Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD12-47

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Gordon Gosse

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/



Fourth Session

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTSPAGE

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
URB - NSP: General Rate Application - Deny,
3586
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Human Resources Comm. - Anl. Rept.,
3586
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1948, Lepage, Dr. Véronique - Groupe Médical Ravines:
Recruitment - Congrats, Hon. D. Wilson »
3586
Vote - Affirmative
3587
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 127, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia Act,
3588
No. 128, Life-threatening Illness Student Support Act,
3588
No. 129, Liverpool United Baptist Church Cemetery Act,
3588
No. 130, Convention of Atlantic Baptist Churches Act,
3588
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1949, Hicks, Paul & Jan: Boston Christmas Tree
- Provision, Hon. C. Parker »
3588
Vote - Affirmative
3589
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1950, Prem. Power Rates/Wages Inaction: Hammonds Plains-
Upper Sackville MLA - Effects, Hon. Manning MacDonald »
3589
Res. 1951, C.B.-Richmond Fed. of Agriculture/Seaton Elem. Sch.:
Partnership - Congrats., Mr. E. Orrell »
3590
Vote - Affirmative
3590
Res. 1952, Oickle, Cathy: ALS Fundraising - Congrats.,
3591
Vote - Affirmative
3592
Res. 1953, Bay St. Lawrence - Food Bank Opening:
Fed. Conservatives/Prov. NDP - Actions, Hon. M. Samson »
3592
Res. 1954, C.B. Highlanders - Anniv. (141st),
3592
Vote - Affirmative
3593
Res. 1955, Cole Hbr. Comets Prog.: Vols./Coaches/Parents/Players
- Congrats., The Premier » (by Ms. B. Kent « » )
3593
Vote - Affirmative
3594
Res. 1956, Sperry, John Alan et al - Heroes Force: Design/Production
- Congrats., Hon. K. Casey « »
3594
Vote - Affirmative
3595
Res. 1957, Nova Scotia: Future - Plans,
3595
Res. 1958, Country Hbr. Commun. Ctr. & Multipurpose Facility:
Opening - Congrats., Mr. J. Boudreau »
3596
Vote - Affirmative
3596
Res. 1959, Barrett SSgt. Phil: Retirement - Congrats.,
3596
Vote - Affirmative
3597
Res. 1960, U.S. Hurricane Relief: Nova Scotians - Donate,
3597
Vote - Affirmative
3598
Res. 1961, O'Hearn, Melinda/Creative Cuts - Anniv. (20th),
3598
Vote - Affirmative
3598
Res. 1962, Norwood, Paul: Commun. Commitment - Congrats.,
3599
Vote - Affirmative
3599
Res. 1963, Margaree Highland Games: Vols. - Congrats.,
3599
Vote - Affirmative
3600
Res. 1964, Young St. Variety Store/Col. Commun. Workshop:
Opening - Congrats., Ms. L. Zann » (by Ms. V. Conrad « » )
3600
Vote - Affirmative
3601
Res. 1965, World Jr. A/Hockey Challenge: Organizers - Thank,
3601
Vote - Affirmative
3602
Res. 1966, Deveaux, Corey: Athletic Achievement - Congrats.,
3602
Vote - Affirmative
3602
Res. 1967, Lun. Dist. Mun. Coun.: Mayor/Councillors
- Election Congrats., Ms. V. Conrad « »
3603
Vote - Affirmative
3603
Res. 1968, Rossiter, Edith: Commun. Contributions - Recognize,
3603
Vote - Affirmative
3604
Res. 1969, MacKenzie, Graham: Pharmacist Award - Congrats.,
3604
Vote - Affirmative
3605
Res. 1970, MacLean, Margaret: N.S. Library Assoc. Award
- Congrats., Hon. C. Parker « »
3605
Vote - Affirmative
3605
Res. 1971, NDP: Economic Plan - Efficacy,
3606
Res. 1972, Armstrong, Bernadette - Ste. Anne's Church:
Organ Donation - Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont « »
3606
Vote - Affirmative
3608
Res. 1973, Lun. Co. Walk to Cure Diabetes: Vols./Participants
- Congrats., Ms. P. Birdsall »
3608
Vote - Affirmative
3608
Res. 1974, Bedford Titans Girls U-18 Tier 2 Soccer Team/Coach:
Victories - Congrats., Ms. K. Regan »
3608
Vote - Affirmative
3609
Res. 1975, Maillet, Brenda/Hicks, Colleen: Camp Récré Action
- Organizing Thank, Hon. W. Gaudet »
3609
Vote - Affirmative
3610
Res. 1976, Prem. - Power Rates/Wages Inaction: Halifax Fairview MLA
- Effects, Ms. D. Whalen »
3610
Res. 1977, Logie, Dave: Health Care System - Contribution,
3611
Vote - Affirmative
3611
Res. 1978, LeBlanc, Paul: Fire Serv. Long-Serv. Award (25 Yrs.)
- Congrats., Hon. W. Gaudet « »
3612
Vote - Affirmative
3612
Res. 1979, Grbac, Ms. Graziella - Main St. BID: Exec. Dir
- Appt., Mr. A. Younger »
3612
Vote - Affirmative
3613
Res. 1980, Creighton, Myles: Golf Achievements - Congrats.,
3613
Vote - Affirmative
3614
Res. 1981, Ritcey, Maddie: Fundraising - Congrats.,
3614
Vote - Affirmative
3614
Res. 1982, Salah, Anthony - Outstanding Lebanese Company of Yr. Award,
3615
Vote - Affirmative
3615
Res. 1983, Plaskett, Joel: Recording Studio - Congrats.,
3615
Vote - Affirmative
3616
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 399, ERDT - Gov't. Deals: Failures - Explain,
3616
No. 400, Prem. - Woodlands Purchase: Funds - Source,
3618
No. 401, ERDT - PROJEX: Payroll Rebates - Details,
3619
No. 402, ERDT - IBM Deal: Signing - Reasons,
3621
No. 403, ERDT - Corporate Welfare: Spending Spree - Cease,
3622
No. 404, ERDT - IBM: Confidentiality - Confirm,
3624
No. 405, ERDT: Jobs Plan - Failure Admit,
3625
No. 406, ERDT: Deals - Transparency,
3627
No. 407, ERDT: C.B. Dev. - Lack Admit,
3628
No. 408, Nat. Res. - Bowater Lands: Deal - Announcement,
3629
No. 409, Educ. - Special Needs Students: Stats - Table,
3631
No. 410, Justice - Taavel Fam.: Recommendations
- Consideration Confirm, Mr. A. MacMaster « »
3632
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 119, Cosmetology Act
3634
3636
3637
3637
3640
Vote - Affirmative
3640
No. 125, War Amps Key Tag Act
3640
3641
3641
3642
3644
3644
3645
Vote - Affirmative
3646
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE (5):
NDP: jobsHere Strategy - Rename,
3647
3650
3652
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Wed., Nov. 13th at 2:00 p.m
3655
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 1984, Campbell, Omer & Maude - Anniv. (50th),
3656
Res. 1985, West Kings HS Wolverines Hockey Team (2001-02):
Berwick Sports Hall of Fame - Induction, Mr. L. Glavine « »
3656
Res. 1986, Bullying Awareness Wk.: Importance
- Recognize, Hon. J. Baillie « »
3657
Res. 1987, Diwali - Celebrations: Best Wishes - Extend,
3657
Res. 1988, South Shore Health: Accreditation - Congrats.,
3658
Res. 1989, Legere, Jordon - Springhill HS Jr. Boys Athlete of Mo. (09/12),
3658
Res. 1990, Moore, Anna - Springhill HS Sr. Girls Athlete of Mo. (09/12),
3659

[Page 3585]

HALIFAX, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012

Sixty-first General Assembly

Fourth Session

2:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Gordon Gosse

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Ms. Becky Kent, Mr. Leo Glavine, Mr. Alfie MacLeod

MR. SPEAKER » : Order, please. Before we begin the daily routine, the subject matter has been chosen for late debate and I will now read it:

Therefore be it resolved that due to the increasing losses of full-time jobs in the province, the NDP's jobsHere strategy should be renamed part-time jobsHere.

It was submitted by the honourable member for Preston.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Kings West.

3585

MR. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition with the operative clause:

[Page 3586]

"Therefore, your petitioners call upon the Nova Scotia House of Assembly to use its powers over the Board of Commissioners of Public Utilities, the Nova Scotia Utility and Review Board (UARB) to deny any General Rate Application presented by NSPI requesting a rate increase in 2013, 2014 and 2015."

There are 100 signatures and I'll affix my name, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

MS. BECKY KENT « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise today to table the report of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, on behalf of the chairman. I'd like to present that to the House.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The report is tabled.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Health and Wellness.

RESOLUTION NO. 1948

HON. DAVID WILSON « » : M. le Président, à une date ultérieure, je demanderai l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu qu'il est important pour les Néo-Écossais de recevoir des soins de santé dans leur langue maternelle, dans la mesure du possible; et

Attendu que le Conseil communautaire du Grand-Havre et le Groupe médical Ravines ont travaillé avec diligence pour recruter un autre médecin francophone pour leur nouvelle clinique qui ouvrira ses portes en janvier; et

Attendu que la docteure Véronique Lepage sera le nouveau médecin à la clinique et accepte dès maintenant l'inscription de nouveaux patients;

Par conséquent, il est résolu que les membres de cette Assemblée félicitent la docteure Véronique Lepage, nouveau médecin du Groupe médical Ravines, lui souhaitent la bienvenue en Nouvelle-Écosse, et la félicitent pour son engagement à offrir des soins de santé améliorés aux Néo-Écossais francophones.

[Page 3587]

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas it's important for Nova Scotians to receive health care in their first language, wherever possible; and

Whereas le Conseil communautaire du Grand-Havre and le Groupe médical Ravines have worked diligently to recruit another francophone doctor to their new clinic opening in January; and

Whereas Dr. Véronique Lepage will be the new doctor at the clinic and is taking registration now for new francophone patients;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Dr. Véronique Lepage on becoming the new doctor for le Groupe médical Ravines, welcome her to Nova Scotia, and commend her commitment to providing better health care to francophone Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Communities, Culture and Heritage.

HON. LEONARD PREYRA « » : Mr. Speaker, before I introduce this bill, I wonder if I would be permitted to make a few introductions.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Most certainly.

MR. PREYRA « » : Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure to draw the House's attention to the east gallery where we are joined today by several special guests from the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. I would like to ask them to stand when I say their names: Mr. Mark Bursey is chair of the Board of Governors of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Mr. Robbie Shaw is a member of the Board of Governors of the Art Gallery and chairs the board's development committee, and Mr. Ray Cronin is the director of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. All three gentlemen are well-known in the arts community and are great supporters of the arts in general, but particularly of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. I would like all members of the House to extend a warm greeting to them. (Applause)

[Page 3588]

MR. SPEAKER « » : We welcome all our guests to the gallery and hope that they enjoy this afternoon's proceedings.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 127 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 22 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia Act. (Hon. Leonard Preyra)

Bill No. 128 - Entitled an Act to Support Students with Diabetes and Other Life-threatening Illnesses. (Hon. Karen Casey)

Bill No. 129 - Entitled an Act Respecting the Liverpool United Baptist Church Cemetery. (Ms. Vicki Conrad)

Bill No. 130 - Entitled an Act Respecting the Convention of Atlantic Baptist Churches. (Ms. Vicki Conrad)

MR. SPEAKER « » : Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT » : Mr. Speaker, with the indulgence of the House, could we revert to the order of business, Government Notices of Motion.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

RESOLUTION NO. 1949

HON. CHARLIE PARKER « » : Thank you Mr. Speaker, and I thank the honourable members for their indulgence. I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas each year since 1971, Nova Scotia sends Boston a large Christmas tree in gratitude for the help the Bostonians provided after the devastating Halifax Explosion of December 6, 1917; and

[Page 3589]

Whereas a beautiful 15-metre white spruce will be this year's gift from Nova Scotia to the American city as part of the yearly tradition now entering its fifth decade; and

Whereas this year's Nova Scotia tree for Boston was donated by Paul and Jane Hicks of Jordan Bay, Shelburne County, where the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture attended that event this morning;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House express our thanks to the Hicks family for providing this year's remarkable tree to represent Nova Scotia's gratitude to the City of Boston.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

RESOLUTION NO. 1950

HON. MANNING MACDONALD « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas since 2008, food bank usage is up more than 38 per cent in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas power rates have risen 25 per cent under this government's watch; and

Whereas this NDP Government agreed to hand over $590 million to six corporations only to watch them lay off 1,310 Nova Scotians, $245 million of that went to Bowater and Port Hawkesbury paper companies that slashed wages, rolled back benefits and left pensioners in the cold;

[Page 3590]

Therefore be it resolved that the member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville still supports the Premier's inaction on power rates and their failure to improve wages is hurting this province and the people in the riding of Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1951

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas students from Seton Elementary School in North Sydney were treated to locally grown food during a luncheon at Cape Breton-Richmond Agriculture Federation in October under the watchful eye of manager Maureen Murphy; and

Whereas the school is also partnering with the federation to grow its own garden in the Spring, connecting the students with their food source; and

Whereas it's great to be able to introduce children to the wonders of growing your own food and give them a better understanding of how hard farmers work to grow our food;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Cape Breton-Richmond Federation of Agriculture and their partnership with Seton Elementary School.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Education.

HON. RAMONA JENNEX « » : Before I bring forth my resolution may I have permission for an introduction.

[Page 3591]

MR. SPEAKER « » : Most certainly.

MS. JENNEX « » : Thank you very much. Today in our gallery we have Kathy Oikle and her daughter Carolyn Dominey. Kathy was diagnosed in April 2011 with ALS, or more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Kathy has previously worked as a CCA for 20 years before her diagnosis and after finding out that she had ALS Kathy did not let that get her down and with the help of her family and her friends, Kathy has embarked on a journey of education and awareness about ALS.

On September 9th, Kathy was at the helm at Kings County's first walk for ALS. I would like the members of this House of Assembly to give Kathy and her daughter Carolyn a very warm welcome to our Legislature. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER « » : We welcome all our guests to the gallery and hope that they enjoy this afternoon's proceedings.

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 1952

HON. RAMONA JENNEX « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kathy Oikle of Coldbrook, was responsible for organizing and participating in the first walk for ALS ever to have taken place in the Annapolis Valley; and

Whereas the efforts put forth by Kathy and those who supported her led to over $13,000 being donated to raise awareness and to fund research toward an eventual cure; and

Whereas Kathy has shown a dedication throughout her life and in her career to those who need assistance the most;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize the passion and dedication of this remarkable Nova Scotian, congratulate her for an incredible fundraising effort despite living with ALS and celebrate her remarkable contributions to ALS research and to a future with a cure.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 3592]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 1953

HON. MICHEL SAMSON « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas ongoing employment insurance investigations involving 11 fishing operations in northern Cape Breton has resulted in denial of benefits and ongoing undue hardship on the families living in Bay St. Lawrence; and

Whereas there's no greater sign of the impact of the investigations initiated by the federal Conservative Government than the opening of the Bay St. Lawrence Food Bank to ensure residents are able to feed themselves and their families while they wait; and

Whereas families interviewed indicated that while they tried to find employment to support their families, they were unable to do so due to a lack of jobs;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge that the actions of both the federal Conservatives and the provincial NDP are creating undue hardship for the residents of Bay St. Lawrence and one needs to look no further for proof than the opening of yet another food bank in our province.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 1954

MR. KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on October 13th, a ceremony commemorating the Cape Breton Highlanders was held at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 53 in Baddeck; and

Whereas since their inception on October 13th, 1871, the Cape Breton Highlanders have distinguished themselves at home and on the battlefields of the world through the two great wars and in Korea; and

[Page 3593]

Whereas a cairn and plaque, prepared and presented jointly by the County of Victoria, the Baddeck Village Commission, the Royal Canadian Legion and the Cape Breton Highlanders was unveiled to honour the 141st Anniversary of the Highlanders;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature join in recognizing the 141st Anniversary of the Cape Breton Highlanders and their distinguished service both in the past and the present.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 1955

MS. BECKY KENT « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the honourable Premier, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the community of Cole Harbour has long been known for its strong sports teams and organizations, particularly its women's softball teams under the Cole Harbour Comets program; and

Whereas this season was another great year for the Comets, with the groups Under 10, Under 12 and Under 14 teams finishing first in their respective provincial championships; and

Whereas the Under 12 team, coached by Joe Fitzharris, went undefeated during the provincial tournament and pulled out a nail-biting win in the championship game, taking Stellarton an extra inning to win 8-7;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House thank all of the volunteers, coaches and parents who dedicate their time to our young athletes and congratulate all of the players of the Cole Harbour Comets Under 10, Under 12, and Under 14 teams on an outstanding season and receiving top honours in the province.

[Page 3594]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1956

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Soldier On Fund supports serving Canadian Forces personnel and also former personnel and families of ill and injured members; and

Whereas John Alan Sperry, a freelance graphic designer from Valley, Colchester North, designed the three original toy solider action figures, the Heroes Force logo, the packaging of the dolls, and the tags included with the first 6,000 toys; and

Whereas Sperry and several other individuals in other parts of Canada were also involved in the action figure project and presented a cheque for $6,600 to representatives of the Soldier On Fund;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate and thank John Alan Sperry and all those involved with the design, production, and sale of the action figures, which will help provide for those who have volunteered so much for our country and our citizens.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3595]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Argyle.

RESOLUTION NO. 1957

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas there are 5,500 fewer full-time jobs in Nova Scotia today than there were three years ago; and

Whereas 6,100 jobs have disappeared from the South Shore since the NDP became government; and

Whereas the unemployment roll grew even larger with news that the Colony Restaurant and Chowder House will close its doors in the new year;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly agree that the better way forward for our province is a balanced budget, lower taxes, power rates that fit with what consumers and businesses can afford, and labour laws that encourage investment and growth.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Sheet Harbour.

RESOLUTION NO. 1958

[Page 3596]

MR. JIM BOUDREAU « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas September 30, 2012 marked the day the Country Harbour Community Centre and multi-purpose facility was officially opened; and

Whereas the site of the new Country Harbour Community Center and multi-purpose facility is on the site of the old school, which has a strong local attachment; and

Whereas the community, along with funding through both local and government partners, erected a new community centre and playground facility for use by its residents and guests;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate the residents of Country Harbour on the successful opening of the Country Harbour Community Center and multi-purpose facility and wish them every success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 1959

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in early October, Staff Sergeant Phil Barrett decided to retire after 41 years of service; and

Whereas like all Mounties, Barrett's career began at the depot in Regina, with posts in Ontario, British Columbia, the Yukon, and finally Digby, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Barrett's career has also led him to spend 21 years in plainclothes, investigating major crimes and even working with the U.S. Secret Service, coordinating motorcade visits from Halifax;

[Page 3597]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Staff Sergeant Phil Barrett on his outstanding career and wish him many enjoyable retirement years ahead.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1960

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the honourable member for Cape Breton West, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the New York-New Jersey area was battered by Hurricane Sandy, leaving 8.5 million people without power and tragically taking the lives of more than 100 people in 10 states; and

Whereas the storm damaged and destroyed the homes of thousands of families; and

Whereas the shortage of gas is hampering restoration efforts and causing rationing and long lines at service stations;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly urge all Nova Scotians to open their hearts and donate anything they can to hurricane relief efforts in the United States as our neighbours to the south begin to rebuild after the storm.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3598]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 1961

MS. BECKY KENT « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Creative Cuts in Cole Harbour, owned by Melinda O'Hearn, recently celebrated its 20th Anniversary; and

Whereas Creative Cuts has become one of the most popular salons in the area, presently employing eight stylists, two aestheticians, and one nail technician, making the small business a viable employer; and

Whereas Melinda began with modest beginnings and admirably developed this salon into a location serving a dedicated and growing clientele over the last 20 years;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Melinda O'Hearn and her salon, Creative Cuts, in Cole Harbour for not only 20 years of service to the local small-business community, but also providing a successful business example for others.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 1962

[Page 3599]

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Paul Norwood, a resident of Lake Echo, has lived and worked in and around his community all of his life; and

Whereas he has donated countless hours of his time and equipment to the Lake Echo Playground, and has provided support in the community to many individuals; and

Whereas Paul was responsible for the milling of trees that were downed from Hurricane Juan to use for a picnic shelter in the Lake Echo Playground, which he constructed by himself on his own time;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House join me in recognizing Paul Norwood's contribution to the community and especially to the children of Lake Echo.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 1963

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 12th, the first Highland Fun Day drew 600 visitors to Margaree for the Highland Games, a fundraiser for St. Michael's Church; and

Whereas many volunteers, specifically Adele LeBlanc, Audrey LeBlanc, and Chris McDaniel, contributed to the success of the day through event planning, bake sales, dances, and children's activities; and

Whereas Father Doug MacDonald, who has been a world-class competitor on the professional Highland Games circuit before his ordination, was happy to participate with top athletes from all over the Maritimes in this first Margaree Highland Games;

[Page 3600]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly acknowledge the hard work and dedication put forth by all volunteers in organizing the 2012 Margaree Highland Games.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 1964

MS. VICKI CONRAD « » : Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the member for Truro-Bible Hill, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Colchester Community Workshop first opened its doors in the 1960s and has undergone tremendous expansion and development since that time to now include services to approximately 70 adults with intellectual disabilities, teaching them life and employment skills; and

Whereas the Colchester Community Workshop, after a successful fundraising campaign, moved into the new Rotary House building in 2005, expanding programs to include the Intercolonial Café, a larger New to You second-hand clothing store, making a total of nine programs available for clients; and

Whereas the Colchester Community Workshop recently opened their newest venture, the Young Street Variety store, and celebrated their official grand opening on October 27, 2012, providing a new range of employment opportunities for clients;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature thank the Colchester Community Workshop for all of its hard work, the success of their programs, and on the grand opening of their most recent business venture, Young Street Variety.

[Page 3601]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Yarmouth.

RESOLUTION NO. 1965

MR. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas after nearly two years of planning the Yarmouth Mariners Centre was the site of the World Junior A Challenge, which took place from November 5th to November 11th; and

Whereas teams from all over the world, including the Czech Republic, Russia, Switzerland, the United States, and from all over Canada, enjoyed the famous warmth and hospitality of Yarmouth and surrounding area; and

Whereas the tournament was called the best-ever World Junior A Challenge by Hockey Canada board chair Mike Bruni;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly recognize and thank the host committee, the countless volunteers, and the management and staff of the Yarmouth Mariners Centre for their incredible hard work in putting together and hosting such a successful event and showcasing the hospitality of Yarmouth, which is receiving international praise.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3602]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1966

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Corey Deveaux placed 44th out of 2,500 competitors at the Ironman Mount Tremblant competition in Quebec; and

Whereas the 20-year-old Little Bras d'Or teacher has now qualified for the 34th Annual Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, where only the top 1,800 athletes worldwide qualify to compete; and

Whereas Corey has been a member of the Cape Breton Barbarians triathlon group for the past two years and has come a very long way in this sport;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Corey Deveaux on his athletic achievement and wish him every success in Hawaii this Fall.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 1967

[Page 3603]

MS. VICKI CONRAD « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg is the third-largest rural municipality in terms of total property assessment in the Province of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas in October of this year the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg saw 25 people put their names forth in the municipal election, including Lee Nauss of District 10 and Eric Hustvedt of District 12; and

Whereas the new council, consisting of mayor and 12 councillors, will represent the best interests of the residents of the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg for the next four years;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly congratulate Mayor Don Downe and Councillors Lee Nauss and Eric Hustvedt on their election to the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg municipal council.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 1968

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Edith Rossiter was born and raised in Jollimore, Nova Scotia, and lived and worked in Halifax until 1975, when she and her family moved to Chezzetcook, Nova Scotia, while working at the Dartmouth Police, the Department of Finance, and the Registry of Motor Vehicles; and

Whereas she was very involved within her community, as well as the City of Dartmouth, as she distributed food to various church organizations and Hope Cottage; and

[Page 3604]

Whereas in the mid-1990s the MLA for the area saw the need for a food bank in the community and together they worked to organize what is known as the Chezzetcook Food Bank, which now supports over 70 families, thanks in part to Feed Nova Scotia and generous donations from the public, the churches, and the local supermarket;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House recognize Edith Rossiter for the contributions she has made to her community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 1969

MR. KEITH BAIN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Graham MacKenzie, owner of Stone's Pharmasave in Baddeck, was recently presented the Takeda Magnum Opus Award 2012 for significant education in a particular area to further the pharmacy practice; and

Whereas the award recognized Graham's education to further his knowledge in nutraceutical, anti-aging and preventive therapies, and much more; and

Whereas Graham was the Nova Scotia winner of the award;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize Graham MacKenzie's achievements and thank him for his contribution to the betterment of the health of residents of Victoria County.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 3605]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

RESOLUTION NO. 1970

HON. CHARLIE PARKER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Margaret MacLean, a library assistant at the River John Library in Pictou County has received the Emile Theriault Library and Information Award from the Nova Scotia Library Association at their annual conference in September; and

Whereas this award is made to a library staff member who has made a significant contribution to her library community; and

Whereas Margaret MacLean has worked at the River John Library and has helped many people with their reading and educational issues, as well as their information technology needs, for 25 years;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Margaret MacLean on receiving the Emile Theriault Library and Information Award from the Nova Scotia Library Association, and thank her for her time and dedication to the River John Library and the River John community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

[Page 3606]

RESOLUTION NO. 1971

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Village of Tatamagouche has opened its first-ever food bank; and

Whereas the growth of food banks in our province is a sign of a poor economy coupled with intense cost pressures facing families and individuals in not only Tatamagouche but throughout Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the high cost of gasoline, seasonal unemployment and the high number of minimum wage jobs were factors which contributed to the opening of the Tatamagouche Food Bank;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly acknowledge that the NDP's plan to fix the economy and make life more affordable for Nova Scotia families is not working, and no one needs to look further for proof than the opening of yet another food bank in our province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Argyle.

RESOLUTION NO. 1972

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : M. le Président, à une date ultérieure, je demanderai l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que le 15 août 2012, lors de la messe de l'Assomption de la Vierge Marie à Sainte Anne-du-Ruisseau, une consécration très spéciale a eu lieu lorsque Monseigneur Gérald LeBlanc a présidé à la bénédiction d'un nouvel orgue pour l'église; et

Attendu que Bernadette Armstrong de Tusket, anciennement de Belleville, a fait le don généreux de l'orgue à l'église Sainte-Anne en mémoire de son mari décédé Paul Armstrong; et

[Page 3607]

Attendu que Bernadette Armstrong est une enseignante à la retraite, une mère de six enfants qui a vécu dans la paroisse toute sa vie et s'est dévouée à sa famille d'église ayant fait partie de la chorale de l'église ainsi étant une directrice musicale des messes dominicales pendant de nombreuses années;

Par conséquent, qu'il soit résolu que tous les membres de cette Assemblée félicitent l'Église Sainte-Anne d'avoir acquis leur nouvel orgue, remercient Bernadette Armstrong pour son généreux don, son dévouement à sa paroisse et lui souhaitent la bonne santé continue.

M. le Président, je demande l'adoption de cette résolution sans préavis et sans débat.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 15, 2012 at the Mass of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary in Sainte Anne-du-Ruisseau, a very special dedication took place when Monseigneur Gerald LeBlanc presided over the blessing of a new organ for the church; and

Whereas Bernadette Armstrong of Tusket, formerly of Belleville, generously donated the organ to Sainte Anne's Church in memory of her late husband, Paul Armstrong; and

Whereas Bernadette Armstrong is a retired school teacher, a mother of six children who has lived in the parish her whole life and dedicated herself to her church family, having been part of the church choir as well as a musical director at Sunday masses for many years;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sainte Anne's Church on acquiring their new organ and thank Bernadette Armstrong for her generous donation, her dedication to the parish, and wish her continued good health.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 3608]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

RESOLUTION NO. 1973

MS. PAM BIRDSALL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Walk to Cure Diabetes made a return to Lunenburg County on September 30th at the MARC in Dayspring; and

Whereas the fundraising goal this year was to raise $10,000, part of the Diabetes Foundation's goal of raising $200,000 province-wide; and

Whereas this year's Walk Ambassadors were Stephen Strum and Nathan Rechnitzer of Bridgewater, who helped the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation to meet their fundraising goal with 85 per cent of the funds going directly to diabetes research;

Therefore be it resolved this House of Assembly recognize the Lunenburg County Walk to Cure Diabetes event held in Dayspring on September 30th and commend all volunteers and participants for their efforts.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 1974

MS. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the U-18 Tier 2 Girls Bedford Titans Soccer Team rose to the challenge of competition in the 2011-12 soccer season, garnering not one but two significant championship titles; and

[Page 3609]

Whereas throughout the 2011-12 season, this team of young women juggled their individual responsibilities while learning as a team to co-operate, persist and focus on their competitive goals, and are described by their coach Mike MacLean as articulate, well organized and respectful; and

Whereas the U-18 Tier 2 Girls Bedford Titan Soccer Team first claimed the Capital Inter-district Soccer League title on August 18, 2012, beating out seven other teams from HRM and, unwavering, came back just one week later to take the Nova Scotia Provincial Title 3-2 over the Highland and Cape Breton Northern Nova Falcons;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate all members of the U-18 Tier 2 Girls Bedford Titans Soccer Team on their victories and their coach Mike MacLean, who believes these young women will one day apply the good character they have shown in competition to their chosen paths in life.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 1975

HON. WAYNE GAUDET « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Clare Organization Representing Persons with Disabilities (CORD) launched the 2012 Camp Récré Action Summer Camp this past summer; and

Whereas disabled youth from ages 15 to 29 who may have difficulty qualifying for other programs, or may just not have an interest in other programs, participated in this special summer camp pilot program; and

Whereas the community of Clare was exceptionally supportive of this special summer camp organized for our disabled youth;

[Page 3610]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly thank volunteer coordinator Brenda Maillet and volunteer assistant coordinator Colleen Hicks for making sure that everyone who participated in this summer camp had fun and made sure that everyone was well taken care of, and wish them continued success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 1976

MS. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas since 2008, food bank usage is up more than 38 per cent in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas power rates have risen 25 per cent under this government's watch; and

Whereas this NDP Government agreed to hand over $590 million to six corporations, only to watch them lay off 1,310 Nova Scotians and $245 million of that went to Bowater and Port Hawkesbury paper companies that slashed wages, rolled back benefits, and left pensioners in the cold;

Therefore be it resolved that the member for Halifax Fairview still supports the Premier's inaction on power rates and their failure to improve wages is hurting this province and the people in the riding of Halifax Fairview.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3611]

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1977

MR. LEO GLAVINE « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas David Logie was appointed to the Western Regional Health Board in 1996 and was appointed District Health Authority Chair for Annapolis and Kings County in 2000; and

Whereas David became engaged in the Corpus Sanchez provincial health services operational review, which was reflective of his dedication to strengthen not only the Annapolis Valley District Health Authority but our provincial system; and

Whereas David Logie served his community for 12 years in this important leadership role and constantly presented the need for human resources and more mental health and addiction services;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly express gratitude for Mr. David Logie's contribution to a health care system that is nationally recognized for its excellence.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 1978

[Page 3612]

HON. WAYNE GAUDET « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas local volunteer firefighters provide a vital and outstanding service throughout rural Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Paul LeBlanc will be recognized for his dedication and service beyond the call of duty in helping preserve the security of our community; and

Whereas Paul LeBlanc will be recognized on November 24, 2012, by the Little Brook Volunteer Fire Department for his 25 years of dedicated service;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate firefighter Paul LeBlanc for receiving the Fire Service Long Service Award for his 25 years of service to his community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 1979

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Main Street Business Improvement District Association was incorporated in July 2008; and

Whereas the Main Street Business Improvement District Association has a mandate of working with all area businesses to raise the quality of experience for investors, business owners, residents, and visitors to the Main Street area; and

Whereas Graziella Grbac was recently appointed as the new executive director of the Main Street Business Improvement District;

[Page 3613]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Graziella Grbac on her new role supporting businesses of Dartmouth's Main Street area.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 1980

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Myles Creighton of Digby, Nova Scotia, has captured his third straight Player of the Year title from the Nova Scotia Golf Association; and

Whereas Myles walked away with this year's title after finishing the season with 197 points; and

Whereas highlights of Creighton's season included winning the Avon Valley Invitational and third-place finishes at the Ashburn Invitational and the Sam Thibeault, and he also tied for fourth at the Abercrombie Invitational and the Subway Invitational at Ken-Wo;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Myles Creighton for his exceptional achievements in the sport of golf and wish him all the best in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 3614]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 1981

MS. KELLY REGAN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 11-year-old Maddie Ritcey of Bedford, who lost her grandfather to Alzheimer's, decided to take action to fight the disease; and

Whereas Maddie Ritcey spent her spare time baking and selling muffins, cookies, and cupcakes in order to raise money for research into Alzheimer's disease; and

Whereas Maddie Ritcey, through her own motivation and generosity, raised $500 and even donated her birthday gift money to the work of the Alzheimer's Society;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Maddie Ritcey for doing her part to contribute to a worthy cause.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 1982

[Page 3615]

MS. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on May 17, 2012, the Canadian Lebanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry hosted the 5th Annual Cedar and Maple Gala; and

Whereas MacDonell Welding and Metal Working Limited, owned by Anthony Salah, was honoured at the event with the award for Outstanding Lebanese Company of the Year; and

Whereas since buying the company in 1996, Anthony Salah has worked tirelessly to build the company up and has faced major challenges and successfully transformed the company into a construction firm;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Anthony Salah on receiving the Outstanding Lebanese Company of the Year Award for his successful company, MacDonell Welding and Metal Working Limited.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 1983

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Joel Plaskett is a Lunenburg-born, Dartmouth resident whose music with his band, Emergency, defies categorization by being folk, pop, and rock, all at once; and

Whereas Mr. Plaskett, who immortalized the Dartmouth Ferry in song, owns his own independent record label, New Scotland Records; and

Whereas Mr. Plaskett has recently purchased a property on lower Portland Street where he plans to open a new recording studio;

[Page 3616]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly congratulate Mr. Plaskett on the construction of his new studio, and recognize him for his commitment to the downtown Dartmouth area he calls home.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER « » : There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The time is now 2:57 p.m., we will finish at 3:57 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

ERDT - GOV'T. DEALS: FAILURES - EXPLAIN

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, this government has a bad habit of over-promising, over-hyping, and under-delivering when it comes to job announcements. We've heard this government say 500 jobs at DSTN; 11,000 at Irving; 2,000 at Bowater; 1,400 in Port Hawkesbury; and 280 at Scanwood. That's 15,180 jobs promised, and what have we got from those five deals, Mr. Speaker? More than 1,300 layoffs.

Mr. Speaker, my question for the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism is, five deals that were supposed to create 15,180 jobs have resulted in 1,300 pink slips - why have so many government deals gone bad?

HON. PERCY PARIS » : Mr. Speaker, unfortunately the Leader of the Official Opposition is fabricating some of the numbers - that is simply not true. Last week alone all Nova Scotians had cause to celebrate - we created nearly 1,000 jobs in the Province of Nova Scotia. That's a reason for all Nova Scotians to be proud. The only ones who aren't proud are the job-killers sitting on the opposite side of the House.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. I'd remind the honourable member that "fabricating some of the numbers" is a little bit questionable around unparliamentary, so I'd ask the honourable member to retract that, please - "fabricating."

[Page 3617]

MR. PARIS « » : I will take that back, Mr. Speaker, and I'll substitute "simply not true."

MR. SPEAKER « » : That's fine; that's fine.

MR. MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, $590 million for 1,300 pink slips - talk about job-killers.

There are now more Nova Scotians unemployed than during the recession. We've lost more than 3,000 full-time jobs since the NDP have taken office, and youth unemployment is up 20 per cent. The only comfort this government has offered to 46,200 unemployed Nova Scotians is that jobs will come soon.

Mr. Speaker, people are getting tired of this government's pointing to tomorrow; they are suffering today. So my question for the minister is, why has the minister's job strategy only created part-time jobs in the Province of Nova Scotia?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, through the Leader of the Official Opposition's own admission, one of the problems when we had a Liberal Government in the Province of Nova Scotia was they did not plan for the future - a huge difference between then and now. We are planning for the future.

MR. MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, that future seems like writing big cheques, no job guarantees and a lot of part-time work for Nova Scotians. Too many Nova Scotians are struggling to make ends meet. Our taxes are the highest in the country. The Premier says elect me and I'll fix that. Power rates are the highest in the country. The Premier says elect me again and I'll fix that too. Over the last three years our economy had the worst economic growth in Canada and again, the Premier says things will get better after the next election. This government's economic development strategy has failed and Nova Scotians are suffering now, today. My question for the minister, when will the government admit jobsHere is a failed strategy and when will they go back to the drawing board?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I can stand in my place and I can say, do you know who has failed Nova Scotians? I know who has failed Nova Scotians and it is sitting on the opposite side of the House.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

PREM. - WOODLANDS PURCHASE: FUNDS - SOURCE

[Page 3618]

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, today it is being reported that the government is considering buying up to 550,000 acres of woodlands, woodlands that as recently as June had an estimated value of $120 million. That is $120 million that could end up in the pockets of Resolute Forest Products Limited and so my question to the Premier is a simple one, where will the Premier find the money for such a large purchase?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, as I pointed out in the past there are certainly negotiations going on with Resolute. The question that is before us is not where the money will come from but what will happen to 550,000 acres of forest land in our province in southwestern Nova Scotia. Now, perhaps, it would be the desire of the members opposite to have to fall into the hands of a foreign company and have it stripped out and sent offshore without processing but if that is the desire of the Progressive Conservative Party of Nova Scotia, just let the people of southwest Nova Scotia know.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, here we go again. Just like Muskrat Falls where the Premier says the cost is not the issue, he now believes that with a $120 million purchase of land, the cost is not an issue either. For the taxpayers of Nova Scotia the cost of that land, just like Muskrat Falls, certainly is an issue for them. Like Muskrat Falls the Premier is plunging down this expensive road without even considering the other options that are available to him because we can all share the goal of protecting that land, of making sure it is available to future generations of Nova Scotians, of making sure it is used in a responsible way. Purchasing is not the only option. There are many other ways of accomplishing that same objective that don't require another $100 million of debt.

So my question to the Premier is, has he looked at other options for accomplishing that same objective that don't involve adding another $100 million to our debt and will he table them in the House today if he has?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, of course there has been a full examination of the assets of the company including, as I said, the 550,000 acres of Nova Scotia woodlands that would be up for sale to foreign companies and then we would be hostage to whoever that potential purchaser might be. This, in fact, has been the way that things have been done in the past and I say to the House of Assembly, I say to the people of southwestern Nova Scotia, I say to Nova Scotians that we are sick and tired of watching the future of Nova Scotia being sold off to foreign interest, and that day is over.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, what Nova Scotians are sick and tired of is a government that thinks the answer to every problem is to write a gigantic, great big cheque with their money - that is what they are sick and tired of. They are also sick and tired of a Premier who commits them to massive expenditures of money without looking at all his options.

The fact of the matter is, Mr. Speaker, in this House of Assembly we can decide to put that land to its highest and best use for all Nova Scotians without writing a big cheque. So my question to the Premier is, will he look at the other options and bring them here for all Nova Scotians to see, instead of giving another $100 million to Resolute Forest Products?

[Page 3619]

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, I would remind the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party that that land, not only is it a resource that will generate every year stumpage, not only is it land that will be used for recreation for generations of Nova Scotians to come, but it is also about the future of the forestry sector.

Now back on August 27th - I'd like to table this - the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party, in an interview with CKBW, said 5,000 acres of prime Acadian forests are up for sale and the government has no plan for that. I am one of those people who believes it would be a real shame if all that land were to fall into the foreign hands who have no interest in long-term sustainability for our province, for our forests. (Interruptions)

We thought we knew where he stood, but apparently we don't.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

ERDT - PROJEX: PAYROLL REBATES - DETAILS

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, this government signed a deal with PROJEX to subsidize one business in a successful industry. The government promised this would create 440 jobs over five years - we've heard this before; the government promised 500 jobs over five years with DSTN. This government committed up to $11.4 million in payroll rebates to this company. What is not clear is if the company will receive rebates for employees poached from other Nova Scotia businesses.

So my question for the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism, a job poached is not a job created - will PROJEX receive payroll rebates for employees taken from other Nova Scotia employers?

HON. PERCY PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, for years we've stood in this House and we've heard complaints about out-migration. Even when we were in Opposition we had some concerns about out-migration.

Mr. Speaker, we have an opportunity here with PROJEX. This was a Calgary-based firm. What we are simply doing is the reverse of a trend that was employed by a previous government - we are bringing Calgary to Halifax; that's what we're doing.

MR. MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, I wonder if he believes what they write for him; it's hard to believe at some point some of the stuff that comes out of that minister.

Mr. Speaker, the government is wading into a thriving industry to grab headlines without considering the impacts. Even in tough economic times this industry has grown and companies that already had a presence in Nova Scotia are growing. The government picked one company over all of them - this government is trying to pick winners and losers without consulting the industry.

[Page 3620]

My question for the minister is, why did this government give $11.6 million to one company in an already thriving industry, without consulting those other players?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, this idea that we've got Calgary finally coming to Nova Scotia is going to give an opportunity for those Nova Scotians who are graduating from our universities to stay right here in the Province of Nova Scotia; also, it's going to give an opportunity for those Nova Scotians who are out West to come back home.

Mr. Speaker, chambers of commerce promote this activity. I've got to say - and someone in this House doesn't understand it and those individuals aren't sitting on this side of the House - payroll rebates are paid in arrears, they are paid out as job numbers are achieved. This is a way of doing business. We've done business for the good citizens of the Province of Nova Scotia - not only that, we have to go around and fix some of things that that Leader over there is trying to undo.

MR. MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, I hope those graduates the minister is referring to aren't like those employees that he promised jobs at DSTN; I hope they are not like the 1,400 people in the Strait area who were looking for work that this government promised, which is evaporating; I hope they are not like the 500 people in the South Shore whose jobs not only vanished but Nova Scotia taxpayer dollars went to Quebec to invest in a paper mill - that is what Nova Scotians are getting from this government.

Now what we have is a government taking tax dollars out of Nova Scotia companies and handing it over to a company from Calgary to compete directly against them for employment - that's the kind of economic development we have out of this speaker. Think about that for just a second, Mr. Speaker, hard-working Nova Scotians who have been building an industry, building an economy in the Province of Nova Scotia have their government turn around, take their tax dollars and give it to a firm in Calgary to compete directly against them, to take their employees. Those aren't jobs being created - those are jobs being poached from hard-working Nova Scotian firms.

My question to the minister is, why would the minister be so eager to invest in a Calgary firm instead of supporting hard-working Nova Scotian entrepreneurs?

MR. PARIS « » : What this government is about is about creating jobs. I know that may be a foreign concept to members on the other side of the House. I'm going to read, and I'm going table this. This is written by Scott Richards who is president at Atlantic Region Projects: "Not one employee of Projex left their previous employer based on government support of Projex, because there hasn't been any government support in our . . ." first operation here in the Province of Nova Scotia.

[Page 3621]

I'm going to table this, and what this does is it outlines a company that believes in Nova Scotia - a company from Calgary believes in Nova Scotia unlike those members over there.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Glace Bay.

ERDT - IBM DEAL: SIGNING - REASONS

MR. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : This government says its deal with IBM will bring hundreds of good-paying jobs to Nova Scotia - and certainly we've heard that before. Governments in Queensland, New York, and Iowa, have heard that as well - in fact, IBM has a history of taking government money and failing to meet job targets.

My question for the Economic and Rural Development and Tourism Minister is, why did this government sign a deal to make job promises with a company that has such a poor track record of meeting its obligations?

HON. PERCY PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, what the Opposition doesn't understand, which we understand fully, and Nova Scotians understand - with a company like IBM coming to the Province of Nova Scotia it is going to attract other companies. I can't understand for the life of me why somebody would be against a progressive company, 500 jobs, Mr. Speaker. Now that may not mean a whole lot to the Liberals, but I can tell you right now it means a heck of a lot to Nova Scotians.

MR. MACLELLAN « » : I can tell the minister that any single corporation of these large corporations that we've given money to, they'll all return and come to Nova Scotia for $100 million of taxpayers' money, any day of the week. (Applause) In fact, Mr. Speaker, IBM does have a history of serious, serious cost overruns. A deal between London's Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency and IBM promised $57 million in savings - instead it saw overruns to the tune of $81 million. Given this government's program cuts and increasing deficit, we certainly cannot afford such a fiasco. The government already cut $65 million from education and $100 million from universities. My question to the minister is, what measures are part of the deal with IBM to recoup such cost overruns so students in Nova Scotia don't pay for the mistakes of the world's ninth-largest corporation?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, again, it's hard when you're asked questions and people just can't grasp the - they don't understand. Payroll rebates are paid in arrears. Once you reach the milestone, as it's recognized, it's done by an external audit. One of the things these 500 jobs, these 500 IT jobs - which is a growing sector here in the Province of Nova Scotia - will provide employment for new graduates, for recent graduates from our institutions.

I can't for the life of me understand why the Liberal Party would be complaining about these jobs. Jobs for good Nova Scotians so they can stay here in Nova Scotia, so they can come back home to Nova Scotia, so they can raise their families here in the Province of Nova Scotia. That's 500 jobs.

[Page 3622]

MR. MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, this contract, of course, was untendered so we don't even know what kind of investigation was done before this decision was made. If the government had investigated, it would have learned of the Queensland experience. Queensland decided to use IBM to create a new payroll platform involving SAP and the result - the agreement has been called a debacle and it will cost at least $1.2 million or more to repair the faulty system by 2017. My question to the minister is, when it comes time to pay for these cost overruns, who will the government side with - students and their families or the ninth-largest corporation in the world?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I'll break this down and make it a little bit more simple. With IBM, what we're going to have - just listen up now - what you have is $50 million in payrolls. Do you know what that means to Nova Scotia? Do you know what that means? It's going to mean not only more jobs, not only more Nova Scotians staying here, it's going to mean more money for education. It's going to mean more money for health, it's going to be more money for our roads, more money for community services. This is a sensible thing to do but only a government with a vision would realize that.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

ERDT - CORPORATE WELFARE: SPENDING SPREE - CEASE

HON. JAMIE BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, over the last three years since that bunch has been in, 7,400 Nova Scotians have lost their full-time jobs. In the interest of accuracy, I will table the report from Statistics Canada that shows just that - 7,400 fewer full-time jobs. During that same three years in the rest of Canada, the number of full-time jobs has increased by 688,400; the rest of Canada up 688,400. I'll table that in the interest of accuracy here in this House.

Clearly, spending $0.5 billion on corporate welfare is not working for job creation in Nova Scotia when jobs here go down while jobs go up in the rest of the country. My question to the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism is, will he now abandon his corporate welfare spending spree since it is so clearly not working?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, if it wasn't so pathetic, it would be laughable. The simple fact of the matter is that Nova Scotia Business Inc. - which of course was instituted originally through the Progressive Conservative Government of Dr. Hamm - over the years has operated to work to recruit business into the province.

In fact, I would point out to the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party, a company like RIM which came to Nova Scotia - we're very happy to have them, 500 jobs - the simple fact of the matter is that they have had less people working now but what that means is that they recover less in the way of payroll rebates because the rebates are actually tied to the jobs and this means that these companies are essentially paid out of the money that they pay in payroll. So they get some of their own money back and the balance of that goes to the people of Nova Scotia, as was pointed out by the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism. It goes into new roads; it goes into payments for community services; it goes into health care, and it goes into education - some of the $90 million that we have put into student assistance in the last number of years.

[Page 3623]

MR. BAILLIE « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm interested in the Premier's answer, I'm just not sure whose question he was answering because that had nothing to do with my question to the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism about why 7,400 full-time jobs have disappeared in Nova Scotia while the rest of Canada has been going up in full-time jobs.

But, of course, that's not the end of the story - 2011 was one of the worst years in Nova Scotia history for outmigration, the worst year, in fact, in at least the last 25. At the same time our economy, our GDP, went from the third best in the country, when the NDP came in, to one of the worst in the country, and I will table that report from Statistics Canada - again, Mr. Speaker, in the interest of accuracy.

It appears that the only mess the NDP are trying to clean up is one of their own making and so now my question to the minister, or whoever over there wants to try an answer to it. Will they now, in the light of this evidence, stop their expensive, corporate welfare spending spree and actually get on with the job of creating a few jobs in the province?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, just so we understand, the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party is dead wrong on all of those counts. First of all there are 7,600 more jobs in Nova Scotia today than there were at the pre-recession peak. That is the first thing. The second thing is that the worst years for outmigration in this province's history were 2004-05, 2005-06, 2006-07, when the Progressive Conservative Party was in charge of the province. Fortunately, we have put an end to that.

MR. BAILLIE « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, apparently it is unparliamentary to say that someone is making something up but perhaps it is not unparliamentary to actually invent your own statistics when you are answering a question because that is what we have just seen happen in this House.

But, Mr. Speaker, I will go on because in addition to the job losses, which are measured by Statistics Canada, and in addition to the outmigration, which is measured by Statistics Canada, I have another report on Nova Scotia's exports over the last three years and, guess what? They are down the most in all of Canada - over 16 per cent. Whether it's natural gas, whether it's lobsters, whether it's paper, whether it's anything else, the worst performance in the country and I will table that report. I hope the Premier takes the time to look at what Statistics Canada has to say about this province at some point.

[Page 3624]

My final question to the minister, or whoever over there wants to answer it, is will they now, in light of all this evidence, stop the expensive, corporate welfare spending spree and get on with the job of actually creating a few jobs in Nova Scotia today?

THE PREMIER « » : Mr. Speaker, you know, the simple fact of the matter is that rebates come out of the money that is actually paid by the company to us. They receive some of that back. That is - and maybe I need to explain the meaning of the word rebate to the Leader of the Progressive Party - but that's what a rebate is. The simple fact of the matter is there are 7,600 more jobs in this province than there were at the pre-recession peak.

The other fact of the matter is the Progressive Conservative Party left us with a $375 million deficit. Even the auditors afterwards said that that was on track for a $1.4 billion deficit if we continue down the track that the Tories were on. Mr. Speaker, their complaint is that we haven't cleaned up their mess fast enough.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Glace Bay.

ERDT - IBM: CONFIDENTIALITY - CONFIRM

MR. GEOFF MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, IBM has a poor performance record, similar to this government. It also has a habit of making deals behind closed doors. On March 19, 2012, the U.K. Observer reported that the British Government and IBM agreed to change their initial agreement governing the control of personal, confidential information. Both parties agreed, and in such, let personal, confidential information be stored offshore.

My question for the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism is, with IBM's past, how can we be sure that this government will keep our personal, confidential information safe?

HON. PERCY PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, we have the utmost confidence in IBM. IBM is sworn to confidentiality. We have no concerns. We are proud that we were able to form a partnership with IBM, who could have chosen to be anywhere in the world - anywhere in the world. They could be in India, they could be somewhere in the U.S., they could be in other jurisdictions. They chose Halifax, Nova Scotia, and this government is proud of that.

MR. MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, not only does sending this data offshore put security at risk, it puts jobs at risk. U.K. Labour MP John McDonnell said, "Despite all past promises from the government, the decision to offshore this sensitive information database will not only cost jobs but open up vast opportunities for fraud." We signed a deal that does open vast opportunities for fraud and puts Nova Scotian jobs at risk.

[Page 3625]

My question to the minister is, how does the agreement with IBM ensure our data and Nova Scotian jobs will be safe and secure?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I will table this - Personal Information Protections with respect to provincial SAP services:

"Security features either reflect the province's current practices or enhance them.
No personal information will leave Nova Scotia – it will remain on the servers that the province will continue to own and operate in its data centre.
The province determines what is considered personal information (e.g. addresses, banking information, social insurance numbers).
Any other data that may be shared for testing or quality assurance will be masked to protect personal and identifying information."

MR. MACLELLAN « » : Mr. Speaker, my question on this issue is about IBM changing the deal after the original deal is struck - guarantees that the data will not be sent offshore, guarantees that the jobs will not be sent offshore, guarantees that this government will not enter into secret deals with IBM after the deal is signed.

Again, I'll ask the minister: will he guarantee that our information is safe and secure and that Nova Scotians can count on our government standing up for the people and making sure the information is protected?

MR. PARIS « » : What I will guarantee, Mr. Speaker, is that the protection of information will be the same if not better than what we currently have. That is what I guarantee.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Argyle.

ERDT: JOBS PLAN - FAILURE ADMIT

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, 8,200 Nova Scotians between the ages of 15 and 24 have lost full-time employment since October 2009. That is close to the same as the population of Sydney Mines. The loss of full-time employment for young men and women in Nova Scotia is almost five times the national average. Nova Scotians, of course, deserve better.

My question for the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism is, will the minister admit his "jobsWhere?" plan has failed young Nova Scotians, or will he continue to force our best and brightest to move away to make a decent living?

[Page 3626]

HON. PERCY PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, our track record will show that we are creating employment for Nova Scotians. We are creating an environment that will keep Nova Scotians here. Those recent graduates, with what we are doing, will not have to leave the Province of Nova Scotia to go for employment in other jurisdictions around North America and around the world.

Mr. Speaker, 7,600 new jobs have been created in the Province of Nova Scotia. The jobsHere strategy is working. We've proven that - nearly 1,000 jobs last week alone, one of the most productive weeks in Nova Scotian history, not to mention 11,500 jobs that will be created at the peak of the Irving Shipbuilding.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : Mr. Speaker, total employment, full time and part time, for Nova Scotians ages 15 to 24, has dropped 9 per cent, that's nine times the national average. Meanwhile, 3,800 young Nova Scotians have left the labour force in the last three years. We are losing our young people because of this NDP Government's failure to create jobs.

The other day the minister stood on his feet and said it was a pleasure for him to boast about the things his government has done with respect to employment. Again, Nova Scotians deserve better. So my question to the minister, what will the minister tell the 8,200 young Nova Scotians who lost a full-time job, or the 3,800 young people who have left the workforce, as to why they cannot find a job?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I can remember three years ago when we first came into power and the shape that this province was in. There are more people working today than there were when we took over government.

Mr. Speaker, we have a strategy and our strategy is working. What we need and what we should have, for the benefit of all Nova Scotians, is have that Party over there get onboard.

MR. D'ENTREMONT « » : So again, while we're talking about stats, Mr. Speaker, the unemployment rate for young men ages 15 to 24 in Nova Scotia has gone up by 41.4 per cent since October 2009 - let me repeat, it has gone up by 41.4 per cent. Unemployment for this age category is dropping in the rest of the country but it has gone up 41.4 per cent here in Nova Scotia. These young men are saving for college, finding their first career, are in the prime age for putting down roots here, but the unemployment rate has gone up by 41.4 per cent under this government's watch. Nova Scotians deserve better.

My question to the minister, will the minister finally admit his plan has failed young Nova Scotians and that a 41 per cent increase in the unemployment rate for young men is totally unacceptable?

[Page 3627]

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I don't understand the rationale here. Here we are, last year we made this big announcement, nearly 1,000 jobs for Nova Scotians, and many of those jobs are going to be filled by young people. Do you know what? During the Liberal and the Progressive Conservative reign of 20 years, Nova Scotia was in what place? What place was Nova Scotia in for 20 years? They were last, dead last. We've taken that and we've turned the corner. We've turned the ship around, something that they couldn't do in 20 years.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

ERDT: DEALS - TRANSPARENCY

MS. DIANA WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, almost a year ago this NDP Government offered up $90 million to Resolute. The Premier handed this money over to a corporation who, in turn, closed up shop and laid off Nova Scotians. This deal was no different than any of the other corporate handouts that the NDP have been so fond of. One of the most concerning aspects is the complete lack of transparency around this deal and subsequent deals to come.

Mr. Speaker, my question for the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism is, when will the minister be up front with Nova Scotians and start opening the books on his multi-million dollar deals?

HON. PERCY PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I can tell you this, this government is more up front than any other previous government. We didn't sell Nova Scotia taxpayers on P3 schools. That wasn't this government that has sold taxpayers on P3 schools. A problem that we've yet to see come to fruition. When it does, the debt that we have inherited as a result of P3s. Mr. Speaker, it wasn't this government that sold Nova Scotia Power. (Interruptions) It wasn't this government that did all those silly things. We have a plan: our plan is proven. I don't know how anyone can stand in this House and criticize a government for looking out for the future of Nova Scotians.

MS. WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, it's easy to criticize this government on its lack of transparency and that's what I'm trying to do right now. The NDP Government has a track record of handing over hundreds of millions of dollars to large corporations, without handing over any details of these contracts. It is essential that the terms and conditions of the large corporate deals that the NDP keep making be made known so that they can be debated in this House. Instead, there is a veil of secrecy over everything that the NDP Government does. The Bowater deal was no different and Nova Scotians have low expectations when it comes to transparency on the impending Resolute land deal to follow. My question to the minister is, why does the NDP Government insist on signing multi-million dollar deals without giving Nova Scotians the proper information and details?

[Page 3628]

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, payroll rebates, once they are done, they're there for the public to look at.

What we don't do - and no government previous to us - we don't negotiate deals with the corporate community, in public. Those are done behind doors. Once those deals are done, they're open. Once they're done, they become part of the public record. We've stood here session after session and explained this to all honourable members of this House. Some people just refuse to understand it.

MS. WHALEN « » : Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotians are watching their tax dollars leave this province. We saw it with the Resolute deal and we're watching it happen again with DSME Trenton. What we've learned from the Bowater deal and what we've learned from the NDP is that the devil is in the details and Nova Scotia taxpayers are too often left holding the bag. My question to the minister is, when will Nova Scotians see the NDP live up to the level of openness and transparency that they repeatedly called for when they were in Opposition?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, that reasoning is just not sound. What we've done and what we do is we create jobs for Nova Scotians. We create employment. They are going to get a salary, they're going to be paid a salary that's going to be spent here in the Province of Nova Scotia. More tax revenue for the Province of Nova Scotia. It's not rocket science, however, they fail to understand it.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

ERDT: C.B. DEV. - LACK ADMIT

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, last week in this House, the Minister of ERDT said, "Mr. Speaker, it's certainly a pleasure for me to rise on my feet and I could spend the rest of Question Period boasting about the good things that this government has done when it comes to employment for Nova Scotians."

Not only is that insulting, it's offensive and it's blatantly incorrect. Nova Scotians deserve an Economic and Rural Development and Tourism Minister who will admit when he's wrong and more importantly, a minister who knows what he's doing. My question is, will the minister finally admit things are going in the wrong direction under his watch and admit there's nothing to boast about in Cape Breton?

HON. PERCY PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, I could stand here and I could tell you all of the offensive things that I've heard from that member coming from the opposite side of the House. But, you know what? I'm not going to do that. The member doesn't understand about the investments that we made in Billdidit. He doesn't recognize PIP, the Productivity Investment Program, that we've made investments in every corner of the Province of Nova Scotia - good investments; investments that are paying off.

[Page 3629]

Do you know what, Mr. Speaker? It's shameful that the Third Party, after what they did to the Province of Nova Scotia, would get up from their seat and throw insults around such as that.

MR. ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, last week this minister said this government is to protect the jobs in the Province of Nova Scotia, yet Cape Breton has an unemployment rate of 16.4 per cent - that's a 16.4 per cent unemployment rate - the second highest unemployment rate in all regions of this country. With a protector like that, who needs enemies?

Mr. Speaker, will the minister admit today that his protection is driving up unemployment in Cape Breton, and will he admit he's just not up to the job?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, this government knows full well where it stood with respect to NewPage. We were the first ones there - 1,400 jobs that we protected in Cape Breton; 1,400 jobs that we've made investments in so that they could stay here, raise their families here, and have a good quality of life.

Mr. Speaker, not to mention TeleTech, another company that this government has invested in; Billdidit - there are countless companies not only in mainland Nova Scotia but certainly in Cape Breton that we have invested in because we believe in Nova Scotians - and I don't know where the Third Party was when it came to NewPage.

MR. ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, last week the Premier said job growth is going in the right direction. When comparing October 2009 to October 2012, Cape Breton's employment rate has decreased - employment decreased by 1,800 jobs. Approximately 500 full-time jobs lost, and approximately 1,200 part-time jobs lost. If job growth is going in the right direction, which direction does the minister think is right?

MR. PARIS « » : Mr. Speaker, one thing I do know for sure is that Nova Scotia is the leading province in Atlantic Canada. When it comes to jobs, when it comes to opportunities and job creation - we are number one.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

NAT. RES. - BOWATER LANDS: DEAL - ANNOUNCEMENT

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Natural Resources.

I think people can be forgiven if they're a bit suspicious when the government says there's a good deal coming with respect to Resolute or Bowater. I think we all remember the postcard the Premier and the member for Queens sent out that said a five-year deal brightens prospects on the South Shore, enhances the long-term sustainability of the paper mill - you know, protecting 2,000 jobs, good jobs. We've spoken to a number of people who are still waiting for the apology for that one.

[Page 3630]

You know, Mr. Speaker, last week the member for Queens introduced the late debate topic about the expected sale of the timberlands, and yet the fact is the government wouldn't provide any details so that the Parties could actually debate and discuss that. So, will the Minister of Natural Resources please tell us when this expected deal will be announced and whether he plans to bring it before the House so it can be properly examined?

HON. CHARLIE PARKER « » : Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for his question. Certainly the Bowater situation is very important to this province. We've been in good-faith negotiations with Resolute and, in addition to that, we've spent considerable time on the South Shore consulting with sawmillers and woodlot owners, workers, environmental groups, MTRI, a whole lot of very important people there on the South Shore. We're there to protect good jobs, to move forward with new and innovative ways to do forestry in this province, and to ensure that workers and their families can remain and prosper here in Nova Scotia.

MR. YOUNGER « » : Well, Mr. Speaker, the minister just stood and said that they are still going through good-faith negotiations, yet last week the member for Queens stood and said that this is a great deal. So, either the deal is done and it can be tabled before the House, or the member misled the House last week by suggesting that it is a good deal, because unless the deal is done, you can't know if it's good or bad.

Mr. Speaker, will the minister explain why he can't release the details of the deal now if his colleague already seems to know enough to argue that it is a good deal?

MR. PARKER « » : Mr. Speaker, certainly, as I mentioned, we are in good-faith negotiations with Resolute and we're looking at all possible options for the assets of that company, including the 550,000 acres. We're looking at moving forward to support the forest industry, to support other wildlife and recreational needs, really the needs of the community and the workers, and in due course the details will be made available.

MR. YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, I hear the minister saying that in due course the details will be released. We read reports today that it might be around Christmas, kind of the way the boundary review was done, as a Trojan Horse around Christmas.

Mr. Speaker, last week the member for Queens stood and said it is a good deal. The minister now says well, we are looking at all possibilities and we are negotiating in good faith. This is a bit confusing, one member says it's a good deal, suggesting that it is done, and the other member says they haven't finished it so he doesn't know.

[Page 3631]

Mr. Speaker, let's make this simple. Will the minister commit to the House that he will release the deal with Resolute Forest Products, in full, well before the Legislature rises, so it can be examined by the Legislature?

MR. PARKER « » : Mr. Speaker, it takes time to get things right. I would just ask for the honourable member to have patience and again, we're working to get the best possible deal for Nova Scotians, for the workers and their families, and the communities along the South Shore - 2,000 workers and the spinoff will be of great benefit to all Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester North.

EDUC. - SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS: STATS - TABLE

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, in response to a question on November 6th to the Minister of Education regarding the number of students in our schools who have identified special needs, the minister responded, "The information that is being requested is information that I will need to ask the boards to supply to the Department of Education."

Mr. Speaker, we know the information is already available at the department and it's appalling to think that this minister does not know that, so my question to the minister is, will the minister table the information today?

HON. RAMONA JENNEX « » : Mr. Speaker, I always find it confusing when a question is asked that the honourable member knows the answer to already. She is very well aware that the information for specific (Interruption) Well, we live in Nova Scotia and we don't label our children with specific needs within our school system. I can say how many children are under IPPs or have modifications but we don't track, exactly, children with special needs. They do that in the United States. We don't do that here in Nova Scotia. Thank you.

MS. CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I find it a bit strange to think that that is language that the minister doesn't want to use; however, she talks about funding for special needs children so I'm confused.

Mr. Speaker, all school boards were asked to complete a survey regarding students in their schools with identified special needs and that came from the Department of Education, for which this minister is responsible. That survey included students with IPPs, students on resource, students in learning centres, and students receiving special services through speech language pathologists and school psychologists. The deadline for that survey to be completed and returned to the department was June 2012. That's five full months ago.

Obviously, the minister hasn't reviewed the information that she asked for five months ago, so my question to the minister is, how can parents, students, and teachers have any confidence that the minister understands the needs of their students when she has admitted she doesn't even know the information was requested, she hasn't been able to table it, and it has been there five months?

[Page 3632]

MS. JENNEX « » : Mr. Speaker, I have been listening to parents and to school boards about funding for students in our schools who have specific needs. We listen very carefully. In our budget we increased that protected budget line by $13 million. Thank you.

MS. CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, the minister doesn't seem to know the information that she asked for. She doesn't know if it has been submitted. She didn't know what the numbers were, and obviously hasn't been able to use them for future planning. The minister talks about more funding to special needs students, and I applaud the government for that. However, I would also ask the minister, how can you build a budget to provide services and supports for students when you don't even know how many people you are planning for?

MS. JENNEX « » : The honourable member would know that we work very closely with school boards. They present us with their needs each year, and we put that in our budget. We actually listen to our school boards and to our parents and respond appropriately, unlike when I was in education - and I think the honourable member would remember this (Interruptions) Excuse me, Mr. Speaker, I'm trying to speak and having some trouble hearing here.

When I was a teacher and the honourable member was a teacher, she remembers very clearly that when the Liberals were in power that they actually broke our collective agreement and rolled us back by 3 per cent over a three-year period. And speaking of students and students with special needs, they sent teachers home for five days, and when the teachers were home the children did not get the education they needed and deserved.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

JUSTICE - TAAVEL FAM.: RECOMMENDATIONS

- CONSIDERATION CONFIRM

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice. This government refuses to take action on the use of ankle bracelets for patients on unescorted leave from the East Coast Forensic Hospital. Despite pleas from victims' families they will not even consider it. They will keep them waiting. We do not believe this is a responsible approach for the government to take.

My question to the minister is, what assurance has the minister given to the family of Raymond Taavel that he has given their suggestions serious consideration?

HON. ROSS LANDRY » : Mr. Speaker, once again I see that the Progressive Conservative Party is trying to play on the plight of a family that is suffering from a very grievous loss. I want to assure the Third Party there that I have read the documents and I have heard their concerns. I've also looked at the 18 recommendations that the committee has put forward that did the analysis on the matter surrounding the forensic hospital and the sudden death that occurred. We are taking those seriously and moving them forward. What the Progressive Conservative Party would like to do is treat mental illness as though it is a crime, and that, in itself, is a crime.

[Page 3633]

MR. MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, the minister will remember that our difficulty with the 18 recommendations in the report is that there was no focus on public safety. This government has kept people waiting on every level: thousands of people are waiting for full-time employment; they're waiting for lower power bills; they're waiting for long-term care and surgeries. The family of Raymond Taavel has made a very legitimate and heartfelt plea to the government. They do not deserve to be ignored. Keeping people safe should be a priority of any government.

My question to the minister is, why won't the minister listen to those who have been affected by his inaction and examine the use of ankle bracelets to protect both patients and the public?

MR. LANDRY « » : Unlike the member who is raising the question, I spent a lifetime in public safety and take the matter very seriously. I put my career there. In addition this government takes public safety seriously and I'm very proud to say I have the utmost confidence in the court system and the judiciary, unlike the Progressive Conservatives that allude that they do not know how to make sound judgments as to who should or shouldn't receive ankle bracelets. I, too, have respect for our probation officers and correctional services officers who provide a high-quality service, unlike the Progressive Conservative Party who do not trust their judgment. I, too, respect the police officer and the front-line workers. They do great work and I just wish the Progressive Conservative Party would give them the respect that they deserve.

MR. MACMASTER « » : Mr. Speaker, it is funny how times change. I spoke to a lot of law enforcement officers who really appreciated the Boots on the Street program but when this former police officer becomes the Minister of Justice, what does he do? He cuts that program. I can tell you, there are a lot of law enforcement officers across this province who told me they did not appreciate that. They talked about the good work that that program did right in the schools, getting police officers into schools to help the young people, especially the young people at risk.

Mr. Speaker, I think I'm running out of time - I think I've made my point.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The time allotted for the Oral Question Period has expired.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition on an introduction.

[Page 3634]

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to draw the attention of the House to the west gallery. We have with us today members of the Pictou County Injured Workers Association who were holding an information picket outside when members were coming into the House. They are asking government to hold a Royal Commission into WCB. I'd like to recognize and acknowledge them and read their names off and ask them to stand and receive a warm welcome from the House. They are Denise MacKenzie, Larry Maloney, Daniel Stewart, Mary Lloyd, Candy Hubley, Valerie Stewart, and Wes MacLean. I ask the members to give them a warm welcome. (Applause)

Also, I just want to draw the attention of the House to the west gallery, again, where we have Matthew Gaul with us. Matthew is a student at Saint Mary's University and he is from my constituency in Middleton. He is here observing what is going on in the House. He has a keen interest in politics and I'm sure he is taking special note to what all the Pages are doing here on the floor of the Legislature. Perhaps we may see him here someday in the future. I ask the House to give him a warm welcome here today. (Applause)

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 119.

Bill No. 119 - Cosmetology Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. MARILYN MORE « » : I rise today to move second reading of Bill No. 119, the Cosmetology Act, which was last reviewed eight years ago. In Nova Scotia 9,200 cosmetologists, 2,400 salons, 17 schools, and 600 students are licensed or registered to provide services such as hairdressing, skin care, and nails. Under the Act the industry is managed by the Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia, a self-governing body, and that is not changing. The Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia establishes standards of practice for various areas of the profession and inspects workplaces to see that those standards are followed. By regulating the industry, the province ensures that cosmetologists are properly trained and that their customers know that they are being served in a safe and clean environment.

[Page 3635]

These proposed amendments, Mr. Speaker, which come at the request of the Cosmetology Association, modernize the Act to reflect changes that have arisen in this trade over the years. The proposed changes would allow the Cosmetology Association to establish licences for specific areas of practice, such as facials. Until now, one had to be competent in all areas of cosmetology, even if they only intended to practice in one area of the industry.

Through this bill, we are responding to the needs of an industry that is seeing more specialization. Under the current Act, someone would enter the profession as a junior cosmetologist and practise under a master cosmetologist. Nova Scotia is the only province in Canada to have a two-tiered classification, which makes it difficult for a cosmetologist to relocate here from other provinces. As well, junior cosmetologists sometimes had difficulty finding a master cosmetologist in rural communities, which made it harder for them to find work locally.

This bill would eliminate the junior cosmetologist category, bringing Nova Scotia in line with practices across the country. We are also proposing to eliminate the Provincial Examining and Licensing Committee and allowing the Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia to administer its own testing procedures. This way people would be able to enter the industry faster than currently happens.

I mentioned earlier that the Cosmetology Association in Nova Scotia inspects workplaces to see that standards are maintained. If necessary, they may suspend or revoke an operator's licence or a school's licence. As well, this bill would establish a new disciplinary appeal process. Currently those appeals go through the courts. The proposed changes would also allow the Minister of Labour and Advanced Education to approve the Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia's bylaws, instead of the full Cabinet.

Again, Mr. Speaker, this will help the Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia address changes in the industry in a timely fashion. As well, these changes bring our legislation in line with national efforts to make it easier for workers to move between provinces and have their qualifications recognized across jurisdictions.

I want to assure the members, Mr. Speaker, that staff consulted with the Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia and its members several times before bringing forth these amendments at the request of the association. These consultations included face-to-face sessions in Yarmouth, Dartmouth, and Sydney.

Summing up, Mr. Speaker, this legislation will help this self-regulated industry to adapt to changes in practice in a timely fashion and bring Nova Scotia in line with national efforts to make it easier for workers to move between provinces. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

[Page 3636]

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER « » : Mr. Speaker, I just want to stand and say a few words on this. There's a young woman in my constituency by the name of Christina Stephenson who actually just started cosmetology school - I'm not sure exactly which school. I think it is a good idea to modernize this and move this forward and address some of the issues around professionalization, because I think that one of the problems we have sometimes in trades such as this - and I think I'm safe calling it a trade - is when we talk to guidance counsellors at schools and so forth. I remember that she and a number of others who were going to the same school struggled with this issue of when they got up on stage at graduation - and I attended her graduation - what they would say they were going on to do, because they were concerned that people would think that they were doing something somehow less important by going to cosmetology school when, of course, that isn't the case at all.

This is a young woman who is pursuing something that she's passionate about, that she's interested in and, frankly, she could have pursued any occupation she wanted but she chose to pursue this career path because it's what she was interested in and what she was passionate about. And I think sometimes we need to be cognizant of stories like that where there are occupations that somehow society and guidance counsellors, in being well meaning, tell everybody they need to go and become doctors and lawyers - hopefully not politicians, but doctors and lawyers anyway, or they have to go to university or so forth, and we need to get past that because there are many reasons why the field of cosmetology is hugely important.

As I've talked to her over the past year - I guess it hasn't been quite a year, but the past few months that she started in school - it amazed me some of the things that they're going through and learning and the rigour of the programs. I think that that's important to recognize and, you know, cosmetology isn't always about going and having makeup done or something. There are also a lot of things, obviously part of it is about - it is part of the beauty industry, we can't deny that, but by the same token there are many people I'm aware of who are patients at the hospital who, you know, people in the cosmetology fields come in and people from hairdressing come in and they do their hair, their makeup, or they do their nails, or things like that that make them feel better about themselves and help them get through a hard time, because maybe it's that little extra, it's that little thing that makes them feel special at that moment.

So there are all different - sometimes we don't think about the whole broad range of this. Likewise, I think it's really important that the association is able to set these standards and able to manage them themselves because we have seen a change. So, for example, there's a lot on the laser treatment side of things where people get treatments for varicose veins, or acne, or rosacea. There are all kinds of different things and, you know, it's important that people know when they go out there that people are appropriately certified, that they're properly regulated by the association - and especially the claims that are made are accurate. And I think that that's an important role for the association because I think we've all seen the info commercials on TV late at night where they're selling the latest wonder thing that's going to solve all the problems in the world for you and, you know, it's going to fix your face, or fix your skin, and they are competing with that.

[Page 3637]

People need to know and I think the professionalization and knowing that when they go to somebody who is registered under this bill, or registered under the association, that these are people that they can trust and are held to a certain standard and that there's a consequence if those standards aren't met. I noticed that the bill allows things such as removing the licences in the case that some of these are not met.

So I think that this is a positive step forward and I think that there's a lot that we can do to make the public aware that professions - and not just cosmetology, but many professions like this are important, not only an important part of our economy but also that they are very credible, very highly sought after, and very important professions as part of our overall economy. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the Cosmetology Bill, knowing that it was the industry's request to have these regulations come forward. We support the cosmetology industry, and with the elimination of the junior and master categories, for allowing freer movement and to allow the Cosmetology Association to better regulate themselves. We look forward to this bill going to the Law Amendments Committee and coming back for debate in third reading. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville.

MR. MAT WHYNOTT « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm going to speak in support of this bill as well. It gives me an opportunity to stand and talk a little bit about the importance of this industry to Nova Scotia. Again, as I said, I speak in favour of Bill No. 119 moving forward to the Law Amendments Committee.

This is something, Mr. Speaker, that has been on the move, something that the Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia has been asking for several years now. I think that this is something that we want, to ensure that we modernize our current legislation. For many years, legislation in this House has been on the books and hasn't been looked at. I think that Nova Scotians want their government, their legislators, to ensure that they actually have a means to modernize pieces of legislation, of the law that is in effect in Nova Scotia, by ensuring that it's modernized.

The other thing that we're doing is streamlining the processes, streamlining to ensure that Nova Scotia is now catching up with the other provinces across the country in this regard. That is something, again, as I said, that the Cosmetology Association has been talking on and been asking for many, many years. I'm glad that our government has been able to recognize that.

[Page 3638]

We know that there are exciting times happening in Nova Scotia. We've heard that over the past weeks in regard to last week's announcements around PROJEX and IBM coming to Nova Scotia. That is a thousand jobs that will ensure that people do not have to leave Nova Scotia anymore - something that in the past we have always ensured, that we just say, yup, sure, let's just let our young people go. I'm proud that I can stand in my place as the member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville to ensure that the people I went to school with, the people who are behind me in my generation, that we are able to say that in Nova Scotia we can build a home, we can create good jobs, we can ensure that Nova Scotia is a place to grow up, a place to have a family, a place to build a home. This is exactly the sort of thing that we want to do as a government.

We know that the tides are changing, Mr. Speaker. As the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism would say, we are turning this ship around. I think that's something that is so important, after 20 years of the worst economic times in our province, we are turning that ship around.

Again, this bill is something that will ensure modernization of the Act, but what is also important is that our government committed to ensuring that we streamline the way that businesses are regulated in Nova Scotia. Something that we did was we introduced what we call Better Business, something that was under the jobsHere strategy, ensuring that we have a 20 per cent reduction in the administrative burden for businesses in Nova Scotia. This is exactly what this bill will do. This will ensure that those sorts of businesses right across Nova Scotia will have less administrative burden, and I think that is a positive thing.

When I go out and I talk to businesses in my riding - I was out during Small Business Week, Mr. Speaker. I did a small tour of some of the businesses in the constituency that I represent, and that is something that people talked to me about, is reducing the so-called red tape. I know that this bill does it as well around the whole process of licensing and permitting. This is something that I talked about to many of my colleagues around our table, our caucus table - that whole notion of reducing red tape. It's something that we're committed to doing.

Also around the question of inspectors is something that we have said around our better business model, ensuring that Nova Scotia is a better place to do business. This bill, Bill No. 119, is a step in the right direction in that regard. We recognize the central role that small businesses play in our economy to ensure that Nova Scotians can build a future here. We know that over 9,200 people work in cosmetology around Nova Scotia, and many of those are in rural Nova Scotia. We have, believe it or not, over 2,400 salons right across Nova Scotia. We recognize that that is an important industry that we need to support, and that is exactly why this government reduced the small business tax for Nova Scotians. We did it every year that we've been in government, and that is such an important piece of ensuring that small businesses are supported in this province.

[Page 3639]

I know that in the last election the Liberal Party talked about that they were going to reduce the small-business tax, yet we haven't heard them say anything about what a positive move that is, so this is actually going to support the cosmetologists in this province. I know that the member for Dartmouth East talked about that as well.

When I was out talking during Small Business Week, I did have the opportunity to talk to a cosmetologist in the Middle Sackville area and she did mention to me, as well, that through her correspondence with the Cosmetology Association, she was really glad that the government was looking at a progressive piece of legislation, changing it, modernizing it. That's something that she was glad that the government recognized.

The Cosmetology Association of Nova Scotia, known as CANS, recognized that there are changing realities in their industry. I think it is important that our Minister of Labour and Advanced Education has worked with them over the past several months to put forward amendments that will make life a little bit easier for them and their businesses, to ensure that their businesses can thrive right here in HRM and in every municipality, every municipal unit, right across Nova Scotia. I think that is such an important piece around consultation, something that sometimes we haven't seen in the past, but we are seeing now in this government - consulting, talking with Nova Scotians, listening to their ideas how we can make Nova Scotia a better place.

I think that no matter what Party we are in, whether you are on this side of the House or that side of the House, that is our goal in this place, to make Nova Scotia a better place to live, to work, to play and to do business. For the last several decades Nova Scotians have gotten used to just allowing our children to leave and I think that is what we are trying to do, what we are doing, to ensure that doesn't happen anymore. We've just let our kids leave and we can't do that anymore.

In the case of the cosmetology industry, we are making it more efficient and more effective. This is, I think, what all businesses will want, that they are able to support them and I look forward to supporting this and allowing this piece of legislation going to the Committee on Law Amendments so that we can hear from businesses and people who want to see this bill being enacted into law.

We have heard from the cosmetologists and this bill will also eliminate the provincial examining and licensing committee and will allow the Cosmetology Association to administer its own testing and procedures. We are reducing red tape. We're allowing businesses to thrive in Nova Scotia. I think it is an important step that we are taking here and I'm glad to hear the Opposition - often I don't think we necessarily see eye to eye on all bills and all issues but I'm glad to see the Opposition is supporting this bill. I encourage that we move this bill over to the Committee on Law Amendments. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

[Page 3640]

The honourable Minister of Labour and Advanced Education.

HON. MARILYN MORE « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank all honourable members for their comments and support. I move second reading of Bill No. 119.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 119. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Acting Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. MAT WHYNOTT « » : Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 125.

Bill No. 125 - War Amps Key Tag Act.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. JOHN MACDONELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I move that Bill No. 125 be now read a second time. It's my pleasure to begin debate on Bill No. 125, the Motor Vehicle Act, to Preserve the Key Tag Service of the War Amps."

This amendment to the Motor Vehicle Act will better balance the privacy rights of Nova Scotia drivers with the rights of those citizens who want to support the work of The War Amps of Canada. Nova Scotians want to know that their privacy is respected and protected. Ensuring this is a priority for this government. This legislation will clarify how and what information about Nova Scotia drivers is provided to the War Amps. It will also clarify how Nova Scotians can request that their information not be shared with The War Amps, should they so choose.

The War Amps use information on Nova Scotia drivers provided by the Registry of Motor Vehicles for its popular Key Return fundraising program, which returns lost keys to their owners. In 2011 The War Amps Key Return program benefited more than 500 Nova Scotians by returning their lost keys to them.

Every driver in Nova Scotia is currently able to choose that their name and address not be provided to The War Amps. They can do this in person at an Access Nova Scotia centre, or by telephone, fax, or mail. Today's amendment will help clarify for Nova Scotians how their information is provided to The War Amps, as well as how drivers can request that their information not be shared. This is an example of how this government is working to ensure that Nova Scotians are better informed and have the information they need to make choices about their privacy.

[Page 3641]

In summary, this government's priority is to balance the privacy rights of Nova Scotia drivers with the rights of those citizens who do wish to receive information from The War Amps on the key return program. This change will benefit Nova Scotia drivers by clarifying for them what information is sent to the War Amps and how they can request their information not be shared.

Let me be clear, Mr. Speaker. Nova Scotians are generous and caring people, but they want to know their privacy is protected and respected, even when it comes to charitable giving. So we're doing the right thing by clarifying the bill for Nova Scotia drivers and making sure they know what information is provided to the War Amps and how they can request that their information not be shared.

Mr. Speaker, I take my place and I look forward to further debate on this bill and to what my colleagues in the House may offer before this bill moves on to the Law Amendments Committee. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Colchester North.

HON. KAREN CASEY « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise in my place today and speak to Bill No. 125. I think most of us, perhaps all of us in the House, will remember in our younger days when the little licence plate tags used to come around. As children, little did we know what that was supporting. As we grew older, we recognized the value of that, and anything that can be done to preserve that is something that I think every member in this House would support.

The information that is being shared is information that will, if used, help raise money to support The War Amps movement. The ability for that information to be provided will, I believe, strengthen The War Amps initiative. It will provide more money to support those people who have benefited and who will continue to benefit from funds raised through that fundraiser. So whether it is a little key tag that we all remember or whether it is a piece of paper that is a receipt for our contribution, as long as we know that we are doing the right thing by supporting those who have fought for us or who are needing those services from The War Amps, we can feel good about that.

I'm pleased to be able to give our support for Bill No. 125. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Inverness.

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Of course, we're all familiar with The War Amps - with veterans returning home from the First World War, we know there were a lot of people who came from that war who were injured because the war implements at that time were much cruder. There was a lot more hand-to-hand combat in the First World War and certainly not for the faint of heart. When those veterans who survived the First World War were returning back home, this organization was started. Its goal was to preserve military history but also it was about amputees helping amputees, because many of those who returned were amputees.

[Page 3642]

Mr. Speaker, I can think of one person they helped in my area and that is Siobhan MacDonald and they've helped her greatly. I recently saw her at a school accreditation ceremony in Mabou and she was playing the piano. I was very impressed with her performance, never realizing she did play the piano and she plays it very well. I saw her growing up at a distance. I used to work with her mother Brenda, and we're all proud of her. She's an impressive young woman and I know her community is proud of her. She was helped by the CHAMP Program, which The War Amps run. That's about helping children accept their amputations and develop a positive approach to challenges and Siobhan is living proof of that.

Mr. Speaker, The War Amps have helped Siobhan through the CHAMP program. We know about their key tag program as well, we are all familiar with it. We will be supporting this bill because it preserves or maintains The War Amps' ability to continue that program and it also improves privacy for Nova Scotians. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Queens.

MS. VICKI CONRAD « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to stand and speak to Bill No. 125, the War Amps Key Tag Act. This is so appropriate that this is here today. As we all know, most of us would have spent time with many of our veterans on Remembrance Day this past Sunday, so it is appropriate that we are standing here speaking to this very important bill for all of those veterans and certainly for all those veterans who have been in or were injured in previous wars.

The War Amps Canada is just such an important organization and as the member across the floor indicated, it was started back in 1918 or 1920, immediately after the First World War. The War Amps, over the last many years, have provided much in the way of services with their campaigns, raising donations to provide for many services for veterans, veterans who have been injured and perhaps are in need of employment assistance, perhaps they're in need of educational assistance, perhaps they're in need of practical services in terms of counselling and helping them get through either their injuries and, in some cases, their abilities to work as an amputee.

One of the other programs that War Amps are famously known for is the CHAMP Program. The CHAMP Program is one that I certainly have been supporting for many years. The CHAMP Program reaches out to children who are the unfortunate recipients of being - I shouldn't say recipients, Mr. Speaker, but they have had the unfortunate circumstances to find themselves with an injury that has seen an amputation of a limb. The War Amps CHAMPS Program mentors young children who are learning to live with an amputation. It is one that finds children who are amputees looking up to soldiers who themselves are amputees and it assists many children to recognize that they don't have a disability, what they have is an incredible opportunity to work with their disabilities in different ways.

[Page 3643]

This bill will allow for The War Amps organization to become better known if they're able to reach out to more Canadians and show Canadians the value of not only the Key Tag Service that they provide, but also what they provide or what they get in return with those donations that many Canadians provide the organization.

Mr. Speaker, the key tag program allows for many veterans and War Amp recipients to actually work in sheltered workshops where they make the key tags that get delivered to all of our homes right across the country. In return, what Canadians get, being a recipient of the key tag program, is a service that is very valuable. So if you lose your keys and you have that key tag attached to your key chain, and you happen to be out somewhere and you lose those, the finder of that key tag can call The War Amps toll-free phone number from anywhere in Canada and they can ask the key tag program through the organization if those keys can be returned to the rightful owner. There is a tracking number, a confidential tracking number on that key tag, and The War Amps organization through the key tag program, what they will do is they will send a courier to pick up your keys at the finder's location and that courier will ensure that they get your keys back to you at your home location.

So that's a very important service. We all know what it's like to all of a sudden have lost something as valuable as your keys, and the cost of replacing those keys, and to have that key tag as an identifier to allow your keys to be returned to you is something that most of us would say is a service of great value - and to have our many veterans working to ensure that we actually receive something as valuable back to us, I think is a tremendous service. I certainly look forward to getting my tag every year and I look forward to giving a donation in return for that valuable service. I know that my donation, along with many donations from Canadians right across the country, allows for more programs to be put in place through that Key Tag Service. It allows that service to continue and, you know, I have absolute clarity that this bill will protect not only the privacy of Nova Scotians, but it will also continue a valuable service with The War Amps program.

So I'm in complete support of this bill, Mr. Speaker, and I look forward to it going to the Law Amendments Committee at some point in time so that we can see the passage of this bill. I thank you for the opportunity to speak, and I will take my place.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Preston.

HON. KEITH COLWELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm just going to say a few words on this bill. I think the bill is a good idea. It's one our caucus is going to support. The War Amps do a wonderful job of supporting people in our communities and all over Nova Scotia, and indeed across Canada. The work they do is very important.

[Page 3644]

I just have a couple of questions for the minister and maybe he can address these when he stands up to close debate. I was just wondering what insurance we're going to have to make sure that our lists of names and addresses - and I know The War Amps is a very credible organization, I'm not saying that - won't somehow or other find their way onto a mailing list someplace, which we're all very well aware of when you fill you name in at a store or something, all of a sudden the mailing lists are sold, or given, or used for other purposes. I just want to know how the minister will guarantee that that won't happen in this case. I do stress again The War Amps is a very, very credible organization and I don't think that they would ever do that, but it is nice to know we'll have that protected anyway and to ensure that people's privacy is protected.

There is a lot of concern over this new IBM deal, about privacy of individuals and how that privacy is going to be protected in this province. If the minister could make some comments on that, I'd appreciate hearing his comments. With those few words, I look forward to supporting the bill as it moves forward.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

HON. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS « » : Mr. Speaker, I want you to know that in another life I'm called the Master of Lost Keys. My dearly departed wife used to yell at me so often that when we got our War Amps - I want you to know that my card I have attached here today is of some importance because when they return my keys, they are sometimes returned before I actually returned to my home after a walk with my favourite dog. I also, of course, have my Boston Bruins insignia on it so it is a race which one will be recognized quickest.

When it comes to War Amps, I think we all are aware - I recall those wonderful ads and members opposite hopefully remember them too - of Mr. Chatterton, Cliff Chatterton, I believe his name was and you see the CFL players and the program involved in terms of what they're doing for these young people especially. I've heard members in here talk about the vets and the amputees and I understand the importance when it comes to a fundraiser, but when you see some of these young people, particularly of school age and elementary school age, who are with CFL players and they are recognizing the fact that they are being assisted in so many ways.

When that card arrives in your mail and in return you get a return address label or whatever labels you are using, make sure you make your contribution to the War Amps. I want to compliment the minister. I want him to know this is something that is well received. I had the opportunity on Sunday, and yesterday too, with a number of veterans who were impressed with the fact that this is an important fundraiser for veterans and an important part of the program that the minister should take some pride in supporting and I thank him for that.

[Page 3645]

The key thing over the years, and I think the Deputy Premier would admit to this, the number of places that I've lost my keys, some of them I will not mention in here today, but I'm famous for taking my dog for a walk and leaving the keys in the mailbox. It comes down to the fact that when someone comes in and sees that my keys are still in the mailbox, they either recognize the Boston Bruins insignia and take it back to me, or someone, for some reason or another, doesn't know that's my mailbox and they plop it in the mail. Over the years, just looking at the last year, I've lost my keys, misplaced my keys, or people have hidden my keys - I think the member for Cape Breton Centre on occasion has done this deliberately just to see how long it will take for my keys to return - I've lost my keys in the last 12 months, five times, five times. There's no excuse for some of the places.

I know the member for Kings West will admit to the fact that one time I lost my keys when I was at an Old Timers hockey tournament down in Greenwood and I'm sure the member for Kings West actually took the keys. He took my keys that time and he hid them from me just to make sure that I could use my war amputee tag again.

I want to put it on the record that when you see 622638591, those are my keys and they are to be returned to 4909 St. Margarets Bay Road. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : If I recognize the minister it will be to close debate.

The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. JOHN MACDONELL « » : Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my colleagues on all sides of the House for their interventions on Bill No. 125. I think about the member for Timberlea-Prospect, I didn't think it was such a "risk-key" business giving him keys.

I appreciate the support this piece of legislation has. For the member for Timberlea-Prospect, I think he, as well as all members, must recognize the history of the War Amps Key program. This has gone on some many years. I don't have the exact year of origin for this program, but I think certainly he - I don't know if any member in this House could come up with an incident where the War Amps inappropriately used people's information. I think it's unheard of. I think that they are an extremely reputable organization.

The information is really being disclosed by the Department of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations to the War Amps. We're giving them the information for people who have a licence in Nova Scotia. What this bill really does is ensure that if people don't want that information to go forward they can make that request and we'll see that that does not happen.

The bill indicates that the minister will set conditions in the bill for that transfer of information. I'm not sure that it's necessary to put that in writing - I'll discuss that when the regulation is written on this - that we take a look at the need for such a regulation. With that, Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to move second reading of Bill No. 125.

[Page 3646]

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 125. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT « » : Mr. Speaker, that concludes the government's business for today. I move that the House do now rise to meet again on the morrow at the hour of 2:00 p.m. The House will sit until 6:00 p.m. or until the conclusion of business. Now I turn it over to the Progressive Conservative House Leader to call business.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable Progressive Conservative House Leader.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT « » : After the daily routine and Question Period tomorrow, we'll be calling Resolution No. 1945 and Resolution No. 1946. I move the House do now rise.

MR. SPEAKER « » : The motion is to adjourn.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We have reached the moment of interruption. The adjournment motion was submitted by the honourable member for Preston:

"Therefore be it resolved that due to the increasing losses of full-time jobs in the province, the NDP's jobsHere strategy should be renamed part-time jobsHere."

ADJOURNMENT

[Page 3647]

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

MR. SPEAKER « » : The honourable member for Yarmouth.

NDP: JOBSHERE STRATEGY - RENAME

MR. ZACH CHURCHILL « » : I hope all the folks at home excuse my Movember wear on my face. This is obviously a very important topic to discuss in this Legislature. It's on the minds of the majority of Nova Scotians, especially those who are having a hard time finding full-time meaningful work in this province. That's not a new challenge that this province has had, it's an ongoing one, and it's one that we really haven't figured out how to deal with yet. It's been interesting to sit in the Legislature this session and to hear a lot of the - I'm being generous in saying - arguments presented from the government side. Some would call it rhetoric.

It's been interesting to hear what this government has been saying about how we're creating jobs, how unlike any government ever in the history of Nova Scotia, this government cares about jobs, because the last two governments didn't like jobs and they're job killers. It's an unbelievably offensive and ridiculous line of attack. There is absolutely no Party in this province that has ever been privileged enough to be the government that has wanted to kill jobs or not have jobs or had a problem against jobs. The fact that this government stands up and says that with such conviction, I think, is borderline hilarious. Clearly everybody who enters into this Chamber, who is privileged enough to be here, who takes their seat, who is able to stand up and discuss these issues, nobody is coming here - nobody; no individual, no Party - and saying they want to get rid of jobs or they're against jobs.

I think that really speaks to the desperation on that side when they resort to attacking - not just past governments but now they're attacking the Opposition - over the fact that we're losing jobs in the Province of Nova Scotia.

We have a Premier who stands up and says the reason we're in the mess we are is because of the last 20 years of Liberal and Tory rule, and he has run out of past governments to blame so he has just started blaming the Opposition - that is a minority Opposition in a majority government. Somehow blaming the job losses in this province on us is as absurd as it sounds, and people watching at home will see it for what it is.

You know, we hear from the government that their plan is working, we're ushering in a new era in economic performance and jobs. We have created thousands of jobs, they're saying. They promised, I think, 15,000 jobs to Nova Scotians. They haven't delivered on those jobs, Mr. Speaker, and the facts speak for themselves.

Now our caucus has taken a position that we do not think, based on the data that we've looked at, that jobs are being created at the rate that the government says they are. This is based on data that's provided through Statistics Canada, which I think everyone can agree, is objective data, which is based on scientific gathering of information.

[Page 3648]

So we hear the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and Tourism stand up and say we're creating jobs and unlike the past governments, we care about this, but let's look at what has actually happened. Let's look from October 2011 to October 2012, full-time employment - this is in Cape Breton - dropped by 1.1 per cent. That's a loss of about 500 jobs, Mr. Speaker. However, part-time employment increased by 2.4 per cent, which is a gain of 200 part-time jobs.

If you look at October 2010 to October 2012, in Cape Breton alone, full-time employment dropped 3 per cent, which is a loss of about 14,000 jobs. Part-time employment actually dropped during that time, we lost about 1,000 jobs. The southern region, the story hasn't changed much: full-time employment from October 2011 to 2012 has dropped by 13 per cent. In real numbers, that's about 5,700 full-time jobs that have been lost in the southern region of the province.

Part-time employment during that time did increase. So when we have a government stand up and say we're creating jobs and they're using data to support that, we need to understand that the jobs that this government is referring to are part-time jobs. They're not full-time jobs with full-time benefits, where people are working and providing, necessarily, for their whole family or are able to provide for their whole family without additional supports. The jobs that this government is boasting about are part-time jobs, not full-time.

Mr. Speaker, I'll table this data for the House's record. I think when it comes to looking at the plan that this government has laid forward, everything this government does to create jobs can be viewed as an attempt to buy jobs. So we have seven of the largest corporations in North America, receiving multi-million dollar handouts from this government. I think that all, in total, we've had approximately $700 million given out to about seven different corporations, large corporations.

I remember NDP members and NDP Leaders from the past, including the Honourable Ed Broadbent, the Honourable Alexa McDonough, who I know were very popular Leaders amongst New Democrats nationwide and have respect outside of NDP circles. Those Leaders used to refer to those large corporations that took public money as corporate welfare bums. We've never said that. That's what former NDP Leaders have said, but yet, we have a government sitting in Province House that has doled out almost $700 million to seven companies.

AN HON. MEMBER: It isn't doled out.

MR. CHURCHILL « » : Okay, it's one thing to do that if you're actually going to see a return on that investment, if you're actually going to see jobs created, but what has happened with this is that we've had two or three of these large corporations actually packing up and leaving, in some cases with taxpayers' money. We have another couple that are on the brink and in total we have 1,300 layoffs.

[Page 3649]

That means these corporations, Mr. Speaker, have taken $700 million of hard-earned Nova Scotia taxpayer dollars and laid off 1,300 Nova Scotians. How does the math work out on that? You know, how does the math work out on that? It doesn't. What we are noticing is that there is a real lack of attention to details in these contracts and these big deals with these big corporations. Quite frankly, Nova Scotians are losing out as a result.

Then when we have new businesses come forward, most recently PROJEX and IBM, these are new big deals that this government is working on. I think IBM is receiving about $100 million and PROJEX around $11 million or $12 million. The government is surprised when the Opposition Party is critical and asking critical questions about these deals because the record of this government hasn't been one in investing millions of dollars to receive new jobs, or create new jobs. Actually it has been the opposite. We pour out all this money, don't do our homework, and then we actually lose full-time employment in the Province of Nova Scotia. The rhetoric that has been used against the Opposition for being critical and simply asking rational, normal, critical questions that should have been asked by the government before any of these deals were signed by the way, I don't think is doing our democratic system justice here in the province.

This is a government that has not once brought in any single piece of legislation or an idea that has actually addressed some of the fundamental issues which affect the competitiveness of this province in actually creating new jobs. This Party is of the belief that we can't just go out and buy new jobs. The answer just isn't in getting the major industry of the day and giving them $100 million and bringing them in here. We need to have a strategy in place that addresses the fundamental issues that this province has when it comes to being competitive, recruiting industries, and supporting small business. We don't want to be a place where industries say, oh, we can go to Nova Scotia and get a cheque, go in there for a number of months or years, and take it and leave.

We want to be a province where industry says, that place is a great place to do business, not because they're cutting us a huge $100 million cheque, but because it actually makes sense to go do business there because the province is supportive of what we want to do at a fundamental level. We have not seen this government take any action on taxes. We have some of the highest taxes in the country.

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, please. The member's time has expired.

The honourable member for Kings North.

MR. JIM MORTON « » : Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to stand tonight to speak to this resolution but I would like to begin with just a couple of comments about the way it was. You know, when we took office in 2009, we had what has been referred to in this House already today as the worst economic record in Canada for a period of 20 years. That's what we were facing.

[Page 3650]

We also inherited a fiscal mess. We had a deficit that we needed to deal with in the vicinity of $340 million - something that we could see would have escalated to $1.4 billion if it had been unchecked. We had a roads deficit in this province, something that matters an awful lot to rural Nova Scotians, that at the point that we took office was in the vicinity of $4 billion, the amount that it would have taken to put our roads in reasonable shape. We had a stagnating minimum wage, something that actually drove people out of this province. We had an accumulated debt that in 2009 was at $12 billion with interest approaching $1 billion on our $9 billion budget each year.

Of course that's nothing new. If you look at our history, we've been "Goin' Down the Road," as a great Canadian film of the late 1960s showed, for a very long time. You know that history of going down the road is something that my colleague, the member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley chronicled in a book that he prepared, called Away, which I think demonstrates so clearly that we've been going down the road to look for work for 150 years. During those 150 years, I think a reasonable question is, who has been presiding over that state of affairs here in this province? I don't have to tell many people in this House who that is - it's those guys over there, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, when we were elected in 2009, the world economy had sunk into a very precarious state. We were elected in the midst of probably the worst global economic times that we have experienced since the Great Depression. I only have to call the attention of this House to what is happening in Greece today and this week, and what has been happening over months past; what's happening with the European sovereign debt; and what has been happening with the U.S. slowdown, a market that has traditionally bought more than 80 per cent of our products. We've understood that reality and we haven't panicked in the face of that reality, but we've moved forward with care and an understanding that it's a plan we need for building a better future, not panic or reactivity. That's the basis of a better economic future.

We've been doing a number of things, Mr. Speaker, to put ourselves on a different path - we've been getting our fiscal house in order and we've been making good progress on that. We recognize that there's a need for balance if we're to build a better economy, an economy that also recognizes the need for investments in education, and the changing demographics that this province needs to think about. We need to build a better future that's based on new opportunities in health care, understanding that better collaboration and innovation and delivery in health services is critical. We need to build an economic future that recognizes that there are still those among us who have too little, who need more supports, and we've been paying attention to that with new arrangements in Community Services.

[Page 3651]

We've been trying to deal, as we've gone forward, with improvements and more transparency in our planning around road development as we reduce the kind of imbalance that had been built up there.

Mr. Speaker, there are a number of things that we've been focused on in particular as we've been trying, and succeeding, in building that better future. I think the Irving Shipyard needs to be mentioned as we go forward, something that will result in 11,500 jobs at the peak of shipbuilding in our future. We've been continuing to move forward with an arrangement with Lower Churchill, something that will build more jobs as that construction work occurs, and we'll build a better economic future as we move more and more of our electrical generation to renewables.

We have a plan for building a convention centre in Nova Scotia, here in Halifax, one that will create jobs as that happens, but also it will bring the world to Nova Scotia, something that also is important in our future. I think the kind of mapping that has been done - in this province - of the seabed has led to some of the most extensive exploration that Shell Canada is doing in our province's history. All of those activities, Mr. Speaker, are part of our jobsHere strategy, our plan to grow the economy and create good jobs.

We've predicated that work on investing in three things: increased productivity; more innovation; and understanding that our future needs to be based on being more competitive not only here, locally, but across the world. We've used tools that have already been mentioned in this House today, like the Productivity Investment Program, a voucher program that connects business ideas with academic know-how, and things like the payroll rebate that has had quite a lot of discussion in this House already today.

I can mention some examples of things that are coming to fruition as we talk about ideas like this, the PROJEX engineering investment or contract has been talked about already today, which will bring 440 engineering jobs to this province. We've talked today, already, about the IBM Global Delivery Centre, which, over the next eight years, will bring 500 good jobs to Halifax and be of use to all of Nova Scotia, but those are just two examples, Mr. Speaker. I could mention as well UPS' decision to open up a distribution centre here in Dartmouth, to serve Nova Scotia and Atlantic Canada.

I think about investments, about the careful evolution of aquaculture, which will increase local food production in a sustainable development plan - something that's creating good jobs for coastal communities all around Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, when I think about the kinds of economic development that have occurred through jobsHere, I think about my own neighbourhood, where a company called Great Valley Juices, that processes half the apple crop of the Annapolis Valley, got a new piece of equipment that enables it to bottle more apple juice and other kinds of juices, keeping important jobs in Port Williams. I think of Crown Fibre Tube in Kentville, which has new equipment which will position it to compete more successfully in the world and local markets.

[Page 3652]

I think of Livelenz, a company that's now located in Bedford but was earlier located in the Annapolis Valley, which develops computer software programming for the fast food industry and has, at the time of our investment, something like 5,000 customers in eight countries and is poised for growing that business and creating more good jobs for this province. I think of Air Jazz and Chorus Aviation, which will, over the next five years, by relocating here to Halifax, be creating 150 new jobs in our province. I think of Allendale Electronics in the southwest part of our province; it's been building circuit boards for 30 years, and it's retraining its employees so that it is better prepared, in the hopes it will secure more work with the Irving Shipbuilding contract. I think, Mr. Speaker, of LED Roadway Lighting, which is doing work around the world and here in Nova Scotia, actually improving the lighting and the finances of those municipalities and cities that decide to change their roadway lighting.

We have, Mr. Speaker, 7,600 more jobs in Nova Scotia - 7,600 more jobs in this province than we had when we were elected in 2009.

I have to think, as I have been doing this, what have those other guys been doing across the aisle? Well, I think they haven't been doing a lot, or I guess they've been making suggestions for going back to some old ways of doing business. They have made suggestions for changing the way we generate electricity that would raise our costs from 30 to 50 per cent. In fact, they have been laughing in this House and being, I think, impolite when we've had visitors who are interested in creating job development in this province. That's not helpful, Mr. Speaker.

Of course, there is a great deal more work to do. We have to shepherd all those taxes that we've begun . . .

MR. SPEAKER « » : Order, order. The time allotted is now up.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

MR. EDDIE ORRELL « » : Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It's my pleasure to rise this evening to speak to this resolution: "Therefore be it resolved that due to the increasing losses of full-time jobs in the province, the NDP's jobsHere strategy should be renamed part-time jobsHere."

Mr. Speaker, over the last two or three weeks in this Legislature, we keep hearing 7,600 more jobs, 7,600 more jobs. Not once have I heard anyone over on that side say, 7,600 more full-time jobs. Mr. Speaker, a full-time job, in this society today, allows a family to get by. It gives them a fighting chance to survive with our high taxes and our high power rates and our high cost of fuel, but it doesn't make it easy. So I can just imagine what living on a part-time job is like. Creating part-time jobs is fine and dandy for someone who needs a part-time job, but for someone who needs a full-time job, a part-time job just doesn't cut it.

[Page 3653]

We sit here day after day after day and we get the blame for all that is going wrong in the province today because of past governments, back as far as 20 years ago. We've had three years of this government's rule and even today we are hearing, it's our fault, it's our fault, we can't do this because we're strapped.

We had balanced budgets before this group came into power and we don't have that anymore. We hear, we've got a plan and I hear that every day, we have a plan, we have a plan. We don't have the details of that plan, we know it's an expensive plan - our electricity is coming from Muskrat Falls, we have a plan. We don't know how much it's going to cost.

So the people out there with full-time jobs, who are struggling to make it, are wondering what this plan is going to cost and the people with part-time jobs? They've got to be scared to death. They are talking about getting their house in order and what do they do to start that? They raise taxes, two per cent on the HST.

AN HON. MEMBER: I remember someone said they weren't going to do that.

MR. ORRELL « » : That two per cent brought in $470 million-some odd more dollars to this society and they still can't balance that budget. We hear the potential of all these announcements; the potential jobs. Well, until those jobs and those people start getting a salary from those jobs, that's all they are - potential. We hear about keeping jobs versus creating jobs. We're talking about creating jobs. It's great to be able to keep the ones we have and we're all for that but we have to create new ones as well.

The honourable member who just spoke, started rhyming off businesses that have done well in society - well, we think about DSTN, we think about Bowater. The little jobs from your PIP programs - the couple thousand here, couple thousand there - it's a great idea and keeps these jobs in business, but what about the millions that are spent on the big corporations that take that money and run? This government has made life so expensive, that those who should be enjoying their golden years are having to try and get full-time jobs, just to make their ends meet.

Since October 2009 there are 7,400 fewer, full-time jobs in this province, so they created 7,600 part-time jobs and lost 7,400 full-time jobs.

AN HON. MEMBER: That's a better deal for today's families.

MR. ORRELL « » : I can't see where that deal is better for today's families. I've heard that slogan in this House, Mr. Speaker, and if I ask those people who are losing jobs, I don't hear that from them. Almost 3,000 hard-working Nova Scotians with jobs couldn't make ends meet and had to use a food bank in the last year. Parents are forced to make tough choices - food or rent, food or medicine - and all we hear from the NDP are their arrogant claims about success; the jobsHere program. They dismiss the poverty stats and they pat themselves on the back for creating these part-time jobs. It's like boastfully bailing out a sinking ship with a pail, while there are pumps available and ignoring the advice to utilize them.

[Page 3654]

Mr. Speaker, it's shameful this government is making life harder for Nova Scotians, who are playing by the rules and doing all of the right things. They are working full-time. They are living by the rules but life is getting harder - higher power rates, higher taxes. What I see is a government that is grasping at straws, as the reality of the past three years of poor decisions and bad management is finally starting to catch up with them. Part-time jobs are usually not stable.

AN HON. MEMBER: No benefits.

MR. ORRELL « » : They usually don't include benefits - thank you - pensions or vacation time, to spend with your family. This is the solution provided by the NDP. Worse than that, is the excuse of a solution, that they boast their failures as a success policy. Our employment rate is the third worst in the country and well back from the national average. Part-time jobs are not the answer to develop a growing economy. They are a symptom of a much worse, much more serious problem - an economy that is crumbling.

Mr. Speaker, just a few statistics. We have the second-worst provincial job losses in this country, over the last three years, losing 7,400 full-time jobs since October, 2009. In October 2008 full-time jobs in this country stood at 371,000; in October, 2012 it was 365,500. That's 5,500 less full-time jobs, that's less than the worst recession in this country.

We keep hearing they help the economy and we think there is nothing further from the truth: the second worst growth in jobs over the last two years with only 2,400; the second worst job loss in the last year, 1,400. Statistics show that growth of full-time jobs is moving in the wrong direction.

Let's look at specific areas in Nova Scotia. Cape Breton has lost 500 full-time jobs since 2009. Since October 2011, Halifax has lost 1,800 full-time jobs; the staggering number on the South Shore, 6,100 full-time jobs since October, 2009. We hear about the loss of the Yarmouth ferry. These numbers show the effect that has on the economy of Nova Scotia, especially the South Shore. The people there are losing jobs at an alarming rate, especially in the tourism industry. When people don't come from the United States and don't travel through the South Shore to see that beautiful part of the province, they miss out. Tourism operators, we've seen hotels close, we've seen small businesses close.

[Page 3655]

That's not a better deal for today's families, those families who are losing these jobs, those families who have to pack up and go out West. I don't see that as a better deal for today's family.

Only one area has seen any growth in this province in the last three years and if we look at the unemployment, the number of people, we have the second highest unemployment in the country, behind New Brunswick. There are 2,300 more people to this unemployment since 2009. The provincial unemployment rate is at 9.2 per cent; Cape Breton, 16.4 per cent - that's up from 15.2 per cent since they came into power; the South Shore, 13.5 per cent, up from 8.4 per cent.

The employment rate is the worst in Canada at 58.6 per cent; the national average is 61.8 per cent. Dexternomics and his social abacas have dealt winning hands to unions and large corporations. While sliding through untendered deals to choose winners and losers, they have abandoned the average Nova Scotian who simply wants to work and play by the rules and have a full-time job to support their family, to make sure their family can get ahead and enjoy life in this beautiful province. Under this government, we're not seeing that. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER « » : I thank all the members for engaging in today's late debate. That now concludes the business of the House.

The House will now rise and meet again tomorrow at 2:00 p.m. We are adjourned.

[The House rose at 5:13 p.m.]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

[Page 3656]

RESOLUTION NO. 1984

By: Mr. Allan MacMaster « » (Inverness)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Maude and Omer Campbell, of Port Hood, were named Chestico Couple of 2012; and

Whereas Maude grew up in Rankinville as the youngest of 10 children who went on to study nursing while Omer was the 6th of eight children who grew up in Harborview; and

Whereas after 50 years of marriage, Maude and Omer are enjoying retirement and various interests such as four-wheeling, headlining, travelling and attending concerts;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Omer and Maude Campbell on 50 years of marriage and wish them a great year as this year's Chestico Couple.

RESOLUTION NO. 1985

By: Mr. Leo Glavine « » (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 2001-02 West Kings High School hockey team, the Wolverines, were undefeated in league play and performed one of the truly memorable hockey seasons at West Kings High School in Auburn; and

Whereas the West Kings Wolverines of 2001-02 also won the regional title that year by defeating Yarmouth;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly recognize and congratulate the West Kings Wolverine Hockey Team of 2001-02 on their induction into the Berwick Sports Hall of Fame in June, 2012.

RESOLUTION NO. 1986

[Page 3657]

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this week marks the 10th annual Bully Awareness Week in Canada; and

Whereas this year's theme Stand up! To Bullying encourages people to take real action to prevent bullying from taking place; and

Whereas in honour of this week, the BC Government is hosting an ERASE bullying summit to raise awareness about the seriousness of this issue;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly recognize the importance of Bullying Awareness Week and urge the NDP Government to take real action on protecting children from becoming victims of bullying.

RESOLUTION NO. 1987

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today people across the world are celebrating Diwali, also known as the Festival of Lights; and

Whereas this joyous holiday dates back thousands of years and is marked by lighting candles to signify the triumph of good over evil; and

Whereas members of the Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist, Jain, and other communities will gather tonight with families and friends to share good food, dancing, and togetherness on this joyful occasion;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly extend our best wishes to those celebrating Diwali and embrace this spirited holiday.

RESOLUTION NO. 1988

[Page 3658]

By: Hon. David Wilson « » (Health and Wellness)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Accreditation Canada is an independent organization that provides national and international health care organizations with an external peer review process to assess and improve the services they provide to their patients, based on standards of excellence; and

Whereas South Shore Health has recently received full accreditation status with exemplary standing; and

Whereas the health authority was first accredited in the Spring and worked over the summer to complete additional work related to areas of client identification and clients' and families' roles to have their accreditation upgraded to the highest achievement level – exemplary standing;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating South Shore Health on receiving full accreditation status with exemplary standing and commend their dedication to providing quality services and patient care to the residents of Queens and Lunenburg Counties.

RESOLUTION NO. 1989

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jordon Legere was named Springhill High School's Junior Boys Athlete of the Month for September; and

Whereas Jordon is one of the school's top scorers on the junior boys soccer team so far this season and has played a large role in the team's undefeated record to date; and

Whereas Jordon is a leader on the field and shows great sportsmanship as he maintains good grades in class while keeping a positive and respectful attitude at games and practices, which motivates his teammates;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Jordon Legere on being named Springhill High School's Junior Boys Athlete of the Month and wish him continued success throughout the coming year.

[Page 3659]

RESOLUTION NO. 1990

By: Hon. Jamie Baillie « » (Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Anna Moore was named Springhill High School's Senior Girls Athlete of the Month in September; and

Whereas Anna Moore has shown that she has the ability to play any position on the soccer field and has played a key role on the team as the goalie, defence, midfield and has scored two goals as a striker; and

Whereas Anna has an excellent attitude both on and off the field and will be relied on many times as the team prepares for Regionals;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Anna Moore on being named Springhill High's Senior Girls Athlete of the Month and wish her continued success throughout the coming year.