe is something that could improve the bill, that we are trying to do that, Mr. Speaker.

I'm not going to speak on what the issue is around the sexual violence and that component of it; I think a lot has been said. I have spoken on this legislation on another side, on the other side of it. We've had an interesting discussion in our caucus trying to determine how to move forward - do we support the piece of legislation? Do we try to improve it, which we tried to do, to make it even better? I think that's really what we're all here for. It doesn't matter what side of the House you are on, we should all be able to have the opportunity to have input.

If you are a government member, the opportunity is maybe in caucus when Cabinet Ministers or when the legislation committee is created for the government members brings forward an idea, I would assume they caucus it and they explain the bill, that those members have an opportunity at that time to talk one-on-one with the minister, to maybe even get into the department and have staff explain things.

[Page 2633]

We, as Opposition members, do similar things: we talk to those individuals out in the community who will be affected by this and we try to make sure to figure out, should we support a piece of legislation that government is coming forward with because that's our role? We want to support good legislation. There are many pieces of legislation over the last 12 years that I've been here that I've supported in Opposition, in government and now in Opposition.

So again, as we move forward, I would hope - and I know that the government has a majority, Mr. Speaker. They don't need to do anything or change anything they bring forward over the next length of their mandate, over the next three years. They don't have to listen to anything any of the members on this side have to say; they have a majority government.

We can talk on it; we can ring the bells on it; we can make amendments; we can try to do what we can to improve it but at the end of the day, the government has the majority to just pass whatever they want. I hope that's not the avenue and that's not the approach they'll take over the next three years because it will be a long three years, Mr. Speaker, because I have to say I'm not going to stop trying to improve legislation that comes forward on the floor of this Legislature, and that includes government bills.

I would hope if an Opposition bill gets the opportunity to get called for second reading and move through, that we may have that exchange in the opposite, where government members will support that legislation if you do this, if you amend this aspect of it, because I think that's what we're here to do.

With this piece of legislation one of the areas of concerns I had is for other victims. I know that what we've been talking about so far today are the victims of sexual crime. It's the other side of the component that was brought to my attention with this bill and that was around minor injuries and accidents.

We heard from the Association of Trial Lawyers who came to the Law Amendment Committee - they don't just come to the Law Amendments Committee for the fun of it. I don't believe they got paid to come, they were representing the association. These are lawyers who are very busy, most of them. There was a range of them - a lawyer that was, I think, five months on the job to some more experienced seasoned lawyers like Barry Mason, I believe his practice is in Bedford, and Ryan Hubert, I believe is the other lawyer with Hubert and MacKeigan or MacKeigan Hubert - I don't know which name comes first.

These are busy individuals, they have thriving practices, from my understanding, and there was a young fellow, Ryan - I can never his last name, but Ryan I think he was with BoyneClarke, Mr. Speaker. And he came for a number of reasons as I indicated I think in previous comments, not only because he was a lawyer but because he had an association with BIANS, Brain Industry Association of Nova Scotia. Each one of those presenters brought some concerns to government at the time.

[Page 2634]

They caught my attention because I explained in second reading, I believe, kind of a little history of the experience I've had since I've been here, since 2003 around other legislation, around minor injury cap, the injury cap that in place in right for minor injuries. There was a process at that time because it was a minority government and sometimes I have to say it's probably better when there is a minority government because there needs to be a bit more co-operation when legislation is brought forward with a minority government, then they have to look for support across the aisle and I think at times that can be beneficial because then you really do take the time to listen to what Opposition members bring forward, how they are trying to improve a piece of legislation because you need their support - and I say that after being in government with a majority government.

We tried through our mandate to work with changing legislation if it needed changes. There is nothing better than to have a majority government bring a bill in and have all-Party support on it, that's a huge victory I think for a government to say listen we brought something forward that all Parties are going to support and I think that should be the goal of every piece of legislation they bring forward.

Of course we have differences in some areas that of course we're not going to support this or the Progressive Conservatives may not support it, but ultimately I think you want to bring good public policy forward that makes positive changes that gets the support of not only the House, because if you have support of the House I can guarantee you you're going to have support of the public when you leave this Chamber and go out into the community after you wrap up the session. If you have Opposition MLAs not hammering you on why this bill is bad if they support it then they're going to project that and we're going to project that into our communities as we leave this place.

So with this piece of legislation the trial lawyers came forward and said wait a minute, we don't know if this was overlooked. We understand that the government is trying to consolidate a bunch of different pieces of legislation around limitation and the years allowed for that, but there was a special, agreed-upon, negotiated area in minor injury caps and in dealing with minor injuries around accidents that we need to continue to look at and make sure that this legation doesn't, I think, hinder or make that negotiated kind of area worse.

What we have seen - and I want to commend the government for listening to part of the presentation and addressing some of the concerns that the trial lawyers brought forward

around minor injuries and accidents. That's when you have an accident or if there's an accident and you are the injured party - currently the status quo is you have up to three years to make a claim against the individual, and I would assume their insurance company, for any kind of award because of your injury.

[Page 2635]

With this legislation, it will remove that three years and change it to two. The trial lawyers came in, made presentations saying, no, you're taking something away from the victim. You're taking - I don't know if rights is the right word - you're taking the ability for a victim of an accident, on the other end of the spectrum compared to those victims of sexual violence - you're taking away a right for them to have up to that three years to seek restitution for injuries.

They were also going to eliminate the Section 3 which has the ability for an individual to go before the courts and ask for a special reason - and there are a number of them - why they should be allowed to go and maybe sue the individual or the organization that caused the injury. The government listened to part of that argument. I know when I brought my amendment in, it was ruled out of order because it was similar to the government's amendment that they had just introduced, which put back that Section 3, in the legislation but didn't change the years; they kept it at two instead of three.

I'm glad they did that because yes, there will be opportunities for victims who are injured in a motor vehicle accident to go, within those two years, to seek some additional years because of maybe some special circumstances of why they didn't come forward or couldn't come forward to start a litigation against the individual or group that caused that injury. But why would we want to take away one year of their ability to do that? I haven't gotten an answer on that and that was clearly stated as one of the areas and concerns from the trial lawyers and their presentations. Not only did they come and make a verbal presentation, I think they provided copies for everybody, and I believe there was even some other correspondence from other trial lawyers, litigation lawyers and injury lawyers with a similar concern.

Is it as important as some of the issues brought up around the sexual violence? I would say no. Those victims should be given every opportunity down the road to be able to go after the perpetrators or those who inflicted that injury. It's still important on this side of things because if you're going to keep the cap in place, which is what's going to happen, if you are in an accident and you have minor injuries, you will still be able to sue somebody but you'll be limited to the cap, which is at $8,100 now. The original negotiated deal was to cap minor injuries at $2,500. You have three years to make a claim. You possibly could go and ask for extended time on that under special circumstances.

I mentioned this earlier, I was glad as part of a government that we increased that almost three times from $2,500 to $7,500 and then we ensured there was indexing in there so each year that would continue to go up. That's why it's at $8,100 now. If you're going to leave the cap in, then why are you changing the years that you can make that claim? In my mind that's not helping the victims and when I asked the trial lawyers who were there, I asked I believe both Barry and Brian who are the winners here? That should have been the indicator for government to say, maybe we should leave that the status quo; maybe we should leave that alone. The answer was, two groups will be winners: the insurance company and those who have caused the accident or the injury. I mean, that's why it's hard for us, when we were talking about this, well, why would they do that? To this date I still haven't gotten a good answer on that one.

[Page 2636]

I don't know why that aspect of it wasn't looked at. I mean, if the government brought the amendment in around Section 3, they must have read the submissions from the trial lawyers and the other presenters with their concern. But insurance companies and those who have caused the injury or accident are going to be the winners when it comes to a motor vehicle accident where there are minor injuries. That's not what I really want to support, and that's why we had the discussion in caucus that there are aspects of this bill that are good.

As the Leader of the Progressive Conservatives mentioned, it's kind of a theme on legislation. I'm sure - I don't know if it's today or Tuesday - I'll be up on another piece of legislation and I'll be saying pretty much the same thing, that there are some good things in this piece of legislation, but there are some negative things. That's the dilemma we have here.

I would hope that the government recognizes that we discuss this, as Opposition members. We care about the legislation coming forward. We all know the government can pass it without our support, but we care about the legislation that goes through this process, and we're here to try to make it better.

There haven't been too many examples in this session that a government has said, okay, let's really make this a good piece of legislation, let's strengthen it. I've got to tell you, no matter how big an ego someone has or how much they think they know everything, there's always an opportunity to make things better. As a government, when you bring something forward, there's probably an opportunity to make it better, to strengthen it, to ensure that we're protecting victims.

I wanted to lay that out again on third reading, that there is going to be a negative impact when this legislation passes. We try to weigh that as a caucus - are there more positive things here, are there more negative things? Unfortunately, at times it's a tough decision for us.

I hope the government realizes that as this gets supported and gets Royal Assent and is proclaimed, we'll be monitoring what happens. I look forward to the member for Inverness coming forward in the Spring and hopefully trying to really make sure government realizes that, well, maybe we should have done it in the first place, making good, positive changes.

I'm going to do the same thing. I'm going to be watching over the next six years - six years, that would be long. I hope it's not six years until the next session, Mr. Speaker. I don't know if that's legal. It will feel like six years - six months or five months, whatever it is, I'll be watching.

[Page 2637]

I'll be talking to the people who I've had experience with not only over the last 12 years as a MLA and as a minister but as a paramedic - people who support victims of accidents, victims of sexual violence, to see if this piece of legislation is helping you or is it something that is worse or hurting victims in our province. If I find it's doing what I think it might do, and that is giving a benefit to the insurance company and not to victims, then I may also bring in another piece of legislation to try to improve this one.

We'll continue to do that, and ultimately it's going to be the government that has to answer to Nova Scotians. If a Nova Scotian feels that the piece of legislation that has been passed is hurting them, is not good for them, then it's really the government that has to answer to that and hopefully realize that they can make changes to it. I look forward to that process over the next three, four, or five months. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. LENA DIAB « » : Mr. Speaker, I am going to speak in English, but je crois firmament que c'est nécessaire pour moi de remercier tous les membres de l'assemblée ici dans les deux langues pour tous leurs sentiments et tous les discours longue ce sujet qui est très important.

I want to thank all the members of the House, Mr. Speaker, for all the comments they made on this bill over the last number of weeks. First and foremost I want to clarify for everybody something that is very important. It has been suggested that this piece of legislation we are introducing today, the Limitation of Actions Act, does not support victims of sexual abuse and violence.

Mr. Speaker, I think the actions of this government have clearly shown that simply this is not true. The actions to bring closure to the former residents of the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children demonstrate that we deeply care about victims of sexual abuse.

Mr. Speaker, the new Limitation of Actions Act that we are introducing that was introduced earlier in this session is a significant step forward with respect to sexual assault claims. This bill eliminates limitation periods altogether for any claims involving sexual assault, as well as assault of someone who is financially, physically or emotionally dependent. The adoption of the new discoverability provisions will also assist victims of abuse.

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that when you introduce laws you have to look at all sides. You consider the people impacted, of course, and you also have to look at case law and you also look at precedents that have been set in other jurisdictions. Making the legislation retroactive would change the substantive rights of individuals retroactively.

[Page 2638]

Mr. Speaker, my colleague, the member for Inverness, referred to a Supreme Court of Canada decision from 2005. That case stemmed out of a British Columbia constitutional challenge involving the Tobacco Damages Health Care Cost Recovery Act. This was a Statute enacted by the Government of B.C. and it's also a similar Statute that has been enacted in all provinces across Canada that allows governments to sue tobacco companies to recover the costs spent by government in treating tobacco-related diseases in the health care context. Under that Act, government was required to bring their action within two years of proclamation of the Act. This was not an unlimited, open-ended power. It set out specific purposes for the enactment of this retroactivity section.

Mr. Speaker, it is not lost on me that we're talking about people who have done or are alleged to have done serious, terrible, heinous things, and that's what makes this concept all the more difficult to understand, to explain and, frankly, to defend. I know the retroactive amendment put forward by my colleague opposite comes with only the best intentions and I commend him for his advocacy on behalf of victims of abuse.

As Attorney General, my job is to ensure the laws we put in place are fair and protect Nova Scotians. The current limitations legislation does permit victims of assault to file claims against their abusers. I would never second-guess a victim as to why they chose to file or not file or when to file a claim. This is not my place to question that. I want to reiterate that the current law allows for civil actions to be filed by all plaintiffs.

Mr. Speaker, I recognize that the decision not to make the bill retroactive to cover all cases where claims have expired under the former law is a difficult one to accept. But Bill No. 64 also broadens the rights that the current law already has with respect to civil actions that give all plaintiffs, all victims of sexual assault, the opportunity to file claims against the perpetrators.

I want to go back to the very reason we decided to put forward this legislation. The primary goal of this bill is to make the laws more consistent and uniform to reduce uncertainty for everyone involved. It was also to bring Nova Scotia in line with other provinces. The new bill proposes standard limitation periods for all claims. Specifically, it establishes a two-year basic limitation period for most civil claims, such as those that involve personal injury and breach of contract.

The current legislation is outdated, confusing, and archaic, and it's a couple hundred years old. There are various time limits to bring actions forward, depending on what the cause of action is that you're trying to bring forward.

It also creates an ultimate limitation period - the new bill, that is - of 15 years for legal claims which may not be discovered right away. The bill also provides benefits for businesses and professionals who may be involved in lawsuits. The 15-year ultimate limitation period allows businesses and other professionals more certainty and long-term stability.

[Page 2639]

I was pleased to have been joined at the bill briefing by Mr. Ingersoll, who is counsel for Engineers Nova Scotia. He spoke of the uncertainty the current laws create for his members and any former members. In fact, he commented that many retired professionals have to keep a career's worth of records in their garage 25, 30 - quite frankly, past their lifetime, because they're worried they may get sued after they die and their estate would have to answer those suits.

Mr. Ingersoll also expressed concerns about how our outdated limitations laws reflected Nova Scotia as a place to do business. He said the current law acts as a barrier to professionals coming to Nova Scotia and setting up shop. I think it's worth reminding this House that government started on this journey in 2009, following the adoption of modern limitations legislation by our neighbouring province of New Brunswick.

In 2009 the Department of Justice began a review of our Limitation of Actions Act. This included liaising with the Nova Scotia Barristers' Society, consulting with other provinces, and public consultations. In 2011, in addition to arranging specific consultations, Justice released a discussion paper to the public and invited feedback. We received feedback from numerous individuals and groups, and we made changes to the legislation based on some of that feedback. One of those changes was to the limitation periods around sexual assault and assault involving dependents.

We are one in a long list of provinces that have adopted this modern legislation. A working group of the Uniform Law Conference of Canada began work on more modern limitation of actions legislation in 1998. Alberta adopted modern legislation in 2000; Ontario in 2002. The Uniform Law Conference of Canada formally adopted the modern uniform model legislation in 2005. Saskatchewan proclaimed their legislation in force in 2005, New Brunswick in 2010, British Columbia in 2013, and Manitoba in 2014.

This legislation has certainly been of interest to many. When the discussion paper was out for feedback, and during second reading and Law Amendments Committee, I heard from many members of the House and stakeholder groups about the bill. Many different individuals and groups came forward and spoke favourably about modernizing our limitations legislation, and I want to thank everyone who spoke for sharing their views, particularly with respect to the sexual assault piece.

Many members shared personal stories and experiences, and it's clear that they feel strongly about this part of the bill. What we've tried to do throughout is to balance a variety of interests that are sometimes competing and put forward a bill that is fair and protects all Nova Scotians. I feel we've achieved that balance.

[Page 2640]

While I recognize that some members wish to have other things included in this bill, I hope they can appreciate that what we are proposing is a significant step forward for limitations legislation in this province. At the Committee on Law Amendments, possible amendments were proposed that people felt would improve the bill for Nova Scotians. As a result of what the committee heard, we have made a change to the proposed new bill to include a safeguard provision for people who have experienced the personal injury. That party can apply to the court to have a limitation period extended if they were injured and did not take legal action during the two-year limitation period.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, I think we all agree that this is a good piece of legislation, that consistency and standardization will benefit all Nova Scotians. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 64. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

A recorded vote is being called for.

Ring the bells. Call in the members.

[3:11 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Are the Whips satisfied?

We'll get ready to conduct the recorded vote on Bill No. 64 and, once again, I will ask for everyone's 100 per cent co-operation in silence for the entirety of the vote.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:30 p.m.]

YEASNAYS
Mr. Churchill Mr. MacLeod 
Ms. Bernard Mr. MacMaster 
Mr. Samson Mr. Dunn 
Ms. Whalen Mr. Baillie 
Mr. Glavine Mr. d'Entremont 
Mr. MacLellan Mr. Orrell 
Ms. Diab Ms. McFarlane 

[Page 2641]

Mr. Younger Mr. Houston 
Mr. Horne Mr. Harrison 
Mr. Hines  
Mr. Stroink  
Ms. Arab  
Mr. Delorey  
Mr. Ince  
Mr. Farrell  
Mr. Gordon Wilson  
Mr. Rankin  
Ms. Miller  
Mr. Rowe  
Mr. Maguire  
Ms. Eyking  
Ms. Lohnes-Croft  
Ms. Treen  
Mr. Gough  
Mr. Jessome  
Mr. Corbett  
Ms. MacDonald  
Mr. David Wilson  
Ms. Zann  
Ms. Peterson-Rafuse  
Mr. Belliveau  

THE CLERK « » : For 31, Against, 9.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, that concludes the government's business for today. We'll meet again on Tuesday, November 18th, from the hours of 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Following the daily routine we will continue with third reading of Bill Nos. 51 and 60, and as well Address in Reply if time permits.

With that, I wish all members safe travels home, and I move that the House do rise to meet again on Tuesday, November 18th at 1:00 p.m.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for the House to rise to meet again on Tuesday, November 18th, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.

Is it agreed?

[Page 2642]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[The House rose at 3:34 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

[Page 2643]

RESOLUTION NO. 906

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Flag on the Play is a YouTube sketch comedy series about football and fantasy filmed in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas Flag on the Play creators Paul Doucette and Hugh Stewart are innovative and creative comedians capitalizing on modern production channels and social media platforms; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Flag on the Play Best Web Production in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Flag on the Play on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Web Production and express its appreciation for Flag on the Play's contributions and commitment to Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 907

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Megan Leslie has been the Member of Parliament representing Halifax since 2008; and

Whereas Megan Leslie has worked hard on issues of social, economic, and environmental justice for many years; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Megan Leslie Best Member of Parliament in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Megan Leslie on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Member of Parliament and express its appreciation for her contribution and commitment to Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 908

[Page 2644]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Ecology Action Centre has been working to build a healthier and more sustainable world for over 40 years; and

Whereas the Ecology Action Centre organizes public education campaigns and political initiatives to protect nature and provide environmentally and economically sustainable solutions for Nova Scotians; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted the Ecology Action Centre Best Activist Organization in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate the Ecology Action Centre on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Activist organization and express its appreciation for the EAC's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 909

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lion's Head is a friendly neighbourhood tavern that has been serving classic pub fare in the North End of Halifax for more than 30 years; and

Whereas the Lion's Head is a dedicated sponsor of local amateur sports; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted the Lion's Head Best Karaoke Night in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate the Lion's Head on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Karaoke Night and express its appreciation for the Lion's Head's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 910

[Page 2645]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Agricola Street Brasserie is a new urban, rustic restaurant and bar serving French inspired seasonal home-style cooking; and

Whereas Agricola Street Brasserie uses fresh, local, high-quality ingredients in its dishes; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Agricola Street Brasserie Best Atmosphere in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Agricola Street Brasserie on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Atmosphere and express its appreciation for Brasserie's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 911

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Julien's Patisserie Bakery and Café has been serving artisan breads, traditional French pastries, and delicious coffee in the Hydrostone area of North End Halifax for over 20 years; and

Whereas Julien's Patisserie Bakery and Café provides individualized customer service and education about their products and French culture; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Julien's Patisserie Bakery and Café Best Bakery in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Julien's Patisserie Bakery and Café on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Bakery and express its appreciation for Julien's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 912

[Page 2646]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Agricola Street Brasserie is a new urban, rustic restaurant and bar serving French inspired seasonal home-style cooking; and

Whereas Agricola Street Brasserie uses fresh, local, high-quality ingredients in its dishes; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Agricola Street Brasserie Best Atmosphere in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Agricola Street Brasserie on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Atmosphere and express its appreciation for Brasserie's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 913

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Salvatore's Pizzaiolo Trattoria is an Italian restaurant in the Hydrostone area of North End Halifax; and

Whereas Salvatore's Pizzaiolo Trattoria has been serving high-quality pizza and pasta for over 20 years; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Salvatore's Pizzaiolo Trattoria Best Pizza Pie in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Salvatore's Pizzaioloa Trattoria on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Pizza Pie and express its appreciation for Salvatore's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 914

[Page 2647]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dee Dee's Ice Cream is a small family-run ice cream and burrito shop in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas Dee Dee's Ice Cream sells handcrafted products using local milk and cream and real organic ingredients; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Dee Dee's Ice Cream Best Ice Cream/Gelato/Frozen Yogurt in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Dee Dee's Ice Cream on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Ice Cream/Gelato/Frozen Yogurt and express its appreciation for Brasserie's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 915

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ace Burger Company is a small restaurant serving handcrafted flatiron burgers out of Gus' Pub in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas Ace Burger Company uses local products whenever possible; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Ace Burger Company Best Burger and Best Fries in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Ace Burger Company on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Burger and Best Fries and express its appreciation for Ace's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 916

[Page 2648]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Field Guide Restaurant and Bar is a small restaurant in the North End of Halifax with an open-concept kitchen, passionate service, and local products; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Field Guide Restaurant and Bar Best Cocktails in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards; and

Whereas Field Guide Restaurant and Bar's Shane Beehan was voted Best Bartender in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Field Guide Restaurant and Bar on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards for Best Cocktails and Best Bartender and express its appreciation for Field Guide's contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 917

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas enVie is a vegan restaurant in the North End of Halifax that promotes a healthy, sustainable, and compassionate lifestyle through plant-based eating; and

Whereas enVie offers cooking classes and nutrition education to create a healthier community and planet; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted enVie Best Vegetarian-Friendly Food in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate enVie on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Vegetarian-Friendly Food and express its appreciation for enVie's contributions and commitment to the Halifax community.

RESOLUTION NO. 918

[Page 2649]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Coastal Café is a popular casual coffee shop offering high-quality cooking at reasonable prices in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas the Coastal Café prepares delicious meals from scratch, using personally selected ingredients and, where possible, Nova Scotian products; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted the Coastal Café Best Brunch in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate the Coastal Café on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Brunch and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to the Halifax community.

RESOLUTION NO. 919

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tarek's Café is a family-owned and operated café that has been serving delicious Middle Eastern and Mediterranean food in the North End of Halifax for 15 years; and

Whereas Tarek's Café offers excellent customer service and strives to accommodate all diets and food restrictions; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Tarek's Café Best Middle Eastern/Persian Food in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Tarek's Café on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Middle Eastern/Persian Food and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to the Halifax community.

RESOLUTION NO. 920

[Page 2650]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Menz & Mollyz Bar is an all-inclusive LGBTQI bar in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas Menz & Mollyz Bar offers all-inclusive entertainment, often showcasing local music and artists and performers; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Menz & Mollyz Bar Best Gay Bar in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Menz & Mollyz Bar on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Gay Bar and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to the Halifax community.

RESOLUTION NO. 921

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Marina Smith is a metal jewelry artist who hand-crafts "Victorian Retro-Futuristic" pieces out of vintage mechanisms and repurposed materials; and

Whereas Marina Smith is the founder and president of the Jules Verne Phantasical Society of Halifax, a steampunk club for fans of Victorian science fiction and aesthetics; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Marina Smith Best Crafter in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Marina Smith on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Crafter and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to the Halifax community.

RESOLUTION NO. 922

[Page 2651]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Finer Things is an antiques and curio store that has been operating in the North End of Halifax for 10 years; and

Whereas Finer Things deals in a varied selection of quality furniture and decorative arts, spanning many periods of design; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Finer Things Best Antiques Store in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Finer Things on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Antiques Store and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to the Halifax community.

RESOLUTION NO. 923

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cyclesmith has been selling and servicing cycling equipment and accessories in Halifax for 27 years; and

Whereas Cyclesmith is the premier bike store in Atlantic Canada, offering the best selection, complete repair service, and friendly, knowledgeable staff; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Cyclesmith Best Bike Store in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Cyclesmith on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Bike Store and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 924

[Page 2652]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Peak Audio is a home entertainment store that has been operating in the North End of Halifax for over 25 years; and

Whereas Peak Audio provides high-quality audio and home theatre equipment, furniture, custom installation, and a full on-site service department; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Peak Audio Best Home Entertainment Store in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Peak Audio on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Home Entertainment Store and express its appreciation for its commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 925

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sarah Mayfield is a dog groomer committed to creating a safe, stress-free environment for her canine clients; and

Whereas Sarah Mayfield and her sister Emma started their own successful dog salon in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Sarah Mayfield Best Dog Groomer in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Sarah Mayfield on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Dog Groomer and express its appreciation for her contributions and commitment to North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 926

[Page 2653]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Evolve Fitness is a personal training studio in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas personal trainers Mathew and Mitchell Benvie are dedicated to improving the health and fitness of Haligonians; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Evolve Fitness Best Gym in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Evolve Fitness on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Gym and express its appreciation for its commitment to the health and well-being of residents in the community of North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 927

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas One Block Barbershop is a street-level hair salon in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas One Block Barbershop uses its space to support art, music, and community projects and ideas; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted One Block Barbershop Best Hair Salon in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate One Block Barbershop on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Hair Salon and express its appreciation for its contribution and commitment to the community of North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 928

[Page 2654]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lydia K is a talented tattoo artist who has been tattooing Halifax since 2008; and

Whereas Lydia K founded and runs the Gem Tattoo Co., a successful private tattoo studio in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Lydia K Best Tattoo Artist in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Lydia K on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Tattoo Artist and express its appreciation for her contributions and commitment to the community of North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 929

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hope Blooms is a community garden and cooking project in Halifax's North End with a mission to promote and advance health and wellness and community development in economically-deprived communities; and

Whereas Hope Blooms has received many awards and has been recognized by media across Canada; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Hope Blooms Best Community Project in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Hope Blooms on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Community Project and express its appreciation for its contribution and commitment to the community of North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 930

[Page 2655]

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas The Doppler Effect is an independent theatre company based in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas The Doppler Effect's mission is "to bring bold, original new works of theatre to the stage in a medium that's engaging to the minds and hearts of a contemporary audience"; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted The Doppler Effect's Tribe of One Best Theatre Production in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate The Doppler Effect on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Theatre Production and express its appreciation for its contributions and commitment to the community of North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 931

By: Hon. Maureen MacDonald « » (Acting Leader of the NDP)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Stewart Legere is a talented writer, actor, singer, and songwriter who lives in the North End of Halifax; and

Whereas Stewart Legere has won many awards and accolades in the many years he has been active in the Halifax theatre scene; and

Whereas the people of Halifax voted Stewart Legere Best Male Theatre Actor in The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Awards;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Stewart Legere on receiving The Coast's 2014 Best of Halifax Award for Best Male Theatre Actor and express its appreciation for his contributions and commitment to the community of North End Halifax.

RESOLUTION NO. 932

[Page 2656]

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Shalan Joudry, a resident of Bear River, recently launched her first book, Generations Re-merging, which includes 61 poems exploring the complex relationships between generations, communities, cultures and the natural world; and

Whereas Ms. Joudrey, a cultural interpreter, community ecologist and spoken word artist at Bear River First Nations felt that poetry can reconnect people to each other and the natural world we share; and

Whereas recognizing that things have a way of disappearing from generation to generation, Shalan wove Mi'kmaw words throughout her poems, with the desire to introduce her people's language to her readers;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Shalan Joudrey on the launch of her first book and wish her continued success in finding creative ways to preserver Mi'kmaw cultural traditions.

RESOLUTION NO. 933

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Shawn Ross, a powerful arm wrestler from Middleton, Nova Scotia, recently travelled to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, to compete in the Canadian Arm Wrestling Championships; and

Whereas Mr. Ross went undefeated all weekend and competed for two back-to-back days; and

Whereas Shawn became a triple champion by capturing gold in both Masters Right and Masters Left, gold in the Open Right categories, and contributed to Team Nova Scotia winning the trophy for the most points;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Shawn Ross on his accomplishments as an athlete and wish him continues success in his future competitions.

RESOLUTION NO. 934

[Page 2657]

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 25 years ago, if a woman wanted to become a member of a traditional "all boys" service club, it raised some eyebrows and a few hackles; and

Whereas Dianne Hankinson-LeGard fortunately was not averse to doing things differently, having pursued two university degrees, a distinguished career in the Armed Forces, the executive manager of a regional business association and a successful business owner; and

Whereas 25 years later, Dianne is celebrating her success as the first female Rotary president and member with fellow Rotary members, both male and female, paving the way for other women to join this tremendous organization;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Diane Hankinson-LeGard on her accomplishments and wish her continued success.

RESOLUTION NO. 935

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jillian Olsen, a resident of Clementsvale, Nova Scotia, was presented with the 2014 Visionary Award for Nova Scotia from the Gulf of Maine Council on the Marine Environment; and

Whereas Ms. Olson was recognized for contributions toward conservation of species at risk through her volunteer field work with the Clean Annapolis River Project and she has become a steward for wood turtles and striped bass; and

Whereas Ms. Olson was also recognized as being a role model for other young people in her community;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Jillian Olsen for her innovation, creativity and commitment to marine protection, which is making a difference in the Gulf of Maine.

RESOLUTION NO. 936

[Page 2658]

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Elizabeth McMichael was presented with one of the province's Remarkable Seniors Awards, which recognizes outstanding adults over the age of 50 who are actively involved in community groups; and

Whereas Ms. McMichael oversaw the development of 30 raised gardens that partnered knowledgeable seniors with younger generations; and

Whereas Elizabeth also involved students from Digby Regional High School and the Digby Area Learning Association, plus some Cornwallis Park locals:

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Elizabeth McMichael for her work to improve communities and encourage interaction across generations.

RESOLUTION NO. 937

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Annapolis Royal resident Caitlin Bridson-Pateman, a fourth year student at St. Francis Xavier University, was recently crowned the 82nd Queen Annapolisa during the 2014 Apple Blossom Festival; and

Whereas the royal party toured the Annapolis Valley on June 2nd, making a stop at the Historic Gardens in Annapolis Royal where Town Crier Peter Davies officially welcomed Her Highness and the princesses, as many friends, neighbours and well-wishers gathered to greet and congratulate Caitlin; and

Whereas Queen Annapolisa delivered a touching message of thanks to those gathered and spoke highly of the support given to her by the Town of Annapolis Royal and also how this leadership competition helped her and her 12 "new sisters" grow into strong, amazing and confident young women;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate the 82nd Queen Annapolisa Caitlin Bridson-Pateman and wish her well as she continues to represent the Annapolis Valley over the next year.

[Page 2659]

RESOLUTION NO. 938

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas for the past 68 years, the beautiful and historic Town of Annapolis Royal has proudly turned out worthy opponents for the Apple Blossom Festival's Queen Annapolisa pageant; and

Whereas this year's Queen Annapolis Royal is no exception, Cecelia Cress had the touching distinction of being chosen by her fellow peers as Miss Friendship and then received the icing on the cake when she was crowned Queen Annapolis Royal 2014 at the town's Natal Day celebrations; and

Whereas there is no doubt Cecelia will represent her town well at next Spring's Apple Blossom Festival;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly wish Cecelia best of luck as she moves to the next level of competition.

RESOLUTION NO. 939

By: Hon. Stephen McNeil « » (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Middleton Regional High School graduate Rachel Lewis was selected as this year's recipient of the Hawboldt Environmental Bursary in recognition of Ms. Lewis' outstanding academic and community involvement; and

Whereas an essay focusing on steps the average person can take to be good stewards of the environment captured the Clean Annapolis River Project's selection committee's attention; and

Whereas Rachel has chosen to pursue her interest in environmental studies at Acadia University, focusing on geology;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Rachel Lewis on being awarded the Hawboldt Environmental Studies Bursary and wish her success with her studies at Acadia University.

[Page 2660]

RESOLUTION NO. 940

By: Hon. Zach Churchill « » (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 2014 Men's World's Candlepin Singles bowling tournament was held at Academy Lanes in Bradford, Massachusetts, on Monday, November 10th; and

Whereas accomplished bowler Cody Bourque of Yarmouth competed in this tournament; and

Whereas Cody Bourque won the 2014 Men's World's Candlepin Singles championship;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Yarmouth's Cody Bourque on this most impressive achievement and wish him continued success in the sport of bowling.

RESOLUTION NO. 941

By: Ms. Joyce Treen « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Charlie Oakey, a lifelong resident of Eastern Passage, graciously provides unwavering support to the community; and

Whereas he is an active member of The Knights of Columbus where he assists with monthly breakfasts and weekly card games; and

Whereas he is one of the first residents on hand for all community events to benefit the community and gives countless hours of valuable volunteering to his fellow residents;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Charlie Oakey on behalf of all the constituents in Eastern Passage for his continual support and we wish him a life of health and happiness.

RESOLUTION NO. 942

[Page 2661]

By: Mr. Iain Rankin « » (Timberlea-Prospect)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas ten-year-old Elle Tufts attends Elle Dancer Academy in Timberlea where she is part of the intensive team at the studio; and

Whereas from November 5th to 9th, Elle and other dancers from the Elle Dance academy participated in a Dance quest competition in Saint John, NB; and

Whereas Elle did one duo with her friend Panagiota, and they won a gold medal, and three other group dances that each won silver;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly recognize Elle Tufts and her fellow dancers from Elle Dance Academy for their dedication and practice of the art of dancing, and wish them much success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 943

By: Mr. Iain Rankin « » (Timberlea-Prospect)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Captain Ola Legere, Fire Station 3, Halifax, has achieved 25 years of service with the fire department; and

Whereas members of our fire department, both volunteer and paid firefighters, need to be recognized and honoured for their courage, dedication and concern for people in their community; and

Whereas the members of all fire departments put their lives at risk to serve and protect the people of their community and are always available day and night in an emergency;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Captain Ola Legere on his 25 years of service and thank him for his dedication to his community.

RESOLUTION NO. 944

[Page 2662]

By: Mr. Iain Rankin « » (Timberlea-Prospect)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ret. Station Chief James Belanger from Station 58, Lakeside, was recognized for his 20 years of service with the Fire Department; and

Whereas members of our Fire Department, both volunteer and paid firefighters, need to be recognized and honoured for their courage, dedication and concern for people in the community; and

Whereas the members of all departments put their lives at risk to serve and protect the people of their community and are always available day and night in an emergency;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Chief James Belanger on his 20 years of service and thank him for his dedication to his community.

RESOLUTION NO. 945

By: Mr. Iain Rankin « » (Timberlea-Prospect)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Elle Dance Academy in Timberlea has had tremendous success delivering both recreational and competitive dance training in ballet, jazz, lyrical, contemporary, modern, musical theatre, hip hop and acro from highly trained, creative and professional dance instructors; and

Whereas the competitive dancers at EDA train a minimum of five hours a week and are required to take a weekly ballet class on top of their chorography classes where they rehearse routines for competition; and

Whereas from November 5th to 9th the Intensive team of 28 dancers, aged 8 to 17, won awards at Dance Quest in Saint John, NB; the dancers were: Caitlin Benoit, Abigail Boucher, Julia Baker, Jenna Davis, Lindsay Dix, Ashtyen Clarke, Sarah Crewe, Gabriela Dosman, Cassie Gauthier, Kate Greening, Maddy Greening, Hanna Guthro, Rachel Hodder, Makayla Jewers, Mallory LeBlanc, Haiven MacDougall, Courtney Martell, Madison Martell, Lillian Ramia, Grace Richardson, Kayli Ryan, Camila Smithers, Paige Smithers, Elle Tufts, Panegiota Trihopoylos, Clauida Watt, Rachel Walker, and Payton Webb;

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Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Elle Dance Academy on their dancers' accomplishments at Dance Quest, and wish each dancer continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 946

By: Ms. Pam Eyking « » (Victoria-The Lakes)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Adrianne and Mike Gorey of Ingonish launched their debut album entitled, Where the Heart Lies, on October 12, 2014, at Celtic Colours' Festival Club at the Gaelic College in St. Ann's; and

Whereas the album was produced through the support of the Big Sampie Award, a sponsorship program named in honour of Frank Sampson, a dedicated volunteer driver for the Celtic Colours International Festival for 10 years and an inaugural member of the Drive'er Association; and

Whereas the award grants young up and coming artists in the Celtic Arts six days recording studio time at Lakewind Sound Studios;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the generosity of the Drive'er Association and Lakewind Sound Studios and congratulate Adrianne and Mike Gorey on winning the award and producing their album, and wish everyone continued success.

RESOLUTION NO. 947

By: Ms. Pam Eyking « » (Victoria-The Lakes)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jill and Dan Franklin of Iona opened The Little Dipper NSLC and Convenience Store in Iona in October 2014; and

Whereas they already have plans to expand in 2015 with a café and retail outlet for Jill's Chocolates, a successful business based out of Halifax; and

Whereas these entrepreneurs have chosen to return to Cape Breton to expand their business and raise their families, representative of the entrepreneurial spirit on the island;

[Page 2664]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Jill and Dan Franklin and wish them success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 948

By: Ms. Pam Eyking « » (Victoria-The Lakes)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Big Spruce Brewery in Nyanza has been awarded the People's Choice Award at the Atlantic Canadian Beer Awards and was also named an Impact Award winner by the Cape Breton Partnership; and

Whereas Big Spruce brews certified organic, unfiltered, unpasteurized beer on its on-farm brewery; and

Whereas they are producing a local product that has been well received all over the province and beyond;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the economic impact that Big Spruce Brewery has had in Nova Scotia and wish them success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 949

By: Ms. Pam Eyking « » (Victoria-The Lakes)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Noah MacAskill, who grew up in Millville and now resides in Sydney, competed at the Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships in Blainville, Quebec in October; and

Whereas Mr. MacAskill and his horse Chex Nu Doll were one of two junior reining competitors on the Nova Scotia team; and

Whereas Mr. MacAskill has shown dedication, hard work and commitment to his sport and a great love of the horse;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Mr. MacAskill on his success and wish him much happiness as he continues his work with horses.

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RESOLUTION NO. 950

By: Ms. Pam Eyking « » (Victoria-The Lakes)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Seniors Youth Time Bank Program, based out of the Bay St. Lawrence Community Centre, seeks to connect youth and seniors; and

Whereas the participants in this program have come together to beautify local graveyards, pick blueberries, hike, paint, do community cleanouts and numerous other activities; and

Whereas the Seniors Youth Time Bank Program is an example of a program that encourages both seniors and youth to contribute positively to the community;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the youth and seniors involved in this program and encourage them to continue working together and enjoying time with each other.

RESOLUTION NO. 951

By: Mr. Brendan Maguire « » (Halifax Atlantic)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Captain Harold Henneberry has been a long-time resident of the Sambro area, spending his life making a living from the sea and raising his family in Sambro; and

Whereas he is a local legend in the area with many stories to tell of days gone by such as the time he was shipwrecked off the Grand Banks; and

Whereas Captain Henneberry turned 100 years old in September;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Captain Henneberry on his 100th Birthday and wish him continued health and happiness.

RESOLUTION NO. 952

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By: Mr. Brendan Maguire « » (Halifax Atlantic)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas government employees are the backbone of our great province helping our government run smoothly and efficiently; and

Whereas Shauna Gray has served the province of Nova Scotia for the past 25 years; and

Whereas Shauna Gray's dedication and commitment to the people of Nova Scotia is demonstrated by her long-term service with the province;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly commend Shauna Gray for her 25 years of dedicated service to the Province of Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 953

By: Mr. Brendan Maguire « » (Halifax Atlantic)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas an anniversary is a time to celebrate the joys of today, the memories of yesterday, and the hopes of tomorrow; and

Whereas 50 years of marriage is a milestone to be celebrated with family and friends; and

Whereas September 5th marked the 50th Wedding Anniversary of Marina and Nelson Burkey;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Marina and Nelson Burkey on their 50th Wedding Anniversary and wish them continued health and happiness.

RESOLUTION NO. 954

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By: Mr. Brendan Maguire « » (Halifax Atlantic)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas government employees are the backbone of our great province helping our government run smoothly and efficiently; and

Whereas Robert MacLellan has served the province of Nova Scotia for the past 30 years; and

Whereas Robert MacLellan's dedication and commitment to the people of Nova Scotia is demonstrated by his long term service with the province;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly commend Robert MacLellan for his 30 years of dedicated service to the Province of Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 955

By: Hon. Andrew Younger « » (Energy)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Andrea Maureen Shannon, a resident of the riding of Dartmouth East, has earned a Master of Arts degree from Dalhousie University; and

Whereas Andrea was recognized as a top-tier doctoral student by being awarded a Canada Graduate Scholarship by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council; and

Whereas Andrea successfully defended her dissertation, Projects of Governance: Garrisons and the State in England, 1560s-163s, and was granted the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the highest degree awarded by Dalhousie University, on May 20th, 2014;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating Dr. Andrea Shannon on her impressive academic achievements and contribution to historical scholarship.

RESOLUTION NO. 956

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By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nuriya Shamsuddin was the recipient of an Action for Neighbourhood Change Seed Grant sponsored by the United Way; and

Whereas Ms. Shamsuddin hosted a wonderful public Afghan Poetry Night at Our Lady of Lebanon Church that gave the opportunity for community members to gather for a cultural event; and

Whereas Ms. Shamsuddin is actively connecting different cultures together while promoting her own heritage and helping new Nova Scotians feel welcome in their new home;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Nuriya Shamsuddin for her multiculturalism and for promoting unity and new friendships in a diverse community.

RESOLUTION NO. 957

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Halifax North West Trail Association is a community group run by volunteers that promote, protect and maintain many Halifax trails; and

Whereas Bob and Wendy McDonald have been organizing guided hikes for all fitness levels for many years through the Trails Association, both being promoters of health and wellness and wildlife conservation; and

Whereas the Halifax North West Trails are strong advocates for our brooks, wetlands, woodlands and flora and fauna alike;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Halifax North West Trails Association for their efforts in maintaining and improving the trails in our communities.

RESOLUTION NO. 958

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By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Al-Arz Pita Bakery located at 19 Alma Crescent is an independent grocery store offering fresh baked pita bread and other Lebanese delicacies to the community; and

Whereas the Al-Arz Pita Bakers specializes in bread, fresh meat kibbi, stews, steaks, fresh fruits, vegetables, salads and pastries with fresh ground Arabica coffee; and

Whereas this independent grocery store has been supplying good, wholesome food to Fairview and Halifax community and is welcoming and inclusive to our diverse community in Fairview-Clayton Park;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Al-Arz Pita Bakery and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 959

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Yummy Deli located at 3647 Dutch Village Road is an independent grocery store, offering takeout and catering to our local community; and

Whereas the Yummy Deli is a new business that is just a year old; and

Whereas this independent grocery store features European treats from Russia, Ukraine and Poland and is welcoming and inclusive to our diverse community in Fairview-Clayton Park;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Yummy Deli and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 960

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By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Hair Design Centre, located at 278 Lacewood Drive, is an affordable place to get your hair cut and styled; and

Whereas the Hair Design Centre is an extension of the HDC school offering students a platform to practice their skills and the HDC programs offer a foundation program to prepare students for careers in hair design; and

Whereas the Hair Design Centre provides a mentorship program that helps students learn on real clients and facilitate the transition from student to stylist while passing along the savings to customers;

Therefore be it resolved members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Hair Design Centre and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 961

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas The Last Game Store, located at 278 Lacewood Drive, is an independent video gaming store owned by Adam Perry; and

Whereas The Last Game Store features new and used vintage video games, board games, statues, action figures, accessories, and other fun toys; and

Whereas this independent store provides a venue for gamers to exchange and trade new and used games, meet other gamers, and hosts weekly gaming events such as Super Street Fighter Mondays, biweekly Blaz Blue Battles, and monthly Super Smash Brothers tournaments;

Therefore be it resolved members of the House of Assembly congratulate The Last Game Store and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 962

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By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cutting Gardens, located at 70 Lacewood Drive, is an independent paper craft studio; and

Whereas the Cutting Garden supplies everything you need for a wide variety of artistic projects; and

Whereas the Cutting Garden offers expert classes for every season to help you meet all your crafting needs;

Therefore be it resolved members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Cutting Garden and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 963

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Kwacha House, located at 3450 Dutch Village Road is an independent world coffee house owned by Folami Jones; and

Whereas Folami Jones is taking after her late grandfather, Burnely Allan "Rocky" Jones and she is inspiring open political and world discussion for our diverse community by providing a safe, inclusive space for people to gather; and

Whereas the Kwacha House has quickly become a popular spot for community meetings, study sessions, hangouts, international meals, and weekend jam sessions, this coffee house is welcoming and is all encompassing to our diverse community in Fairview-Clayton Park;

Therefore be it resolved members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Kwacha House and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 964

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By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Allyson Cromwell participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Allyson engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Allyson was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Allyson Cromwell put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 965

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hannah Richard participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Hannah engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Hannah was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Hannah Richard put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

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RESOLUTION NO. 966

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Talis McKay participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Talis engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Talis was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Talis McKay put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 967

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ryan Rafuse participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Ryan engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Ryan was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Ryan Rafuse put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

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RESOLUTION NO. 968

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Marissa MacCallum participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Marissa engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Marissa was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Marissa MacCallum put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 969

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kendra Redmond participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Kendra engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Kendra was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

[Page 2675]

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Kendra Redmond put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 970

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jermaine Morris participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Jermaine engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Jermaine was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Jermaine Morris put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 971

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hannah Birru participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD Program and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities, which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Hannah engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Hannah was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

[Page 2676]

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Hannah Birru put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 972

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dafina Kozhani participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Dafina engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Dafina was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Dafina Kozhani put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 973

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brianna Jenkins participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Brianna engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

[Page 2677]

Whereas Brianna was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Brianna Jenkins put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 974

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alex Marriot participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Alex engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Alex was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Alex Marriot put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all his successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 975

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Marcel Gaudet participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Marcel engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

[Page 2678]

Whereas Marcel was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Marcel Gaudet put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all his successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 976

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Justin Smith participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Justin engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Justin was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Justin Smith put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all his successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 977

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brionna Clearly participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Brionna engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

[Page 2679]

Whereas Brionna was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Brionna Clearly put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 978

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lauren Melanson participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Lauren engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Lauren was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Lauren Melanson put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 979

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Juls Castro participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Juls engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

[Page 2680]

Whereas Juls was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Juls Castro put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 980

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dustin Ellsworth is an innovative and passionate young community activist and volunteer; and

Whereas Mr. Ellsworth has started a new program called Building Up for Integral Life Decisions, or BUILD program, that targets at risk youth by engaging them in after school activities that promote physical fitness, self-confidence and mental health; and

Whereas Mr. Ellsworth is a community leader that motivates young adults to be the best that they can be through his BUILD program and through his personal example;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly wish Mr. Dustin Ellsworth continued success in all of his community outreach endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 981

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lal Tiwari participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions, or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Lal engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

[Page 2681]

Whereas Lal was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Lal Tiwari put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all his successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 982

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mohammed Hafez participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions, or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Mohammed engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Mohammed was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Mohammed Hafez put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all his successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 983

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Anthony Savory participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions, or BUILD program, and has increased his level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

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Whereas Anthony engaged with his fellow classmates to increase his self-confidence, his community engagement and increase his goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Anthony was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught him the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Anthony Savory put into the BUILD program and congratulate him on all his successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 984

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lia Day participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions, or BUILD program, and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

Whereas Lia engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Lia was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Lia Day put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 985

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lou-Ann Campbell participated in the Building Up for Integral Life Decisions, or BUILD program, and has increased her level of fitness and after school participation through the program's activities which strive to "push harder for a better tomorrow"; and

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Whereas Lou-Ann engaged with her fellow classmates to increase her self-confidence, her community engagement and increase her goal-setting abilities through the one-hour after school exercise and self-confidence building program; and

Whereas Lou-Ann was a valued member of the BUILD team, a program that has taught her the importance of a healthy lifestyle and the value of diverse friendship;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the effort and level of commitment that Lou-Ann Campbell put into the BUILD program and congratulate her on all her successes.

RESOLUTION NO. 986

By: Ms. Patricia Arab « » (Fairview-Clayton Park)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the House of Halal, located at 14 Titus Street is an independent grocery store offering halal meats and products to the community; and

Whereas the House of Halal has been a prosperous business in the community for over a decade; and

Whereas this independent grocery store has been supplying Zabeeha-Halal meats, free range and locally sourced meats to Halifax and is welcoming and inclusive to our diverse community in Fairview-Clayton Park;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the House of Halal and wish it continued success in the years to come.

RESOLUTION NO. 987

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas every year since 1971, Nova Scotia donates a Christmas tree to the City of Boston for the help provided after the Halifax Explosion; and

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Whereas John and Ethel Ann MacPherson of Antigonish have donated a 43-foot tall white spruce, from their property, that is approximately 55 years old; and

Whereas this is the first time a tree has been selected from northern Nova Scotia to be sent to our friends in Boston and to be lit and on display on the Boston Common;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly thank John and Ethel Ann for their generous donation, and congratulate them on having the honour of their tree representing Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 988

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas since it opened in 2011 the Antigonish Town and County Library has truly become The People's Place, a focal point of the community, offering programs and services to people of all ages, as well as a meeting space for non-profit organizations; and

Whereas The People's Place also promotes local artists and craftspeople, creating a warm environment with unique character that draws in hundreds of people every day; and

Whereas for these reasons, and many more, the library has won the title of Great Public Space in the 2014 Great Places in Canada contest;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate the designing architect, library staff, and residents of Antigonish for having created a great space at the Antigonish Town and County Library.

RESOLUTION NO. 989

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Sunday, November 2, 2014, the St. Francis Xavier Women's rugby team won their fourth national title, defeating the McMaster Marauders 43-34 in the highest-scoring CIS women's rugby final in history; and

Whereas the 17-time Atlantic University Sport Conference champions are now 4-3 in CIS gold medal games, having won the national championship in 2006, 2010, and 2012; and

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Whereas this fourth national title comes after an outstanding regular season, where the X-Women were 6-0, outscoring their opposition 404-34;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate the players, coaches, and support staff, on an incredible season and for winning the national title.

RESOLUTION NO. 990

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Staff Sergeant Anthony Arthur Perry is being honoured on November 24, 2014, at the Nova Scotia Police Long Service Awards; and

Whereas Staff Sergeant Perry, who has been stationed at the Antigonish RCMP Detachment for many of his years of service, has been an invaluable member and volunteer in the Antigonish community; and

Whereas for having served over 25 years with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, this award is very much deserved as he has helped Nova Scotians and Canadians live safe, healthy, and vibrant lives;

Therefore be in resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Staff Sergeant Perry on receiving his Long-Service Award, and thank him for his years of dedication and leadership.

RESOLUTION NO. 991

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in October, the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce held its annual Business Gala during Small Business Week; and

Whereas Sarah England was the recipient of the Young Entrepreneur Award; and

Whereas this award is designed to recognize youth who have excelled in the development and enhancement of the economic infrastructure, and contributed to the propensity and well-being of Antigonish through entrepreneurship;

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Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sarah on winning the Young Entrepreneur Award.

RESOLUTION NO. 992

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in October, the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce held its annual Business Gala during Small Business Week; and

Whereas Sacred Temple Tattoo and Design won the Emerging Business Award; and

Whereas this award is designed to put the spotlight on a new profitable business showing excellence in new or innovative product or service, quality of merchandise/customer service, job creation, growth potential, market served, and community involvement;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Jamie MacKay and the staff at Sacred Temple Tattoo and Design for winning the Emerging Business Award.

RESOLUTION NO. 993

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in October, the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce held its annual Business Gala during Small Business Week; and

Whereas the individual who won the Outstanding Customer Service Award was Emma Peters who works at the Tall & Small Café and adores her customers; and

Whereas this award is designed to turn the spotlight on an employee who has demonstrated outstanding customer service to their customers;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Emma Peters on winning the Outstanding Customer Service Award.

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RESOLUTION NO. 994

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in October, the Antigonish Chamber of Commerce held its annual Business Gala during Small Business Week; and

Whereas the Ian Spencer Excellence in Business Award went to DeCoste Electrical and Ventilation for having demonstrated successful business practices and strong corporate responsibility and community service; and

Whereas this award is named in memory of Ian Spencer and is in recognition of his commitment to bridge the gap between business and the community;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kevin and Bonnie DeCoste, who have owned and operated DeCoste Electrical and Ventilation for over 30 years, on winning the Ian Spencer Excellence in Business Award.

RESOLUTION NO. 995

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 5, 2014, at the annual conference held by the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities, Long-Service Awards were presented; and

Whereas Owen McCarron, a councillor with the Municipality of the County of Antigonish received one of these awards for his 20 years of service; and

Whereas this award is very much deserved for his many years of leadership and dedication providing the programs and services to help Nova Scotians have healthy, prosperous and vibrant lives;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly take this opportunity to thank Councillor McCarron for his commitment and dedication to public service as we appreciate his time and contributions to our province.

RESOLUTION NO. 996

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By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 5, 2014, at the annual conference held by the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities, Long-Service Awards were presented; and

Whereas Jack MacPherson, a councillor with the Town of Antigonish, received one of these awards for his 10 years of service; and

Whereas this award is very much deserved for his many years of leadership and dedication providing the programs and services to help Nova Scotians have healthy, prosperous and vibrant lives;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly take this opportunity to thank Councillor MacPherson for his commitment and dedication to public service as we appreciate his time and contributions to our province.

RESOLUTION NO. 997

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 5, 2014, at the annual conference held by the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities, Long-Service Awards were presented; and

Whereas Liz Chisholm, a councillor with the Town of Antigonish, received one of these awards for her 10 years of service; and

Whereas this award is very much deserved for her many years of leadership and dedication providing the programs and services to help Nova Scotians have healthy, prosperous and vibrant lives;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly take this opportunity to thank Councillor Chisholm for her commitment and dedication to public service as we appreciate her time and contributions to our province.

RESOLUTION NO. 998

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By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 5, 2014, at the annual conference held by the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities, Long-Service Awards were presented; and

Whereas Remi Deveau, a councillor with the Municipality of the County of Antigonish, received one of these awards for his 10 years of service; and

Whereas this award is very much deserved for his many years of leadership and dedication providing the programs and services to help Nova Scotians have healthy, prosperous and vibrant lives;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly take this opportunity to thank Councillor Deveau for his commitment and dedication to public service as we appreciate his time and contributions to our province.

RESOLUTION NO. 999

By: Hon. Randy Delorey « » (Environment)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 5, 2014, at the annual conference held by the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities, Long-Service Awards were presented; and

Whereas Donnie MacDonald, a councillor with the Municipality of the County of Antigonish, received one of these awards for his 10 years of service; and

Whereas this award is very much deserved for his many years of leadership and dedication providing the programs and services to help Nova Scotians have healthy, prosperous and vibrant lives;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly take this opportunity to thank Councillor MacDonald for his commitment and dedication to public service as we appreciate his time and contributions to our province.