Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

La Chambre s'est ajournée le
26 octobre 2017
























HALIFAX, MONDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1994



Fifty-sixth General Assembly



Second Session



2:00 P.M.



SPEAKER



Hon. Paul MacEwan



DEPUTY SPEAKER



Mr. Gerald O’Malley






MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We will commence the daily sitting at this time. The first item on the
agenda is the daily routine.



PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS



PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East.



MR. ROBERT CARRUTHERS: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Private and Local
Bills, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:



Bill No. 135 - Eastern Shore Recreation Commission Act.



Bill No. 136 - Yarmouth County Agricultural Society Annual Grants Act.



Bill No. 138 - St. Martha’s Regional Hospital Foundation Assistance Act.



and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without
amendment.



MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.



TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS






5825

 

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Finance.



HON. BERNARD BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I have a rather lengthy statement today. I beg the
indulgence of the House.



Mr. Speaker, today I have the privilege of informing this House and all Nova Scotians of a
development that will mean new jobs for thousands of Nova Scotians and new revenue for the province.
Acting on the recommendation of the Nova Scotia Casino Project Committee, last Friday I met and signed
a Memorandum of Agreement with the Metropolitan Entertainment Group and its parent company, ITT
Sheraton. That corporation will be the operator of two casinos in Nova Scotia, one located in Halifax and the
other in Sydney.



Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to now reveal the terms of that agreement. The benefits to Nova Scotians
from this development answer the question so often posed by members opposite, why is the government
pursuing a casino gaming industry? Today, the answer is clear. Casino gaming brings thousands of direct and
indirect jobs - well paid, secure jobs - to Nova Scotians. The casino project means millions of dollars of new
investment in our province. Casinos will provide new revenue to the government, revenue to support the
economic and social programs Nova Scotians need and expect. Casinos will attract tourists and convention
visitors to Nova Scotia, bringing additional jobs and economic opportunities.



Mr. Speaker, the casino gaming industry is a modern, well-regulated industry. Its major operators are
corporations with the highest standards of integrity and an acute understanding of the social responsibility
that this industry carries. Nova Scotia is fortunate to have, in ITT Sheraton, a casino operator that readily and
willingly accepts its responsibilities and will take tangible action to fulfil those responsibilities. The result will
be minimal, if any, negative social consequences from casino gaming. Indeed, this casino operator will help
Nova Scotia deal effectively, not only with problems associated with casinos, but also with problems that
already exist as a result of current gaming operations in our province. (Applause)



ITT Sheraton will undertake extensive educational programs to raise awareness. Its employees are
trained to identify problems and know how to deal effectively with those problems. The company will work
closely with Nova Scotia organizations that deal with the problems associated with gaming. In addition, the
casino operations will contribute a minimum of $1 million annually to the Nova Scotia Department of Health.
That contribution will support additional provincial education and treatment programs to combat problem
gaming from all sources. Mr. Speaker, experience all over the world shows us that modern, well-regulated
casinos provide significant economic benefits to their host regions, with little or no adverse effects.



The experience in Nova Scotia, as the agreement I will detail indicates, will be no different. The
permanent casinos in Halifax and Sydney will create 1,072 full-time jobs. Additional indirect jobs, as a result
of these operations, will number more than 1,500. Mr. Speaker, that’s more than 2,500 jobs for Nova Scotians
that would not exist if we did not proceed with this project. (Applause)



The average salary, excluding tips, in the casino operations will exceed $26,000 annually, and I’m told
that with tips included, the average salary is more than $32,000 a year. ITT Sheraton estimates that its total
annual payroll will be in the order of $28.2 million. The company is committed to making those jobs available
to Nova Scotians. It has a policy of local hiring and promotion from within and, Mr. Speaker, that is
demonstrated clearly at the Sheraton Hotel in Halifax, where 85 per cent to 95 per cent of the employees are
Nova Scotian, and 3 out of 4 managers have been trained and promoted from within. ITT has committed to
duplicate that record in its casino operations. (Applause)



As well, ITT Sheraton will develop and fund, in cooperation with the Nova Scotia community college
system, an extensive training program to provide Nova Scotians with the skills required for this exciting
industry. On that subject, Mr. Speaker, I want to alert all Nova Scotians to the training requirements for this
industry. The only accredited training program will be offered by our community colleges in Halifax and
Sydney. Entry competition for the first of those programs will be advertised publicly in the very near future.
Programs will begin in time to ensure a fully trained staff is available when the interim casinos open in 1995.
The only training program recognized by the operator is the program offered in our community college
system.



Mr. Speaker, there will be employment for approximately 800 Nova Scotians in those interim casinos.
The Halifax interim casino will be in the Sheraton Hotel. The Sydney interim casino will be in a building near
Centre 200. Those employment opportunities will be available to train Nova Scotians in the spring of next
year, that is the spring of 1995. Capital investment by ITT Sheraton in the Halifax interim casino will be
$23.9 million. The Sydney interim casino will cost $11.1 million.



Within a year, construction will begin on a permanent casino in Halifax, to be located on the
harbourfront, north of Purdy’s Wharf. That facility, with 40,000 square feet of floor area, will be built at a cost
of $121.2 million, and is expected to open late in 1997 or early in 1998.



In Sydney, construction will begin on a $20 million permanent casino within six months of the opening
of the interim casino. It will be located next to Centre 200 and is expected to open in 1996.



The total capital investment the operator will make in Nova Scotia is in excess of $176 million. Mr.
Speaker, ITT Sheraton is committed to employing local contractors and using local suppliers where possible
and when prices are reasonably competitive. In Halifax, 242 full-time jobs will be created by the casino
construction project. In Sydney, 154 construction jobs will be created. This translates into 759 employment
years of work for Nova Scotians in the construction of those facilities. (Applause) Indirect employment, as
a result of construction activity, will mean an additional 1,017 employment years of work. In case you have
not been keeping track, this project will create more than 2,500 permanent jobs in Nova Scotia and 1,775
employment years of work during construction.



Mr. Speaker, let me go on and outline the financial aspects of this deal. The Province of Nova Scotia
will receive a win tax, which is 20 per cent of all gaming revenue. That is 20 per cent off the top, if you will,
after winnings are paid out but before any other expenses are calculated. Once the two permanent casinos are
in operation, it is estimated that revenue to the province from the win tax alone will be approximately $32
million annually.



Mr. Speaker, the province’s share of after-expense profits from the casino will be 65 per cent. The
operator’s share will be 35 per cent. Revenue from the province’s profit share from the Halifax casino will be
an estimated $18.8 million annually. The profit share from the Sydney casino, an estimated $4.4 million per
year, will be distributed to charities and community groups throughout Nova Scotia. (Applause) Again, in case
you have not been keeping track, total direct financial benefits to the province are expected to exceed $50
million annually in revenue.



Mr. Speaker, the operator has great confidence in the potential of this project. That fact is illustrated,
in no uncertain terms, by the guarantee that they have provided. ITT Sheraton has guaranteed the province
$100 million in revenue, to be paid at a rate of $25 million per year in each of the first four years of operation.
The first $25 million will be paid on the day the interim casino in Halifax opens its doors. (Applause) In terms
everyone can understand, the operator will pay the province $100 million, regardless of the revenue the
casinos generate. Needless to say, both the operator and the province believe the revenues will far exceed the
operator’s guarantee.



[2:15 p.m.]



Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the government, I want to publicly thank Mr. Laszlo Lichter, Chairman, and
all members and staff of the Nova Scotia Casino Project. Working under the stress of some very tight
deadlines, the project team produced excellent legislation and a sterling recommendation concerning the
casino operator. That recommendation, I might point out, was the unanimous choice of the project committee.
The process undertaken by the Casino Project Team was beyond reproach. They brought diligence,
intelligence and integrity to the task. The results speak for themselves.



The project team recommended and the government has entered into an agreement in principle with
a first-class organization. ITT Corporation is a diversified, global enterprise engaged in financial and business
services, manufacturing and the hospitality industry. In 1993, ITT recorded revenues in the order of $23
billion and profits of $913 million. Nova Scotia can be proud of its expanding association with ITT and its
98,000 employees world-wide.



I might add, Mr. Speaker, that during this selection process, all of the expenses involved have been
covered by the proponents, including the successful proponent. This process, the Casino Project Committee
and its selection, done with great diligence, has not cost the taxpayers of Nova Scotia one red cent. (Applause)



ITT Sheraton is known to Nova Scotians for its beautiful hotel on the Halifax waterfront. It operates
hotels in 61 nations around the world, and casinos in the United States, Egypt, the Netherlands Antilles,
Australia and I think, as of yesterday, now in Ontario. The Government of Nova Scotia is proud and fortunate
to have entered into this association with ITT Sheraton, a corporation built on the finest traditions of service,
integrity and business excellence. Together we are confident we can offer Nova Scotians new economic
opportunities in an industry that will bring lasting benefits to the people of Nova Scotia. Thank you, Mr.
Speaker. (Applause)



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.



MR. GEORGE MOODY: Mr. Speaker, it is a very sad day for all of Nova Scotia. It is a very dark day
for Nova Scotians and when the minister indicated at the end that it will bring everlasting benefits to Nova
Scotians, I wonder what benefits it will bring to some people who are affected by this casino. It will have a
socio-economic impact on this province; it will have an effect on the way of life in this province, as we have
known it in the past.



AN HON. MEMBER: Prove it.



MR. MOODY: I can prove that just like you can prove some of the numbers that are given here today.
That is what is sad about this. If we were going to go ahead with casinos, why couldn’t we have done it right?
Why couldn’t we have done our socio-economic impact studies ahead of time? (Interruptions)



AN HON. MEMBER: Put some truth to what you are saying.



MR. MOODY: Mr. Speaker, I listened to the minister out of courtesy and our caucus listened with
courtesy. I would hope that I would get that same respect from this House that that minister got today. This
is a very serious issue. It is an issue that is going to affect the lives of a lot of people in this province and it
is an issue that should be fairly and openly discussed. If you are afraid of that, then it is very unfortunate.



Mr. Speaker, the minister says that we are going to get 7 per cent to 28 per cent of the revenues from
out-of-province. We don’t know where the study or those numbers come from. How do we know that that will
be true?



When he says that there will be minimal negative social consequences from casino gambling in this
province, how do we know that, Mr. Speaker? How do we know that that is true? When he says that we are
going to give $1 million to the Health Department, it will take more than $1 million, I am sure.



Mr. Speaker, when we talk about the good jobs, well, when he compared this with an industry that
comes here that makes a product that we sell out-of-province, we do get good jobs because revenue does come
to this province. Here we have an industry that this government is bragging about, that all it does is recycle
money. It will take money from businesses in this province. People only have so much money to spend. As
you look at studies that have been done and effects of casinos in other places, we know that the local
businesses will suffer. There will be some job gains here, there is no question, but there will be some job
losses. How are you going to explain to those people that this casino was important and they are going to lose
their job, because it came?



So, Mr. Speaker, there have been a lot of people in this province - this minister says, he listened to this
committee. He didn’t listen to the three committees that went around the province. He didn’t listen to what
many Nova Scotians are saying, that they don’t want casinos in this province because of what they bring. This
government came to power saying that they had an economic plan. Well, if the best economic plan they can
lay before the people of this province is to add casinos to this province, to me, that is not the kind of economic
generator that is going to have a long-term and a good effect on this province down the road to pay its bills,
because we are talking about money that will be just recycled.



Mr. Speaker, how do we know that we got the best deal? The minister says, trust us. Well, we can look
at other issues that have happened in this province, whether it be Lucy Dobbin, or whether it be the hiring
of Dan Reid, and all kinds of things come out that are not the way that they are supposed to be. How do we
know that we can trust this government and not allow Nova Scotians to be the best judges? Nova Scotians
should be allowed to be the best judges of whether we got the best deal or not. If Nova Scotians are allowed
to do that, then they can truthfully say to this government, yes, we did get the best deal.



That is the question that will nag a lot of people for a long time, Mr. Speaker, when this government
allowed a process to go through that they said would be entirely open, entirely up-front, and at the end of it
they say, no, there are closed doors. We can’t reveal all the information. So, if we are going to have these
kinds of things happen in this province, and we have all kinds and forms of gaming that have been accepted
in this province. We know that VLTs were not accepted in corner stores, because the people said they didn’t
want them there. The people have clearly spoken that at this time they don’t want casinos in this province,
maybe never, but at least at this time, because they cherish the way of life we have here. It’s a friendly place.
It’s a place you can walk down the streets and feel pretty safe. What we are going to get with this casino, there
are a lot of unanswered questions.



Why couldn’t this government have waited and done the proper studies and then made the decision
to go on? That would have been seen as, at least, to be an open and not rushing something down Nova
Scotians’ throats. What happens in two, three or four years? We all make predictions. Well, my prediction is,
Mr. Speaker, that it won’t be good for the Nova Scotia tourist industry. It won’t bring people to Nova Scotia.
It won’t be a way of life that many Nova Scotians like to have.



I tell you, it is a sad day and I feel very bad that this announcement came so quickly, after less than
a year when a committee reported to this House, that Nova Scotians, at this time, didn’t want casinos. Thank
you, Mr. Speaker.



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.



MS. ALEXA MCDONOUGH: Mr. Speaker, it may indeed be a good day for the Liberal Party of Nova
Scotia, indeed the Liberal Government of the day, who have their sights fixed on short-term revenues that will
appear on the books of Nova Scotia just prior to the next election campaign. But it is not a good day for Nova
Scotia as it relates to the state and health of democracy in this province.



It surely is fitting that the Sheraton operators indicated that privateering would be the theme of their
casino operation, because we have here a corporation that has been successful, that is for sure, in pirating this
government away from Nova Scotians and in convincing a Minister of Finance, and presumably his colleagues
as well, that this is an exciting, new industry. An industry, Mr. Speaker, which preys on the vulnerable and
the gullible.



The Finance Minister, in issuing his statement today, Mr. Speaker, indicated that he would be
answering the question of why is this government pursuing a casino gaming industry. Well, I want to
congratulate the Finance Minister because he has answered that question for Nova Scotians today. He has
made it clear that he is a Finance Minister not only drunk with power and has sugar plums dancing in his
head like dollar signs, but also that he is displaying already all of the characteristics of a compulsive gambler.
In the financial statements of this minister today, what we see is exactly what happens to a compulsive
gambler and their family; they calculate the wins, they ignore the losses. They talk about all the revenues, they
do not talk about the net impact when those dollars are diverted away, not just diverted away from small
businesses and local economic activity, but diverted absolutely away from producing some goods and products
and services that have inherent value.



Mr. Speaker, this statement from the minister today, if graded during the Christmas exam period,
would not meet the requirements of Accounting 101. The Minister of Finance goes on at great length about
how the employees in the casinos are going to be trained to deal effectively with the problems of gamblers.
I am a psychiatric social worker. Nobody knows how to deal effectively with the problems of compulsive
gamblers that are killing their families and harming their communities.



The Minister of Finance has talked about how we are going to see so many jobs but he knows, and
Nova Scotians know, that there has been no calculation of the net effect of this pro-casino policy. He talks
about the construction jobs that are going to be generated in the short term. Of course, there are going to be
construction jobs but it is false economy and deceptive in the extreme to talk about this being an investment
from some Santa Claus from away that is going to bring a sack of money into our midst and dump it on Nova
Scotia ground and see it take root. Mr. Speaker, all that casino operator is doing is taking the money directly
out of Nova Scotians’ pockets and returning some of it in short-term investments.



Mr. Speaker, it is, to say the least, deceptive to say to Nova Scotians that Nova Scotians are not going
to have to pay one red cent for the process that has gone on to determine what the course of action should be.
I want to say that at least Laszlo Lichter, the chairman of that committee, told the truth when he told Nova
Scotians recently that he was not working for Nova Scotians. He told the truth when he said he was not asked
to do economic and social impact analyses and make recommendations of whether this was a good policy or
a bad policy for Nova Scotians. Laszlo Lichter did his job well. He delivered on what the government directed
and that was the decision to get into casino gambling and we are getting into it now if this government is
going to thumb its nose at democracy and decide that Nova Scotians should have no say.



[2:30 p.m.]



But let’s be clear that the agreement that the minister shared with the people of Nova Scotia, finally
some information put out to Nova Scotians, makes it clear that it is only upon the successful passage of
legislation in this House. Well, Mr. Speaker, there are only 11 seats on the Opposition side, but there are tens
of thousands of Nova Scotians out there that are opposed to the general course of action that this government
has launched and I believe, as they analyze the unbelievable economics of the statement made by the Minister
of Finance today, are going to be opposed to this proposal, in particular.



The minister has gone to great lengths to thank the casino committee group for their great diligence,
intelligence and integrity that they applied to the task. Well, I have to say, I don’t know how the Minister of
Finance would know that that was true or untrue because he keeps telling us that this has been an arm’s length
relationship.



Mr. Speaker, I think it is a sad day for democracy. I think that we have here a statement from a
Finance Minister who either does not know the difference between gross and net proceeds, gross and net
gains, or he does know perfectly well, but his very short-sighted view of what casino gambling revenues could
do for his budget in the short term, going into the next election, have clouded his judgment, have clouded his
intelligence and allowed him to deceive Nova Scotians into thinking that this is all about net gains to Nova
Scotia. It is not about net gains to Nova Scotians. It is about a government that is utterly bankrupt and devoid
of any positive, constructive economic development strategy for this province and that is a very sad thing
indeed.



GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION



INTRODUCTION OF BILLS



NOTICES OF MOTION






MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Opposition.



RESOLUTION NO. 1338



MR. TERENCE DONAHOE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas legislation at present being debated in this House will have a profound impact upon municipal
ratepayers across Nova Scotia far into the future; and



Whereas if the government is unable to ensure a full contingent of government members in this
Legislature conducting the people’s business of Nova Scotia, the Minister of Municipal Affairs should ensure
Nova Scotians that she will be present in this Legislature; and



Whereas a Canadian Press story this morning, in both the Daily News and the Halifax Chronicle-Herald, reported that the Minister of Municipal Affairs has booked time off over the Christmas holidays;



Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Municipal Affairs make the decision as to what is the most
important to her, a vacation or the people’s business of Nova Scotia.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable Government House Leader.



RESOLUTION NO. 1339



HON. RICHARD MANN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Junior Achievement group from St. Peter’s District High School, JASP 3D, was named
the national Company of the Year for the second consecutive year; and



Whereas this group had to outperform over 450 other Junior Achievement organizations across the
country, a remarkable accomplishment, in order to win this prestigious honour; and



Whereas such lofty awards can only be obtained through the dedicated, unselfish and consistent efforts
of the many whose talents join together to produce such a winning combination;



Therefore be it resolved that the members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly unanimously applaud
and congratulate the JASP 3D students, the advisors, the sponsor and Junior Achievement of Cape Breton,
who have worked so hard to bring this national honour to the Island of Cape Breton once again.



Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice and passage without debate.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.






Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.



RESOLUTION NO. 1340



MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption
of the following resolution:



Whereas it is no coincidence that Nova Scotians are learning today both that the Liberals still intend
to impose casinos in the face of a hostile, alert public and that the Premier is once again firing his senior staff
and threatening his Cabinet; and



Whereas only Liberals with very bad aim would keep shooting the messenger when it is plain to see
that the Liberal message is the problem; and



Whereas any Liberal who believes that what they have here is a communications problem should not
risk much money at a casino;



Therefore be it resolved that in the opinion of this House, the government could hire Gerald Regan and
all his former staff, yet Nova Scotians would still hate this Liberal Government for breaking all of its promises
and, without consultation, arrogantly adopting discredited Tory policies.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Kings West.



RESOLUTION NO. 1341



MR. GEORGE MOODY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Liberal Government has asked Nova Scotians to trust them with respect to decisions
affecting health, education and municipal reform; and



Whereas today the government has announced the lucky winner on the bid to operate two Nova Scotia
casinos without providing details on the competing bids so that Nova Scotians could best determine whether
they are getting the best deal; and



Whereas an ugly pattern has emerged whereby this government has made expensive deals with
individuals - like Lucy Dobbin, former Judge Albert Bremner and Grant Morash -which do not represent the
public interest and which have cost taxpayers a lot of money;



Therefore be it resolved that the government make available financial details for each of the three final
bids to establish casinos in Nova Scotia, as well as documentation relating to the consideration of and the
prescriptions for social, economic, justice, health and community service problems which will result from the
establishment of casinos in Nova Scotia.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Pictou West.



RESOLUTION NO. 1342



MR. DONALD MCINNES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Minister of Housing and Consumer Affairs said on January 7th, of this year, that he
wanted banks to reduce interest rates on credit cards because, “it was time the banks’ credit charges reflected
the reality of today’s marketplace”; and



Whereas the minister also said that he would be talking with ministerial colleagues across Canada to
seek their support in cutting the cost of credit for Canadians; and



Whereas the minister’s complaint was lodged at a time last year when interest rates charged on
standard bank cards ranged from 14.70 per cent to 15.75 per cent;



Therefore be it resolved that, with one major bank increasing credit card interest rates late last week
to 17.5 per cent, with others expected to follow suit, the Minister of Housing and Consumer Affairs explain
to Nova Scotians as to why, one year later, credit interest rates have increased by nearly 3 per cent, and
resulted in an additional cost to Nova Scotians instead of decreasing as he said he wanted them to do last
January.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Kings West.



RESOLUTION NO. 1343



MR. GEORGE MOODY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas an emergency room nurse at the Digby General Hospital said in Sunday’s Daily News that,
“she is tired of seeing frail elderly people sent home from hospital with the flu because there is too few beds,
only to return a few days later much sicker”; and



Whereas the Digby emergency room nurse in describing the minister’s master plan said, “All we have
seen are budget cuts, we haven’t seen much reform; and



Whereas a nurse at Cape Breton’s largest private home for special care said, “Nurses want health
reform but Health Minister Ron Stewart’s blueprint won’t deliver it”;



Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Health stop dressing up the drastic cuts to Nova Scotia’s
health care system and disguising them as health reform initiatives.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.






RESOLUTION NO. 1344



MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Liberals MLAs have prepared a roster for Cabinet Ministers and backbenchers alike to avoid
attendance in this House during the next two weeks; and



Whereas this House will be reviewing government legislation that was prepared without thorough
consultation and that has met widespread opposition; and



Whereas only Liberal arrogance could demand that ill-considered laws, introduced with no mandate,
be railroaded without a break, then cosily arrange time off for Liberals only;



Therefore be it resolved that the Liberal Government should give Nova Scotians a break this Christmas
by withdrawing for further consideration its undemocratic legislative agenda, instead of reserving all the little
comforts for themselves alone.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.



RESOLUTION NO. 1345



MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the Health Minister is scheduled on the roster to have several days off during the holidays
while the House is scheduled to continue to sit, on taxpayers’ time; and



Whereas the Health Minister’s portfolio has been one of the major focuses in this session of the
Legislature; and



Whereas there are many more questions and issues which are waiting for the Health Minister’s
attention and will require serious answers;



Therefore be it resolved that if the Health Minister feels that he has time for a vacation, even though
the House is still scheduled to be in session, he should be prepared to have the Premier well briefed to respond
in his absence.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled. (Interruptions)



Order, please.



The honourable Leader of the Opposition.



RESOLUTION NO. 1346



MR. TERENCE DONAHOE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas in this government’s Throne Speech of this year, it stated that the,  “government has outlined
an ambitious plan to lead the province toward a better future”; and



Whereas the Throne Speech continued, “Because of this plan . . . 1994 will be remembered as a turning
point in the life of our province.”; and



Whereas it appears as if the turning point will include the influences of a casino, regardless of how
many Nova Scotians ask this government to keep them out of our province;



Therefore be it resolved that this government rediscover its commitment in its April Throne Speech
and offer evidence of their work toward this turning point in Nova Scotia’s future well-being and congratulate
Nova Scotians on what they, themselves, have done to see 1994 as a year of growth and optimism.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.



RESOLUTION NO. 1347



MS. ALEXA MCDONOUGH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Nova Scotia today lacks an effective system of control and regulation over gambling activities,
despite many recommendations that such a system be put in place before casinos are considered; and



Whereas without putting regulation or control in place, the lotteries minister is playing high roller with
other people’s money by deciding which government friends and loyal Liberals will be awarded Canada’s only
private, for-profit casino license; and



Whereas Nova Scotians deserve to know the expected effects, regulation and control before any casinos
proceed;



Therefore be it resolved that this House urges the government to proceed carefully and only with clear
expressions of public approval, as have most other provinces, before ever opening a permanent casino.



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Annapolis.



RESOLUTION NO. 1348



MR. EARLE RAYFUSE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas Mr. Joe Graves of Port Lorne, Annapolis County, has recently celebrated his 90th birthday.
As well, Joe and his wife, Hattie, celebrated their 65th Wedding Anniversary in August 1994; and



Whereas Joe produces superior turnip seed that he has exhibited at the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto
for the past 45 years; and



Whereas Mr. Graves has won first prize for 43 out of the 45 years of competition;



Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Joe Graves, and I am sure his wife, Hattie, who
takes part in the competition preparations, and wish them both good health to continue on their hobby farming
at Port Lorne, Annapolis County.



Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice and passage without debate.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed that notice be waived?



It is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried.



The honourable Leader of the New Democratic Party.



RESOLUTION NO. 1349



MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption
of the following resolution:



Whereas Province House staff, including those working in the Legislative Library, Clerk’s Office,
Speaker’s Office, Pages, messengers, and security, have turned in long hours of excellent support during both
spring and fall sittings this year; and



Whereas these many capable women and men share duties requiring that staff be here well before the
first MLA arrives for an 8:00 a.m. call to order and here also after the last speech of the evening; and



Whereas Province House staff also share, without a voice in this Chamber, the burdens of sitting
without recess through the last days of Advent and the entire Christmas holidays;



Therefore be it resolved that in the spirit of the season, this House thanks each and every staff person
who serves this Legislature, with warmest wishes to them and their loved ones at this time of peace and
goodwill.



Mr. Speaker, I would request waiver of notice and passage without debate.



MR. SPEAKER: I take it that it is agreed.



Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.



The motion is carried. (Applause)



The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.






RESOLUTION NO. 1350



MS. ALEXA MCDONOUGH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the winning Sheraton-Purdy’s Wharf casino proposal will appropriately have a pirate theme
since so many Nova Scotians view the Liberal casino mania as little more than piracy; and



Whereas the Finance Minister and his officials have not once addressed the net effects, economic or
social, of the promised 87 per cent increase in gambling which amounts to little more than a tax on the
vulnerable and the gullible; and



Whereas no other provincial government has imposed a casino without clear evidence of local approval
and careful public study of the net effects;



Therefore be it resolved that this House urges the government to desist from its drive to open casinos
under a cloud of secrecy and reconsider this unwelcome and destructive move which, by the minister’s own
admission, may benefit only Sheraton, Purdy’s Wharf and a few who actually get casino jobs.



[2:45 p.m.]



MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Bedford-Fall River.



RESOLUTION NO. 1351



MRS. FRANCENE COSMAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas the official signing of the site agreement was held on December 14, 1994, to transfer 48 acres
of land from the Town of Bedford to the Canadian Red Cross Fractionation Corporation; and



Whereas this facility will have tremendous and positive impact on the economy of this region; and



Whereas this facility will ensure self-sufficiency for Canada’s blood requirements;



Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly applaud the government’s vital work with the four
municipalities, the Red Cross and Miles Canada to attract this essential facility to our region.



Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed that there be waiver of notice on that?



I hear several Noes.



The notice is tabled.



The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.



RESOLUTION NO. 1352



MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the
adoption of the following resolution:



Whereas in July, the Finance Minister and Premier were bravely forecasting that in the relatively near
future, decentralization of government operations into Cape Breton would begin; and



Whereas while specific decentralization has been promised for Amherst, the minister is shoving a
casino down Cape Bretoner’s throats to try and drain every last dime out of the local economy and into his
pocket; and



Whereas this is exactly the kind of behaviour that brought down the silent nine Conservative MLAs
from Cape Breton;



Therefore be it resolved that instead of taking three more years to break the promise of jobs, ignore
Cape Bretoners and increase the economic crisis with schemes like a casino, the Finance Minister should get
it over quickly by resigning his seat now.



MR. SPEAKER: I would like to ask the Clerk to read that motion very carefully.



The notice is tabled.



ORDERS OF THE DAY



GOVERNMENT BUSINESS



MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RICHARD MANN: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve
itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried.



[2:48 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Speaker Mr. Gerald O’Malley
in the Chair.]



[9:59 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened with Deputy Speaker Mr. Gerald O’Malley
in the Chair.]



MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:



THE CLERK: That the committee has met, made some progress and begs leave to sit again.



MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?



It is agreed.



The honourable Government House Leader.



HON. RICHARD MANN: Mr. Speaker, tomorrow we will be sitting from the hours of 12:00 noon until
8:00 p.m. The order of business following the daily routine and Question Period will be Committee of the
Whole House on Bills, probably Bill No. 114. I move that we adjourn until 12:00 noon tomorrow.



MR. SPEAKER: The motion for adjournment has been made and carried. The House will now rise to
sit tomorrow at the hour of 12:00 noon.



[The House rose at 10:00 p.m.]