Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

La Chambre s'est ajournée le
26 octobre 2017

HANSARD13-23

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Gordie Gosse

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



Fifth Session

MONDAY, APRIL 29, 2013

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

SPEAKER'S RULING:
Referral of question in Oral Questions Put by Members
(Pt. of order by Hon. C. d'Entremont » [Hansard p. 934, 04/17/13])
1567
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee,
1568
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
HAMC - Anl. Rept. (2011-12),
1568
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 956, Fisher, Graham: Excellence in Pub. Serv. Award (2013)
- Congrats., Hon. M. More »
1569
Vote - Affirmative
1569
Res. 957, Women's Instit. N.S. - Anniv. (100th),
1570
Vote - Affirmative
1570
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 66, Mariners' Day Act,
1571
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 958, iMoeTeam: Invention - Congrats.,
1571
Vote - Affirmative
1572
Res. 959, Simm, Rick: "Come Dine With Me" - Success Wish,
1572
Vote - Affirmative
1573
Res. 960, Stead, Bob: Commun. Contributions - Congrats.,
1573
Vote - Affirmative
1573
Res. 961, Lanteigne, Terra Carling, et al: Sci-Tech Expo
- Congrats., Ms. K. Regan « »
1574
Vote - Affirmative
1575
Res. 962, MacEachen, Alex Angus - Hockey/Life: Pursuit
- Congrats., Mr. A. MacMaster »
1575
Vote - Affirmative
1575
Res. 963, Cyber Internet Safety Soc.: Contributors
- Congrats., Ms. L. Zann »
1575
Vote - Affirmative
1576
Res. 964, Paragon Golf & Country Club - Anniv. (50 Yrs.),
1576
Vote - Affirmative
1577
Res. 965, Gould, Kendra: Eskasoni Elem./Mid. Sch
Female Athlete of Yr. - Congrats., Mr. K. Bain »
1577
Vote - Affirmative
1578
Res. 966, Gov't. (Can.): Senate - Abolish,
1578
Res. 967, N. Shore Area Commun. Health Bd. - Wellness Expo:
Organizing - Congrats., Hon. K. Casey »
1579
Vote - Affirmative
1579
Res. 968, Bernard, Tristen: Eskasoni Elem./Mid. Sch
Male Athlete of Yr. - Congrats., Mr. K. Bain « »
1580
Vote - Affirmative
1580
Res. 969, Richmond Co. Step Dancers: Work/Trophies/Medals
- Congrats., Hon. M. Samson »
1580
Vote - Affirmative
1581
Res. 970, MacDonald, Lloyd: Death of - Tribute,
1581
Vote - Affirmative
1582
Res. 971, St. Peters Parish Drama Group - "Sound of Music":
Production - Congrats., Ms. D. Whalen »
1582
Vote - Affirmative
1582
Res. 972, McKeough Trust Fund - Vols.: Commun. Spirit
- Recognize, Mr. E. Orrell « »
1583
Vote - Affirmative
1583
Res. 973, Train Convention - Tatamagouche: Innovation
- Congrats., Hon. K. Casey « »
1583
Vote - Affirmative
1584
Res. 974, Talbot, Coach Marilyn/Richmond Synchronized Skating Team:
Season - Congrats., Hon. M. Samson « »
1584
Vote - Affirmative
1585
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 43, Onslow Cemetery Company Trustees Incorporation Act
1585
Vote - Affirmative
1586
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 51, Financial Measures (2013) Act
1587
1595
1601
Vote - Affirmative
1601
No. 62, Protection for Persons in Care Act
1602
1603
1604
1604
Vote - Affirmative
1604
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
1605
1614
Adjourned debate
1627
[PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:]
Law Amendments Committee,
1627
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., Apr. 30th at 12:00 noon
1628
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 975, Alice Housing: Exec. Dir./Bd. of Directors/Staff/Vols
- Anniv. (30th), Mr. A. Younger »
1629
Res. 976, Chesnutt, Tim - EPIC Race Director: Dart. Event
- Congrats., Mr. A. Younger « »
1629
Res. 977, Smith, Lloyd E.: Town Crier - Anniv. (35 Yrs.),
1630
Res. 978, Dalbrae Dragons Boys Hockey Team: NSSAF
Prov. Championship - Congrats., Mr. A. MacMaster « »
1630
Res. 979, Brown, Chris: Music Achievement - Congrats.,
1631
Res. 980, Colpitts, Sarah: Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee
Medal - Congrats., Hon. J. Baillie « »
1631
Res. 981, Connors, Bill: Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee
Medal - Congrats., Hon. J. Baillie « »
1632
Res. 982, Davison, Kerwin: Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee
Medal - Congrats., Hon. J. Baillie « »
1632
Res. 983, Landry, Haley & Francis: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
1633
Res. 984, Rohland, Christine & Guy: Daughter - Birth Congrats.,
1633
Res. 985, Surette, Cindy & Michel: Son - Birth Congrats.,
1634
Res. 986, Southeastern Commun. Health Bd. - Seniors Acad.:
Partner - Thank, Ms. B. Kent »
1634
Res. 987, Justice Dept. (N.S.) - Seniors Acad.: Partner
- Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1635
Res. 988, Karsten, Councillor Bill - Seniors Acad.:
Partner - Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1635
Res. 989, Atl. Superstore (Portland St.) - Seniors Acad.:
Partner - Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1636
Res. 990, RCMP Cole Hbr. Detachment - Seniors Acad.: Partner
- Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1636
Res. 991, Tim Hortons East. Passage - Seniors Acad.: Partner
- Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1637
Res. 992, East. Passage Lions Club - Seniors Acad.:
Partner - Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1637
Res. 993, Price, Mike - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1638
Res. 994, Pike, Meghan - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1639
Res. 995, Vanberkal, Connie - Seniors Acad.: Presenter
- Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1639
Res. 996, Brushett, Barby - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1640
Res. 997, Dickson, Nora - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1640
Res. 998, MacDonald, Ian - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1641
Res. 999, Deon, Noelle - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1641
Res. 1000, Roe, Jan - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1642
Res. 1001, Cooper, Louanne - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1642
Res. 1002, Stevens, Susan - Seniors Acad.: Presenter - Thank,
1643
Res. 1003, MacDonald, Sgt. Scott - Seniors Acad.: Presenter
- Thank, Ms. B. Kent « »
1643
Res. 1004, Arsenault, Ruby - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1644
Res. 1005, Ayre, Judy - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1644
Res. 1006, Ayre, Llayne - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1645
Res. 1007, Barrett, Lillian - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1646
Res. 1008, Bennett, Barb - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1646
Res. 1009, Bhathena, Khorshed - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1647
Res. 1010, Bhathena, Shapur - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1647
Res. 1011, Davis, Jean - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1648
Res. 1012, Eddy, Lorraine - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1648
Res. 1013, Fortin, Elizabeth - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1649
Res. 1014, Fox, Margaret - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1649
Res. 1015, Gill, Peter - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1650
Res. 1016, Gill, Elizabeth - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1650
Res. 1017, Gosbee, Ruby - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1651
Res. 1018, Gosbee, Victor - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1652
Res. 1019, Johnston, Elsie - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1652
Res. 1020, MacIntyre, Kay - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1653
Res. 1021, McKinnon, Maureen - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1653
Res. 1022, Moffatt, Maxine - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1654
Res. 1023, Parkyn, Sharon - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1654
Res. 1024, Peachey, Myrna - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1655
Res. 1025, Penney, Patricia - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1655
Res. 1026, Ramey, Garnetta - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1656
Res. 1027, Riles, Ken - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1656
Res. 1028, Shore, Rita - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1657
Res. 1029, Simpson, John - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1658
Res. 1030, Thompson, Christine - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1658
Res. 1031, Thompson, Robert - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1659
Res. 1032, Van Den Heuvel, Colleen - Seniors Acad.: Graduate
- Congrats., Ms. B. Kent « »
1659
Res. 1033, William, Madonna - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1660
Res. 1034, William, Tom - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1660
Res. 1035, York, Ina - Seniors Acad.: Graduate - Congrats.,
1661

[Page 1567]

HALIFAX, MONDAY, APRIL 29, 2013

Sixty-first General Assembly

Fifth Session

4:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Gordie Gosse

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Ms. Becky Kent, Mr. Leo Glavine, Mr. Alfie MacLeod

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. Before we start the daily routine, I'm going to give a Speaker's Ruling.

SPEAKER'S RULING: Referral of question in Oral Questions Put by Members (Pt. of order by Hon. C. d'Entremont [Hansard p. 934, 04/17/13]) Only one answer to an Oral Question.

On April 17th the honourable Progressive Conservative House Leader rose on a point of order. His complaint was that on a couple of occasions the Premier had given a full answer to a question, and then referred it to a minister for another full answer. He thought the convention was that if the Premier was referring a question to a minister, he could say a little bit and then refer it.

1567

The Progressive Conservative House Leader is correct in his assessment of the convention. As stated in O'Brien and Bosc, at Page 509: "Only one Minister may respond to a question, and it need not be the one to whom the question is addressed who actually answers it."

[Page 1568]

In referring the question to another minister, the Premier or any other minister is entitled to advise the House that he or she is referring it to another minister and to perhaps give a short explanation, of a sentence or two in length, about why. I have noticed that since the member raised the issue, that seems to be what is happening. A lengthy answer, followed by a referral to another minister, would not be appropriate.

While we are on the topic of lengthy answers, I should say that in reviewing Hansard on this question, I confirmed what I said in the House recently; that is, that both the questions and answers often become quite long, and all members should strive to shorten things up. Thank you.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. ROSS LANDRY « » : Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 3 - Support for Parents of Critically Ill or Abducted Children Act.

Bill No. 32 - Solemnization of Marriage Act.

and the chairman recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : Pursuant to Section 11(1)(f) of the House of Assembly Management Commission Act, I, as chairman, table the 2012 Annual Report of the House of Assembly Management Commission, which includes the audited financial statements for both the 2011 and 2012 fiscal years.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

[Page 1569]

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of the Public Service Commission.

RESOLUTION NO. 956

HON. MARILYN MORE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Government of Nova Scotia recognizes employees and teams who are dedicated to making Nova Scotia a better place with the prestigious Excellence in Public Service Award; and

Whereas Graham Fisher of the Department of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations was recognized with the Excellence in Public Service Award for his efforts on the design, development, and implementation of the Municipal Climate Change Action Plan Guidebook; and

Whereas this important resource is now helping municipalities reduce greenhouse gas emissions and identify priorities for climate change adaptation;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Graham Fisher for being recognized with a 2013 Excellence in Public Service Award for his work helping Nova Scotia municipalities address climate change, and recognize the dedication of all government employees to making this province a better place.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 957

[Page 1570]

HON. JOHN MACDONELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Women's Institute of Nova Scotia has been strengthening rural communities across Nova Scotia for an entire century; and

Whereas the Women's Institute provides Nova Scotia women with opportunities to enhance their quality of life through education and personal development, and also helps to meet the changing needs of their sisters in developing communities around the world; and

Whereas 2013 is the centennial year for the Women's Institute of Nova Scotia, and the theme of this year's annual general meeting is A Century of Women's Voices for Progress and Change;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Women's Institute of Nova Scotia on their 100th Anniversary, and recognize the important role this organization plays in strengthening communities in Nova Scotia and around the world.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU « » : Mr. Speaker, may I make an introduction?

MR. SPEAKER « » : Most certainly.

MR. BELLIVEAU « » : Today in your gallery - I ask our guests to stand - we have Della Sears, the mother of Katlin Nickerson, the captain of the Miss Ally, and accompanying her is Adam Newell. I would ask my colleagues in the House to give them a warm welcome today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : We welcome all our guests to the gallery and hope they enjoy this afternoon's proceedings.

[Page 1571]

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 66 - Entitled an Act Respecting a Memorial Day for Mariners. (Hon. Sterling Belliveau)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that this bill be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

MS. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Most certainly.

MS. REGAN « » : I'd like to draw the members' attention to the west gallery, where we have two groups of very smart girls here today. First of all, with my first resolution, I would like to introduce the iMoe team - please stand as your name is called - Isabel Sarty, Emma Travers, Olivia Warrington, and Madison Presunka. The girls have just returned from St. Louis, where the iMoe team was the only Canadian team to win an award, but I'll speak about that in the resolution. Thank you for coming. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : We welcome all our guests to the gallery this afternoon.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 958

MS. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the iMoe team - Isabel Sarty, Emma Travers, Olivia Warrington, and Madison Presunka, all current or former residents of Bedford - developed a sensor designed to warn seniors of a possible fall; and

Whereas the four girls worked with seniors at Spencer House community centre in Halifax to develop the sensor, called the iMoetion, which can be attached to a walker and which emits a signal when the user's body is out of alignment with the walker; and

Whereas the iMoe team beat out 32 other teams of competitors aged 9 to 16 to claim the championship of the FIRST LEGO League Robot Programming Competition, held February 10th at Acadia University;

[Page 1572]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Isabel Sarty, Emma Travers, Olivia Warrington, and Madison Presunka on their victory, which gave them the right to compete in the FIRST LEGO League World Festival in St. Louis, from which they have just returned.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 959

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Florence native Rick Simm will appear on the popular W Network television show Come Dine With Me; and

Whereas the show sees five people host five dinner parties at their homes and then vote on each other's performances to decide who wins the $1,000 prize; and

Whereas Rick has been living in Toronto for the past six years and works as an actor and theatrical administrator;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly wish Rick Simm success on his TV appearance that will no doubt showcase his Cape Breton hospitality.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 1573]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Education and Early Childhood Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 960

HON. RAMONA JENNEX « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bob Stead was a 1963 Acadia graduate and then an Acadia employee from 1969 to his retirement as the director of Admissions; and

Whereas Bob Stead served his community of Wolfville, first as a town councillor for nine years and then as mayor for 15 years, providing outstanding leadership to Wolfville; and

Whereas Bob was instrumental in the creation of the Wolfville Watershed Nature Reserve and in having Wolfville, the first town in Nova Scotia, to be 100 per cent indoor public smoke-free, along with many other initiatives along with being named a Fair Trade Town;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Bob Stead for his fine leadership in municipal politics, environmental and health issues, and thank him for the positive influence he has had on so many people, and for providing leadership which has been so influential in the vibrant community of Wolfville.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

[Page 1574]

MS. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to make an introduction.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Most certainly.

MS. REGAN « » : I would like to draw the attention of members to the west gallery once again where we have the grand prize winners of the Sci-Tech Expo: Terra Carling Lanteigne of Bedford Academy - if you'd like to stand up - Julia Sarty of Citadel High School, Nicole Poirier of Bedford Academy, Briana Ross of J.L. Ilsley High School, and Hannah Miles of Sir John A. Macdonald High School. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : We welcome all our guests to the gallery.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 961

MS. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canada-Wide Science Fair is the largest extracurricular youth activity related to science and technology in the country; and

Whereas the top six grand prize winners in the Sci-Tech Expo held April 6th in Halifax will travel to Lethbridge, Alberta, for the Canada-Wide Science Fair in May where their products will be judged and where they'll expand their scientific knowledge; and

Whereas every single one of the grand prize winners of the Sci-Tech Expo is a young woman - Terra Carling Lanteigne of Bedford Academy, Julia Sarty of Citadel High School, Nicole Poirier of Bedford Academy, Zoe Abraham of Bedford Academy, Briana Ross of J.L. Ilsley High School, and Hannah Miles of Sir John A. Macdonald High School;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Terra, Julia, Nicole, Zoe, Briana, and Hannah on their scientific prowess, and wish them much success at the Canada-Wide Science Fair and with their future academic and scientific pursuits.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 1575]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 962

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alex Angus MacEachen of Mabou is 13 years old and has limited vision and is considered legally blind; and

Whereas he learned to skate at the Mabou Arena and later learned to play hockey with the encouragement of volunteers coaches; and

Whereas Alex Angus went to Toronto to take part in a Courage Canada Hockey Tournament where he carried the Canadian flag and was at centre ice for the opening face-off;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize Alex Angus MacEachen for pursuing his love of hockey and his passion for life.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Truro-Bible Hill.

RESOLUTION NO. 963

MS. LENORE ZANN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Truro Community Credit Union recently awarded $2,500 each to two local anti-bullying initiatives - the Kids Help Line and CISS, the Cyber Internet Safety Society, which is also supported by the Town of Truro and members of the police board; and

[Page 1576]

Whereas the financial contribution by the credit union comes on top of two Lighthouses Grants awarded by the Department of Justice, as well as many hours of invaluable work on a Cyber video by many members of the Truro community, including the students and professors of the animation program at the NSCC Truro campus, and performances by professional actors Jonathan Torrens and this MLA for Truro-Bible Hill, who waived their professional fees in order to portray the characters of Doc, the scientist who creates the robot Cyber, and Officer Web, a female police officer who teaches kids about the importance of Internet safety and the dangers of cyberbullying; and

Whereas this video presentation of Cyber has now been seen by 25,000 students across Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Truro Community Credit Union, the Town of Truro, and all those who have contributed their time, money, and expertise to the Cyber Internet Safety Society over the past four years in order to teach our kids the importance of standing up to bullying in all of its many forms - and in fact, refraining from doing it themselves, thus teaching all Nova Scotians that bullying is definitely not cool.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 964

MR. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Paragon Golf and Country Club was the brainchild of Kaye Huet, Gordie Shaw, and Len Giffen 50 years ago, and opened in 1963 with seven holes in play; and

[Page 1577]

Whereas 2013 marks 50 years of operation for Paragon, located in Kingston, which this year will surpass well over 500 members, and it is now an 18-hole golf course with some of the finest golf holes in the Annapolis Valley; and

Whereas the 50th Anniversary of the Paragon Golf and Country Club will be celebrated with numerous activities and special tournaments during this banner year of golfing, fellowship, and enjoying the sport during the summer days in the Annapolis Valley;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate the members past and present, the board of directors, and the staff at Paragon Golf and Country Club in Kingston for 50 years of golfing excellence in the Annapolis Valley.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 965

MR. KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kendra Gould of Eskasoni was recently named Female Athlete of the Year at Eskasoni Elementary and Middle School; and

Whereas Kendra is the daughter of Paula Marshall and Jay Marshall of Eskasoni; and

Whereas Kendra is a Grade 9 student at Eskasoni Elementary and Middle School, and is very involved with all the school's activities;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kendra Gould on being named Female Athlete of the Year, and wish her the best of luck as she continues on with her education and extracurricular activities.

[Page 1578]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Sheet Harbour.

RESOLUTION NO. 966

MR. JIM BOUDREAU « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Conservative Senator Stephen Greene's recent attack on the federal fleet separation policy has caused significant concern in coastal communities across Nova Scotia; and

Whereas another Conservative Senator, Tom McInnis, showed an equal lack of respect and understanding for Nova Scotia's fishery with an over-the-top defence of the Harper Government's damaging changes to the EI program; and

Whereas the fishery is Nova Scotia's largest export industry, contributing close to $1 billion annually to our GDP, and recent changes to the EI program and potential changes to the owner-operator and fleet separation policies could cripple rural economies across the province;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House condemn the comments of Senator McInnis and Senator Greene, and tell the federal Conservative Government that if they can't appoint Nova Scotia senators who will defend the best interests of Nova Scotia, perhaps it's time they followed the advice of the federal NDP and abolish the Senate.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 1579]

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 967

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on May 7th the North Shore Area Community Health Board is hosting a wellness expo at the Tatamagouche Fire Hall in Colchester North; and

Whereas the event will highlight projects that raise community awareness about how the community health board contributes to wellness, how to get involved with local wellness programs, and how to access the wide range of services that the district health authority offers; and

Whereas volunteer-based groups, such as the Lillian Fraser Memorial Hospital Auxiliary and the North Shore Health Services Foundation, will showcase their roles in the local health care;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate the North Shore Area Community Health Board for their initiative in organizing such an informative event and wish them every success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 968

[Page 1580]

MR. KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tristen Bernard of Eskasoni was recently named Male Athlete of the Year at Eskasoni Elementary and Middle School; and

Whereas Tristen is the son of Jasine Dennis and Kevin Bernard of Eskasoni; and

Whereas Tristen is a Grade 9 student at Eskasoni Elementary and Middle School and is very active in the school's activities;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Tristen Bernard on being named Male Athlete of the Year, and wish him the best of luck as he continues on with his education and extracurricular activities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 969

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Richmond County Step Dancers performed at a dance competition in Halifax on March 23-24, 2013; and

Whereas the Richmond County Step Dancers received awards for highest marks in traditional and non-traditional step dance solos, trios, small groups, and large groups, taking home seven trophies and 43 medals; and

Whereas the group consists of Victoria Mury, Kendra MacDonald, Kaitlynn Keating, Amber Keating, Olivia Boudreau, Leah Boudreau, Alexandria Samson, MacKenzie Keating, Kathryn Joyce, Reagan Hunt, and is under the direction of Trina Samson;

[Page 1581]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating the Richmond County Step Dancers for their hard work and dedication, as well as for winning several trophies and medals.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

RESOLUTION NO. 970

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cape Breton entrepreneur Lloyd MacDonald passed away Saturday at the age of 82; and

Whereas Mr. MacDonald founded the MacDonald Auto Group 50 years ago and built the business until he became the largest car dealer on the Island; and

Whereas Mr. MacDonald was the father of 12 and was an accomplished musician - he was a good fiddler - the recipient of an honorary degree from Cape Breton University, and an inductee into the Cape Breton Business Hall of Fame;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly send condolences to the family and friends of Lloyd MacDonald, and remember his legacy as a father, employer, and entrepreneur.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 1582]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 971

MS. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on April 17-19, 2013, St. Peter's Parish Drama Group, in Dartmouth, presented a unique interpretation of The Sound of Music, raising funds for parish outreach and youth at risk; and

Whereas the cast, supported by a seven member band, delighted the large and appreciative audiences of family and friends; and

Whereas this annual production provides children and adults with the chance to perform and share their talent in support of a good cause;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the cast and crew and their producer Greg Becigneul and director Tracy Giffin, and wish them all continued success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 972

[Page 1583]

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a tribute to the late Dave and Donna McKeough's love of music and hockey raised an estimated $7,200 for the family's trust fund; and

Whereas an afternoon hockey game between the Cape Breton musicians and the Northside Vics gave way to an evening performance by the same musicians who had taken to the ice; and

Whereas the event was so popular there are plans for it to become an annual event that will include a women's hockey game;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the community spirit of these Cape Breton musicians, a small army of volunteers, and the many people who joined in the fun in support of the cause.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 973

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tatamagouche, Colchester North, is hosting a train convention of model trains on May 31st and June 1st and in recognition of this event, Colchester County Council has proclaimed the week of May 27 - June 2 as Train Days in the municipality; and

Whereas model trains will be set up in the North Shore Recreation Centre and there will also be a display of artwork relating to trains, crafted by the local elementary school students; and

[Page 1584]

Whereas Via Rail is sponsoring a prize for the winning entry from each class, which includes a free train ride for the winner;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Tatamagouche, Colchester North, for their innovative undertaking for using this as an educational experience for the elementary students, and for giving train lovers of all ages an educational and enjoyable experience.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 974

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Richmond Synchronized Skating Team competed at the Atlantic Synchronized competition in East Hants on January 26, 2013; and

Whereas the Richmond Synchronized Skating Team was awarded the bronze medal at the competition, which had over 300 skaters from all four provinces; and

Whereas the team consists of Alex Wilson, Emily Covin, Chelsea Pickett, Cheyenne Courchene, Nicole Curtis, Victoria O'Brien, Abigail MacDonald, Sara Porier, MacKenzie Keating, Makayla Boudreau, Hannah Curtis, Amber LeBlanc, Kiersten Paul, Shaylah Sampson, Seth Boudreau, Jenna MacLeod, Katelyn Marchand along with coach Marilyn Talbot;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating coach Marilyn Talbot, as well as the Richmond Synchronized Skating Team, for their hard work during the season and wish them continued success.

[Page 1585]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 43.

Bill No. 43 - Onslow Cemetery Company Trustees Incorporation Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester North.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 43 does speak to the Act of amending Chapter 197 of the Acts of 1901, an Act to Incorporate the Trustees of the Onslow Cemetery Company. In the explanatory note that goes with this bill, it's very clear that it's a change of language and it's a change of responsibility. The responsibility as the Act currently reads, the approval of bylaws rests with the Governor in Council, and the amendment being proposed here in this bill is to change that approval to the members . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I'm having a little trouble hearing the speaker this evening. There's way too much chatter in here for a Monday. I'd ask you if you'd all just keep the chatter down or take the conversations outside.

[Page 1586]

The honourable member for Colchester North has the floor.

MS. CASEY « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The bill as it currently exists has the approval for the bylaws resting with the Governor in Council and the change that's proposed in this amendment is to transfer that permission to approve bylaws to members of the company.

Part of the rationale for that, Mr. Speaker, is to facilitate the process. We have a number of members of the company who have been good stewards of the cemetery, who have been good trustees over the years and, in fact, you will recall that when the bill was introduced that this cemetery is one of the oldest in the province and, over the last number of years, has been well protected, well represented and the amendment here will facilitate and give to those members of the Onslow Cemetery Company the responsibility to approve the bylaws as is necessary.

Mr. Speaker, this is a historic site, it is one of the oldest in the province, and I'm pleased to stand and move second reading of Bill No. 43.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 43. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Private and Local Bills.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 51.

Bill No. 51 - Financial Measures (2013) Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

MS. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, it's a pleasure for me to get up today - I actually thought there might be a little bit more in the preamble to the bill coming from the government side, but I gather the minister had finished her opening statement on the bill. So for the context of the members of the House and those who are watching at home, we are looking at the Financial Measures (2013) Bill, which is always a bill that accompanies the budget, so it's very much part of the budget.

[Page 1587]

We did vote last week for the budget here in this House and, as those in the House know, the government supported the budget and those in Opposition did not, and there were a number of reasons why those in Opposition did not support the budget as it was presented. Number one was the title of the budget, which said it was a balanced budget, and we took great exception to that, Mr. Speaker. We don't agree with that. We've had an opportunity to say why and I believe today I'll have another opportunity to say why we don't believe the budget was balanced as it was presented here in the House over the last month and debated.

Mr. Speaker, the Financial Measures (2013) Bill which accompanies the budget often has many other Acts that are impacted; it is the amendments that are required to make the elements that are in the budget legal, so very often if there's a change in fees or there's a change in anything financial, it often can relate back to an earlier Act where those fees were set.

One of the things that is very noticeable in this Financial Measures (2013) Bill is that it is enacting the fee increases that were brought here at the very end of March. I am glad to say they were tabled here in the House. We received a large document of 1,400 fees that changed, the government said, by 5.8 per cent. That may be the average or it might have been the usual amount that was increased but there were fees in there that hadn't existed before and now are $100, so that is a lot more than 5.8 per cent. There were other fees included and there were fees that were increased that, I think, are very damaging to the people of Nova Scotia. To increase the fees that go along with so many services that are provided by government is another way to bump up revenue for the province and that is exactly what the NDP Government did when they brought in the fee increases at the very end of March.

One might remember there was a little bit of - I don't know if it was humorous or not, but the fee increases to alcohol were actually introduced a couple days earlier than they should have been. They were put into play on the very first weekend after the fees were brought here at the legislature. The NSLC has jumped the gun by a day or two and they are now making provisions to give that extra revenue to charity, as I understand it. I don't know, Mr. Speaker, if they've chosen a charity yet to give it to but there was something like $28,000 that was collected that day or two, just from that one fee increase getting enacted two days early. You can see that even one of those 1,400 fees, an increase in alcohol costs and the taxes related to alcohol, all of those have impact on Nova Scotians.

That is really why we are here today looking at the Financial Measures (2013) Bill. Some of the fees could be done arbitrarily because they are in regulation and they just need to be changed in a policy or in something departmental. But some of the fees have been set in stone - they are put right into an Act and if a fee is set in the Act then it must come back here to be adjusted. That is exactly what we have before us - a whole raft of fees are included in the current budget, or this FMA Bill in front of us.

[Page 1588]

They affect everything, Mr. Speaker, from maintenance enforcement to the cost to get your GED exams, and we know how important it is, for people upgrading and improving their skills, adult learners returning to school to get their GEDs, which is the equivalent to your high school. Really, people cannot get decent jobs without having that credential, it's very important and a lot of adults who are learning and improving their education start with returning to school to get the GED. In this Financial Measures (2013) Bill in front of us today, right away we see that the cost to get your GED is going to go up. Again, are we not harming vulnerable Nova Scotians, people who are working hard to improve their standing and their ability to earn a good living? We are hitting them with higher fees to get their GED exam, to sit those exams and get their marks.

Mr. Speaker, just a few of the things. There are increases to eating establishments, the fee for mobile food establishment, for example, going up; if you're working in a restaurant, the fee to take the food handling course is going up; an eating establishment permit, a one year permit, going up, that hits small business at their bottom line. It makes it hard for people, who are trying to start a business and employ Nova Scotians, to make ends meet.

In the context of small business were talking about an environment where the cost of power has gone up over 30 per cent, I think it's closer to 40 per cent, in the last four years of the NDP Government. There is talk of the water rates going up now, monumentally, it's going up something like 100 per cent, or 200 per cent for water rates here in HRM because of the old infrastructure. So that's going to hit everybody that has water. We've heard particularly from the brewery in the city, anybody who is using a large amount of water, it's going to be extremely difficult on their bottom line.

Power rates, water rates, taxes, minimum wage, all up, and on top of that now they have extra fees just to register their eating establishment or to have their staff take a food-handling course - all of these things have gone up, Mr. Speaker. I could go down the list of it - the tourist accommodation licence fee, another small business that we have many small tourist operators and here you go if you want to have an accommodation business catering to tourists, up goes your licence fee for that.

Mr. Speaker, imagine 1,400 different fees that will touch every aspect of life in Nova Scotia. From birth when you have to register your birth and get a copy of your birth certificate, to a marriage certificate and death registrations, all of those are going up. Fees to the Public Archives for getting some of the older records are going up. Mortgage fees are going up for people who bought their homes and have a mortgage to pay.

[Page 1589]

This is just the tip of the iceberg, Mr. Speaker; I'm only talking about the first few that you can see there. I see salvage yard licences going up as well. We know that under this current government there were new laws brought in to govern the operations, to some degree, of the salvage yards and scrap-metal dealers. That has been a huge burden, in terms of a regulatory burden on those scrapyards.

I know that the largest one in Nova Scotia is in my riding, Mr. Speaker. It is John Ross & Sons, and I believe that it's been going in our province for four generations. It's a very big operation. In fact, in terms of scrap metal, that business is something like the fourth- or fifth-largest customer at the port. It's amazing - you wouldn't realize there was that much, but it's a lot of volume and a lot of weight that goes in and out of the Port of Halifax. They sell a lot of it to China and other countries.

Under this budget, they are having a new fee. The licence for their salvage yards is going up in price again. All of these are employers in our province; all of these small businesses are the backbone of our smaller communities, in particular. Their business community is made up of small operators, and every one of them is going to be hit with these different fees.

Now again, for those living in the country or in rural areas, the fees for on-site sewage disposal systems are going to go up again, and the ones to get your approvals and your subdivision reports. So if you are subdividing a property and you need a new sewer put in for that on site, higher fees again, which are going to be passed back to homeowners, passed back to people who are trying to stimulate the economy by buying a new house, by building something new, by creating something here in our province.

Right off the bat, the Financial Measures (2013) Bill is a fairly weighty bill, although we have seen longer ones here when they've put everything but the kitchen sink in it. This bill alone is a good number of pages. It goes through an awful lot of the taxes and a few of the rebates, to be honest - a few of the things that are perhaps going to be beneficial to people.

I wanted to begin with the things that I think are going to be harmful in our communities and harmful to the people of Nova Scotia. As I said, right from birth to death we're going to be paying more for our fees from the government. There are some unusual fees, like a deer farm licence application. I'm not sure how many deer farms we actually have in our Province of Nova Scotia. (Interruption) Well, there must be a few of them in this province, for sure.

Mr. Speaker, I know there is a legal fee that has gone from zero - that didn't exist before and has now gone up to $100, which will be passed back to businesses that are registering in the province. That's just one. I know that the legal community has pointed out quite a few new fees, all of which go back and are downloaded - they'll have to be - back to the people who are setting up businesses and, again, making a positive impact in our province.

[Page 1590]

So while the government likes to point out the few fees and taxes that they may have lowered - I think it's taxes, actually, not fees, because every single fee in the province seems to have gone up - I think at the same time we have to question whether or not the 5.8 per cent has any validity across the board. Some of the fees were raised 5.8 per cent; a lot of them were higher than that. I'd love to know what the average is across the board, since there were so many of them, but 5.8 per cent seemed to be the rule of thumb that the government was using.

The explanation for that was that the previous year there was no increase, so the government says that over those two years the average cost of living increase was 5.8 per cent and that therefore that justified putting 5.8 per cent on every fee, regardless of whether or not it could be proven that there was actually a 5.8 per cent in the cost to deliver the fee - which brings me right back to, what is a fee and what is a tax? Really, I know for Nova Scotians it all hurts their pocketbook. It's all somebody putting their hand in your pocket and taking some of your hard-earned money.

The rule for fees is very clear. The rule says the fee should be directly related to the cost to deliver the service. When the NDP were in Opposition and sat on this side of the House, they were very clear and very, very critical of the current government, who raised fees without justifying the cost, to actually go back and say, this fee is associated with issuing a birth certificate and this is the number of people we need to do it or this is the equipment we needed to buy to do it, this is the rent we need to cover the office where we do it. Therefore if those costs went up, you could justify an extra cost on every application for a permit or a licence.

We haven't seen anything like that, not with any of these fees have we seen any of them justified. Not even one. We're just told that the cost of living has gone up so therefore all the fees will go up. Overall in two years the estimate is 5.8 per cent more to live so we'll pass that on to the public.

That's not necessarily true for the cost of delivering the service. We see more and more government services are available on-line. The purpose of doing that is to lower costs so that you can deliver a service quickly. You can now apply for permit renewals on your motor vehicle on-line, and that certainly saved a lot of money for the government. If more people start to use the on-line service they won't need as many people on the desk at Access Nova Scotia, they'll be able to take pressure off the front-line staff that are there, perhaps they won't need as big an office over time.

We know that many services are going on-line. People actually want that. It's much better for the people who live in rural Nova Scotia or smaller towns where they don't have regular office hours to get to an Access Nova Scotia office. It's hard enough for us here in the city to go up to Bayers Lake, which is close to home for me but not convenient for many people here on the peninsula of Halifax. They find it difficult to go up there and to wait in line and take a number, it takes a long time.

[Page 1591]

People are looking for the convenience of on-line services and that will help, the more we turn to that the more we decrease the cost of delivering the service. At the same time as we're using technology and bringing down the cost of these individual services, the government is just saying across the board we're taking an extra almost 6 per cent out of the pockets of Nova Scotians for those same services. There is not a connection here, I feel there's a disconnect, that's exactly what I think.

I see the fees going up with no justification and I know very well that the Premier of this province said in Opposition that was just a tax grab. Those were exactly his words. Now that he's in there we don't hear that at all.

I may return again to the fees in a minute but I wanted to talk about the small-business tax. The increase - I mean the decrease in the small-business tax is included in the budget and you'll forgive me if I made the mistake of saying an increase because the other thing that's happening at the same time will mean increasing taxes to some small business owners because we are headed to having the absolutely lowest threshold in the country for small-business taxes, to throw a small business into the corporate tax rate is what it is.

In the past, just prior to this budget coming in, our threshold was $400,000 of revenue that you could have before you had to pay corporate tax. The difference in the rate was 3.5 per cent prior to the current budget. When you're a small-business owner, that would be your tax rate, versus 16 per cent tax rate if you're a corporation. Now, with the change in this threshold we're now seeing that a company only needs to get to $350,000 in revenue before they're thrown into the 16 per cent tax bracket.

This will be a smaller number of companies, I realize, but enough extra revenue coming into the government that they can continue to have the lower tax rates. (Interruption) I'm not sure about that but I will look at that, thank you. Oh, I see, there's a button there - I'm getting some advice from the Clerk which I'm going to watch out for. That's right, they're here to advise all of us and we appreciate it all the time. I don't know if they would agree with me, we don't know about that 5.8 per cent increase there.

But what we're talking about here is how you can play around with numbers, how you can lower the tax rate with one hand and boast about it to the chamber of commerce - not just here in Halifax but right across the province. It's a good speaking point for every speech that the Minister of Finance wants to make in any business community. But bear in mind that the piece of information that has not been given to the business community is that the threshold has also gone down and that some of those small-business owners were going to be charged extra money in taxes because they would go from 3.5 per cent to 16 per cent tax. So it's really a small comfort to people in business to know that if they're successful, if they start to earn a little bit more, they're going to be thrown into the 16 per cent tax bracket.

[Page 1592]

As I said, prior to the change we were tied for the worst threshold in the country; we are now the very worst in the country, bar none. We are the worst. That is not good when so much of our economy depends on small business, on the jobs they create and on the work they do in our communities right across the province.

I think a lot of us in Opposition were very upset, really, to see that only half the story came out in the Budget Speech and that the other half required everybody to read the fine print. Yes, for Opposition members we know about that, that we don't always hear the full story and we have to dig into these bills - the Financial Measures (2013) Bill is no different. You want to get a copy of a bill like this and you need to dig through and find the detail, because you're going to discover that a lot of the good-news stories that the government has come out with have a corresponding negative side.

The bottom line is the small business tax - good-news story - that we've continued on the path of going down by 0.5 per cent over the last few years; it has gone down by 0.5 per cent every year. That's a good-news story but the part that is not public, not discussed is that it is revenue-neutral to the government because they're going to claw more money back from other businesses.

AN HON. MEMBER: You can't believe what you read.

MS. WHALEN « » : You can't believe what you read. Exactly, and you often cannot believe half of what you hear in government speeches, so it's a very selective amount of information that we're given from the government, really, when it comes to what is happening in this province.

Mr. Speaker, the half story again, the balanced budget which this Financial Measures (2013) Bill is the corollary to - it's a document that goes hand in hand with the budget. In this Financial Measures (2013) Bill it is, I guess, the myth that we're dealing with a balanced budget continues and the government's speaking notes and boasting of the Financial Measures (2013) Bill continues right on . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: And spin doctors.

MS. WHALEN « » : And spin doctors, exactly, that's where the message is coming from, the large host of communications staff that the government relies on so heavily - I don't think there's been any reduction of 5.8 per cent in that group. That is one thing we asked a lot about in estimates - where the money is going in communications.

[Page 1593]

Mr. Speaker, one of the things that is very clear is that the Financial Measures (2013) Bill continues that fallacy, that fiction, of a balanced budget and for those who may not have heard, the Opposition do not believe that the budget is balanced. I don't think the people of Nova Scotia believe it either. There have been a number of editorials and papers right across the province questioning the government's explanations, and the government's sense that they have to broadcast it by stamping it on the cover of their budget that it's balanced - as if they have to convince themselves and their members and backbenchers that this is the message. Take this document forth and you will convince people - but it won't convince people.

Mr. Speaker, two things in particular need to be said about the balanced budget that is not balanced. The first is that a prepayment to two universities of over $30 million that went to NSCAD and Acadia - that money was given on the last business day of the previous year and it was a prepayment for this year, 2013-14. If that prepayment had not been done, we would be in a deficit position right off the bat. So if the government had not chosen to - and I'm going to choose my words carefully because I know you're listening to make sure that I don't use any inappropriate words; I've been asked a couple of times to retract some of my words.

I feel it is financial manipulation - and I think that would be allowed to be said - that, in presenting the budget, numbers are manipulated and that there was a choice made, a very deliberate choice, to prepay two of the universities, even though the Deloitte consultants from a few years ago, that the government relied on so much, had said don't do that, that's not really a proper thing to do. Still, the government went forward for the second time in their mandate and prepaid universities so they could build up the deficit from last year and, really, falsely show a positive surplus this coming year.

Bear in mind that Nova Scotians understand what this means, it was simply a question of the timing of your payments, and by timing it for the last business day of last year there is a financial manipulation that allowed a supposedly balanced budget to be tabled.

The debt from last year is now $30 million higher than it would have been. Nova Scotians are still paying for that cost. It's no more than smoke and mirrors - how you present these figures - so what we saw is smoke and mirrors, in terms of the timing and the validity of this so-called balanced budget. Mr. Speaker, the budget is in deficit. The government has failed to keep their promise. They promised four years of a balanced budget. Nova Scotians heard that. We heard the current Premier of this province say in the last election, during a debate that was televised, that he would balance the budget every year. That was a promise made throughout the campaign.

There was also a promise made that there would be no new taxes, not an increase in taxes. I believe I've just pointed out that the 1,400 fee increases that we've seen this year are, in fact, a tax. There is no evidence that they are related to the cost of delivering those fees. Even more importantly, Mr. Speaker, it took scarcely a year for the NDP Government to decide that they had to increase the HST and that two cents on every purchase, which is actually a 25 per cent increase in the HST that we got, as a province, that huge increase has put hundreds of millions of dollars into the government's hands from the pockets of Nova Scotians and that is in direct contravention of the promise made by the Premier, that there would be no increases in taxes.

[Page 1594]

So one promise made was no increase in taxes and that government has failed to maintain that. Here we are in the fourth year of their mandate, Mr. Speaker, and there is also the problem that they have yet to balance the budget properly. We know there have been some changes over those years, some great miscalculations from year to year. One year it was $600 million difference, they went from a $200 million deficit to a $400 million surplus overnight. It has left the public in great confusion over what is going on, to be so far out in budgeting and planning.

Mr. Speaker, this budget isn't balanced at all, not by any standard. We can't accept that, absolutely. We've seen there are some financial manipulations - I'm sticking to that word because I know other words are popping into my mind. We see that these have been advantageous to the government's message, that they have a fantasy message that everything is balanced and everything is rosy and that they have created all of this through their hard work and efforts, but the income has been supplemented by extra HST revenue, which means digging into the pockets of Nova Scotians for everything we buy, increases in fees that are really quite phenomenal.

Look at this, Mr. Speaker « » : home care fees up, maintenance enforcement fees up. These are fees that we have to look at for people in our ridings, for people who are in need, again, vulnerable people.

I've already mentioned the GED fees which just punish people for trying to improve. There are definitely some things that I would say the Liberal caucus believes should change in this FMA. There are a number of things that we would like to challenge. Some of them I realize they are here just because the budget passed and the legal need to change many other Acts that were affected by the budget. I see here there's the Personal Property Security Act, which again goes through some changes and the Probate Act. These are all fees that are being changed along the way. You can flip through it and see all kinds of things like that.

Mr. Speaker, there's a couple of good things. I would like to say that the government is trying very hard to posture and paint a picture that would suggest that the Opposition are opposed to lowering taxes or eliminating taxes on certain areas. That couldn't be further from the truth. We have never said that we had any problem with taking off the cost of tax on things like baby clothes, children's clothes. I know in the past it was on diapers and on feminine hygiene products. Those things are obviously going to help Nova Scotians who are paying higher HST right now in everything else and are paying higher property taxes and are paying higher power rates. All of those things do come back to the provincial government. I can just about read their minds, saying well we're not responsible for property taxes, that's not us.

[Page 1595]

But what about the downloads in this budget to municipalities? I spoke to the president of the UNSM on the weekend who said that there is a download in this budget that is going to mean millions of dollars more on the budgets of the municipal units, and if that is the case, Mr. Speaker, then in fact that's why they're charging us more in property taxes. The education fee is the amount that was mentioned particularly by UNSM, that we do download the educational costs onto the municipalities and they are not happy about that.

Mr. Speaker, everything really can come back to a downloading that comes back to one taxpayer, and that's the individual Nova Scotian.

Mr. Speaker, as I said we have a number of concerns with the FMA, absolutely, we believe that there are some things that perhaps should be amended or changed it that bill. We do not accept that the fees that were passed here and are enacted in this Act are actually fees, because there has been no evidence at all presented to us that any one of them are really trying to make up for the cost of delivering the service. I go back to the Premier of the province who, in Opposition, said that these increases in fees without explanation are no more than a tax grab from Nova Scotians. For that reason alone I think that this FMA is very deficient in the information it's providing to Nova Scotians and in the confidence that we can have that this indeed is a balanced budget, which it is not, or that the province is in good financial hands. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : The budget is not balanced; the budget is not balanced; the budget is not balanced. Mr. Speaker, I say that as the Leader of my Party, the Finance Critic for my Party, and as a chartered accountant - and I'll say it one more time as a dad who wants better things for our province, the budget is not balanced.

The government had an opportunity to get it right and they didn't. Let me just count a few of the ways that it's not balanced. The government chose on, March 28th, three days before their year end, their fiscal year end, to give an entire year's grant to two of our universities - a whole year's grant. Now they say they asked us to do that. But waiting three days and doing it in the right year was the right decision, but it's not the decision that the government made. Those three days would not have made any difference to the students, to the faculty, or to the alumni of those two universities at all - not one iota of difference. The only people that the three days mattered to were the NDP Government, desperate to use some accounting trickery to try to present a falsely balanced budget to the people.

[Page 1596]

Why not - if they wanted to be accurate and if they wanted to be transparent - insist on making that grant in the new year, three days forward, and they could not have been accused of this kind of accounting methodology? They would not have been accused of that had they just put the right money in the right year. Now that's one, that amount on its own is more than twice the paper surplus that they are claiming - that already shows that the budget is not balanced.

In the Department of Community Services another example arises, a $50 million example, almost four times the surplus that the government is claiming all by itself where income assistance payments that are April payments, April 2013 in part of the new year, were accounted for in the old year, Mr. Speaker, in order to create the appearance of balance, because those payments historically have been made at the end of March and counted in the old year even though they relate to April, and an accounting change, an international accounting change, allowed the government to move them out of the year of the budget year and try to appear to be in surplus. But do they tell people that? No. Did they say look we're really in deficit but we got this lucky accounting change and we just want to be open and honest about it? That would have been okay and no one could accuse them of manipulating the numbers, if that was what they did.

Instead they made the decision, just like they made a decision to prepay those universities three days early, where no one benefits except the Minister of Finance. They made a similar decision with $50 million at the Department of Community Services and didn't disclose it. We put a bill into the House calling on the government (Interruption) - and that is what I think of that action, Mr. Speaker. (Interruption) Well accounting is nothing to sneeze at, it's very important.

In anticipation of this kind of activity, we put a bill in the Legislature that actually requires governments, in the future, to account accurately and openly to the people, under the old rules and the new rules, when the accounting rules are changing, so they can see for themselves whether the budget is truly balanced or not.

They could have picked up on that and they didn't. The Auditor General would love a bill like that. The Auditor General would love it but they didn't do it. No, they didn't do it in this case. They had an accounting change, a $50 million change, and they just absorbed it and moved on and hoped nobody would notice. Well, somebody noticed and I am telling everybody now, the budget is not balanced. It is not balanced and this is one of the reasons. This is a $50 million reason.

Beyond that, as if the $35 million that they stuffed into those two universities and the $50 million accounting change, buried deep in the budget is a claim of $18 million of savings from better purchasing and efficiencies that they haven't actually even done yet. They are budgeting ahead of time for actions that they haven't actually taken and haven't proven to save any money yet.

[Page 1597]

In every other household, in every other business, you would first take the action, then realize the savings, and then account for it. You don't get to go home at night and say I think we'll buy a new car because I'm anticipating a raise sometime next year; that would be pretty bad financial management, but that's what they have done. In fact, it reminds me of a story, a true story - and I'm hoping the member for Truro-Bible Hill will appreciate this - because when I was a young curler at the Truro Curling Club, there was a fellow curler there, a competitive curler, who was very good. He was the skip of his team and he was also quite arrogant. I won't name him but this happened regularly.

What he would do when it came down to his last shot, he would go and put his points on the scoreboard before he even made his last shot. Nobody liked that, nobody bought it and yet this is the political equivalent of putting your points on the board before you actually take your last shot. They're claiming savings that they may hope to have someday in the future and putting it in their budget, more on their own than the surplus as a whole, and counting it as if it has already happened when in fact it hasn't already happened. That is another reason this is not a balanced budget. It is a deficit budget.

Of course, we can always look at the past record of the NDP for guidance on how the sad story of this budget is going to turn out. Do you want to guess how far off they were from their budget last year when the year finally came to an end and we could see what really happened? It was $145 million off of what they said they were going to do in last year's budget, compared to what actually happened when the year came to an end. That is almost 10 times the amount of this year's claimed surplus that they were off.

Payments to universities three days early, accounting changes another $50 million, $18 million - counting the points on the board before they actually earned them - and being $145 million off last year, that's a pretty sorry record. That's why Nova Scotians see this budget for what it is, a political document, not based in financial management reality. When the time comes that we are going to have to truly account for how they have done this year, we know how this story ends - $145 million off or who knows, maybe even more by the time we get to the end of the year.

Mr. Speaker, that is without getting into the sorry details, which everyone has examined now, of how they had a $27 million error in last year's budget and didn't tell anybody. On its own, that is more than the surplus they are claiming this year. That is why, in financial terms, in accounting terms, in open and transparent terms, this budget is not balanced. It is a deficit budget. If you take out all of these things that I articulated in the past few minutes, in fact, it is almost $100 million out of balance. So the reality is that that $100 million will end up being new debt at the end of the year, add it to the high debt that Nova Scotia already has - $100 million more in bills left for our children to pay.

This isn't just an accounting exercise. This is about whether we are going to continue the legacy going on too many years, but particularly in the last four deficit years, of adding more debt, and more debt, for our kids to pay. This is the very issue that the Auditor General raised, about whether it's even ethical to continue to pile up debts after debts after debts that will only be paid by the next generation of Nova Scotians. And to try to show them a budget that is balanced but really isn't, is the political equivalent of continuing to pile up the bills but hiding those credit card statements under the mattress, and hopefully they won't find them until it's too late. That's what we're really talking about here today.

[Page 1598]

Mr. Speaker, beyond the accounting and the finances of the budget, which is so out of balance - I don't know if I mentioned that, but it's not balanced - but beyond all that, Nova Scotians actually, quite wisely, expect a government to bring in a budget that is balanced in many other ways, in addition to being truly financially balanced. When a government presents a budget that has the highest taxes in the whole country, that reaches another 6 per cent in their pockets in higher user fees, that is relying on digging ever deeper into Nova Scotians' pockets for the government to manage, that is not balanced either.

Taking more from Nova Scotians to spend is not balanced, and it's not fair to them. As long as they are paying the highest taxes in all of Canada, and they are paying ever higher user fees, and yet they get less and less in services for it; as long as they are paying the highest tax in the country, and class sizes go up; as long as they are paying the highest tax in the country, and ERs are open, and closed, and open and closed; as long as they are paying the highest taxes in all of Canada, and rural schools have to close, while the administration at the top goes on and on and on; as long as they are paying the highest taxes in all of Canada and have less in return for it - it is not a balanced budget in any natural sense of the word.

That's why Nova Scotians will reject this budget. That is why we're going to vote against it. The accounting is one thing. The injustice of digging deeper into their pockets, and they get less in return, shows it's not balanced that way either, Mr. Speaker. The fact that a province, which is crying out for jobs; where the economy grew by an amazing amount of 0.2 per cent last year as a whole, so we can just imagine what it did outside Halifax; in a year where every Nova Scotian outside the capital is living in outright recession; where 18,000 people moved away; where 3,000 net chose another part of Canada to live than here; and the reason is jobs; that a budget that is silent on new ideas for job creation, it's not balanced.

It's not balanced, Mr. Speaker, when it comes to the most important issue that we face, which is kick-starting our economy, making it grow again, creating real jobs and opportunity. A budget that is not only silent on those things, but actually in the details - in the schedules attached, projects no job growth next year, no labour force growth, and no population growth - is an outright admission of failure on the economy part of the government's mandate. That is not balanced.

If we really want to balance the budget, Mr. Speaker, we ought to know, as we do know and as the NDP doesn't know, that a growing economy with more jobs and rising incomes is a very important part of balancing the government's books. But they have no plan for that, only to dig deeper into people's pockets. That's why it's not balanced in the jobs sense either, which is the most important thing that Nova Scotians want, a plan for jobs and it has no plan for jobs.

[Page 1599]

By the way, Mr. Speaker, again buried in the schedules to the budget is an admission that even if they hit their target - by some fluke they hit their target - the provincial debt still goes up by another $100 million, another $100 million that Nova Scotia's next generation will have to pay. The debt goes up and up. This budget doesn't change that, it adds to it. So many Nova Scotians are asking, how can they say it's balanced when the debt is still going up? That is a good question because in the global sense of truly balanced, where there's a plan for job creation, where taxes are not going up, where services are not getting worse, where Nova Scotians are not moving away, when there's a true plan for those things and the debt stops its growth, then we'll be the first ones to say now that's balanced. But that is not what this budget does.

Let me also point out the specific new gimmick that the government has come up with in the Financial Measures (2013) Bill itself, which is the goofy, gimmicky call for a referendum if any future government wants to change the HST rebates that are included. I don't know what problem they're trying to solve, Mr. Speaker, of all the problems of the province, jobs and health and education and so on, this is not a problem.

I heard the previous speaker, the Finance Critic for the Liberal Party, make the point and I'll make it, too - no political Party in this House has any plan to do anything with those rebates other than, hopefully, make them better. The government has created a phony problem to bring in this gimmicky referendum idea with. All that is is a distraction from the real problems of the budgets, which is that it is not balanced. It has several measures that show it's not balanced and has no plan for jobs, leaves our taxes the highest in the country. One thing they do want to do is make sure there's a referendum on HST tax rebates, a gimmick of the highest order, Mr. Speaker.

We all see through that and Nova Scotians see through it because I have no doubt that once we all vote on this side against the budget, they're going to try to say, well, they voted against a referendum on HST rebates for electricity and those things, Mr. Speaker. I'll just put it on the record right now - we support those rebates. Every Party in this House supports those HST rebates but what we don't support is a budget where they say it's balanced when it isn't. What we don't support is a budget that keeps our taxes at the highest in all of Canada. What we don't support is a budget that includes accounting manoeuvres like stuffing payments into last year and so on. We don't support those things, we say no to those things - no, no, no to the old ways of playing with the budget numbers.

As long as that continues, we will vote against the budget, Madam Speaker. We'll vote against it because it's not balanced. We'll vote against it because it maintains our taxes, like the HST, at too high a level. We'll vote against it because there's no plan for jobs. Nova Scotians will know that's why, not because of this gimmick about a referendum on HST rebates.

[Page 1600]

Madam Speaker, if they truly believed that there should be a referendum on the HST, they would have made it about the 15 per cent rate itself that they've imposed on all Nova Scotians, already taking $1,000 in extra HST revenue out of the pockets of each and every one of us. But no, the NDP doesn't want to have a referendum on that because that's what they like about the HST, it's got the highest rate in all of Canada. They want to maintain the ability to say one thing on the HST before the election and then do the opposite after the election.

You can say, well, you're just speculating, but you know what, Madam Speaker? I'm speaking from experience - from my experience, and from the experience of all Nova Scotians who took them at their word when they said they wouldn't raise their taxes in the last election, and then so quickly did after the election was over. It's just like Lucy and Charlie Brown, where every Fall Lucy tells Charlie Brown that this time she won't take the football away if he'll just kick it, and he takes her at her word and he runs up to the football and she yanks it away at the last minute and he falls flat on his back. That is exactly what happened to Nova Scotians when they believed the NDP last time, when they had anything to say about their taxes.

Now here we are again, and it's a new season - it's not a football season, but it is election season. Here they are with a whole new promise on the HST. They are inviting Nova Scotians to just come on and kick the NDP HST football again, and maybe this time, just maybe, they won't yank it away at the last minute. Madam Speaker, we've all been there before and we know how it ends. That is another reason why the budget is not balanced - it's not.

It is too bad that we don't get to pick a few things that we like and be in support of them when they present an omnibus Financial Measures (2013) Bill like this. I do want to say briefly that we are relieved and happy to finally see the NDP fund insulin pumps for our young people. It is a measure that both Opposition Parties have been calling on for quite some time. In our case, we actually showed the government where they could find the money to pay for those insulin pumps.

Now, they didn't actually take up our suggestions on where they could find the savings, which is in health administration and the Tim Hortons and cafeterias that they subsidize - for example, at the QEII hospital here in Halifax - and I wish they had, because then that money could go into something good and useful in health care as well, but at least they finally saw fit to fund insulin pumps for young people. That is a good thing and we support it.

It's too bad that one or two good things like insulin pumps are buried deep within the details of such a flawed budget. I just want all Nova Scotians to know that we are going to vote "no" as a PC caucus, as we will always vote no to a budget that's not balanced, to a budget that contains the highest taxes in the country, to a budget that does nothing for jobs and the economy - and that in fact projects that nothing good is going to happen on jobs and the economy for at least the next two years.

[Page 1601]

What Nova Scotians really need is a real plan to turn our economy around and create jobs. That will not come from the NDP, who continue to pile up deficits, continue to pile up debt, and continue to collect the highest tax in the country and hope that somehow that equals a growing economy. But as we learned in 2012, where the economy flatlined at 0.2 per cent - the same as 2011, when the economy flatlined at 0.6 per cent - it doesn't work. More of the same - banging our heads against the wall and hoping that this time it will be different - is not going to work either.

That's why we need a real plan that builds our economy from the ground up for everybody: lower taxes like the HST so all families can get ahead equally again; freezing power rates so that no more jobs have to be lost because of the price of power; stopping wasteful government spending like those Tim Hortons that they continue to fund, and all of the health bureaucracy that goes along with it; and reinvesting that money in the front lines of health care so services can actually get better. That, Madam Speaker, is a better way that actually does kick-start our economy and create more jobs. Until we have a Party in this House that presents a budget that makes those things happen, we will continue to vote no. As long as I'm here, as long as there are budgets like this one that contain accounting manoeuvres that do not show Nova Scotians the true picture, we will continue to vote no as well.

Thank you for your time, and I look forward to the rest of the debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Finance.

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleagues on the other side of the House for their remarks, although I don't agree with a fair amount of what they had to say. Nevertheless I listened to it intently, as I know all my colleagues did, and now I move that we close second reading debate and move this bill forward to the Committee on Law Amendments.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 51. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

[Page 1602]

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 62.

Bill No. 62 - Protection for Persons in Care Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise to move second reading of Bill No. 62, an amendment for the Protection for Persons in Care Act.

Everyone has the right to be safe and receive quality care, especially those Nova Scotians who are away from their families, living in the care of others. We are working to improve safety for the over 10,000 Nova Scotians living in provincial care facilities or in hospitals or visiting one of our collaborative emergency centres across the province.

The intent is to ensure individuals who live in homes and facilities licensed under the Homes for Special Care Act and the Hospitals Act are protected. Many of these individuals typically have intellectual, physical, or mental health issues. Often we are speaking about our most vulnerable citizens, including seniors and persons with disabilities. It's sad to say there are some cases of abuse, and government is taking further preventive measures to ensure our most vulnerable citizens are protected - it is their right and our responsibility.

The Department of Health and Wellness has worked with the Department of Community Services to improve the protection of vulnerable citizens in care. Our departments share the responsibility of administering the Protection for Persons in Care Act and are requesting amendments to enhance the bill. While these are minor amendments, the PPCA is important legislation to Nova Scotians - we want to give our families peace of mind when it comes to their loved ones living in provincial care facilities or while in hospitals.

The Protection for Persons in Care Act, proclaimed in 2007, is an extra safeguard for patients and residents 16 years of age and older who are receiving care from the Nova Scotia hospitals, residential care facilities, nursing homes, homes for the aged and disabled persons, group homes or residential centres under the Homes for Special Care Act.

The Protection for Persons in Care Act covers allegations of abuse by anyone against persons in care, including staff, volunteers and visitors, or by other patients or persons in care. One of the key benefits to Nova Scotians is that the risk of future incidents of abuse may diminish by clarifying the authority of the Protection of Persons in Care.

We are bringing the Protection for Persons in Care Act, or the PPCA, up to date in terms of other recent enacted legislation such as the Personal Directives Act. Also this important legislation allows the province to hold administrators of these facilities more accountable for residents and patient safety. Amending the Act will allow government to direct administrators to make constructive changes. The amendments to the Protection for Persons in Care Act are part of government's broader initiative to ensure seniors and all others in care get the help they deserve in a safe and secure environment.

[Page 1603]

Government has made significant investments in continuing care. We have established Collaborative Emergency Centres throughout the province so that Nova Scotians have access to the care that they need. In fact, other provinces are following Nova Scotia's progressive and innovative approach to health care. We have demonstrated to Nova Scotians that this government is taking a different approach to health care delivery, and we know it's working. Equally as important is to ensure that our legislation is current and improves the safety of Nova Scotians accessing health care in one of our hospitals, Collaborative Emergency Centres, or provincial care facilities. We want to have clarity in the Act to ensure we have authority to prevent an incident. That is the best possible outcome for all Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I want to say how hard many Nova Scotians are working within our facilities to ensure that we have a safe environment for Nova Scotians who find themselves in the care of one of these facilities across the province. I think by ensuring that this Act is up to date with language and is tied to other pieces of legislation that government has introduced over the years - I look forward to this piece of legislation going through, and any comments from Opposition members. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. LEO GLAVINE « » : I'm pleased to stand in my place today and speak for a few minutes on the amendments to the Protection for Persons in Care Act. While the amendments presented are good and we support these changes, the majority of the clauses we are considering today are changes to ensure this Act adheres to other, more recent Acts. In other words, the majority of the clauses are housekeeping. There is intent as well from this piece of legislation to ensure there is clarification around the directives the minister can issue to the administrator of a health care facility following an investigation. While directives are important, follow-up to ensure adherence to directives is equally important. The amendments we are discussing today are, for the most part, housekeeping.

We only have to look at what other jurisdictions are doing to show leadership when it comes to legislation that they have adopted around a Protection for Persons in Care Act. Alberta, for example, has a clause which requires service providers or employers to immediately take all reasonable steps to provide for the immediate safety, security, and well-being of a patient or client of whom a report of abuse is made when a report of abuse is received. This ensures protection and support for the patient until such time as a conclusion to an investigation is reached. This provides for an added level of protection for our most vulnerable patients and clients.

[Page 1604]

It's also interesting to note how open and accountable Alberta is when it comes to reporting the number of cases referred to investigation under their Act and the end results of these investigations. These statistics are important because they show the general public that cases are being reviewed - without identifying specifics, of course - and the outcome of the investigations. In other words, these statistics show that the legislation is being adhered to and that it's being used to ensure patients or clients are being appropriately protected. The government in Alberta is being open and accountable when it comes to the ultimate outcome of legislation, which we all know is adherence and action.

Manitoba has seen fit to become the first jurisdiction in the country to establish an adult abuse registry, a registry that has grown out of their protection for persons in care legislation. Mr. Speaker, government owes it to the people of Nova Scotia when reviewing legislation to ensure housekeeping measures are undertaken to bring the particular piece of legislation up to date with other pieces of legislation. Not only that, they owe it to the people to ensure we are doing the best possible job we can to protect people in health care and other settings. With these few words, Mr. Speaker, I take my place.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We, as a Progressive Conservative caucus, are behind and support anything that will bring protection to anyone - to persons in care. Every one of us on this side of the House knows of someone who is in care or who is under the protection of the province and in the care of the Province of Nova Scotia. We look forward to this bill moving through Law Amendments Committee to see what the people of Nova Scotia have to say and to see what law amendments may come forth to support this Act. With that, Mr. Speaker, I'll take my seat.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I thank the members for their input. I, too, look forward to any representation at Law Amendments Committee as this bill moves forward through the process. I move second reading of Bill No. 62.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 62. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 1605]

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

MS. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to continue my Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne that was read again at the start of this session. As members know, if you're going to get up and speak on this address, it's an opportunity to talk about your riding or about issues that you think have not been addressed in the province, about, perhaps, your critic area that you think has some important points that need to be made about that. It is actually one of the few times that all members of the House can rise: backbenchers, Opposition members, ministers can rise on behalf of their own constituents and say a few words. For that reason, I am happy to resume my reply.

There are a couple of things that I feel are important to speak about in the Clayton Park West area of Halifax. Mr. Speaker, one of them is the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes. That is a wilderness area that was created in 2009, on the eve of our last election. The Progressive Conservative Government had done some work on it for the previous two years, public consultation took place. There was clearly a huge demand for preserving lands in the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes area and 3,300 acres were set aside as a protected wilderness area.

Mr. Speaker, we are so fortunate, every one of us in the province, to have this area set aside for the future because it is an urban wilderness park. It is a park that people can reach by bus, get off there, and go in to have a complete wilderness experience in the city. That is a very rare thing across Canada and we are so fortunate.

I know that the people who live in Clayton Park West and other communities that surround the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes area have yet to really fully understand or see what a tremendous benefit this is going to be. The reason for that is that there has been, I think - not anything deliberate - but I think it has been slow to begin to be developed.

We went through the consultation in 2007, 2008 and 2009. There was a great fanfare when the area was designated. The minister, I believe, has been out to see it. I know that the Deputy Minister of Environment has gone to see it. The Chief Executive Officer of the HRM has been out to see this area and there are a lot of people excited about what it could be for the people of Halifax and the people of Clayton Park.

I mention particularly Clayton Park because people in Clayton Park can literally walk on the sidewalks, under the highway, into Bayers Lake Business Park, and walk into the wilderness. It is amazing that just a 20-minute walk behind Kent Building Supplies takes you to a point where you would think you were in a national park. You don't hear traffic, you are far away. There is nothing on your sightline that would indicate you are in a city and it's a beautiful lake in front of you.

[Page 1606]

The people who are members of the canoe and kayak associations go into that area and actually do a full, one-day loop around through all of the lakes and come back to the place where they put their canoe in. That is a tremendous experience for people who love to canoe and are right in the city, to be able to do a complete loop like that with a number of portages along the way.

There are a lot of people who are tremendously excited about the opportunity that the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes park provides. I am really rising today because I believe it's time there was a little sense of urgency, that we get moving on opening this area up for some more public use. Right now, the only people who can safely go back in there are people who have walked those trails before and know their way around. It is not developed so there is any kind of wide, easy-to-walk trail. You're really following deer trails and tracks that have been there for a long time. You have to be careful of roots and rocks, and you have to climb up some little inclines along the way.

I'm thinking particularly of the walk back to Susie's Lake or at Maskwa, if you take the walk up to Charlie's Lake. Those ones require a little bit of fitness and dexterity, but they're certainly not too difficult for the public - but they're not well marked. There are no signs. In fact, you could go around the entire perimeter of this Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes area and not find a single sign that says that this is a protected area, that this is a wilderness that's there for the future of Nova Scotians. It's just not well marked and well known, so the boundaries are not marked or known and it continues to be used by people who live along the edges as they always have, a few of them in the know. The few who are more woodsmen or people who love to get into the backwoods will go back there.

The vast majority of citizens don't have access to it, because they don't know their way in and out again. Unless you have a trails association or somebody knowledgeable to take you in, it's not going to be utilized the way it could. As I said earlier, this has just been a gem for our area. There are people who have lived in the Rockingham area or Fairview area for years who have gone back there and know what it has, who understand what a tremendous, beautiful area it is, what it offers in terms of recreation and fitness and mental health to be able to enjoy wilderness. It is just amazing that we have that on the edge of a highly-populated, densely-populated area like Parkland Drive, for example, which has literally dozens and dozens of apartment buildings.

I want to see at least one opening into that park in the next few years, in the foreseeable future. It is so vital that we start to be able to open up the near urban wilderness that people can use. HRM held a big meeting last year, interestingly - sort of a run-up to the election, municipally. In May last year they did get together and have a big meeting. It was well advertised, and over 200 people came to that meeting to look at what plans were afoot for the regional park, which is going to be partly in the provincial wilderness area, and part would be extra lands that HRM is going to acquire from private landowners and set aside for the future generations as well.

[Page 1607]

There was so much excitement around having that park being discussed, and people who came out were not just from Clayton Park or the Rockingham area. They were from Timberlea and Hammonds Plains, and came in from Dartmouth and other parts of HRM, recognizing that this is such a gem in our city.

Again, the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes park is now the largest urban wilderness park in Canada. We should all know that and be proud of the fact that our province put aside 3,300 acres within the urban area of our city. It's still in the city core. I think that is something so great, but what's the point if we can't get at it? So I really want to urge the government and the Department of Environment to do whatever is necessary to start the planning for an early access point into the park.

One of the ones that has been mentioned is the one by Maskwa Aquatic Club, which is only five minutes from Clayton Park West, but it's a very rural corner of the riding. It's a corner that has very narrow, country-like lanes, and it really won't support heavy traffic in and out, if we use that as an access point, or at least the first access point to the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes trails. I think there may be other points or places around the perimeter that will be better, but it does require planning.

I want to just mention - I'm not sure if the minister knows, but actually as recently as this morning there was a meeting that gave me cause for optimism. There was a meeting held at the Department of Environment that was coordinated by the protected wilderness area - I don't know the exact title of the staff member, but his name is Peter Bush, and he coordinated a meeting of interested parties, people who have been interested in trail building, and particularly vocal around the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes area. We had Chris Miller there from the Canadian Parks and Wilderness, CPAWS. The former city councillor for the area attended, because she has shown an interest over the years. We also had our trails association represented, as well as some other trails associations, so we had Bob and Wendy McDonald from the Halifax North West Trails Association, and Bruce Smith, who may be known to members as well, who's an active member of that association.

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of the meeting was to start to talk about how the community can organize to begin to open up that area and to work with the Department of Environment on their step-by-step process to begin to do work in there, and it's very urgent that all of us work together to see that areas like this are opened up for public use. What is frustrating to me is that we're not moving forward with allowing the public to have access, and I can give a perfect example of an area where this has been a problem in the past. It's the HRM park known as Hemlock Ravine Park. It's accessed from the Bedford Highway, very close to where the round house is - the historic round music house that was part of the estates from the early 1800's.

[Page 1608]

The Hemlock Ravine Park is a lovely area. It's got old-growth hemlocks, and it's very beautiful, has some residential areas just tucked in around it. But because there's no proper parking area, and because the little street that you take to get to the small parking area they have, is again, a narrow country lane, the city has never put up a big sign, and never advertised the lovely trails in Hemlock Ravine Park. The people who live around it know there are trails there, and there are some markings on the trails, but it has been a well-kept secret, and I don't want to see the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes continue to be a well-kept secret. I want to see them opened up and made available so that people can feel confidence in taking their children and walking their dogs, and be able to safely walk into Susie's Lake and other lakes that are on the edge.

I fully accept that there are two types of wilderness experiences we'll see in that park. One will be the near-wilderness - the short walks in on a well-groomed gravel trail that you'd be able to roll a stroller or safely go in with somebody who's perhaps not as - perhaps a little older and doesn't have as sure footing, something that will be safe and allow people to get back in there. At the same time you're still going to have the wild trails and the backwoods experience, the real wilderness experience that comes with taking some of the other trails, and I don't see them being developed and I don't see them being altered greatly, because there are some good trails already in place.

But my concern today is to raise the alarm that we need to get the trails in place, even if it's going to be a staged approach that we do obviously one by one, we can't do them all at once. We need to get a few points where the public can access those lakes, and go back and have a sense of the beauty and the benefits that come from enjoying nature.

Mr. Speaker, as our city grows, we need that more and more. I think we can't even measure the benefits of a good walk in the woods; it's very healthy for us on so many levels. And I want to be able to see the schools in our area take children back there, to see it used for educational purposes, to see it used for health and recreation. And to do that we have to get beyond the point where it's a well-kept secret. We have to open up a parking area, we have to provide some signage, and we have to provide a path back to the lakes. There's just no two ways about it.

So, Mr. Speaker, in my comments today, I think that it would be wonderful if that would become a priority. I want to commend the province for holding that meeting today, which I hope will kick-start some community discussion and get the next stage going. I've been very concerned that four full years have passed since the area was designated. It was, in fact, passed in April - it was around Earth Day of 2009.

Here we are, four years later, we have the comfort of knowing that land will be protected and remain pristine, but we have no further access than we had four years ago. Mr. Speaker, if it were not for the efforts of the trails association in holding regular hikes and leading groups back there, I just don't know how we'd even get to spread the word about this wonderful gem and tremendous asset for the people of Clayton Park.

[Page 1609]

Again, I mention that anybody can reach that very easily by taking the bus to Bayers Lake and going back there, but I would not recommend it if they have not been guided or haven't somebody with them who knows the way, because otherwise there's the danger of being lost in the woods. It does require somebody who knows where they're going; there are no markings on these trails at all.

Mr. Speaker, that to me is a travesty and the time has come for the province to move ahead and do whatever they can to get one section opened. I would also appeal to the province to work closely with HRM; I think HRM has once again fallen asleep on this issue. I believe there was a little pressure on them last year to have that public meeting. Again, when you hold a public meeting and bring 200 people into a church hall, they are excited and they want to be part of the process, they want it to move forward on this Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes and the regional park that would be part of it - and now nothing further has come in the next year.

We need to make sure that the province and the provincial staff that work with protected areas are bringing HRM - you know, even if it means dragging them, let's drag HRM into this issue and make sure that they are going to play their part in building this park. It's not going to happen unless both levels of government are there to see the expansion of the lands that we've set aside.

HRM's planned regional park is going to take up a lot of the very special lands. I've mentioned Susie's Lake, which is pretty easy to access and probably the closest corner for people in Clayton Park West, but a lot of the land around Susie's Lake is in private hands. The Sisters of Charity own a lot of it - I think they own 150 acres on the shores of Susie's Lake. There are other landowners, like the Annapolis Group and they've created a little umbrella group of landowners called Birchdale - and I have very, very great suspicions about their motivation because they are trying to push the city into developing the area and there is absolutely no need in the world to see that area developed. We have enough land that has already been approved for development in HRM to last the next 30 years - I've heard them say there are enough lots and subdivisions and new developments already approved.

So I think it is really irresponsible for HRM to even consider development in the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes area. For anybody who doesn't know, that means as you're driving out of the city and you've passed Bayers Lake, it would be the lands on your left. On the right-hand side you have apartment buildings, and you really have a corridor that runs along Parkland Drive to the Kearney Lake exit. On the left-hand side there's a quarry, and behind the quarry is the Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes area. There's a fairly large amount of land back there that is in private hands.

[Page 1610]

There is no reason in the world to see that land drawn up into bus routes and houses and sewers and roads. The Birchdale group has actually spent money to draw up those plans to show how that land would be carved up into condominiums, apartments and homes, and I object to that because there is no need for it. The city, in 2005, included an area called a regional park where they said we have conceptualized a park is going to be here but those landowners realized it encompassed their land and by simply pushing forward their development agenda they are driving up the cost of that land. When the city wants to acquire it for a park or for the purposes of community, it's going to be no longer seen as resource land or just woodland, it's going to be priced as it would for a development - it will be seen as the price you'd get per lot.

They are driving it up to say that they have an investment that means it is developable. Mr. Speaker, it is not developable, it is not on the plans of HRM, and I think that the developers are actually threatening and pushing HRM to consider it for such.

I will say one more thing on that issue, which really is a reason why I say I am suspicious of this group. They included in the Regional Plan Committee presentations a report on their development - they didn't bring it through the front door to the city council to be reviewed as a possible development, they did it through the Regional Planning Committee about two years ago, possibly three years ago, and they renamed it. We all know that area as Blue Mountain Birch Cove Lakes, and in this regional plan document it came back as being renamed. All of a sudden it was called the Highway No.102 West Corridor Lands, and the member for Halifax Clayton Park, my very own self, did not recognize that. I didn't realize that somebody had made a big application to develop these lands and that these lands are on the doorstep of our wilderness area because whoever heard of the Highway No. 102 West Corridor Lands. It was a whole new name for it and I think that was, to me, very sneaky.

Mr. Speaker, I thought it was sneaky and that the avenue of bringing it forward to HRM Council was very much through the backdoor. Every time they spend more money as a development group to start painting a picture of how those lands look as a development, the more they've invested in that, the more they are driving the price up of those lands. I believe that HRM should slam the door on any further discussion on that and get busy looking at the regional park, which is what the public wants and expects from that area. HRM actually led the way. They were two years ahead of the province in even considering this area as a special park.

Mr. Speaker, I believe that it behooves the Department of Environment to start moving now, to push HRM to do what they promised to do in 2005 and that is get busy creating a regional park in the Birch Cove Lakes areas. Secondly, I think it is urgent that we get busy and create an opening, a park area, a trail head that the public can use to access and enjoy the Birch Cove Lakes area. There should be no further delay in those two activities. I think it's essential for us to enjoy that 3,300 acres that the previous government had the good sense to put aside as a protected area. I know the current government has shown a lot of interest in and support for this as well. So that is one of the subjects I wanted to touch on today.

[Page 1611]

At the same time, on a local level, I wanted to talk as well about the Condominium Act and changes that have come in over the last number of years in my time here as an MLA. Beginning in about 2005, several years after my first election, a couple of years after that, I began to hear complaints about condominiums in my area that were suffering from - and these were new condominiums - that were suffering from leaks and structural difficulties and the costs were very great to rectify, in some cases.

Mr. Speaker, because I have an area with a lot of new development and because condominiums are a rather new development, as well, for HRM there are other cities in the country that have had condominium ownership for a long time but we have really not that many condominium developments in our province. In fact the first one was registered in Clayton Park and it was Town House Condominium in 1978. Each of the condominiums are registered and condominium number one is in Clayton Park. There was not a big market for condominiums or an appetite for owning them but in more recent years we've seen a change, maybe it's our aging population or more familiarity with condominiums but they have begun to take off in terms of sales.

Mr. Speaker, my concern is the protection of people who buy condominiums and although we've seen a number of the concerns that the Condominium Owners Association brought forward and looked at here in this Legislature, I still feel we haven't addressed the biggest concern of all and that is the fact that there is no protection, when you buy a condominium, against being stuck with very high fees or costs, when something goes wrong with the structure.

If your condominium building is leaking or the bricks aren't laid properly or a wall needs to be repaired for bricks, which happened in one of my buildings, an entire face of the building had to be re-bricked only a year or two after the building opened, and if that occurs after you buy one of these nice new condominium units, you will be sharing, along with your other unit owners in that building, the cost of these repairs. We've heard of horror stories of people being asked for $30,000 each for each of the units in a building, or even more, to cover those costs.

We have seen some tremendous problems coming in the buildings. Some of it, again, has to do with water penetration and leakage and that means your roofs have to be fixed or your windows weren't installed properly. All of those exterior things require that the owners come together to pay the cost.

We have done nothing in the ensuing five or six years to address that issue. That group, the Condominium Owners of Nova Scotia, came together as a result of not having a voice. They didn't have anyone to speak on their behalf or to come together. They just knew the stories anecdotally - one unit owner would talk to somebody from another building, and they'd realize that this was widespread, that they were all having these problems. They weren't from one builder. They were from a lot of different builders.

[Page 1612]

The question was, how can you protect people as they're buying into a new building? It doesn't have a history yet, and you wouldn't expect things to go wrong, but they do, and there's no time for the condominium owners to have put enough money aside into their contingency funds to pay for these big changes. Our rules are really good for putting money aside each year for things like a roof replacement in 20 years, but what do you do if that roof replacement is happening two years after the condominium is registered?

We've been waiting here in the Liberal caucus to see some changes to those rules. I brought forward a bill a number of times, an amendment to the Condominium Act. That bill required or calls for - if it were passed - a 5 per cent holdback on the cost as you're buying a new condominium. So when you move into your new condo, 5 per cent of the cost of your unit would be held back in trust, and the same for all the other unit holders around you. Then you would have a pool of money, thousands of dollars set aside in case there are major structural problems that need to be addressed in the first five years of the building being open.

This is what we're finding, that those problems don't arise in the first year when the company that built the building is still responsible. After a year passes and enough units are sold that the condominium is registered, the builder, which is often just a numbered company - that numbered company can dissolve, or the builder can dissolve the company that he had, and there is nobody who can be held legally responsible for the deficiencies that turn up later in the building.

This is not an isolated problem. People were so upset that they formed a new association. It has been going strong for the last number of years - I would say six or seven years now. It was around 2006 that they came together. They are called the Condominium Owners of Nova Scotia, which incidentally spells "CONS," and that is exactly how they felt: that they had been conned on a lot of different levels, that the protections they believed to be in place were not there. For example, if you were relying on the Atlantic Home Warranty, which a lot of people do - there is an Atlantic Home Warranty, if you're buying a new home - it has absolutely no teeth, no ability to help these condominium owners whatsoever.

We have had discussions with Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations, and I've had those discussions, along with the member for Bedford-Birch Cove, to find out where the government is on finding solutions. Where are they in this search for consumer protection?

[Page 1613]

Mr. Speaker, we do understand from the staff that this is a tremendously difficult problem, that our market is too small to warrant other home warranty groups or insurance groups to come in. I know there may well be obstacles, but I believe that it is time we overcome those obstacles, that we find the solutions. We could link with the rest of Atlantic Canada to create a bigger market for condominium home warranties or to provide insurance for buyers, or if we don't have time or the public will or political will to do that kind of co-operation, we could bring forth the bill that I brought forward, which is to provide a holdback, so that once you bought your unit, you know there's a fund of money there to cover any exceptional costs. I think that's needed to protect the public.

I know that the builders will say, well, then we're going to increase your cost by 5 per cent and you'll pay more up front as you buy the unit. They know that the 5 per cent is either lost to them because of a structural problem or certainly not available to them for five years. I think that is preferable for buyers, because if you know up front, then that extra however many thousands of dollars are actually part of your mortgage or part of the agreement that you make when you buy the building, or the unit in the building. That is a lot better because then you have it properly understood that this is your obligation. Under the way it exists now, you're getting an exceptional levy put on you when something goes wrong in the building.

We have a lot of condominium owners who may be fully mortgaged and they are busy paying that mortgage off and then they get the call for $10,000 that they have to pay their share among all the owners to make these repairs. That is putting a tremendous burden on the individual owner. So I really believe the time has come for the government to stop all the other studies and look-sees that they are doing. We are told they are addressing this problem; it's very difficult; they are having a hard time.

I think after four years of the NDP Government, there has been enough time to say that there isn't another solution so we should pass the bill that has already been put forward - by the Liberal caucus, I might add - the bill that I brought forward on behalf of the Liberal caucus to see a holdback for new condominium construction that would allow you to be protected as you go forward.

This is common practice if you are buying a house. If I buy a house and the building inspector tells me there is a deficiency, I hold back until the builder has corrected that or until the seller of the house has corrected it. It works perfectly well when we are talking about houses, so I'm suggesting we put the same system in place and do something to protect condominium owners, because, even today, I cannot assure people that they are going to be protected when it comes to buying a brand new building. I'd like to be able to provide that assurance. I think people love the lifestyle and the amenities that come with living in a condominium. I think there is a big demand for them but we need to give people peace of mind that when they buy into a new or relatively new condominium building that they are not going to be stuck with high levies for structural or other deficiencies.

[Page 1614]

That would be my urging for the government on that second issue is that we stop all the studies and put something in place, today, that will protect consumers when they are buying a condominium in Nova Scotia. I think that is really urgent. With those few comments I would like to take my seat and allow someone else the opportunity to speak.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN « » : One of the very many things that I do not know is whether this is the last time I will get the opportunity to address this House; I rather think it isn't. I know, for example, that I have a resolution that I'm going to bring forward and I suspect that there will be some bills that I might want to comment on. However, those are very focused opportunities, and as we know, the tradition, when it comes to Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne, is that there is great flexibility and an opportunity, therefore, for members to talk on a variety of themes.

One of the reasons I think this might be close to the last time, is that there is wide speculation that there may be an election. This is something that is not an item on which I have any particular knowledge, the decision maker is the Premier on something like that, and indeed whether the Premier has even decided is far from clear. But if it turns out there is an election, I have decided that I'm not running again; this was publicly announced.

I thought therefore that I might take this opportunity to reminisce a bit with my colleagues here. I have to say that you should be prepared, it may take some time, it turns out that there is a lot more of the past now than there used to be. I'm aware that many of you may think of me as being a person who is youthful in appearance and vigorous, and of course this is all true.

The fact of the matter, the hard fact of the matter is that I'm now 64 years of age and I have been a lawyer for 40 years, I started early, but I've been a lawyer for 40 years and there is a lot that has happened. As my late father used to say, it's not just the years, it's the mileage, and I think this is something that we can all identify with.

Let me tell you a little bit about what it's like to turn 64, apart from the fact that when you wake up in the morning you feel grateful - surprised also - but grateful just to open your eyes in the morning. The other thing is that Service Canada sends you a notice shortly after your 64th birthday in which they invite you to consider whether you would like to put in the paperwork early for your old age pension. I have to say that our federal counterparts really should rethink the name of the old age pension, but nonetheless there is that.

Well between age and frankly having been, in my opinion, slightly underemployed for the last few years, I decided that I wouldn't run again. It may seem perhaps odd, I guess, to begin to introduce myself to my colleagues here through reminiscence at this very late stage. I am, nonetheless, going to do it. It's more often the kind of thing that people do when they first speak in the Legislature.

[Page 1615]

Although many of you, and I know members of the public tend to think of me as a politician, in my 40 years in fact I had a whole career - several careers of varying sorts that had nothing to do, really, with electoral politics. I've been in this Legislature for 15 years and before that I was about four years on city council, but really those 19 years are the minority of the 40 years in which I've been a lawyer. The 21 years that I spent before gave me quite a variety of things to do, and I want to talk a little bit about those.

Before I do, I might say just a bit about my future plans. Many people have asked me about my future plans, and of course it's hard to have plans, really. As we all know, many of us do make plans, but God laughs at our plans and something entirely different happens in life. But I'm thinking about various scenarios and I probably will have a bit of time to undertake some things - at least after I finish ghost-writing the memoirs for my colleague the member for Halifax Fairview. (Laughter)

When I do that, I think that there are at least a couple of things that are on my mind. One is - and I really have to confess this right away because it's in some ways an intriguing and sort of terrible thing - I'm actually in the middle of building an addition on the back of my house. The reason I'm in the middle of building an addition on the back of my house is I'm going to have two offices to clear out - one is my constituency office and the other the office I maintain with the rest of my colleagues in the caucus just down the street, and both of these offices are full of papers and books - many of them purchased with my own money.

This is, in fact, something I'm going to have to deal with and I'm building an addition on the back of my house so that I'll have a place to put all of these items, so the undertaking I assure you is a serious, difficult and time-consuming one and, like many of our enterprises, it looks like it's going to take a lot longer than anyone thinks and cost a lot more than anyone anticipated in the first place. That's just a general lesson of life, especially so in politics - that's the way of it. So I am doing that.

The other thing is I've actually been asked several times whether I might be interested in moving to federal politics. I've served at the two other levels, municipal and now provincial, and the suggestion was made that I might look at federal policies, but of course there's no vacancy. We have a wonderful Member of Parliament through Megan Leslie in Halifax, and I don't anticipate any change in that at all, which I suppose would leave the Senate, but of course this is what I'm thinking about that, and here's what it is that I think everyone should keep in mind. There's a possible scenario - I don't promote it, I don't suggest that it's a good scenario, but it is just possible that our good colleagues and friends in Quebec might decide at some point to leave Canada. This is a possibility and I know that our federal counterparts have had some criticism for their views on what the Clarity Act should look like and that it might just take 50 per cent plus one, in a vote.

[Page 1616]

I have to say that I think that criticism of our federal counterparts is entirely mistaken because the issue isn't what it would take for Quebec to leave - the issue is what will it take to keep Quebec in Canada. That is where the focus should be and that is where I think the focus of our Party is, at both levels. But it is entirely possible that this terrible scenario might come to pass and if this scenario does come to pass, then there is going to be an East Canada and a West Canada and what are we going to do? Those of us who are here in the East will have to face up to a number of possibilities. We are going to have to say to ourselves, what do we do here? Because the odds are that West Canada might not want us and it is awkward to run a country when you've got East and West, the equivalent of East and West Pakistan before, of course, they emerged as two other countries.

What are our options? We could be four countries of our own. We could merge and be one country. We could sell ourselves to the Chinese or the Europeans - that's always a possibility - or we could join the United States. If we join the United States, then at that point I'm going to run for the U.S. Senate, so that is the scenario that I have in mind. (Laughter) Apart from that, unless that comes to pass, I don't know that this is something that is necessarily on the agenda of the Prime Minister, to put me in the Senate, so perhaps that is the only scenario that might get me into some senate somewhere.

I am actually going to take you back a long, long way. I ran into a friend of mine from when I was about four or five years old, not long ago. On the street where I grew up in Halifax, on Edward Street, there were a few of us who were little boys together, baby boomers obviously. David Lacusta, the fellow I ran into, Teddy Mitchell, myself, and Johnny Weigel used to play together a lot. It turned out that David Lacusta actually had the invitation that he was sent to my 5th or 6th birthday party and he very kindly sent it to me in the mail about a month or two ago. I was thrilled to see this, mostly because it was in the handwriting of my late mother, and it was nice to see that turn up after all these years.

We all had great fun growing as little boys in Halifax, playing around together. Probably one of the more memorable events I had was stepping on a piece of wood that had a nail sticking through it, when we were playing in someone's backyard, I think it was in Johnny Weigel's backyard, and it went right through my sneaker into my foot. These other boys put me into one of those little red carts that we all had - they pulled it out first, they pulled the nail and the board out first, and I was yelling and screaming - and they trundled me down the street to home, where I was taken care of and, of course, taken over to the children's hospital for an anti-tetanus shot.

I have to say I spent a lot of my youth in the emergency ward of the children's hospital, we were an adventurous bunch. In my recollection I actually spent the whole of the rest of the summer sitting, with my foot bandaged up, on the front porch of my house. It was probably a couple of weeks but it certainly felt like the whole of the summer. It was great. All of us are still alive, amazingly, and still see each other around town and it's a great thing to do.

[Page 1617]

Growing up here in Halifax has, of course, been a real treat. I'm not going to give you every episode, you'll be happy to hear, but here's another one, just jumping forward from age four or five to when I was about 11 or 12. When I was 11 or 12 I travelled with my mother and with the late Muriel Duckworth, who many of us will know, together in a car up to the Thinkers Lodge, in Pugwash. We went because the first cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, was visiting Nova Scotia and he was at the Thinkers Lodge, and my mother, who was in the Voice of Women with Muriel Duckworth, was invited to go to this event and I tagged along with them.

I was thrilled to actually make the acquaintance of Yuri Gagarin as we wandered around on the grounds of the Thinkers Lodge. He was drinking a glass of Coke and he was taken off to the formal ceremonies inside the lodge itself. As he did that, he put down his glass of Coke, which I immediately swiped, I have to say. I not only swiped it, I actually drank his Coke and I took the glass as a souvenir. (Laughter) So this is one of my prized possessions, Mr. Speaker, and was kind of a highlight of my young years here.

Many of us are in the papers and in the press from time to time. I had an early appearance in the local newspaper in about 1961, maybe 1962, for the following reason. There used to be a column on the kind of all-purpose pages they had where we now see games of Sudoku and other crossword puzzles and so on. I think this column was called "Tell me why" and it was aimed at children. The newspaper had a little contest in which they invited their young readers to explain what was the most important subject that could be studied in school. I wrote an essay in which I explained that the most important subject was science.

Now for some reason I won this contest and had to appear at the offices of the newspaper, which used to be just up the street on Argyle Street, now a big hole in the ground, to collect the prize which was an item that I don't have but my children have - it was a set of the Britannica Junior Encyclopaedia. They took my picture and put it in the paper and I think that was my first appearance in the newspaper that I'm aware of, although later on I appeared in some sports columns because I was a member of the track and field team and had some success with races in different places around the province.

Despite the fact that I at some point thought that science was the subject that was the most important, I didn't go into science. I had something of a science mind, but for many long years I thought that I was going to be a professor of English literature. I had a taste for reading and I pursued that and went to graduate school in English literature, before finally deciding that, no, probably being a professor of English wasn't for me and maybe going to law school, and not having any other definite plans, might be the thing.

One of my fondest memories of this House is of a photograph that was taken and published of myself and the member for Timberlea-Prospect. This was when we were in the Opposition - which we were for many long years - and we sat together through many long and, I have to admit, tedious debates from time to time. We both read a lot and we both had books in front of us on our laps and we were kind of sitting there beside each other, eyes rolling but at least managing to keep ourselves entertained with a book to read.

[Page 1618]

Many of us have a fondness for reading, but it was ultimately law that was my interest. I had this long career, as I said, before finally coming into electoral politics. It started with quite an interesting class at law school. Members may know that the honourable member for Antigonish, now our Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, was one of my classmates at law school, that famous class of 1973. There was even a moment in this Assembly in which there were three members of the class of 1973 who were all here together, because Rod MacArthur, our former Clerk, was also a member of that class, so we found ourselves together.

Of course there were some very distinguished members of our class, the Honourable Mr. Justice Jamie Saunders of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal; other members here may well know Paul Pettipas, who is a builder in the area. And there are others who are dead or who have spent time in jail and are perhaps not so distinguished, but it was an interesting class. I have to confess that I probably spent most of my time either debating or playing bridge - it's a wonder, given that I spent so much time doing both of those, that I found myself an adjunct professor at the Dalhousie Law School and have been for the last 20 years.

In fact, on the subject of debating, the honourable member for Antigonish will probably remember my partner, Jeff Fulton. Jeff was a wonderful debater, unlike myself, and because he was so good we actually won the debating championship three years in a row when we were at law school, and managed to amuse ourselves doing that.

After law school, I articled with a firm in Dartmouth which turned out to be exactly the same firm that the honourable Premier articled with, and that he stayed and practised with. So we had an interesting overlap at least in our histories. We weren't there at the same time, but certainly found ourselves working and interested to be working in a law firm that was main-street Dartmouth, meaning Portland Street. That was a firm that had people in it like Richard Weldon, who had been a member of city council for Dartmouth and who later was a Progressive Conservative MLA and who was interested in municipal politics, and we had examples like that in front of us.

I didn't stay with the private practice of law, at least at that moment. I made the choice to go to Ottawa to work for the federal Department of Justice, which I did for three years. The federal Department of Justice does a variety of very interesting things. One of the things it does is it assigns lawyers to be the in-house legal counsel for other government departments. I was assigned by the Department of Justice to be an in-house legal counsel for the Solicitor General's Department. These were the days when Warren Almond was the federal Solicitor General - this was 1974, 1975, 1976. These were interesting years.

[Page 1619]

The Solicitor General federally is responsible for the penitentiaries, the parole board, the RCMP and for, in those days, the antecedent agency to what is now CSIS. My work was quite interesting; we had security clearance for quite a variety of things. My own security clearance was top secret, that is I was able to deal with documents up to that. You'll be interested to know, if you don't know, that along with confidential, secret, and top secret, there are actually other classifications - but I'm not actually supposed to tell you what they are, so I'm not going to tell you what they are.

I had quite an interesting three years working with the federal Department of Justice and I'm hugely grateful I should say to a man who has now passed on, Jack Hollies, who was my director in the legal branch at the Solicitor General's Department. Colonel Hollies had been in the military and in the Judge Advocate General's branch before being recruited to be in charge of the legal services at the Solicitor General's Department.

Most of my work was on penitentiaries and was therefore kind of an obscure part of the criminal law. Some of you who might have attended recently at the estimates when we dealt with the Department of Justice may have heard me reminisce a bit about the capital case files that I had superintendence of at that time. In those years Canada had not yet abolished capital punishment entirely; it was still available if a person had murdered a police officer or a prison guard. There were actually 12 people who were under sentence of death at that time, and I was in charge of those capital case files. It was my job to make sure that their appeals went forward in different courts around the country and that different dates of execution were set by the judges. Most importantly, what I had to do was assemble all the materials that were going to go into a brief that would go to Cabinet on the question of whether the sentence should be commuted to one of life imprisonment.

In order to do that there were rules and guidelines that had to be followed, and that included hiring two psychiatrists to write reports on these individuals. It included getting statements from the defence counsel, the prosecuting counsel, reading the trial transcript, getting statements from the trial judge, talking to anyone else who might have had anything to do with the case, seeing if the jury had any recommendations. I have to say that of those 12 people, if it had turned out that capital punishment had not been abolished in the Fall of 1976 by Parliament, there were probably three or four of them who you couldn't say a lot for. It was pretty difficult. It was an interesting time, and something that was important, and I look back upon it with gratitude.

Although I was in Ottawa working for those three years, it was never my intention to become an Upper Canadian. I always thought of myself as a Nova Scotian, someone who was keen to return here, but at that moment it wasn't quite the right moment for me to do that. I thought what I would do was go to Toronto for a couple of years, which I did, in order to teach. So I taught law at Osgoode Hall Law School, which is part of York University. At that point, I guess, that was the second university where I'd been teaching. It turned out to be five universities, ultimately. The first one had been Carleton University in Ottawa, where I taught a course part time while I was working with the Department of Justice.

[Page 1620]

After two years, however, and now having been five years away from home, I thought it was about time I moved back to Nova Scotia. I was by this time, I think, 28 or 29 years old. I moved here and set up a private practice of law, really as a sole practitioner, although I had article clerks over that time, and each of my two article clerks stayed on and briefly practised with me. I really ended up practising for only three years. I practised from 1978 to 1981. Here's where my law practice was, Mr. Speaker - it was right across Granville Street, where One Government Place is now.

Of course, in those days One Government Place did not exist. What did exist was a small walk-up office building of about three or four storeys that was owned by the late Grover Cleveland, who owned some real estate in downtown. On the ground floor was the Tasty restaurant, which was run by the Migas family and was a popular spot in downtown Halifax. One floor above the Tasty was the well-known law firm of Pace, MacIntosh and Donahoe, and then above that was my law firm.

The Pace, MacIntosh and Donahoe law firm was well known because Len Pace, the senior partner, became the Attorney General of Nova Scotia, I believe at one time, and later a judge on the Court of Appeal. The storied Charlie MacIntosh is probably Nova Scotia's leading real estate lawyer. Many of you will have noted that just recently Ben McCrea of the Armour Group died. Charlie MacIntosh has been Ben McCrea's lawyer for probably 50 years, and it's a partnership that is fascinating. Charlie MacIntosh, as I said, probably remains the leading real estate lawyer in Nova Scotia.

And of course, all the Donahoes. The senior Donahoe was Richard Donahoe, also an Attorney General of Nova Scotia, and his two sons, Art and Terry - Arthur Donahoe being one of your predecessors, Mr. Speaker, in that Chair, and Terry Donahoe having been the Minister of Education for the Province of Nova Scotia. I suppose there was sort of something in the air of that building that flowed upward and made me seriously interested in the possibility of politics in some form.

It wasn't only that example of those lawyers that did it. I actually had a fascinating law practice, in a way. I practised what is clearly middle-class law in order to support my real interest, but here is what middle-class law is: middle-class law is what is now a little on the expensive side but is necessary for the middle class to go about our lives. People want wills and they want to buy and sell houses, and every once in a while someone dies and you have to probate an estate, then also every once in a while someone is hauled up for drunk driving and you have to deal with that, and then finally, of course, they all want to divorce each other. That's the essence of middle-class law.

I did a huge amount of all of that. I mean I have done hundreds of real estate transactions, hundreds of divorces, hundreds of wills; it just went on and on. But my real interest was in labour law and in municipal law, and I became something of a labour lawyer representing the union side. I had some specialist clients and I also became involved with cases that had to do with land-use planning, the subject I've been teaching now for many years at the law school.

[Page 1621]

I should really take this opportunity to express my gratitude to my two secretaries who suffered along with me - or suffered me - during their time there: Sheila Henry and Rose Alphonse. The Alphonse name will be familiar for any of you in Halifax who know the musical tradition of the Alphonse family. One of my strongest memories is one morning when Rose Alphonse arrived in the office, looked at the desk where she was supposed to sit down to work, rolled her eyes and said, oh my God I really don't want to be here, and she turned around and left. Now who has not had that experience when arriving at the office in the morning? Fortunately she was back the next day and on we got with our work.

What was probably most important for me in the time I spend in my private law practice across the street was the fact that I charged so little and barely made a living. The benefit of that was that, although I didn't have a Photostat machine because I couldn't afford one, I used to come across to use the Photostat machine that the Legislative Library had, and I would pay the Legislative Library for the use of its Photostat machine. These were the days when Shirley Elliott was the Chief Legislative Librarian. Her photograph, I think, is now to be found in the Legislative Library. The real attraction was the Deputy Legislative Library and the very beautiful and talented Ilga Leja, later the mother of our two children, Hannah and Noah. So the opportunity to nip across the street and try to make time with the Deputy Legislative Librarian was probably the main attraction of having a law practice across the street. As I said the law practice went on only for three years and I then moved on to something else.

This is where I moved on to a more intensive use of my labour law interests and my nascent political interests. I was retained to the executive director of an organization known of NSCUFA, which is the Nova Scotia Confederation of University Faculty Association. On each campus on our universities there is a faculty association and each of these faculty associations belonged to this provincial confederation and the main function, along with giving advice in the negation of their collective agreements, was politicking with the provincial government, so I had occasions to meet with Terry Donohue in his capacity as Minister of Education, and work to try to establish something of the role of faculty members in the political life of our province. It led me to a profound appreciation of what a wonderful system we are blessed with when it comes to our universities and our other post-secondary education institutions in Nova Scotia.

So I did that for about three years, and then I was back to Ontario. The equivalent organization in Ontario, the OCUFA, the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations, was looking for an executive director, and I was hired to do that. Now that's a big system, that's 40 per cent of the university students and 40 per cent of the university faculty members in Canada work in Ontario. And I did that for four years, from 1984 to 1988 and I learned something very interesting about politics during that time, which is that you have to seek an opportunity when it presents itself. Let me just tell you about something that I can actually claim credit for, and I find quite fascinating to look back upon.

[Page 1622]

In those days, there was a time when the Liberal Party was a minority government in Ontario. They were coming up to an election year, and they were getting ready to go into this election. The university system was not getting quite as much money as it had hoped, and I devised a little advertising campaign that went like this: we placed ads in all of the foreign language ethnic press in Ontario. That meant that these ads were in Italian, and they were in Chinese, and they were in Portuguese, and they were in German; they were in every language where there was a community, a sizeable community in the Toronto area that was present and for whom English was not their first language.

Here's what the ad said: Congratulations. You've done a wonderful job in coming to this country and in establishing yourself as a businessperson, and in taking care of your family. But what about the future of your children? Those children will have to build their future on the basis of education. Did you know that the Government of Ontario was planning on reducing the number of places in the university system by 10,000 next year?

Well, Greg Sorbara, the Minister of Advanced Education, hit the roof. He hit the roof because we were playing in his backyard. He regarded the ethnic community in the Greater Toronto Area as the preserve of the Ontario Liberal Party. However, the immediate consequence was that the Liberal Government came up with an extra $30 million or $35 million dollars for the university system right away before the election. So at that point, I felt I was kind of accumulating some useful experience on how it is that the political system worked. But I was to learn more.

After four years at OCUFA, I decided to move back again to Nova Scotia - again, as I said, not being my long-range plan to be an Upper-Canadian. Many of us in the Maritimes find ourselves living elsewhere for periods of time because there's interesting work or there's opportunity to make a bit more money, and so it was with me, but I always wanted to move back. What I found myself moving back to, when I came here, was no job, but fairly soon I did find one. I became executive director of the Medical Society of Nova Scotia. This was not a long time, I was there for about a year, and it was in that capacity that I first met John Hamm.

John Hamm was not the president of the Medical Society in those days, but he was a past president of the Medical Society. And the Medical Society was in the process of building its headquarters in the Burnside Industrial Park, in the business park portion of it on Spectacle Lake Road. So one of the things John Hamm and I did together was we built that building. There is a lovely building over there and any of you who have had close dealings with the Medical Society or its successor - it has a successor name that escapes me at the moment - Doctors Nova Scotia, I think - who have had the chance to visit that building will probably understand that a lot of work went into that and it was enjoyable doing it and we ended up with quite an interesting structure.

[Page 1623]

From there I moved to be the executive director of the Ecology Action Centre. Well, the Ecology Action Centre is an entity that has achieved over the more than 40 years of its existence a huge amount of credibility and political heft in our province. I'm very proud to have had really a 40-year association with the EAC. It wasn't just the three, maybe four years - three years, I think - that I spent as the executive director of the Ecology Action Centre, during which time I became, in the minds of many people, very closely associated with it; in fact, I think at some point in this House I've been referred to, instead of the member for Halifax Chebucto, as the member for the Ecology Action Centre. I remember one of the other Parties saying that.

My association with the EAC goes back to around 1973, which was just after it was founded. I was a volunteer article clerk or lawyer with the EAC; that is I did some volunteer legal work with it. It was started by friends of mine, Brian Gifford who is still here in Halifax, Cliff White, Kathleen Flanagan, and David Reynolds. These people have put a huge amount of effort into organizing something that has been an enduring organization here.

As I said, the chief virtue of the centre is the achievement of its public credibility. It has public credibility for a variety of reasons - one is that in all of its public utterances no one has ever said that it was wrong about its facts. People might differ and argue about the policies that might flow from the facts or the policies that might be adopted, but no one has ever said that the facts were trimmed or stated inaccurately. That has never happened in 40 years. The other is that the centre has maintained really financial independence during all that time. It has been primarily dependent on the donations of its members, small-time fundraising activities and the occasional grant. That has meant that for a long time the centre was extremely poor. I have to say that in the three years or so that I was the director, I think I was paid only half the time - there just wasn't enough money.

The point is, though, that this does lead to the independence and credibility that the centre has amassed during the time that it has endured. I think this is something we should all admire. In fact some of my time at the Ecology Action Centre as the director led to what I think is my first legislative provision that I can claim some credit for. You may recall that in 1992 the government of the day, the Progressive Conservative Government, decided to sell off Nova Scotia Power, essentially privatize it. There was a bill that went through the Legislature, the Nova Scotia Power Privatization Act, and if you look at Section 8, I think it is of this bill, you will find that there is a prohibition on Nova Scotia Power owning or operating a nuclear-powered electricity generating station.

This provision is in the bill not because it was there at the wish of the government or of the company, it was introduced after Law Amendments Committee, and it was introduced because I went to Law Amendments Committee on behalf of the Ecology Action Centre and made a number of suggestions for changes to the bill - and this was the only one that was accepted. But I'm happy to say that it was accepted, and I'm happy to say that we find ourselves with some protection from having nuclear power in our province as a result of that initiative.

[Page 1624]

Of course, there were many other issues that, as director of the Ecology Action Centre, I was deeply involved with. You may recall that there was a proposal at the time to build an incinerator of sorts to deal with the sewage coming from Halifax. There was a proposal to deal with the Halifax Harbour by essentially building an artificial island and collecting all the sewage there and making an oil-from-waste, oil-from-sludge plant there. This, I'm happy to say, was ultimately headed off.

There was another proposal for a hazardous waste incinerator, another for a solid waste incinerator - the engineers really were mad keen on incinerators in those days - and many of those proposals were headed off and we found ourselves with different systems. I can't claim to be entirely thrilled with the sewage system that we have in Halifax but, nonetheless, it is certainly better than what was proposed in those days.

Ultimately, I decided there was a moment to turn to electoral politics after excursions that flirted around public policy and the elected world in the way that I've described. I decided to run, in 1994, for city council. Where I lived in the city, the member was Nick Meagher. Nick Meagher ran a pharmacy on Quinpool Road for a huge number of years and he had been on city council for 30 years. There was no point in running against Nick Meagher. First, of course, you couldn't beat him; and, secondly, there was no point in beating him because he was a wonderful member of city council. He just did a great job.

But in 1994 he decided he wasn't going to run again and that opened up his seat on city council and I decided to run. In fact, I think about six or seven people decided to run - only three of us were serious candidates - and these are numbers I want to point out to you because it's important, especially over here, since they illustrate a way in which a person whose politics are perhaps on the left, as mine are - I tend to regard them as both red and green - but this is the way a person in my situation sometimes gets elected.

Of the three serious candidates to replace Nick Meagher, the final results were that two of the candidates, who were perhaps more on the right of the political spectrum, each got about 32 per cent and I got 33 or 34 per cent, so I got elected. But having just squeaked in, I found ways, during my time on city council, to cultivate the constituency and when the provincial government surprised all of us by announcing amalgamation and, therefore, the creation of Halifax Regional Municipality, HRM, and calling a special election, when that happened, I ran for election and got 68 per cent of the vote, because during the intervening two years, people in the constituency had been watching what was going on on city council and decided that perhaps I was doing the kind of job they were interested in.

[Page 1625]

One of main things I did was I consulted with them and informed them. I put out a newsletter that was full of facts; that was informative; that invited engagement; that laid out details about the tax structure, for example, of the city; that laid out the issues around solid waste, if that was an issue, as indeed it was in those days; that told people things that they needed to know - and they responded to that very positively, not just in contacts, but ultimately in terms of electoral support.

Looking back on political accomplishments and trying to weigh them up, I find very difficult. I find that it is often hard to point to something and decide that this is an advance, and this is not surprising in politics since politics is a long-range undertaking. Many things inherently just take many years and are complicated and need a lot of attention, but there are things I do want to note that did come forward when I was on city council, and that I can take at least some degree of responsibility for. I can claim some credit for them.

The first one was to reopen negotiations over Africville. This is something that had languished at that point to the disgrace of the city for many years. We all know the story of the removal of that community at the north end of the peninsula and we live today with some of the consequences of that and really this is something that had not ever really been moved on in any satisfactory way in the intervening years. One of the first speeches I made at city council, this is prior to amalgamation, was to put out the issue of Africville and to note for my colleagues that this remained unfinished business that had to be addressed again. Ultimately it was; it took a long time, but I got the ball rolling and I'm very proud to have gotten the ball rolling at the moment I did. (Applause)

I have mentioned already the solid waste and the liquid waste that is the sewage treatment and the garbage systems. Those are things that got started during my time on city council and that we advanced on ultimately, again, like many things it took a lot longer than one had hoped for. Another thing that I got started was the issue of an anti-pesticide bylaw, that was also something that took a long time ultimately to come to fruition, and indeed overlapped with my time in the Legislature because HRM really couldn't move ahead, it felt, with an anti-pesticide bylaw until the Municipal Government Act passed through this House and included provisions that facilitated that. But again, it's an item that I look back on and I look back upon it with no little feeling of accomplishment.

After four years on city council I decided it was perhaps the moment to move into provincial politics and I was nominated late in 1997 to be a candidate for the election that ultimately took place in March 1998. All will remember, certainly over here we remember, that date of March 24, 1998. That was the election in which the NDP made its leap forward, moving from having only a small handful of members to having 19 members in the House; and six of us, I think, who were first elected in those days are still here in our caucus and recently actually had a small dinner together to chat and reminisce.

[Page 1626]

But here is something that I remember the best about that election, it was the next morning. It was the next morning March 25, 1998, and I remember walking down Spring Garden Road and going to City Hall, I was going to work. As I passed by two of the cafés or restaurant that had glass in their fronts and that were immediately adjacent to the street - it happened at two different places, as I walked by people in the restaurant or the café got up and applauded. Now in all the years of being in politics that still puts a shiver through me because I remember that, it was an extraordinary moment and what was extraordinary was the fact that voters in Nova Scotia had placed their hopes for the future in the NDP. I didn't take the applause as something personal to me, I took it as something as an expression of hope for the future that the voters of Nova Scotia saw as being appropriate for the NDP and it has been a long time since then.

We worked hard and it has been many long years in the Opposition and now we finally had the chance to form a government. I have to say, having worked on this side of the House in the shadow of the portrait of Joseph Howe, it has been fascinating. I've had the opportunity to work together with you, my colleagues, and I'm very grateful for the opportunity to have done that. As you all know, all of us in this House know that no one in electoral politics does anything alone. We all have teams who are associated with us.

I know that I've had three very wonderful people who were my constituency assistants: first Cliff White, then Donna Parker, now Scott Gillard. Along with our constituency assistants, there are the people who are heads of our constituency associations. The late Sue Klabunde, who died very tragically at age 43, was president of my constituency association for a while. We all have our families who work with us, volunteers. I want to thank my long-term partner, Mary Evans MacLachlan, and the dog Maddie , the NDP dog who campaigned so often with me with an orange scarf around her neck.

There have been great moments here - trying moments, difficult moments, interesting moments. I think about the hours we spent arguing over Bill No. 68 and the times when, in Opposition, we had to speak for an hour under the tutelage of the great John Holm, who taught us how to do that, when we had to speak in Opposition when the hours of the House were 24 hours. That was hard to do. I think of items like my little heart-to-heart chats with the Auditor General. I think of my comments about prayer in the Legislature. I think about time on the Law Amendments Committee, which I have to say is a great feature of the legislative process here in this Assembly.

We have all had the opportunity to work together for a long time. I'm going to be departing, but many of you will have the opportunity to continue on together. Some of you won't - it will be a surprise, but the nature of this House will undoubtedly change, come the next election.

Mr. Speaker, I have certainly been proud to have had the chance to have participated in some small way over the last number of years with it, so may I therefore offer my thanks to everyone who I have had the chance to work with over the years. I would like to adjourn debate. Thank you very much. (Standing Ovation)

[Page 1627]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is to adjourn debate. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, with the indulgence of the House, could we revert to the order of business, Presenting Reports of Committees.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Attorney General.

HON. ROSS LANDRY « » : Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 36 - Provincial Court Act.

Bill No. 37 - Innovative Transportation Act.

Bill No. 42 - Pension Benefits Act.

Bill No. 54 - Widows' Pension Act.

Bill No. 57 - Language Schools Act.

and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The report is tabled.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, that concludes the government's business for today. I move that the House do now rise to meet again tomorrow at the hour of 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. The order of business will be Public Bills for Second Reading, Bill No. 66, and after that Committee of the Whole House on Bills, Bill Nos. 54, 36, 37, 42, 57, 3, and 32. I move the House do now rise.

[Page 1628]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is that the House now rise to meet again tomorrow at the hour of 12:00 noon.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[The House rose at 7:19 p.m.]

[Page 1629]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 975

By: Mr. Andrew Younger « » (Dartmouth East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Alice Housing, with 18 units, is the largest second-stage safe housing organization for women in Atlantic Canada seeking to escape abusive relationships; and

Whereas in 2012 Alice Housing provided 12,077 bed nights, 311 women's counselling programs, 276 child/youth counselling programs, 410 parenting sessions, 49 personal and professional workshops, and 5,100 kilograms of food; and

Whereas Alice Housing has been recognized seven times by the Donner Foundation for best operated non-profit social service, has been granted the Ethics Award for Non-Profits by the Better Business Bureau, and the Peter F. Drucker Award for non-profit management in Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly recognize Executive Director Joanne Bernard and the dedicated board of directors, staff, and volunteers of Alice Housing on the organization's 30th Anniversary and commitment to those whom they assist.

RESOLUTION NO. 976

By: Mr. Andrew Younger « » (Dartmouth East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on June 30, 2013, athletes from all over the world will run, swim, and bike all over Dartmouth in the most gruelling sporting event ever hosted in Eastern Canada; and

Whereas this year's Subaru EPIC Dartmouth will consist of four separate races - TERRA Dartmouth which is a duathlon of a 10.5- km run, 180- km bike ride, and another 31.5- km run; AQUA Dartmouth, a 3.8- km swim and 180- km bike ride; EPIC Dartmouth, a 3.8- swim, 180- km bike ride, and half marathon; and IRON Dartmouth incorporating the swim and bike portions, plus adding a full 42.2- km marathon to finish; and

Whereas EPIC Dartmouth will also feature an EPIC kids triathlon, Canadian-themed 5k/10k- run, and is anticipated to attract thousands of spectators to the Banook Lake area;

[Page 1630]

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate EPIC Race Director Tim Chesnutt for his dedication to bring such an event to Dartmouth, and wish him luck in his bid to bring Canada's National Triathlon Championship to our community.

RESOLUTION NO. 977

By: Mr. Leo Glavine « » (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lloyd Smith has been performing his duties as a town crier for the past 35 years in various towns and villages throughout the Annapolis Valley; and

Whereas Lloyd will be revealing his new town crier's uniform for the public on May 18th at the Kings-Edgehill Convocation in Windsor; and

Whereas Lloyd Smith is the longest-serving appointed town crier in Canada, and is a honorary lifetime member of the Ancient and Honourable Guild of the United Kingdom and the Nova Scotia Guild of Town Criers;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly recognize and congratulate Lloyd E. Smith for 35 years as the official town crier for Windsor and the honorary crier for Kings County, Hants County, Wolfville, New Minas, Kentville, and Kingston.

RESOLUTION NO. 978

By: Mr. Allan MacMaster « » (Inverness)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Dalbrae Dragons hockey team recently won the Nova Scotia School Athletic Federation Division 3 Boys Provincial Championship; and

Whereas they defeated Par-en-Bas Sharks 5 - 3 in the final game hosted on the Dragon's home ice, coming back from a 3 -1 deficit in the second period; and

Whereas the Dalbrae Dragons went undefeated in the tournament, and won both the Cape Breton West High School League and the Highland Regional Championship;

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Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Dalbrae Dragons Boys hockey team on their success, and recognize them for their achievements.

RESOLUTION NO. 979

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Chris Brown, a Springhill native, was chosen by Halifax radio station Q104 to represent the province in the national song writing competition Radio Star for his song The Record Collection; and

Whereas in the competition Chris is competing with song writers across the country for $10,000 cash, 30 hours of studio time at Metalworks Studio, $5,000 worth of national radio promotion, musical instruments and many more prizes; and

Whereas the residents of Springhill are very proud of Chris and are hoping that he is on his way to building his own record collection;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Chris Brown on this outstanding achievement and wish him continued success in the music industry.

RESOLUTION NO. 980

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sarah Colpitts was one of 13 outstanding Parrsboro citizens to receive the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals at a special event held at the Fundy Geological Museum on January 15th; and

Whereas Sarah was nominated for her outstanding community involvement and the many contributions Sarah has made to her town and community; and

Whereas the commemorative medal was created to mark the 60th Anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's accession to the throne as Queen of Canada and given to those who make outstanding contributions to their communities;

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Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sarah Colpitts on receiving this outstanding award and thank her for her contribution to her town and to the Province of Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 981

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bill Connors was one of 13 outstanding Parrsboro citizens to receive the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals at a special event held at the Fundy Geological Museum on January 15th; and

Whereas Bill was nominated for his outstanding community involvement and the many contributions he has made to his town and community; and

Whereas the commemorative medal was created to mark the 60th Anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's accession to the throne as Queen of Canada and given to those who make outstanding contributions to their communities;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Bill Connors on receiving this outstanding award and thank him for his contribution to his town and to the Province of Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 982

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kerwin Davison was one of 13 outstanding Parrsboro citizens to receive the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medals at a special event held at the Fundy Geological Museum on January 15th; and

Whereas Kerwin was nominated for his outstanding community involvement and the many contributions he has made to his town and community; and

Whereas the commemorative medal was created to mark the 60th Anniversary of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's accession to the throne as Queen of Canada and given to those who make outstanding contributions to their communities;

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Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Kerwin Davison on receiving this outstanding award and thank him for his contribution to his town and to the Province of Nova Scotia.

RESOLUTION NO. 983

By: Hon. Christopher D'Entremont « » (Argyle)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas "a new baby is like the beginning of all things – wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities," as quoted by author Eda J. LeShan; and

Whereas on March 12, 2013, a very special occasion took place when Haley and Francis Landry welcomed their daughter into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Haley and Francis on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 984

By: Hon. Christopher D'Entremont « » (Argyle)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas "a new baby is like the beginning of all things – wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities," as quoted by author Eda J. LeShan; and

Whereas on December 24, 2013, a very special occasion took place when Christine and Guy Rohland welcomed their daughter into the world;

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Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Christine and Guy on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 985

By: Hon. Christopher D'Entremont « » (Argyle)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the birth of a child is a momentous event and marks the beginning of a very satisfying journey down a long road, where the rewards far outnumber the challenges; and

Whereas "a new baby is like the beginning of all things – wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities," as quoted by author Eda J. LeShan; and

Whereas on January 28, 2013, a very special occasion took place when Cindy and Michel Surette welcomed their son into the world;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Cindy and Michel on this miraculous event in their lives and wish them many more happy years as parents.

RESOLUTION NO. 986

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas the Southeastern Community Health Board helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through their partnership with the event;

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Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner, Southeastern Community Health Board, and thank them for their service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 987

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas the Nova Scotia Department of Justice helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through their partnership with the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner, the Nova Scotia Department of Justice, and thank them for their service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 988

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

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Whereas District 3 Councillor, Bill Karsten, helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through his partnership with the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner Councillor, Bill Karsten, and thank him for his service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 989

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas the Atlantic Superstore - Portland Street, helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through their partnership with the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner the Atlantic Superstore - Portland Street, and thank them for their service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 990

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

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Whereas the RCMP Cole Harbour Detachment, helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through their partnership with the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner the RCMP Cole Harbour Detachment, and thank them for their service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 991

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Tim Hortons Eastern Passage helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through their partnership with the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner Tim Hortons Eastern Passage, and thank them for their service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 992

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

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Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas the Eastern Passage Lions Club helped bring this year's Seniors Academy to fruition, through their partnership with the event;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy partner Eastern Passage Lions Club, and thank them for their service in aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 993

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas the Mike Price expertly presented, on behalf of the Canadian Mental Health Association, on March 26th, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Mike Price and thank him for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 994

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By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Meghan Pike expertly presented, on behalf of the Canadian Cancer Society, on March 26th, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Meghan Pike and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 995

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Senior's Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Connie Vanberkal expertly presented, on behalf of the Victorian Order of Nurses, on April 2nd, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Connie Vanberkal, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

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RESOLUTION NO. 996

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Barby Brushett expertly presented, on behalf of the Canadian Diabetes Association, on April 30th, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Barby Brushett, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 997

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Nora Dickson expertly presented, on behalf of Physical Activity Nova Scotia, on April 9th, 2013;

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Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Nora Dickson, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 998

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Ian MacDonald expertly presented, on behalf of ABCs of Fraud, on April 9th, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Ian MacDonald, and thank him for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 999

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

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Whereas Noelle Deon expertly presented, on behalf of Sobeys, on April 16th, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Noelle Deon, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 1000

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Jan Roe expertly presented, on behalf of Pharmasave, on April 16th, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Jan Roe, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 1001

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

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Whereas Louanne Cooper expertly presented, on behalf of St. John Ambulance, on April 23rd, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Louanne Cooper, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 1002

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Susan Stevens expertly presented, on behalf of the Nova Scotia Department of Health, on April 23rd, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Susan Stevens, and thank her for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 1003

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

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Whereas Sgt. Scott MacDonald expertly presented on behalf of the Halifax Regional Police on April 30, 2013;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy presenter Sgt. Scott MacDonald, and thank him for aiding the health and safety of Nova Scotia's seniors.

RESOLUTION NO. 1004

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Ruby Arsenault received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Ruby Arsenault, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1005

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

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Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Judy Ayre received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Judy Ayre, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1006

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Llayne Ayre received their certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon their completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Llayne Ayre, and wish them many more years of health, safety, and vitality in their senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1007

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By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Lillian Barrett received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Lillian Barrett, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1008

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Barb Bennett received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Barb Bennett, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

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RESOLUTION NO. 1009

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Khorshed Bhathena received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Khorshed Bhathena, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1010

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Shapur Bhathena received his certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

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Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Shapur Bhathena, and wish him many more years of health, safety, and vitality in his senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1011

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Jean Davis received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Jean Davis, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1012

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course, where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

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Whereas Lorraine Eddy received her certificate from Constables Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Lorraine Eddy, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1013

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Elizabeth Fortin received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Elizabeth Fortin and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1014

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

[Page 1650]

Whereas Margaret Fox received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Margaret Fox and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1015

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Peter Gill received his certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon his completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Peter Gill and wish him many more years of health, safety, and vitality in his senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1016

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

[Page 1651]

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Elizabeth Gill received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Elizabeth Gill and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1017

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Ruby Gosbee received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Ruby Gosbee and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1018

[Page 1652]

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Victor Gosbee received his certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon his completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Victor Gosbee and wish him many more years of health, safety, and vitality in his senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1019

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Elsie Johnston received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Elsie Johnston and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

[Page 1653]

RESOLUTION NO. 1020

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Kay MacIntyre received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Kay MacIntyre and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1021

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Maureen McKinnon received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

[Page 1654]

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Maureen McKinnon and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1022

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Maxine Moffatt received her certificate from Constable Leppan and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Maxine Moffatt and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1023

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

[Page 1655]

Whereas Sharon Parkyn received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Sharon Parkyn, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1024

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Myrna Peachey received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Myrna Peachey, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1025

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

[Page 1656]

Whereas Patricia Penney received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Patricia Penney, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1026

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Garnetta Ramey received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Garnetta Ramey, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1027

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

[Page 1657]

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Ken Riles received his certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon his completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Ken Riles, and wish him many more years of health, safety, and vitality in his senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1028

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppan and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Rita Shore received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Rita Shore, and wish her many more years of health, safety, and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1029

[Page 1658]

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas John Simpson received his certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon his completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate John Simpson, and wish him many more years of health, safety and vitality in his senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1030

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Christine Thompson received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Christine Thompson, and wish her many more years of health, safety and vitality in her senior years.

[Page 1659]

RESOLUTION NO. 1031

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Robert Thompson received his certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon his completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Robert Thompson, and wish him many more years of health, safety and vitality in his senior years

.

RESOLUTION NO. 1032

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Colleen Van Den Heuvel received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

[Page 1660]

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Colleen Van Den Heuvel, and wish her many more years of health, safety and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1033

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Madonna William received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Madonna William, and wish her many more years of health, safety and vitality in her senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1034

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

[Page 1661]

Whereas Tom William received his certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon his completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Tom William, and wish him many more years of health, safety and vitality in his senior years.

RESOLUTION NO. 1035

By: Ms. Becky Kent « » (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eastern Passage RCMP Community Safety Office ran a successful and informative Seniors Academy at St. Andrew's Parish Hall, led by RCMP Constables Bart Leppen and Brenda Elson; and

Whereas after six consecutive Tuesdays, 32 registrants graduated from the course where different guest speakers educated attendees on all aspects of navigating their golden years by advising them of the many health care professionals and agencies available to assist seniors; and

Whereas Ina York received her certificate from Constables Leppen and Elson upon her completion of the course;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Seniors Academy graduate Ina York, and wish her many more years of health, safety and vitality in her senior years.