Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

Hansard -- Mon., June 29, 1998

First Session

MONDAY, JUNE 29, 1998

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Nat. Res. - Nova Nada: Buffer Zone - Grant, Hon. W. Gaudet 1905
Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Milford: Aitken and Coventry Lane -
Ditch Repair, Mr. John MacDonell 1906
Gov'ts. (Can. & N.S.) - Tax Changes, Mr. M. Baker 1906
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. J. Smith 1907
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Anl. Rept. of the Superintendent of Pensions, Hon. D. Downe 1907
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
Health - Care Delivery: Review - Task Force, Hon. J. Smith 1907
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 953, Agric. - Jeanne & John Eyking (Boularderie):
LL D(Hon.) [UCCB] - Congrats., Hon. E. Lorraine 1909
Vote - Affirmative 1910
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 24, Wilderness Areas Protection Act, Hon. D. Downe 1910
No. 25, Recall Act, Mr. R. Matheson 1910
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 954, Health (Can.) - Care: Cuts Effect - PM Recognize Urge,
Mr. R. Chisholm 1911
Res. 955, Health - Hepatitis C: Compensation Package -
Open (N.S. Extra-1986-90), Dr. J. Hamm 1911
Res. 956, Educ. - Univ.: Tuition Fees - Promise Broken Regret,
Ms. E. O'Connell 1912
Res. 957, Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Hwys.: Hwy. No. 101 Priority Top -
Construction Schedule Announce, Mr. G. Archibald 1912
Res. 958, Health - R.K. MacDonald Nursing Home: Mr. James Deagle &
Dr. Patrick Walsh - Retirement Congrats., Mr. H. Fraser 1913
Vote - Affirmative 1914
Res. 959, Fin. - Casinos: Fixation - Abandon, Ms. Helen MacDonald 1914
Res. 960, DFO - Snow Crab Quota (N.S.): Injustice -
Fish. Min. (N.S.) Resolve, Mr. Charles MacDonald 1914
Res. 961, Health: Brain Injury Month (June) - Recognize,
Mr. Kevin Deveaux 1915
Vote - Affirmative 1915
Res. 962, Nat. Res. - Woodlot Owners: Tax Incentives - Prioritize,
Mr. J. Leefe 1916
Res. 963, NDP (N.S.) Leader - Words/Actions: Dichotomy - Note,
Hon. R. MacKinnon 1916
Res. 964, Bus. & Cons. Affs. - Gasoline Retail: Competition Foster -
Action, Ms. Y. Atwell 1917
Res. 965, Fin. - HST: Relief Future - Broaden, Dr. J. Hamm 1917
Res. 966, MLAs - Summer Adjournment: Shelburne - Stay,
Hon. C. Huskilson 1918
Vote - Affirmative 1918
Res. 967, Fish. - TAGS 2: Insufficient - DFO Convince,
Mr. John Deveau 1919
Res. 968, Nat. Res. - Tussock Moth Spray Prog.: Woodlot Owners -
Inform, Mr. B. Taylor 1919
Res. 969, Housing & Mun. Affs. - HRM: Rooming Houses Deaths -
Responsibility, Ms. Maureen MacDonald 1920
Res. 970, Sports - Antigonish Highland Games: Best Wishes -
Extend, Mr. H. Fraser 1921
Vote - Affirmative 1921
Res. 971, Nat. Res. - Nat. Gas: Communities - Commitment Fulfil,
Mr. M. Scott 1922
Res. 972, Health/Commun. Serv. - Dowloading:
Gov'ts. (Can. [PC & Lib.]) - Condemn, Mr. H. Epstein 1922
Res. 973, CBRM/Vic. Mun. - Fire Services: Understanding -
Acknowledge, Mr. M. Baker 1923
Vote - Affirmative 1924
Res. 974, RCL - Eastern Marine Branch 161: Extension - Congrats.,
Hon. K. Colwell 1924
Vote - Affirmative 1924
Res. 975, Province House - Boer War Statue: Clean-Up - Ensure,
Mr. J. Pye 1925
Vote - Affirmative 1925
Res. 976, NSLC - Tenders: Practices - Follow, Mr. J. DeWolfe 1925
Res. 977, NDP (N.S.): Political Posturing - Put Aside,
Hon. R. MacKinnon 1926
Res. 978, Fin. - HST: Tax Burden - Reduction Unfulfilled,
Mr. C. Parker 1926
Res. 979, Educ. - COGS: Renaming - Deny, Mr. G. Balser 1927
Res. 980, Econ. Dev. & Tourism - Bishop's Landing: Public Review -
Commit, Mr. P. Delefes 1928
Res. 981, DFO - Snow Crab Quota (N.S.): Discrimination -
Contact, Mr. Charles MacDonald 1928
Vote - Affirmative 1929
Res. 982, Educ. - Lunenburg Academy: Renovations - Commend,
Mr. M. Baker 1929
Vote - Affirmative 1930
Res. 983, CRTC - Broadcasting: Job Protection - Regulate,
Mr. F. Corbett 1930
Vote - Affirmative 1931
Res. 984, Bus. & Cons. Serv. - Gasoline Prices: Muscle - Flex,
Mr. B. Taylor 1931
Res. 985, Justice - Spousal Abuse: Initiatives - Review,
Mr. Kevin Deveaux 1932
Res. 986, Culture - Age of Sail Museum (Port Greville):
Lives Lost at Sea - Remembrance, Mr. M. Scott 1932
Vote - Affirmative 1933
Res. 987, East Preston Lions Club: Service (21 Years) - Congrats.,
Ms. Y. Atwell 1933
Vote - Affirmative 1933
Res. 988, Educ. - Cumb. North: Graduates (G12) -
Best Wishes Extend, Mr. E. Fage 1934
Vote - Affirmative 1934
Res. 989, Nat. Res. - Forestry: Inaction - Condemn, Mr. C. Parker 1934
Res. 990, Human Res. - Jobs (C.B.): Increase - Announce,
Mr. R. Matheson 1935
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ON MOTION FOR SUPPLY:
Ms. Helen MacDonald 1936
Mr. M. Baker 1939
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 1942
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON SUPPLY AT 1:27 P.M. 1944
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 3:02 P.M. 1944
REPORT OF CWH ON SUPPLY [Rule 62G(1)]:
Motion to Concur 1945
Vote - Affirmative ~ 1946 ~
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 26, Appropriations Act, 1998, Hon. D. Downe 1946
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 26, Appropriations Act, 1998, Hon. D. Downe 1947
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 26, Appropriations Act, 1998, Hon. D. Downe 1947
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 3:44 P.M. 1948
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 5:10 P.M. 1948
CWH REPORTS: 1948
PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 17, Video Lottery Terminals Moratorium Act 1948
Hon. Manning MacDonald 1949
Mr. J. Holm 1949
Dr. J. Hamm 1951
Vote - Affirmative 1952
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Anl. Rept. of the Nova Scotia Pay Equity Commission,
Hon. R. MacKinnon 1953
Anl. Rept. of the Workers' Compensation Board, Hon. R. MacKinnon 1953
HOUSE RECESSED AT 5:27 P.M. 1953
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 5:38 P.M. 1953
ARRIVAL OF LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 1954
BILLS GIVEN ROYAL ASSENT:
Nos. 6, 8, 11, 17 and 20 1954
No. 26 1955
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Thur., Oct. 15, 1998 1958
NOTICE OF QUESTION FOR WRITTEN ANSWER:
No. 1, Econ. Dev. & Tourism - NSRF (Innovacorp):
Offshore Device - Support Failure, Mr. P. Delefes 1959
NOTICE OF QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN ANSWERS:
No. 2, Educ.: HRM School Bd.-Progs. Buses/Fine Arts Credit (HS)-
Requirement - Costs Increase Effect, Mr. B. Taylor 1960
No. 3, Environ. - Five Island Lake: Project Completion -
Funding Availability, Mr. J. Leefe 1960
No. 4, Nat. Res.: Long Lake (Spryfield) - Development,
Mr. J. Leefe 1960
No. 5, Educ. - Hfx. Reg. Bd.: Eastern Passage JHS (Split-Shifts) -
Hearing Allow, Mr. E Fage 1961
No. 6, Educ. - Chignecto-Central Bd.: Needs Ass't. Report -
Smaller Schools Closure, Mr. E. Fage 1961
No. 7, Transport. & Pub. Wks.: Hwy. No. 104 (Wentworth Valley) -
Speed Limit, Mr. E. Fage 1962
No. 8, Transport. & Pub. Wks.: Hwy. Signage (No. 104 [Exits 7 & 11]
& Trunk 4 [Route 368]) - Improve, Mr. E. Fage 1962
No. 9, Health - Home Care N.S.: Positive Changes Homecare and
Nursing Ltd. - Status, Mr. E. Fage 1962
CORRIGENDUM
Thurs., June 25, 1998 - Page 1797
Line 14 - Insert the words "Auditor General Act &" after "Bill No. 8" and before "Provincial Finance
Act".
Line 15 - Delete "Bill No. 9 - Auditor General Act".

[Page 1905]

HALIFAX, MONDAY, JUNE 29, 1998

Fifty-seventh General Assembly

First Session

12:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Ronald Russell

DEPUTY SPEAKER

Mr. Donald Chard

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We will commence the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Housing and Municipal Affairs.

HON. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, as the MLA for the area, I beg leave to table a petition presented to me by Sister Sharon Doyle of Nova Nada which contains 17,215 names and addresses of individuals who have signed this petition. The petition reads as follows:

"GRANT NOVA NADA THE TWO-MILE BUFFER ZONE

The One-Mile buffer zone which J.D. Irving Ltd. granted Nova Nada November 5, 1997 is not adequate to preserve one of our most unspoiled and unpolluted wilderness areas, now a sanctuary for thousands of guests and retreatants.

1905

[Page 1906]

We, the undersigned, petition J.D. Irving, Ltd. to `go the extra mile,' grant Nova Nada the Two-Mile Buffer Zone, and work creatively with monks and supporters to minimize disturbance from logging operations in the third mile.

Monks and friends recognize the need for jobs in Nova Scotia and believe that preservation of the two-mile-no-harvest radius does not threaten jobs, since J.D. Irving owns over 250,000 acres in Nova Scotia alone and continues to acquire more.

If this buffer zone is not granted, Nova Nada will be forced to leave before the end of 1998 and Nova Scotia and all of Canada will lose one of its unique treasures, cherished for generations.".

Mr. Speaker, I have also added my name to this petition.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Hants East.

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition which reads, "We the people in Milford want the ditch between Aitken and Coventry Lane to be repaired with crocks and properly refilled over, so water off Highway #2 won't continue taking out land and land marks and destroying lawns.". I have affixed my name in support.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

MR. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table the following petition:

"TO FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS

1. The Income Tax Exemption is too low to cope with today's cost of living. It should be at least $20,000 minimum before tax is deducted.

2. Property and Fire Tax should be tax exempt on income tax returns.

3. All prescription drugs and charitable donations should be 100% tax deductible, and not subject to a reduction of 3% of net income.

4. There should be no tax on heating fuel, electricity or phone bills. They should be allowed to be deducted on income tax as these are necessities of life.

5. Eliminate the 15% HST as this will help to create additional jobs for Nova Scotians.

[Page 1907]

6. Repairs on homes, out-buildings, etc., should be deductible on income tax.

7. Eliminate Gun Legislation.".

I have endorsed my name on this petition, Mr. Speaker, and would ask leave to table it.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 17 - Video Lottery Terminals Moratorium Act.

and the committee recommends this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Finance.

HON. DONALD DOWNE: Mr Speaker, in accordance with the provisions of the Pension Benefits Act, I beg leave to table the Annual Report of the Superintendent of Pensions for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1997.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

HON. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotia's regionalized health care system has had many successes, like new services such as the diabetic care program in the northern region and the millions of dollars in savings through fewer administrators and bulk purchasing initiatives but there have been concerns expressed about a feeling of disconnection from the

[Page 1908]

communities the system serves, that the new system has slowed decision-making and eroded accountability. These concerns are real and they cannot and will not be ignored.

On Friday, in this House of Assembly, the members of the Legislature unanimously endorsed a resolution from the Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party calling for a review of the current structure of health care delivery. Today, I am confirming that the government will strike a task force that will include both health care consumers and providers. This task force will review the current structure for health care delivery and recommend changes that will provide for efficient and effective community-based and controlled delivery of quality health care services throughout the province.

We have to remember why Nova Scotia, and virtually every other province in Canada, moved to regionalize and decentralize health care delivery.

The goal to make administrative efficiencies, integrate services and maintain common standards of quality while ensuring an open and accountable system that encourages greater community input and control.

The most important driving force behind everything we do in health care must be the patients, Nova Scotians who require and deserve nothing but the best health care system we can provide for them.

Mr. Speaker, it is my hope that this task force will be able to conduct its work quickly and thoroughly so that we can all work to improve links between our health care system and the communities it serves. I thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. HELEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, on March 24th, the majority of Nova Scotians told members of this House that they wanted change, and particularly they expressed a very real concern about the health care system in this province. Throughout this session, we have debated the need for a more accountable, transparent process at the regional level. We have expressed grave concerns here on the Opposition side of this House about erosion of services in the health care system.

This task force is a beginning place for us to act immediately to restore faith and confidence in the health care system in Nova Scotia. I think this task force is a tangible expression of how a House composed in this way can hold the government accountable for its actions.

Mr. Speaker, this task force, however, needs to cooperate and coordinate its work with the reinstatement of the Provincial Health Council, which we value as Nova Scotians and members of this House ultimately as a watchdog for health care reform. Thank you.

[Page 1909]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. GEORGE MOODY: Mr. Speaker, I welcome this announcement by the Minister of Health. I congratulate him on moving quickly. There is no question that Nova Scotians had a concern about delivery of health care, especially in the rural areas. Obviously, the system is not working so that people from the community can have a say into the kind of health care that is being delivered in their community.

Hopefully, the task force will take into consideration and meet with various people across the province to put in place a more effective system; one that is accountable, one that is open and, yet, will have a quality system that I think, we, as legislators all want to see happen in this province. I believe this task force, as the minister has indicated, will be put together fairly soon and it will be well underway when the health council hopefully is up and running this fall and I see them, obviously in some way, working with the council in the end.

I want to commend the minister. I think he recognizes, along with many of us, that the people of this province were saying that a review needed to happen. Is the system working the way we want it to work for Nova Scotians? If not, how do we correct it and how do we get on with the job. So, I commend the minister on this announcement and look forward to that task force doing the job and reporting back, hopefully, by this fall so we can get on with some changes. Thank you.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Agriculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 953

HON. EDWARD LORRAINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jeanne and John Eyking, Senior, both originally from the Netherlands, immigrated to Nova Scotia choosing to make Cape Breton their home; and

Whereas along with operating a mixed-farm operation in Boularderie, Cape Breton, they are both actively involved in numerous community and farm organizations; and

Whereas Jeanne and John were each presented with honorary Doctor of Laws degrees from the University College of Cape Breton;

[Page 1910]

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Jeanne and John Eyking on each being bestowed honorary Doctor of Laws degrees from the University College of Cape Breton and in recognition of Canada Day on July 1st for all the immigrants who have chosen Nova Scotia to be their home.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice.

[12:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There is a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Finance.

HON. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, before I introduce my bill, if I may, I wish to introduce a very special guest in the Speaker's Gallery today, Mr. Colin Stewart, who is coordinator of the Nova Scotia Endangered Spaces Campaign. Colin has been working with the Department of Natural Resources and our government, and the previous administration, on the whole area of parks and protected areas assistance plan. He is a member of the World Wildlife Fund and I would ask all members of this House to give a very warm welcome to Mr. Colin Stewart. (Applause)

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 24 - Entitled an Act to Protect Wilderness Areas in Nova Scotia. (Hon. Donald Downe)

Bill No. 25 - Entitled an Act to Permit the Recall of a Member of the House of Assembly. (Mr. Reeves Matheson)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Opposition.

[Page 1911]

RESOLUTION NO. 954

MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Prime Minister declared Friday that the federal government will not support health care without making sure the money is properly spent; and

Whereas this is the same Prime Minister of the same Liberal Party who ended federal cost-sharing of health care and who ended federal transfers dedicated to health care; and

Whereas the present Liberal Government hit health care with the biggest spending cut in history, and despite election promises has not yet provided any increase in federal support;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the Prime Minister to recognize the devastating effects of his own government's massive cuts to health care, and the fact that every province would spend additional money to restore some of those cuts if the federal government ever reverses its own disastrous decisions.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 955

DR. JOHN HAMM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the number of Nova Scotians who contracted hepatitis C through tainted blood is significantly below original projections; and

Whereas the reduction in the number of victims who qualify for the original hepatitis C compensation package is a compelling reason to extend the compensation package to all victims of tainted blood and products; and

Whereas the most compelling reasons for extending the compensation package are fairness, justice and compassion;

Therefore be it resolved that this Liberal Government immediately do what is right, fair and just and open the compensation package to Nova Scotians outside the 1986 to 1990 time-frame.

[Page 1912]

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

RESOLUTION NO. 956

MS. EILEEN O'CONNELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Premier promised during the election campaign to freeze tuition fees at Nova Scotia universities; and

Whereas UCCB announced on Friday that tuition fees for the 1998-99 academic year would increase 3 per cent bringing the cost for a full-time student up to $3,548; and

Whereas Joe MacMullen, the Premier's official agent and chair of the UCCB Board of Governors, defended the increase saying it is less than the 5 per cent to 7.5 per cent increases being experienced by students at other Nova Scotia universities;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House regret that the Liberal broken promise on tuition fees will be an expensive one for university students returning to classes this fall.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 957

MR. GEORGE ARCHIBALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Highway Safety Council is the latest to urge government the necessity of twinning Highway No. 101; and

Whereas the Safety Council says it is mandatory that government in compiling a priority list for highway construction, address the areas where highway fatalities are above average; and

Whereas at least 28 people have died as a result of motor vehicle accidents in recent years on Highway No. 101;

[Page 1913]

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Transportation and Public Works immediately announce a capital budget highway plan that places the twinning of Highway No. 101 at the very top of the construction schedule.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Antigonish.

RESOLUTION NO. 958

MR. HYLAND FRASER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. James Deagle, Chairman and Dr. Patrick Walsh, Secretary, have given 30 years of volunteer service as members of the Board of Directors of the R.K. MacDonald Nursing and Guest Home in Antigonish; and

Whereas Mr. Deagle and Dr. Walsh will be retiring from the Board of Directors this year; and

Whereas their role as volunteers to the R.K. MacDonald Nursing and Guest Home has been an outstanding example of dedication and devotion to the elderly and disabled in our community, well above and beyond the call of duty;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Mr. Deagle and Dr. Walsh on their outstanding contribution to the community and wish them a restful and enjoyable retirement.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 1914]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 959

MS. HELEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Liberal Government continues to pursue its vision of Nova Scotia as a haven for casino high rollers; and

Whereas Nova Scotian rejected the Boudreau-Savage casino deal and will ultimately reject the MacLellan casino deal; and

Whereas the Premier of Ontario, Mike Harris, has listened to public opinion and cancelled plans to open 44 permanent casinos in that province;

Therefore be it resolved that the Liberals listen to the people and abandon this fixation with casinos. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 960

MR. CHARLES MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia's Southern Gulf fishermen have access to less than 10 per cent of the allowable snow crab fishery quota; and

Whereas Nova Scotia, especially northern Cape Breton, has been hit particularly hard by the downturn in the inshore fishery; and

Whereas the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans continues to ignore Nova Scotia's legitimate claim to a larger quota of the snow crab fishery, in the same manner that it ignores the request of other Nova Scotia fishermen for a larger portion of the northern shrimp fishery;

[Page 1915]

Therefore be it resolved that this House request the provincial Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture to seek an immediate meeting with the federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans to obtain an immediate resolution to this gross injustice to Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 961

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas June is Brain Injury Month; and

Whereas there are more than 550 brain injured survivors, including those who have had an aneurysm, brain tumour and brain injuries and hundreds more every year who suffer strokes; and

Whereas the people who treat and care for those with brain injuries, including health professionals, friends and family members, deserve recognition and support;

Therefore be it resolved that this House official recognize June as Brain Injury Month and extend our support to those who have suffered brain injuries as well as their friends, families and other caregivers.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

[Page 1916]

RESOLUTION NO. 962

MR. JOHN LEEFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas private woodlot owners are an important sector of Nova Scotia's economy; and

Whereas the recent report tabled by the National Forest congress entitled, Sustainable Forests, recommended changes to the federal Income Tax Act as well as to provincial and municipal taxation to enhance sustainable development of woodlots; and

Whereas the cancellation of the federal-provincial forestry agreements has resulted in woodlot owners urgently needing another form of support for sustainable management of woodlots;

Therefore be it resolved that Nova Scotia's Minister of Natural Resources make taxation incentives for woodlot owners a priority at the next federal-provincial meeting of Canada's Resources Ministers.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Labour.

RESOLUTION NO. 963

HON. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on the opening day of this legislative session, the Leader of the NDP socialist Party found the election of Speaker and Deputy Speaker to be "real democracy"; and

Whereas on Friday, June 26, 1998, that same socialist Leader condemned the majority of members of this Legislature for democratically debating and approving bills, referring to this process as "legislation by extortion"; and

Whereas this socialist Leader continues to remain silent on the issue of Cape Breton East for what appears to be nothing other than a quest for political power;

Therefore be it resolved that this House note the dichotomy between the socialist Leader's words and his actions, and reject any fluff and puff approach on matters of public policy and finance.

[Page 1917]

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 964

MS. YVONNE ATWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a study by two professors from the University of Quebec in Montreal says higher prices, fewer jobs and lower government revenues will ensue if provincial and federal governments don't enforce competition laws in the retail gas sector; and

Whereas the study points out that unlike Canada, where nothing is being done, 27 states in the United States have intervened to make sure rival gas companies compete; and

Whereas the findings by the University of Quebec study merely confirms what independent dealers and members of this House have been telling the Liberal Government for years;

Therefore be it resolved that the Liberal Government finally take action to foster competition in the retail gas business in order to protect consumers, jobs and government revenues.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 965

DR. JOHN HAMM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the HST has created financial hardships for thousands of Nova Scotians, particularly those on low, fixed, and middle incomes; and

Whereas the government's 5 per cent rebate on electricity for a five month period is a far cry from what this government promised; and

Whereas modest HST relief for electricity will do nothing to alleviate the onerous cost of keeping warm for homeowners who heat their homes by way of other energy sources;

[Page 1918]

Therefore be it resolved that any future HST relief be broadened to include all homeowners and not just those who heat their homes by electricity.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Public Works.

RESOLUTION NO. 966

HON. CLIFFORD HUSKILSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the summer tourist has much to pick from in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas a travel column in the June 28th edition of the Sunday Daily News had the headline "Soothe your harried soul with a stay in Shelburne"; and

Whereas the column detailed several ways of enjoying and relaxing in Shelburne County;

Therefore be it resolved that the members present take advantage of our summer break, whenever it should occur, and accept my invitation to soothe any harried souls with a stay in Shelburne.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 1919]

The honourable member for Halifax Bedford Basin.

MR. GERALD FOGARTY: I would like all members to direct their eyes to the Speaker's Gallery, where I have a surprise visitor and his charming wife. They live in Ottawa, they didn't tell me they were going to be here today. My brother, Robert Fogarty and his charming wife, Evelyn, they are here for a vacation in Nova Scotia. I would like all members of the House to please show them the usual welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Yarmouth.

RESOLUTION NO. 967

MR. JOHN DEVEAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Newfoundland government is continuing to fight for a more adequate TAGS 2 program, particularly for those who were cut off in May to be helped; and

Whereas the Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union is also fighting for improvements, including early retirement for those cut off in May, and tax exemption of licence buy-backs; and

Whereas Nova Scotians who were cut off prematurely, and those disadvantaged by the shortcomings of TAGS 2 have yet to hear this government stand up for them;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the Premier and the Fisheries Minister to join the effort to convince the federal government that TAGS 2 as presently designed will not even achieve its own limited objectives.

[12:30 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 968

MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas it is an issue of poor planning more so than costs when it comes to the availability of the spray being used to combat the tussock moth; and

[Page 1920]

Whereas private woodlot owners play a significant role in the Nova Scotia forest industry and have been consistently ignored by this Liberal Government for a number of years; and

Whereas the tussock moth issue has been discussed for at least the past two years in Nova Scotia before the Liberal Government hastily put an order in for the spraying substance to a Chicago-based business;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Natural Resources stop hiding behind the issue of cost and tell woodlot owners the real story behind why 640 owners will have to face the consequences of the tussock moth - the real story being - the lack of a concerted plan and the Liberal Government's slow response in ordering the BTK spray required to deal with the heavy infestation of the tussock moth.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Labour on an introduction.

HON. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I would like to introduce to you and through you to all members of the House, a very distinguished individual who has had numerous years of long and faithful service to this province, and in particular to the House of Assembly, he is seated in the east gallery, Major Harold Long. If he would please rise and receive the approbation of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

RESOLUTION NO. 969

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas social worker and housing activist Paul O'Hara said on Saturday that Halifax Regional Municipality has by-laws on the shelf which would "go a long way in moving us forward in dealing with issues around rooming houses"; and

Whereas these by-laws remain on the shelf because HRM does not have the legal authority to carry them out; and

Whereas the legislation giving HRM that legal authority is being irresponsibly held up by an uncaring Liberal Government;

[Page 1921]

Therefore be it resolved that members of the Liberal Government will be held responsible for any preventable deaths that occur in rooming houses or other sub-standard housing in Halifax Regional Municipality.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Antigonish.

RESOLUTION NO. 970

MR. HYLAND FRASER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Antigonish Highland Games will be held on the weekend of July 10th, July 11th and July 12th this year; and

Whereas the Antigonish Highland Games are the longest running highland games in North America, with the first games being held in 1863; and

Whereas the Antigonish Highland Games showcase the talents and abilities of exceptional young athletes and Scottish performers from across Nova Scotia and the Maritimes, as well as other parts of North America;

Therefore be it resolved that this House extend best wishes to the games officers, volunteers and participants in this year's highland games and invite all Nova Scotians to make their way to Antigonish in mid-July to participate in the activities associated with the games.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

[Page 1922]

RESOLUTION NO. 971

MR. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas natural gas is expected to be the lifeblood for communities across Nova Scotia in the coming years; and

Whereas the availability of natural gas is critically important to many communities in Cumberland South such as Springhill, Oxford, River Hebert, Parrsboro, Port Greville and Advocate in their attempt to attract sustainable industry; and

Whereas the Premier is on record in this Legislature during estimates one week ago Friday saying, "he believed natural gas would be available to all Nova Scotia communities within three years";

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature encourage the Premier and Nova Scotia's Petroleum Directorate to back up this commitment, and ensure there is substance to this statement and it does come to fruition within three years, so all Nova Scotia communities will have a cheaper source of energy.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 972

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas over the last decade, both Tory and Liberal federal governments have been relentless in downloading responsibilities onto provinces and municipalities; and

[Page 1923]

Whereas a recent study by the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce says federal downloading has left provinces and municipalities in a vulnerable position should a recession hit and drive up social welfare costs; and

Whereas the same study notes that the aging population will put added pressure on provincial health care cost;

Therefore be it resolved that this House condemns recent Tory and Liberal federal governments for passing the buck to the provinces to maintain vital health and social programs.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

RESOLUTION NO. 973

MR. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the mutual-aid system used by many Nova Scotia fire departments first came into existence in the late 1940's; and

Whereas fire departments must work jointly with their respective municipal units to make mutual-aid agreements beneficial to everyone concerned; and

Whereas the Cape Breton Regional Municipality and the Municipality of Victoria signed a formal agreement on Wednesday of this week enabling fire protection for rural areas of Cape Breton to be enhanced;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this Legislature acknowledge the understanding of the fire service that exists in Cape Breton Regional Municipality and the Municipality of Victoria and extend best wishes to the firefighters on Christmas Island, Florence, Southside Boularderie, Big Bras d'Or, Iona, and Ross Ferry as they work towards providing an improved ferry service to the residents they serve.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 1924]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 974

HON. KEITH COLWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Royal Canadian Legion in Gaetz Brook, officially known as Eastern Marine Branch 161, has played an important role in the lives of area residents for many years; and

Whereas the Royal Canadian Legion in Gaetz Brook has completed an extension to their building which will improve the facility and benefit the entire community; and

Whereas the Gaetz Brook's Legion will celebrate its grand opening of the extension on Saturday, July 4th, by hosting several events, providing refreshments, and musical entertainment;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Gaetz Brook Legion on the opening of this extension and wish them every success as they continue to work with and for their grateful community.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

[Page 1925]

RESOLUTION NO. 975

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotians stood fit to honour its Boer War dead by erecting the statue that sits on these very grounds; and

Whereas much refurbishing of this House and its grounds has occurred over the last several years; and

Whereas the Boer War statue, with its years of accumulated grime, appears to have been passed over by the Province House face-lifters;

Therefore be it resolved that this House take whatever measures necessary to ensure that, out of respect for our forebears, the Boer War statue is cleaned up at the earliest opportunity.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 976

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in a briefing note supplied to the minister responsible for the Nova Scotia Liquor Control Act, the minister was informed that the contract for collection of glass from commission outlets was not tendered; and

Whereas despite the note saying it was untendered, it provided no background whatsoever as to why the commission had to award it as a contract but not tender it out; and

[Page 1926]

Whereas the briefing note stated that the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission follows government tendering policies while recognizing and addressing the business realities at any point in time;

Therefore be it resolved that the minister request an additional briefing note from senior officials within the Liquor Commission so he can be properly informed as to what practices are followed by the commission in deciding whether to tender a contract or address the so-called business realities of the day.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Labour.

RESOLUTION NO. 977

HON. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Friday, June 26, 1998, during the subcommittee debates for the Department of Labour the honourable member for Hants East toyed with the idea of privatizing the workers' compensation system; and

Whereas the honourable member for Hants East also queried as to how much workers pay by way of premiums into our present Workers' Compensation No Fault Insurance Plan; and

Whereas the NDP socialists have been reluctant to be fully briefed on all matters concerning the workers' compensation system as proposed by the Department of Labour;

Therefore be it resolved that the NDP socialist Party put aside political posturing and differences and, please, reconsider attending briefing sessions so that members of that caucus are fully informed on important issues regarding injured workers in this province.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 978

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 1927]

Whereas this government had promised BST relief to low and middle income Nova Scotians; and

Whereas the Premier has announced over and over and over again since last summer that he would provide BST relief on heating oil, children's clothing and children's school supplies; and

Whereas the one-time electricity rebate does very little for ordinary Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that this government be widely condemned for not helping ease the tax burden for Nova Scotians and for not keeping their promises.

Mr. Speaker, I will ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Digby Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 979

MR. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the former Nova Scotia Land Survey Institute located in Lawrencetown was renamed the College of Geographic Sciences so as to better reflect the expanded curriculum of that school; and

Whereas the College of Geographic Sciences is now part of the Nova Scotia Community College network and as such may be renamed yet again; and

Whereas there is concern among staff, students and former graduates that the prestige, renown and world class reputation associated with the name College of Geographic Sciences may be needlessly diminished if the school is renamed Nova Scotia Community College, Lawrencetown Campus;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Education and Culture deny the request to rename the College of Geographic Sciences.

[Page 1928]

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There is a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Citadel.

RESOLUTION NO. 980

MR. PETER DELEFES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas an increasing number of Nova Scotians are voicing their concerns over Southwest Properties' planned apartment development on the Halifax waterfront; and

Whereas the Minister of Economic Development tries to wash his hands of the issue claiming this development is the responsibility of the Halifax Regional Municipality even though the provincially-run Waterfront Development Corporation owns the land on which the apartments will be built; and

Whereas the president of the Waterfront Development Corporation says the Southwest Properties proposal is part of an overall plan for the waterfront drawn up by the Waterfront Development Corporation;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Economic Development commit to a full public review of the plans of the Waterfront Development Corporation and that final approval of the Southwest Properties plan be suspended until completion of that review.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 981

MR. CHARLES MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 1929]

Whereas the snow crab fishery has been active in the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence since 1979; and

Whereas Nova Scotia has less than 2 per cent of the total fleet fishing in the mid shore crab fishery; and

Whereas access to these stocks is directly controlled by the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans offices in Antigonish and, more particularly, their Moncton office;

Therefore be it resolved that this House request the provincial Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture contact the Antigonish and Moncton offices of DFO to find out why Nova Scotia is discriminated against in the allocation of these quotas and demand an immediate end to this discrimination.

Mr. Speaker, I would ask for waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[12:45 p.m.]

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

RESOLUTION NO. 982

MR. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lunenburg Academy was built in 1895 and is the oldest school in the Province of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Government of Canada, the Southwest Regional School Board and the Town of Lunenburg entered into an agreement which will provide approximately $1 million in funds for much-needed renovation improvements to the Lunenburg Academy; and

[Page 1930]

Whereas the Lunenburg Academy Foundation was founded in 1981 to promote the preservation of the Lunenburg Academy and has provided funds to assist in the renovation and improvements to the Lunenburg Academy;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly commend the Lunenburg Academy Foundation, the Southwest Regional School Board, the Town of Lunenburg, the Government of Canada and the Province of Nova Scotia for providing funds to assist in the renovations of the Lunenburg Academy.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

MR. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I would also like to ask the House if they would bring congratulations to the honourable member for Bedford-Fall River on her recent marriage. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Well, it appears that I have been left at the altar again, Mr. Speaker. (Laughter)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 983

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas seven employees, including news director, Dave Wilson, and sports director, Dave LeBlanc, have been laid off at CKDE-CJCB Radio in Sydney; and

[Page 1931]

Whereas the lay-offs in Sydney follow similar job cuts at other radio stations owned by Maritime Broadcasting; and

Whereas the CRTC allows Maritime Broadcasting to continue to accumulate radio licenses despite its record of laying off employees and reducing service to the community;

Therefore be it resolved that the House protest the CRTC's failure to regulate broadcasting in any way that protects jobs and ensures service to communities in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I ask for waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 984

MR. BROOKE TAYLOR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas concerns expressed in 1996 to Ottawa by the Nova Scotia Liberal Government about Bill C-29, the banning of the octane fuel additive, MMT, were ignored; and

Whereas an internal trade panel has ruled that the federal Liberal Government has violated the four year old federal-provincial Agreement on Internal Trade with its ban of MMT; and

Whereas the Esso Nova Scotia oil refinery is now forced to spend more on using a costly substitute to manufacture gasoline;

Therefore be it resolved that since the decision is non-binding on the federal government and could now go to a North American Free Trade Panel, this Nova Scotia Liberal Government flex some muscle on behalf of Nova Scotia consumers by making presentation before the NAFTA panel before gas prices increase even more.

[Page 1932]

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 985

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas for some time the Justice Department has had a program to sensitize justice officials to spousal abuse; and

Whereas a New Glasgow judge granted a conditional discharge to a member of the RCMP found guilty of a brutal assault on his girlfriend; and

Whereas both the assault and the sentence once again raised concerns about the attitude of some members of the justice system towards spousal assault;

Therefore be it resolved that this government review its spousal abuse initiatives and take whatever steps are necessary to prevent the recurrence of such incidents.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

RESOLUTION NO. 986

MR. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas shipbuilding has played a major role in the heritage of the community of Port Greville; and

Whereas many lives were lost at sea as a result of the shipping industry and also during war times; and

Whereas on Sunday, June 28, 1998, a ceremony was held at the Age of Sail Museum in Port Greville for those lost at sea;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the Age of Sail Museum and the volunteers of the Port Greville area for never letting us forget the many souls who never returned from the open seas.

[Page 1933]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 987

MS. YVONNE ATWELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Lions Club held their 21st Annual Dinner and Dance on Saturday, June 20, 1998 at the East Preston Recreation Centre; and

Whereas the East Preston Lions continue to raise funds for development, sponsor students by raising funds to provide grants to students entering university; and

Whereas the East Preston Lions Club is known for its valiant strength in supporting community events such as donations to the food bank, selling Christmas trees and continuing to instill pride within the community;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulates the East Preston Lions Club for 21 years of committed service.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 1934]

The honourable member for Cumberland North.

RESOLUTION NO. 988

MR. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas high school graduation ceremonies were held throughout the constituency of Cumberland North on Friday evening; and

Whereas students attending high school in Pugwash and Amherst as well as students from Macaan who attend high school in River Hebert participated in a ceremony that will result in major decisions on one's future being made; and

Whereas whether that future begins immediately through employment, the community college system or a post-secondary university, challenging years are ahead for Friday's graduating students;

Therefore be it resolved that all member of this Legislature extend their very best wishes to the graduating students of Cumberland North and, indeed, all of the Chignecto board and wish them the very best with their future plans.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 989

MR. CHARLES PARKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Liberals have failed once again in this session to proceed with badly-needed changes to the Forestry Act; and

[Page 1935]

Whereas the budget introduced by the Liberals breaks promises of increased funding for silviculture and sets silviculture back decades; and

Whereas this further neglect of Nova Scotia's forests is a devastating blow to Nova Scotia's rural economy;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House condemn the government's lack of action on forestry and the budget's devastating effect on silviculture.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver of notice.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton East.

RESOLUTION NO. 990

MR. REEVES MATHESON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cape Breton Development Corporation has announced the loss of another 250 to 300 coal mining jobs, in addition to the 600 or so coal mining jobs already lost over the last four or five years; and

Whereas the Cape Breton Economic Development Authority, as a result of a broad and extensive consultation, produced a comprehensive blueprint calling for the decentralization of government jobs to Cape Breton; and

Whereas 20 per cent of the population of this province still exists in Cape Breton Island and only less than 10 per cent of the Civil Service jobs generated by the Province of Nova Scotia exists there; and

Whereas in 1979, the Premier of this province was instrumental in the successful relocation of the Citizenship and Immigration Registration Service to Cape Breton, injecting over 100 jobs and more than $4 million a year into the local economy;

[Page 1936]

Therefore be it resolved that we urge this Premier and this government to show the leadership necessary by fighting for Cape Breton's fair share of Nova Scotia Government jobs by announcing today to work towards at least the doubling of the amount of existing Civil Service jobs in Cape Breton.

MR. SPEAKER: That notice of motion is much too long.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you permit me an introduction before I call Orders of the Day?

MR. SPEAKER: By all means.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, in the gallery today we have members of the United Mine Workers of America who are up here in Halifax concerned about the future of Devco and the Cape Breton coal industry. I would ask all the members of the House to give them the warmest welcome for having them up here today. (Applause)

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and that the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Supply unto Her Majesty.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

MS. HELEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, today I would like to take the opportunity to address an issue that has been brewing in my constituency for some time and that I brought to the last sitting of this Legislature. Now it seems that the whole issue has really come to a

[Page 1937]

boiling point, basically because what we have seen happen is that this government has refused to listen to the people in the community. The community, a community of approximately 68 homes, is the community of Little Pond. The issue is the whole issue of surface mining, or as it is better known to many people, strip mining. Little Pond, approximately five kilometres from the community of Florence and east of Bras d'Or, is a vibrant, alive community with lots of community initiatives and community activities. The area contains some historic underground and surface coal mining workings, operations-mined coal from the Bonar coal seam and, as well, extensive bootleg mining is reported to have been conducted.

In November 1997, Natural Resources called for coal exploration proposals, and at that time the residents very clearly expressed their concerns to the Minister of Natural Resources and to all politicians. Their concerns, basically, centre around the fact that previous strip mining in that community has left that community with many black eyes. Generally, the residents of the community are not happy with the mining operators that are presently working there.

The resolutions that were presented in the fall sitting of this Legislature, the petition that was presented in the fall sitting of this Legislature, the questions that were asked in the fall sitting of this Legislature, all brought forth the point of view of that community. They feel that their environment is being destroyed. They feel that and they see that. What is happening is that the stripping is being done, but with the exception of one area, there has been no restoration. The purpose in the proposal in the first place was to clean up some unsightly places in that community. Generally, the residents can cite to you, and can show you, many things that have been detrimental to their environment and to their community.

I guess many of the things that they talk about have been talked about many times in this Legislature; for example, the noise level and the very idea that operators don't seem to have to abide by the regulations that are put in place and no one seems to be responsible for carrying out the enactment of those regulations. The community now is very clearly saying that, until things are changed, they are not interested in someone coming in there and doing more strip mining.

We know that the purpose of the call was to reclaim the land, to put the land back in what should be a better condition. But the people there, many of them took me through their community on the weekend and they can show you many things that haven't happened in the previous areas that have not yet been cleaned up. They don't want strip mining in their community until something else comes first. That something else is fixing what is not already fixed.

[Page 1938]

[1:00 p.m.]

The area that is destined to be stripped now, is also an area that is of a lot of concern for the community, because where they are looking to do stripping now is the area that has the access to the beach. The waterfront that that community has used for decades, the people in the community, their parents and grandparents have always gone there during the summer months. Now, as you go down there during the winter, it is very unsightly but in the summer, for the most part, you can't see some of the mess that was left from previous mining.

The whole area of the beach is one area of concern. It is the home of beaver dams, it is the home of eagle nests. As we walked around on Saturday, you would see the animals, the foxes were out, the squirrels, and these people would like to be able to maintain that part of their environment. So they really are asking why we are moving ahead in this way.

They cite a report that was done a number of years ago, I think in 1993, there was a report done, a Davis report, on the environment and it talked about how the environment could be restored. So what the community is asking is, why we had to go ahead with further stripping in order to restore the environment to the condition that it should be in? Why aren't we looking at what that report said? It was a report done by the Department of the Environment, in fact.

In addition to this, the fishermen in that area are quite angry over this new proposal. One of the first things that happened once the tenders were awarded was that a fence was put up and a gate put up that prevented the people from going into an area that they had always gone into, prevented them from getting down to the beach. That was done because, obviously, the companies planning to do the stripping will be working in that area which means that the whole area and access to the waterfront will be cut off.

The fishermen are very concerned, as I indicated, about the further strip mining. They are concerned about quite a large body of water that has been settled there for many decades and they feel that there is a lot of mineral sediment at the bottom of that and to disturb that and to allow that to run off into the water where they are fishing, they feel is not, from an environmental point of view, a good idea. So they are quite concerned.

The community have met - and when you drive over their roads, the conditions of their roads because of the equipment on their roads, most people would find quite appalling - and they are willing to settle with the road issue for now if they can get some kind of commitment that people in this government would be willing to listen to them. Quite honestly, Mr. Speaker, they are quite angry because they have made many appeals to the government. They have formed a liaison group that represents the community and they are requesting that our Minister of Natural Resources and our Minister of the Environment meet with them. I think our Minister of the Environment has already indicated that he would be willing to go to Cape Breton to see the Frederick Street site so maybe while he is there, he and the Minister of

[Page 1939]

Natural Resources would be willing to meet with this group so that this whole issue can be resolved and so that the people who are interested in restoring this land can get on with the business of doing it, but with the cooperation of the community.

I think what we have found out that people who have gone into the community and have listened to the people, certainly would be more acceptable. But unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, I guess even though the call for proposals very clearly talked about how the land should be left, that doesn't seem to be part of the project that is being put forth. I think there is still some work to be done there, and I think it would be well advised if we started to pay some attention to some of these people in some of these small rural communities that are really looking for government to listen to them, and not just to the Liberals in the community, but to the people in that community who have the right of ownership of the community. So if I could, I would appeal to the government to contact the liaison committee, and to arrange to meet with those people so that this issue can be resolved. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg.

MR. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to rise today, and speak on the motion going into Supply. In particular, I would like to begin by making a few brief remarks that I didn't have an opportunity to make in an Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne, and those brief remarks would be to first acknowledge and thank my constituents for their support in the last election. As many members would know, it is a truly humbling experience to be given the very distinct honour of representing the people of Lunenburg in the Legislative Assembly.

I had occasion to look at the list of individuals who have represented my constituency, actually since the House was formed in 1758 and, in fact, there were two German settlers who were in the first House of Assembly in 1758. I presume that my forbears were with them in 1758, so one feels a great sense of connection to the history of this place, and to the traditions of Nova Scotia's democracy. It is in view of that democracy that I wanted to take a few seconds today to speak.

Responsible government came to Nova Scotia 150 years ago. Responsible government means that the Ministers of the Crown are responsible to the majority of Members of the Legislative Assembly, so that the Crown, the government, exists by consent of the Members of the Legislative Assembly who quite literally represent the constituents. This form of representative government is the bulwark of our democracy. We have seen a remarkable transformation in the history of Nova Scotia since the March 24th election.

It is quite remarkable because while responsible government existed for 150 years in Nova Scotia, in name we are seeing it put into practice now. What is going on Nova Scotia today is that probably later today, the members of this House will have an opportunity to determine whether this government continues to exist or is replaced by another. I think that

[Page 1940]

is a great step forward. For many years, for the last five years in particular in this House, government operated with little practical connection to the wishes of the majority of Members of the Legislative Assembly. There are very many documented cases during the previous sitting of the Legislature, when Members of the Legislative Assembly were bludgeoned by the government of which they formed a part, into voting a particular way. In fact, the honourable Minister of Labour is one of the victims of the lack of responsible government in this province.

I think that all members of the House today would be wise to reflect upon the fact that first and foremost, our duty is to represent our constituents. It is in that spirit that I wanted to turn my comments, in particular, to the Department of Transportation and Public Works. When the House goes into Supply in a few moments, we will be back considering the estimates of that department.

Mr. Speaker, there is no department which - perhaps with the exception of the Departments of Education and Culture, and Health - more intimately affects the interests of my constituents. My constituents live in rural Nova Scotia. It is rural Nova Scotia that has been largely ignored during the previous five years. I have constituents who live on roads which are impassable in the winter and spring, which are clouded with dust and practically useless as far as outdoor activities are concerned in the summertime. It is only for a brief period of time in the early fall that these roads are of any value to people.

Mr. Speaker, the reason for that is because this government and previous governments have slashed the spending of the Department of Transportation and Public Works. If I could make a single and impassioned plea today in this House it would be that this government reconsider its habit of continually reducing the budget of the Department of Transportation and Public Works. This is not just a parochial issue of interest to my constituents. This is of interest to all rural Nova Scotians. No one can truly appreciate how difficult ordinary life is unless you have lived on a dirt road that is impassable.

Mr. Speaker, the state of rural roads in Nova Scotia, and particularly the secondary roads, the unpaved roads, is horrendous. There is no question that the constant reduction in the government's budget for the Department of Transportation and Public Works is hampering their ability to do routine maintenance. We are not talking about paving politics. We are talking about the routine maintenance that allows school buses to pick up children, the routine maintenance that allows roads with culverts to be kept open so that they do not flood. We are talking about the routine maintenance that allows ordinary passenger cars to drive on roads and those things are not possible now.

During the last election campaign in one area of my riding, Mr. Speaker, the local inhabitants were forced to actually brush-out the railroad right-of-way bed and drive on the railroad right-of-way bed, the former CNR roadbed, back and forth to their community because the public road had become so impassable. I thought for a moment that perhaps this

[Page 1941]

was something that did not come to the notice of the department. So for a moment you excuse that and say, well, this is quite understandable because perhaps it was overlooked.

Mr. Speaker, I have subsequently spoken to one of the Department of Transportation and Public Works' employees and found out that he lived in that community and that there was no money to fix up the road so that, in fact, he and others had quietly encouraged the local residents to build their own road, in effect, so that they did not have to travel on the public road. In this day and age this sounds like a story out of Africa or some Third-World community, and this is in Nova Scotia, a very few minutes from the Town of Mahone Bay.

If there is anything that I can suggest would be a very valuable thing for this House to consider in looking at budgets, it is to try to do something about the Department of Transportation and Public Works budget. I would indicate, Mr. Speaker, that the twinning of Highway No. 103, while a very laudable project and very important, could be proceeded with even more haste than is presently ongoing because, frankly, the road is very congested. I will not be parochial because, in fact, the Highway No. 101 leading into the Valley is, if anything, at least as bad as that road. People are dying, people are being injured, because of the state of our road system and, like health care and like education, these are urgent priorities for ordinary Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I am going to stop my remarks at this point, but I will again implore the government to consider looking at the amount of money that is being allocated to secondary roads. My one last thought on the subject, I forgot to mention it earlier, was that in many areas of my riding during the last winter, snow was not being plowed because the budget for the Department of Transportation and Public Works for snow plowing expired in March, except someone forgot to tell the weatherman that it snows in Nova Scotia in March. We were left in situations where people didn't have plowed roads. This is a very serious situation. It is just as serious and just as disabling to people in rural Nova Scotia to not be able to have decent roads leading to their work, leading to their schools, as it was disabling and unfortunate for people in the metro area to have no transit service during the last election. That gives the best analogy. It is something that affects the life of every person. Thank you.

[1:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston.

MS. YVONNE ATWELL: Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw the attention of the House to the gallery, where I would like to introduce my family that is visiting here from Toronto. My daughter, Chery, could you stand please, and my granddaughter, Lauren. Our friends, Steve and his son, Isiah, and of course, my daughter, Rhonda. Could the House give them a round of applause. (Applause)

[Page 1942]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity, before we go into Supply, to talk a little bit about an issue that is of concern to me with respect to my riding. It is the issue of sub-standard housing, which I have already raised in this Chamber. Certainly, this won't be the last time I will raise this matter, I suspect. I would like to report on a tour I conducted in that riding on Saturday, with a number of participants who have been working for a long time in the area on housing issues.

I was accompanied by Paul O'Hara, who is a social worker at the North-End Community Health Centre and is well known and well respected in the field of social housing, and working with poor and disadvantaged groups, homeless people. I was also accompanied by Reverend Gus Pendleton, who is the Minister at Brunswick Street United Church, and his wife, Lorna Pendleton, who is the outreach worker from this church. Additionally Carol Charlebois, who is the Executive Director of Metro Non-Profit Housing Society accompanied me on the tour, as did Grant Wanzell, who is a faculty member at the School of Architecture at Daltech, and is currently working with Harbour City Homes. I always like to refer to Grant as the grandfather of social housing here in Nova Scotia. He is well respected as an expert in the field of social housing, not only throughout Nova Scotia, but in Canada.

As we walked through Halifax Needham, I was struck by the devastation, really of the withdrawal of the federal government from social housing in the country. The federal government abandoned their involvement in social housing, beginning in the Mulroney years, and certainly that abandonment of the field escalated to the point where there is no federal government presence whatsoever in the field of housing today in the country.

Now the Province of Nova Scotia has a history of quite a weak and very limited track record of involvement in the field of social housing, in terms of actually providing housing in Nova Scotia using provincial dollars. The province has always been very reliant on the federal government to provide funding, and with federal withdrawal, the province has essentially abandoned their involvement in the social housing field as well. Now, this has left us in the Province of Nova Scotia primarily with social housing being provided on the private market. This leads me to believe that if there is ever a reason for the province therefore to step in and regulate the provision of housing in the private market, it is now, where there is no competitive pressure on private landlords to adhere to building codes and decent provision of housing.

The conditions that we saw, as we toured throughout the North End of Halifax, were truly shocking in terms of the kinds of circumstances that people were living in, but even more to the point, the kinds of circumstances that people were paying extraordinary amounts of public money for. One woman living in a room that was very bare, that had nothing more than a cot that you could pick up in any weekly sort of garbage pick-up, was paying $495 a month for this room. At the same time this woman was receiving the maximum shelter allowance

[Page 1943]

from the Province of Nova Scotia, a mere $225 a month. So the way she was finding the additional money for this room was by using money from the food allotment in her social assistance cheque. She was having to rely entirely on hand-outs of food through Hope Cottage and the Food Bank.

Now this is a disgrace. Many people are being condemned to live in poverty, to have ill health as a result of the conditions of their housing and the lack of proper nutrition, to be vulnerable to situations of violence, to be vulnerable to situations of addictions and ultimately, in some cases, as we all too well know in the North End of Halifax, untimely death.

This situation has been furthered, I believe, by the deinstitutionalization of mental health services and the closure of beds in mental health facilities, at the same time that we have had a freeze on small options homes and development. We are seeing a growing number of people with mental health problems on the street and living in poverty.

Many of these people with mental health problems require more than decent shelter. They require social support, they require some community-based alternatives that will assist them in breaking the isolation of living alone in these inadequate facilities. They require peer support and they require good advocates, such as the people who accompanied me on the tour on Saturday.

One of these organizations that has an incredibly strong and legitimate track record as advocates is the Metro Non-Profit Housing Association. They have recently organized such services as a drop-in centre for these people and, in fact, they have organized a bit of a choir where people from this organization have actually participated in developing their musical talents and it has really raised their level of self-esteem quite considerably. This small effort, however, has some financial difficulties. They require a mere $26,000 in order to function, to have this kind of centre. They have met the same kind of indifference from this government, as many other groups requiring fairly small kinds of assistance have met. I say shame to this government.

There is quite an interesting proposal for the development of a block of social housing being undertaken by Harbour City Homes in the North End of Halifax. If they are successful, and I believe they will be because of the creativity and the dedication of the members of this group, we will shortly see the development of some additional mixed income housing units in this area. I think it is very important for us here in the House, especially when we are coming so close to the end of this part of our session, to ask ourselves what has our responsibility as members of this House been and how have we performed in terms of that responsibility?

Our responsibilities as members are to all people in our society, to the rich and to the poor. I believe that the real test of whether or not we had the political courage to move forward with some positive initiatives in this session of the House will really be when we can

[Page 1944]

answer affirmatively that we have accomplished in this session something for the most disadvantaged in our society; not in terms of what we have accomplished for those who have power, not when we can say that we have accomplished something with financial wealth or with political power because they are organized and they belong to more powerful organizations that assist other groups to give voice to concerns but really the test is going to be what indeed have we done for people who are not organized, for people who have no voice.

Mr. Speaker, it doesn't make me feel very good to have to say that we cannot answer that we have done very much for these groups. Maybe a lot of members in this Chamber might not like to hear this, they might not like to hear about these people and their concerns but I want to say that as long as I have a place in this House, these people and their advocates will have someone who will listen to them. They will have someone who will come here and stand here in this place and talk about these issues even if it is into an absolute vacuum until we are ready as a group to address these concerns and until these issues are resolved. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried.

[1:27 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Supply with Deputy Speaker Mr. Donald Chard in the Chair.]

[3:02 p.m. CWH on Supply rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Ronald Russell, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Supply reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and by virtue of the affluxion of time has for report to the House some 44 Estimates favourably reported, including votes on capital.

MR. SPEAKER: Before taking a vote on concurrence I will recognize the Premier on an introduction.

HON. RUSSELL MACLELLAN, Q.C. (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize in the gallery, His Excellency Robert Sabga, High Commissioner for the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago to Canada. As well, His Worship Mayor Gerard Ferreira, the Mayor of the City of San Fernando in Trinidad and Mr. Rudy Sabga, son of His Excellency the High Commissioner, as well as Her Worship Ann MacLean of the Town of New Glasgow and her husband, Sandy MacLean. All parties are here for the signing of the twinning agreement between the City of San Fernando in Trinidad and the Town of New Glasgow in Nova Scotia. (Applause)

[Page 1945]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Supply has reported that the motion before the House is concurrent with the report from the Committee of the Whole House on Supply. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

A recorded vote is being called for.

Ring the bells. Call in the members.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I request a recorded vote.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: It is agreed.

MR. SPEAKER: How long?

MR. HOLM: Thirty-five minutes.

MR. SPEAKER: The time now being 3:04 p.m., we will come back at 3:39 p.m.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Everybody is here.

MR. SPEAKER: It is the prerogative to ring the bells for one hour if it is wished. (Interruption)

[3:04 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

[3:39 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The motion before the House is concurrence with the report from the Committee of the Whole House on Supply. A recorded vote has been requested.

Are the Whips satisfied?

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[3:40 p.m.]

YEAS NAYS

Mr. MacKinnon Mr. Matheson

Mr. Lorraine Ms. Atwell

[Page 1946]

Mr. MacAskill Mr. K. Deveaux

Mr. Gaudet Ms. H. MacDonald

Dr. Smith Ms. O'Connell

Mr. M. MacDonald Mr. Chisholm

Mr. MacLellan Mr. Holm

Mr. Downe Mr. Dexter

Mr. Harrison Mr. Epstein

Mrs. Cosman Ms. M. MacDonald

Mr. Samson Mr. Estabrooks

Mr. C. MacDonald Mr. J. Deveau

Mr. Montgomery Mr. Chard

Mr. Huskilson Mr. Corbett

Mr. White Mr. Delefes

Mr. Fogarty Ms. Godin

Mr. Colwell Mr. J. MacDonell

Mr. Fraser Mr. Parker

Mr. MacEwan Mr. Pye

Mr. Moody Dr. Bitter-Suermann

Dr. Hamm

Mr. Leefe

Mr. Archibald

Mr. LeBlanc

Mr. Baker

Mr. Taylor

Mr. Fage

Mr. DeWolfe

Mr. Muir

Mr. Balser

Mr. Scott

THE CLERK: For, 31. Against, 20.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried in the affirmative.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Introduction of Bills.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 26 - An Act to Provide for Defraying Certain Charges and Expenses of the Public Service of the Province. (Hon. Donald Downe)

[Page 1947]

MR. SPEAKER: When shall this bill be read for a second time? Does the Minister of Finance move second reading?

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Finance.

HON. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I move second reading of Bill No. 26, the Appropriations Act, 1998.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 26. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Finance.

HON. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I move third reading of Bill No. 26, the Appropriations Act, 1998.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 26. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I assume that the minister is asking for unanimous consent in the spirit of cooperation?

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: I will, thank you.

MR. HOLM: You are welcome.

[Page 1948]

MR. SPEAKER: Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[3:44 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Speaker Mr. Donald Chard in the Chair.]

[5:10 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Ronald Russell, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 17 - Video Lottery Terminals Moratorium Act.

and the chairman has been instructed to recommend this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

MR. SPEAKER: When shall this bill be read for a third time?

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Now.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable member has a motion?

MR. JOHN HOLM: No, I plan to speak on third reading.

[PRIVATE MEMBERS' PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 17.

Bill No. 17 - Video Lottery Terminals Moratorium Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

[Page 1949]

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I know it would disappoint some members opposite if I didn't stand up and say a few words.

MR. SPEAKER: I hate to interrupt the honourable member in full flight there. Actually, the bill hasn't yet been moved for third reading.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I move third reading of Bill No. 17.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, I was so enthusiastic about this that I can be a little bit of a slow learner and have to have the rules explained to me. I thought you were actually calling the bill for third reading when you asked when should it be read for a third time and I got ahead of myself. So I apologize profusely to yourself, Mr. Speaker, and to all members of this House for my error in judgment and my error in the rules on that one.

Having said that, I would like to say a few words on the record. I say on the record because everything that we said in the Committee of the Whole House on Bills although it has some effects in terms of maybe getting through some changes, it is not on the record, there is no Hansard record of anything that is said in the Committee of the Whole House on Bills stage. I know that there are some members opposite who look a little puzzled when I say that but that's a reality. I want it to be clearly on the record where we stand as a Party on this legislation.

Mr. Speaker, we in our caucus, as part of our campaign during the election said that we believe there should be a moratorium on video lottery terminals in Nova Scotia. We have said that we believe and, in fact, we don't even need any study to tell us this, we know that individuals and individuals' families are being harmed very severely by video lottery terminals here in Nova Scotia. I will say it, and I have no hesitation in saying it, they are the hard-core porn of gambling. They are the crack cocaine of gambling. It is the most addictive form of gambling we have. That is known. We don't need another study to tell us that. There have been countless studies done across Canada, across the United States that tell us that. Nova Scotia isn't unique in that regard. We don't need to reinvent the wheel, we know that these machines are causing tremendous havoc in the lives of countless Nova Scotians. That's a given. So anything that we can do that will reduce the destruction, we will support.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased that this bill has gone forward and that it has come as far as it has come today. I am sure that before the bewitching hour when government members have decreed that we should go home for vacation, that this bill will pass. There are, of course, other important pieces of legislation that we still want to see debated. We called this bill for debate on our Opposition Day. We believe in cooperating. We called it because it was the

[Page 1950]

right thing to do, regardless of whose name is on the legislation. I know that is something that bothers some government members on certain bills that they don't want to call but what counts is that we, as legislators, all 52 of us in this House, truly - I don't mean play games about putting politics aside, we have seen enough of that, but truly - put politics aside and advance what is right.

[5:15 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, we have made some progress with this legislation. We have not, unfortunately, gone far enough. When I started in here this afternoon, I had every intention of slowing this bill down and not seeing it go forward. Oh yes I did, indeed. (Interruption) The member for Cape Breton Nova says, I know you did. He is very astute. He noticed. Because, the amendments that were brought forward and passed in the Law Amendments Committee down the hall, was in no way a moratorium. In fact, what had been voted on down there, in the Law Amendments Committee to come back to this House, would have permitted a couple hundred more VLTs to be installed in this province. That is no moratorium.

I am glad that the government got the message. Things aren't the same in this place, as they were before. You may, in fact, have the reality, or the effectiveness of a majority again, but things are still not the same. I assure you that our caucus will, as we did this afternoon, fight for improvements to the legislation. Now, the legislation that is before us will in fact have a moratorium, not like the bill that came back from the Law Amendments Committee.

It will also put a time limit on when that socio-economic study has to be completed. It doesn't unfortunately commit this government to follow any recommendations that are contained in that. You know, we had studies, we had people travelling this province. The Red Team sponsored it, on the casinos, and they didn't follow the advice that was given there, because we have casinos. They didn't take what Nova Scotians told them. They didn't pay any attention to the thousands and thousands of signatures that were gathered on petitions.

So, we have no commitment whatsoever in this legislation that the government will, in fact, pay any attention to the recommendations that come forward. Unfortunately, the government with the support of the Third Party, voted down in the committee another amendment that would have actually seen a gradual reduction in the number of video lottery terminals in the province.

We have won some, but we have more battles to fight. There are some in the gallery who have been fighting a gallant battle on behalf of Nova Scotians and with Nova Scotians. All I am saying, I am certainly not going to cut off my nose to spite my face. I am not going to be voting against this legislation because it doesn't contain all that we need and deserve. It is a step forward. (Interruption) Well, the Minister of Labour must have an important engagement on tonight or tomorrow, because he is anxious. (Interruption)

[Page 1951]

I was hoping that the Minister of Labour would say, oh please, sit down and vote so I can bring in my legislation to solve the backlog for workers' compensation, but he laughs. That is no laughing matter either. There were commitments made about that. (Interruption) Yes, Mr. Speaker. I am sorry, I shouldn't get sidetracked, but certain things make me genuinely angry. Lack of commitment like that, which we see from the Minister of Labour, to address the severe problems makes me angry.

I will be voting for this legislation, but I am going to be looking for a commitment from the government that the study is not just going to be more tokenism. It is not going to be another shell game, like so many that we have seen for years and years from regime after regime in this province. We want commitments that what you hear from the people of this province will actually be acted upon, and that you will act in the best interests of the people of the province, not just your bottom line. That is why it is only a moratorium, not a reduction in the number of machines. This government remains hooked, it remains addicted to the revenue of VLTs; the tens and tens of millions of dollars it takes out of the pockets of countless Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I suggest that it is about time that this government, and the Third Party, put the concerns in the best interests of those Nova Scotians ahead of the bottom line of the government, because even though you may lose a few dollars, if the number of machines are reduced, you may save a few lives and you may prevent others from being destroyed. That is what we, all 52 members of this House, regardless of our political affiliations, have to bear in mind and we cannot be complacent and we cannot accept that what is going through here this afternoon is the end of it. We are only just beginning to address the very severe problems that this government and, in fairness, the former government that first introduced them have inflicted upon the people of the Province of Nova Scotia. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

DR. JOHN HAMM: Mr. Speaker, I rise to spend a few moments talking on Bill No. 17, An Act to Impose a Moratorium on Additional Video Lottery Terminals and to Provide for a Study of Video Lottery Terminals. I am very pleased that we have been able to bring this bill as far as we have as quickly as we have because once all of the speeches have been delivered and all the rhetoric has died down, this is the right thing to do and it is the right time to do it. (Applause)

I was as distressed as anyone at the report of the help line for gambling addiction that gave us those awful statistics that revealed that 1,100 Nova Scotians were referred to the Drug Dependency agencies or Gamblers Anonymous by that agency alone. We certainly should not think that there were only 1,100 seriously afflicted by a gambling disease over the last 12 months, because that is simply not the case.

[Page 1952]

I believe that this is the most sensible thing that we have done since the previous government had taken VLTs out of corner stores. We have to look at what we are doing and whether we are fuelling the gambling addiction by the kind of VLTs we have, and I look forward to that socio-economic study looking at all aspects of gambling and what it is we are doing to the people of Nova Scotia.

I am extremely distressed when gambling in Nova Scotia, and this bill is about gambling in VLTs, we are advertising to try to promote increased revenues from Nova Scotians. It is one thing to control gambling as a government and it is one thing to have those funds available for treating those with gambling addictions, but we have to take a serious look at promotional efforts that are trying to convince more and more Nova Scotians that gambling should be our favourite pastime. There is something fundamentally wrong with this.

I want to congratulate the New Democrats and I want to congratulate the Liberals. I believe that if it were not for the situation in which we find ourselves, and that is in a minority government situation in which all Parties will have a say in what goes on in this place, this legislation would not be before us today and we would not be on the verge of doing the right thing.

Just think, if this legislation was not passed today, how many VLTs would we be talking about in the fall when we got around to bringing forward this legislation? We have 3,300 today. Would it be 3,500, would it be 3,800? It would certainly be a much bigger number because we would drive the industry to produce more and more applications over the summer and, in fact, there would be an explosion of machines in this province if those who would be interested in providing premises that would allow the machines to be licenced if they were fuelled by the fact that a moratorium was coming.

I think one of the strengths of this bill is that it did come up suddenly and it did not allow a lot of last-minute applications. So, I think this bill has so much to recommend it; it isn't perfect and it is not going to end here, but it is a good start in a government being responsible in what it is doing in terms of controlling the gambling in this province. I will be one of those who will be very pleased to support this bill and I congratulate my colleagues on all sides of the House for the way in which the cooperative effort was allowed to happen and allowed this bill to go through the House and the short cuts to be taken to ensure that it is to become law early this summer rather than next fall. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 17. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

[Page 1953]

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, with permission, would you please revert to the order of business, Tabling Reports, Regulations and Other Papers.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Labour.

HON. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table the Annual Report of the Nova Scotia Pay Equity Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1997.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Labour.

HON. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I also beg leave to table, today, the Annual Report of the Workers' Compensation Board for the fiscal year 1997-98.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, that completes the government's business. I would ask that the House recess for approximately five minutes to await the arrival of the Lieutenant Governor.

MR. SPEAKER: The House is recessed until 5:32 p.m.

[5:27 p.m. The House recessed.]

[5:38 p.m. The House reconvened.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: His Honour the Lieutenant Governor is without.

MR. SPEAKER: Let His Honour be admitted.

[Page 1954]

[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]

[The Lieutenant Governor, the Honourable John James Kinley, preceded by his escort, and by Mr. Douglas Giles, Sergeant-at-Arms, bearing the Mace, entered the House of Assembly Chamber. The Lieutenant Governor then took his seat on the Throne.

The Sergeant-at-Arms then departed and re-entered the Chamber followed by the Speaker, The Honourable Ronald Russell; Chief Clerk of the House, Roderick MacArthur, Q.C.; and Assistant Clerk, Arthur Fordham, Q.C. They took up their positions at the foot of the Speaker's Table.]

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: It is the wish of His Honour that the ladies and gentlemen be seated.

MR. SPEAKER: May it please Your Honour, the General Assembly of the Province has, in its present session, passed certain bills to which in the name and on behalf of the General Assembly, I respectfully request Your Honour's Assent.

THE CLERK:

Bill No. 6 - Health Council Appointments (1998) Act.

Bill No. 8 - Auditor General Act & Provincial Finance Act.

Bill No. 11 - Assessment Act.

Bill No. 17 - Video Lottery Terminals Moratorium Act.

Bill No. 20 - Town of Kentville and Kentville Electric Commission Sale of Assets Act.

THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR:

In Her Majesty's name, I Assent to these Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Your Honour, having been graciously pleased to give your Assent to the Bills passed during the present Session, it becomes my agreeable duty on behalf of Her Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, Her faithful Commons of Nova Scotia to present to Your Honour a bill for the Appropriation of Supply granted in the present Session for the support of the Public Service and to request Your Honour's Assent thereto.

[Page 1955]

THE CLERK:

Bill No. 26 - An Act to Provide for Defraying Certain Charges and Expenses of the Public Service of the Province.

THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR:

In Her Majesty's name, I thank Her loyal subjects, I accept their benevolence and I Assent to this Bill.

[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]

[The Lieutenant Governor left the Chamber.]

[The Speaker took the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: Please be seated.

The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, and members of the House of Assembly, I move that this General Assembly be now adjourned, to meet again at the call of the Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, on the Premier's motion, we have much, of course, important legislation and business that has not yet been accomplished. We have yet to deal with the backlog of the workers' compensation legislation, we have yet to deal with a number of other things, therefore . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. HOLM: I am calling for a recorded vote.

MR. SPEAKER: You can have a recorded vote but, however, I am advising the honourable member that there is no debate on a motion to adjourn.

MR. HOLM: Okay, Mr. Speaker, I was just trying to give my reasons. Therefore, I would move for a recorded vote.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Agreed.

[Page 1956]

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I would like to refer to a conversation that I have had with the other two House Leaders and we agreed that we would come back on October 15th.

MR. JOHN HOLM: On the member's point of order, Mr. Speaker. The Government House Leader and the Opposition House Leader were talking about whether or not October 15th was a suitable date and my suggestion on both occasions was that June 30th, which is tomorrow, would be the most appropriate date. I have not agreed so therefore I am asking for a recorded vote.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. There is a motion on the floor to adjourn to the call of the Speaker.

There has been a request for a recorded vote.

The Clerk will call the roll.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I wonder if I may have leave to amend my motion?

MR. SPEAKER: Well, you can with the unanimous consent of the House.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Premier.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker and members of the House of Assembly, I move that this General Assembly be adjourned to meet again on October 15, 1998.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

MR. JOHN HOLM: A recorded vote.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Clerk will call the roll.

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[Page 1957]

[5:44 p.m.]

YEAS NAYS

Mr. MacKinnon Ms. Atwell

Mr. Lorraine Mr. K. Deveaux

Mr. MacAskill Ms. H. MacDonald

Mr. Gaudet Ms. O'Connell

Dr. Smith Mr. Chisholm

Mr. M. MacDonald Mr. Holm

Mr. MacLellan Mr. Dexter

Mr. Downe Mr. Epstein

Mr. Harrison Ms. M. MacDonald

Mrs. Cosman Mr. Estabrooks

Mr. Samson Mr. J. Deveau

Mr. C. MacDonald Mr. Chard

Mr. Montgomery Mr. Corbett

Mr. Huskilson Mr. Delefes

Mr. White Ms. Godin

Mr. Fogarty Mr. J. MacDonell

Mr. Colwell Mr. Parker

Mr. Fraser Mr. Pye

Mr. MacEwan

Mr. Moody

Dr. Hamm

Mr. Leefe

Mr. Archibald

Mr. LeBlanc

Mr. Baker

Mr. Taylor

Mr. Fage

Mr. DeWolfe

Mr. Muir

Mr. Balser

Dr. Bitter-Suermann

Mr. Scott

THE CLERK: For, 32. Against, 18.

MR. SPEAKER: The amendment is carried.

[Page 1958]

The motion as amended. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We stand adjourned.

[5:47 p.m. The House adjourned.]

[Page 1959]

NOTICE OF QUESTION FOR WRITTEN ANSWER

Given on June 26, 1998

(Pursuant to Rule 30)

QUESTION NO. 1

By: Mr. Peter Delefes (Halifax Citadel)

To: Hon. Manning MacDonald (Minister of Economic Development and Tourism)

During the 1970's, staff at the Nova Scotia Research Foundation (NSRF), one of the forerunners of Innovacorp, developed a device called a deep towed reflection profiler known as the "NSRF V-fin system" for investigating the surficial seabed sediments in the eastern Canadian continental shelf. In the 1980's, the device became known throughout the world and was specified as a requirement for seabed survey in such areas as the North Sea by prestigious oil companies like Shell Oil.

In 1997, a patent was given to a staff member of the NSRF for significant enhancements to the system to allow it to define characteristic properties of seabed materials. This is the type of environmental and geophysical information sought by engineers who must design drilling platforms and find optimum routes for pipelines and other facilities. Support for the development and full realization of this patented improvement to the NSRF equipment and for its incorporation into the "NSRF V-fin system" was never given by NSRF.

In 1990, the NSRF announced that it would discontinue survey operations and support for its own invention. In 1997, Mobil Oil of Canada, acting for Sable Offshore Exploration Project in its request for tenders on seabed survey work, specified the "NSRF V-fin system" as the equipment of choice for geotechnical investigations of various sites and pipeline routes.

What explanation can the minister give for the failure of his agency, NSRF (Innovacorp) to support refinements to a Nova Scotia development of proven international worth and current applicability to domestic offshore developments?

[Page 1960]

NOTICE OF QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN ANSWERS

Given on June 29, 1998

(Pursuant to Rule 30)

QUESTION NO. 2

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

To: Hon. Robert Harrison (Minister of Education and Culture)

It has been raised by those within the former Halifax County school board that education is suffering in schools because of the increased costs of busing and the losses that losing programs involving extra bus trips is a great cost to the education of the students in that area. The province has asked that the schools require a fine arts credit for senior high graduation. Has the province since that requirement was instituted, looked into the concerns of our high schools, especially in rural communities, of the cost to ensure that that credit is properly delivered is not a hardship for some schools? If not, is this something that the department will be evaluating in the near future?

QUESTION NO. 3

By: Mr. John Leefe (Queens)

To: Hon. Clifford Huskilson (Minister of Transportation and Public Works)

With regard to Five Island Lake, the Community Committee agreed upon a course of action, submitted a report and a test pilot was conducted last year and the report has been evidently somewhat modified as a result of the test.

Given your commitment as indicated on the first page of your estimates, would the minister please confirm that there is funding available to complete the project in 1998-99? If there is not enough money for the entire project to be completed in 1998-99, would the minister indicate how much is dedicated to the project for 1998-99 and confirm that there will be enough funding to complete the project in the next budget year? When will the project be completed?

QUESTION NO. 4

By: Mr. John Leefe (Queens)

To: Hon. Kenneth MacAskill (Minister of Natural Resources)

Regarding Long Lake (Spryfield, adjacent to Northwest Arm Drive):

(1) Will Long Lake ever be open to domestic or commercial development and if so, when?

[Page 1961]

(2) Is there any plan to develop Long Lake for recreational purposes and if so, when?

(3) Would the minister commit to working with the community group to develop a recreational plan for Long Lake?

QUESTION NO. 5

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

To: Hon. Robert Harrison (Minister of Education and Culture)

Parents from the Eastern Passage area are looking to have their concerns about the changes the school board has outlined for their children's coming school year heard. They are discontented with the way the school board is operating with regard to public submissions and the decision made on split-shifts versus busing - a situation of which I am sure you are well acquainted. Since the Education Act outlines in Section 141(k) that the minister may, "effect improvement generally in the conduct and administration of school boards, and, among other things, consult with, assist and advise school boards . . .", could the minister seek cooperation with the school board in this instance to allow a hearing on what has become a very emotional issue for both these parents and the children?

QUESTION NO. 6

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

To: Hon. Robert Harrison (Minister of Education and Culture)

Parents, concerned citizens, students and teachers in the communities encompassed by the Chignecto-Central board are concerned about the recently released Provincial Election Needs Assessment Report. While you have indicated that you are supportive of boards reviewing their facilities, the thought of those communities who are on the list for losing a school is that it would be a huge blow in their area and to the children in those smaller schools.

This is not the first region responding to reports looking to close facilities. The Strait region has also been in a lengthy battle between the idea of new, larger regional schools and those communities fearing the impact that the loss they will experience, not to mention the long drives and the other impacts this sort of fundamental decision will have on their children.

As Minister of Education for this province, have you undertaken a formal review of the impact that the closure of some of the schools in question will have on those communities and on the children who will be bused from their communities?

[Page 1962]

QUESTION NO. 7

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

To: Hon. Clifford Huskilson (Minister of Transportation and Public Works)

(1) When will the Department of Transportation and Public Works address the ongoing concern about the present speed limit in place through the old section of Highway No. 104 through the Wentworth Valley?

(2) Also, is there anything the Department of Transportation and Public Works can do to regulate the flow of truck traffic on the old section of Highway No. 104 through the Wentworth Valley? The RCMP are presently telling residents of the area there is little that can be done unless they follow a particular truck from Folly to the new highway at Thomson!

QUESTION NO. 8

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

To: Hon. Clifford Huskilson (Minister of Transportation and Public Works)

(1) Will the minister move to improve highway destination signage for the community of Wallace on the Cobequid Pass at Exit 7 at Thomson Station and Exit 11 at Glenholme in spite of recommendations from the local area manager?

(2) Will the minister also move to modify advance highway signage on Trunk 4 for access to Route 368 again despite recommendations from the local area manager of the Department of Transportation and Public Works?

QUESTION NO. 9

By: Mr. Ernest Fage (Cumberland North)

To: Hon. James Smith (Minister of Health)

(1) Why are nurses employed with the VON in Cumberland County not allowed to accept any employment with Positive Changes Homecare and Nursing Ltd.? This company is experiencing difficulties with Home Care Nova Scotia. Why?

(2) Is the Department of Health considering establishing a relationship with companies such as Positive Changes Homecare and Nursing Ltd. to assist with Nova Scotia's Home Care Program?

[Page 1963]

(3) Why are students within the Nova Scotia Community College system being told not to associate with private home care companies and actually being told that employment will be difficult to find with Home Care Nova Scotia if they choose to gain experience with private companies?