Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 01/02-130

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Murray Scott

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Annual subscriptions available from the Office of the Speaker.

Second Session

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2002

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Nat. Res. - Sydney River: Groundwater Supply - Protect,
Mr. R. MacKinnon 11989
Transport. & Pub. Wks.: Sandra Dr. (Lake Echo) - Pave,^
Mr. D. Hendsbee 11990
PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES:
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. M. Baker 11990
Law Amendments Committee, Hon. M. Baker 11990
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Anl. Rept. of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission,
Hon. M. Baker 11991
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
Tourism & Culture - Tourism Industry: 2002 - Record Year,
Hon. Rodney MacDonald 11991
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4913, Baker, Terry: Football Career - Congrats., The Premier 11995
Vote - Affirmative 11996
Res. 4914, Econ. Dev. - Pt. Hawkesbury Office: Teamwork Award -
Congrats, Hon. C. Clarke 11996
Vote - Affirmative 11996
Res. 4915, Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal: Recipients - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Purves 11996
Vote - Affirmative 11997
Res. 4916, SMU - Football Huskies: Vanier Cup - Congrats.,
Hon. Rodney MacDonald 11997
Vote - Affirmative 11998
Res. 4917, Health - CPR: Heart & Stroke Fdn. - Advocacy Congrats.,
Hon. J. Muir 11998
Vote - Affirmative 11999
Res. 4918, Econ. Dev. - UCCB: Prog. Dev. - Innovation Congrats.,
Hon. C. Clarke 11999
Vote - Affirmative 11999
Res. 4919, Sports - IIHF World Jr. Hockey Championship: Organizers/
Sponsors/Vols. - Congrats., Hon. Rodney MacDonald 12000
Vote - Affirmative 12000
Res. 4920, Bartlett, Dr. Cheryl/Francis, Dr. Bernie: Research Grant -
Congrats., Hon. M. Baker 12000
Vote - Affirmative 12001
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 161, Members and Public Employees Disclosure Act,
Mr. K. Deveaux 12001
No. 162, Anglican Church Act, Ms. M. McGrath 12001
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4921, Prem. - Seniors: Blue Book - Promises, Mr. D. Dexter 12002
Res. 4922, Women, Int'l. Day Against Violence (11/25/02) -
Recognize, Mr. W. Gaudet 12003
Vote - Affirmative 12003
Res. 4923, Bray, Joan & Peter/Ducks Unlimited/Region of Queens Mun.:
Wetlands Conservation - Congrats., Mr. K. Morash 12003
Vote - Affirmative 12004
Res. 4924, Environ. & Lbr. - Min. Wage: Policy - Revamp,
Mr. F. Corbett 12004
Res. 4925, Wolstenholme, Colleen - Sobey Art Award (2002):
Shortlist - Congrats., Mr. D. Downe 12005
Vote - Affirmative 12006
Res. 4926, N.S. Home for Coloured Children: Anl. Broadcast for Funds -
Support, Mr. D. Hendsbee 12006
Vote - Affirmative 12006
Res. 4927, Martin, Paul/CSL: N.S. - Effects, Mr. H. Epstein 12007
Res. 4928, Environ. & Lbr. - Coal Stockpile: Standards -
Depts. Coordinate, Mr. P. MacEwan 12008
Res. 4929, Smith, Laura - Recovery: Best Wishes - Extend,
Mr. J. Chataway 12009
Vote - Affirmative 12009
Res. 4930, Beuree, Harry - Petition Long-Term Care: Init. - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Estabrooks 12009
Vote - Affirmative 12010
Res. 4931, Penny, Terri-Lynn, Fdn./Tim Hortons: Fundraising -
Congrats., Mr. B. Boudreau 12010
Vote - Affirmative 12011
Res. 4932, Pictou Co. Christmas Wish Fund: Organizer/Vols. -
Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 12011
Vote - Affirmative 12011
Res. 4933, Unama'ki Instit. of Nat. Res.: Opening - Congrats.,
Mr. Robert Chisholm 12012
Vote - Affirmative 12012
Res. 4934, SMU - Football Huskies: Vanier Cup - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Wilson 12012
Vote - Affirmative 12013
Res. 4935, Sports - RecPlex (St. Mary's Mun.): Opening - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 12013
Vote - Affirmative 12014
Res. 4936, McKay, Marylin: Book Publication - Congrats.,
Mr. K. Deveaux 12014
Vote - Affirmative 12015
Res. 4937, Sydney Tar Ponds - Cleanup: Org. - Problem,
Mr. P. MacEwan 12015
Res. 4938, Archibald, Don: Death of - Tribute, Mr. M. Parent 12015
Vote - Affirmative 12016
Res. 4939, Commun. Serv. - Crawford, Brian/Kennedy, Archie:
Free Speech - Demonstration Congrats., Mr. J. MacDonell 12016
Res. 4940, Baker, Terry: Grey Cup Championship - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Downe 12017
Vote - Affirmative 12018
Res. 4941, Zwicker, Donald - UNSM: Pres. - Election Congrats.,
Hon. M. Baker 12018
Vote - Affirmative 12018
Res. 4942, Mt. A./Pres. - Econ. Dev. Min.: Alumni Meeting -
Knowledge Garnered, Mr. W. Estabrooks 12018
Vote - Affirmative 12019
Res. 4943, Blou: Achievements - Congrats., Mr. W. Gaudet 12019
Vote - Affirmative 12020
Res. 4944, Bear River Commun. Action Comm.: Dedication - Congrats.,
Hon. G. Balser 12020
Vote - Affirmative 12021
Res. 4945, Eskasoni Band Coun.: Commun. Dev. - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Boudreau 12021
Vote - Affirmative 12022
Res. 4946, Peace Init. - Tree Lighting Ceremony: Donors - Thank,
Mr. D. Hendsbee 12022
Vote - Affirmative 12023
Res. 4947, Canning - History: Preservation - Participants Commend,
Mr. M. Parent 12023
Vote - Affirmative 12023
Res. 4948, Can. Soc. of Painters in Water Colour: New Members -
Congrats., Hon. M. Baker 12024
Vote - Affirmative 12024
Res. 4949, Canso - Commun.: Survival - Commitment,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 12024
Vote - Affirmative 12025
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 1347, Health - Long-Term Care: Seniors' Savings - Seizure Cease,
Mr. D. Dexter 12025
No. 1348, Tourism & Culture - Tourism Ind.: Gov't. (N.S.) Assistance -
Details, Mr. Manning MacDonald 12027
No. 1349, Health - Nursing Home Care: Seniors - Assessment Equality,
Mr. D. Dexter 12029
No. 1350, Health - Long-term Care: Announcement - Details,
Dr. J. Smith 12030
No. 1351, Prem. - Political Advertising: Spending - Details,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 12032
No. 1352, Tourism & Culture - Tourism Ind.: Gov't. (N.S.) Resources -
Adequacy, Mr. D. Downe 12033
No. 1353, Health - Long-Term Care: Costs - MacKinnon Farm Details,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 12035
No. 1354, Econ. Dev. - Ocean Nutrition: Loan - Details Table,
Mr. R. MacKinnon 12036
No. 1355, Econ. Dev. - Risley Loan Deferral: Grantors - Name,
Mr. J. MacDonell 12037
No. 1356, Commun. Serv. - Women's Ctrs.: Funding - Commitment,
Mr. W. Gaudet 12039
No. 1357, Educ.: Loan Remission Prog. - Status, Mr. H. Epstein 12040
No. 1358, Environ. & Lbr. - Sydney River Watershed Area: Problem -
Resolution Details, Mr. R. MacKinnon 12042
No. 1359, Educ. - UCCB: Water Quality - Action, Mr. F. Corbett 12043
No. 1360, Kyoto Protocol - Prem.: Plan - Explain, Mr. R. MacKinnon 12044
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 162, Anglican Church Act 12046
Ms. M. McGrath 12046
Mr. J. Holm 12046
Mr. M. Samson 12047
Ms. M. McGrath 12047
Vote - Affirmative 12047
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 2:07 P.M. 12048
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 4:09 P.M. 12048
CWH REPORTS 12048
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5):
Health - Determinants: North End Residents - Address:
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 12049
Dr. J. Smith 12052
Hon. J. Muir 12054
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Wed., Nov. 27th at 2:00 p.m. 12056
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 4950, Baker, Terry: CFL Career - Commend, Mr. B. Taylor 12057
Res. 4951, Dykstra, Andrea: Research Funding - Congrats.,
Mr. J. DeWolfe 12057
Res. 4952, Morse, F.W., Library: Opening - Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 12058
Res. 4953, Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Bridge Repair: Clare MLA -
Appreciate, Mr. B. Taylor 12058
Res. 4954, Oxford Vol. FD Aux.: Donations - Congrats., The Speaker 12059
Res. 4955, Allen, Doug: Dutch Medal of Remembrance - Congrats.,
The Speaker 12059
Res. 4956, Parrsboro Reg. HS - Remembrance Day Prog.: Winners -
Congrats., The Speaker 12060
Res. 4957, Parrsboro Reg. HS - Remembrance Day Prog.: Winners -
Congrats., The Speaker 12060
Res. 4958, Parrsboro Reg. HS - Remembrance Day Prog.: Winners -
Congrats., The Speaker 12061
Res. 4959, Godfrey, Ted & Joan/True Blue Fitness Ctr.: Award -
Congrats., The Speaker 12061
Res. 4960, Connie's Financial Services: Award - Congrats.,
The Speaker 12062

[Page 11989]

HALIFAX, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2002

Fifty-eighth General Assembly

Second Session

12:00 NOON

SPEAKER

Hon. Murray Scott

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Brooke Taylor, Mr. Kevin Deveaux, Mr. David Wilson

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The subject for this evening's late debate was submitted by the honourable member for Halifax Needham:

Therefore be it resolved that the John Hamm Government commit in this House to working with the Halifax North community to address the serious issue of the determinants of health that underpin the health status of its residents.

This will be debated this evening at 6:00 p.m.

We will begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of the residents of Sydney River. The operative clause is, "We the residents of Sydney River, request that the Provincial Government take immediate action to protect the ground water supply of our neighbourhood. This problem was first identified by the Cape Breton Regional Municipality on or about September 30, 2002." By all appearances there are several hundred signatures of local residents and I have affixed my signature as well.

11989

[Page 11990]

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Preston.

MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition on behalf of the residents of Sandra Drive in Lake Echo, a paving petition petitioning the province and/or municipality to cost share the paving of the road at 50/50 dollars.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 154 - House of Assembly Act.

Bill No. 158 - Elections Act.

Bill No. 160 - Public Trustee Act.

and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, as Chairman of the Committee on Law Amendments, I am directed to report that the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 142 - House of Assembly Act/Elections Act.

Bill No. 144 - Justice Administration Amendment (Fall 2002) Act.

and the committee recommends these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, with certain amendments.

[Page 11991]

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, it's my honour to table the 2000-01 Annual Report of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture.

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, yesterday I had the pleasure of announcing this year's tourism performance with members of the Tourism Partnership Council, TIANS, and various industry stakeholders at the 25th Annual Tourism Conference here in Halifax. Today I am pleased to share the good news with members of this House that 2002 has been a record year for tourism in Nova Scotia. (Applause)

Revenue is estimated to reach $1.3 billion - that's a 5 per cent increase over 2001. Visitation also grew this year. Preliminary estimates indicate a 3 per cent increase in the number of non-resident visitors to the province, that's 2.2 million people we welcomed to our shores. Year after year the tourism industry in Nova Scotia shows its strength and impact on the provincial economy, and this year is no exception. Revenues for 2002 translate into jobs for some 34,500 Nova Scotians, with a payroll of more than $515 million. Tourism also puts $122 million worth of taxes into the province and our municipalities and let's not forget the fact that 60 per cent of tourism revenues is new money coming into the province. These export dollars are a huge boost to our economy and also to our quality of life.

Yesterday I told the industry that they have every right to be proud of this success, and the truth is they deserve all the credit. I will tell you why they deserve all the credit - they deserve the credit because they continue to work together to achieve common goals that will benefit the entire sector. I've said it before and I'll say it again, the success of tourism in Nova Scotia is a direct result of this industry's willingness to work together. There's no doubt about it. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, yesterday was an exciting day for tourism in Nova Scotia. Not only did we announce our best year ever, but the Tourism Partnership Council also unveiled its vision for tourism. The vision for tourism is a road map, if you will, for unprecedented growth over the next decade, and that vision is a 100 per cent growth in tourism revenues over the next

[Page 11992]

decade. The industry admits that this is a challenge, but I believe it is achievable. This is a vision that will challenge all players in the tourism industry to do bigger and better than ever before. The vision for tourism is consistent with our strategy, which sets priorities and channels efforts.

The truth is, realizing this vision is all about change. As Paul Stackhouse, Chair of the Tourism Partnership Council said yesterday, in order to grow and improve, we need to change, we need to create the kind of environment that fosters growth and we need to adopt a can-do attitude. The vision for tourism does this. I would like to make it clear that this is not government's vision, it is the vision for everyone working in the tourism industry. Some of the changes this vision talks about include enhancing our tourism products, creating high standards of quality for products and services we provide, standards that don't just meet visitors' expectations, but exceed those expectations. It also says that we need to ensure a competent and stable tourism workforce in the future.

Mr. Speaker, this is something that every member should take an interest in. Tourism affects every community in this province from Yarmouth to northern Cape Breton. It is a rural industry and it is an urban industry. In fact, tourism is at the forefront of rural growth. Tourism is a sustainable industry and a success story here in Nova Scotia.

In closing, I just want to remind all members of the House that tourism is a success in Nova Scotia because of the industry's amazing spirit of co-operation. From the Tourism Partnership Council to TIANS and local associations across the province, to municipalities, community groups, the federal and provincial governments, and the private sector, everyone does their part to build tourism. This record year in tourism is due to the hard work and dedication of thousands of operators, the entrepreneurs, the volunteers and associations throughout this province. They deserve the credit.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I certainly do agree with the minister that kudos must go to the activists involved in this important segment of the economy of this province and, in particular, Karl Webb. Karl Webb, of course, outspoken to the end, who has his say on one issue or another, the past school administrator has done yeoman service and I congratulate that particular organization, TIANS, of which he is associated. Paul Stackhouse, of course, the Chairman of the Tourism Partnership Council, has done yeoman work also. The industry deserves the credit. The local associations deserve the credit and I think it's of real consequence we look at the word partnership. If this government is going to, after all, break its arm by patting itself on the back, it should look carefully at some of the budget decisions that it made in the last budget, particularly when it comes to advertising. It should look also very importantly at the partnership and the need in certain areas and I point out the member for Chester-St. Margaret's in particular. Mr. Karl Webb is a constituent of the member for Chester-St. Margaret's and although the member for Chester-St.

[Page 11993]

Margaret's wouldn't sign the petition, the 100 tourists who signed the Camp Neptune concerned petition about the condition of Route 33, that partnership, we should be working together on and I know that's the direction that we should be going.

[12:15 p.m.]

In particular, I want to look at two different concerns. Kejimkujik Park is down 5 per cent, but golfing is down 3 per cent. Now, if this government is going to continue to support, if golfing is going to continue to receive the dollars which this government has put forward to assist golfers across this province. We have to explain the fact that golfers, 3 per cent less of them, have come to this province.

More particularly, there's one statistic . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect has the floor.

MR. ESTABROOKS: There's one statistic which I always ask to be included in these conclusive reports and I congratulate the people who are taking this analysis year in year out - the number of repeat visitors to this province. Those are our greatest ambassadors. Those are the people who go back to Sarnia, and aside from complaining about the condition of Highway No. 333, they say, come to Nova Scotia, come to King Neptune campground. How many of our visitors are return visitors, I've asked in the past and I would hope the minister would reciprocate.

Mr. Minister, this is an important business throughout this province from one region to another. It deserves the support of all members of this House, the local associations, the local volunteers and the many long hours that have been put in by the TIANS organization.

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to further progress in a partnership between the tourism industry and the governments of this province. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I want to first thank the minister for giving a copy of his presentation in advance of the House. It's obviously good news when you can have some growth in the tourism industry. The tourism industry employs many, some 34,000 or 35,000, almost 36,000 Nova Scotians in the Province of Nova Scotia. It's truly across one end of this province to the other. It's a tremendous economic driver and a 5 per cent number is impressive. It's interesting when you take a look at the first two years, this government said they were going to appoint a minister specifically for tourism; the first two years of his mandate he actually had a declining growth in tourism in the Province of Nova Scotia. This year, as the minister has said in the House, "The industry deserves the credit."

[Page 11994]

I want to make it clear, the minister is right - the industry does deserve the credit for the growth this year because, on average, for the last three years, they've had about a 1 per cent growth because of this government's approach to tourism. I think it's people like Karl Webb and Paul Stackhouse who have done a tremendous job in leading the new vision for tourism in Nova Scotia.

I know the minister is trying to do a job, but his budget has been reduced almost every year that he's been there. I will give you an example, this year alone, the marketing division, the marketing budget - and our Leader, Danny Graham, stated this earlier in the year - has declined by $1.4 million. No wonder this government is saying they have to give the industry the credit because the minister, himself, his hands are cuffed from doing some really aggressive marketing initiatives in the Province of Nova Scotia because of the fact they don't even have enough money in the budget to do a proper marketing initiative. At the same time, this industry has provided $122 million of new tax revenue to the Province of Nova Scotia and those numbers are very significant to the economic well-being of this province.

I would also like to wish, and take the opportunity to congratulate all industry players in their dedication and their commitment to the industry. Most of all because they have been bold in setting a target to double the tourism industry in the Province of Nova Scotia over the next decade. I had the pleasure of being at the tourism association's meeting on Sunday night and I was there yesterday and I listened to the minister's speech. I listened to the industry talk about the future of Nova Scotia in their proposal about building and rebuilding the economic opportunities of Nova Scotia. It's a great proposal. One that I believe can be achieved. It's one I believe that can be successful in the Province of Nova Scotia by partnering together.

One of the significant aspects is they talk about this provincial government partnering together. I have failed to see this government's financial and fiscal commitment to the tourism industry, whether it's infrastructure or whether it's dollars in the tourism budget or whether it's giving the minister the opportunity to do his job the way he should be doing it. Now, he's going to have to fight in that Cabinet to make sure that he can live up to those commitments. I'm sure, after hearing everybody here talk about how great tourism is, he will able to fight even harder. I know he's young, I know he's a rookie, but I'm sure with the confidence of the members over here that he deserves to fight harder at that Cabinet Table that he'll get a better budget for tourism in Nova Scotia.

AN HON. MEMBER: He's the senior one, Cecil's the rookie.

MR. DOWNE: He's still a rookie to me, Mr. Speaker. The government was told in the tourism sector very clearly that they needed better infrastructure. They need programs to do programs where there is Sunday shopping or infrastructure development or things of that nature. This government has to go a long way to meet the requirements they say the tourism

[Page 11995]

industry says they need to make this commitment become a reality. The challenge should be to that minister, to that Premier and to that government.

In regard to the growth, congratulations to the tourism industry, congratulations to all the staff who worked so hard for providing a good Nova Scotia image to the tourists who come to Nova Scotia and in balance, by working together, we'll have a stronger tourism industry in the future.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 4913

HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Sunday, the Montreal Alouettes won the Grey Cup Championship defeating the Edmonton Eskimos 25 - 16; and

Whereas Alouettes kicker, a Bridgewater native and resident, Terry Baker, who played his high school football at Cobequid Educational Centre in Truro, helped Montreal secure their first Grey Cup in 25 years by booting a field goal, a single and three conversions; and

Whereas Sunday's game was Terry's last, after an illustrious 16-year career in the CFL;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Bridgewater's Terry Baker for finishing his pro football career the best possible way and wish him, his wife Krista and their daughters Natasha, Ashley and Brianna the very best in their life together on Nova Scotia's South Shore.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 11996]

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Economic Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 4914

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Strait Area Chamber of Commerce presented the Port Hawkesbury Office of Economic Development with the Teamwork Award 2002 at their annual dinner; and

Whereas it was presented specifically for the collaboration exhibited in bringing the EDS Customer Service Centre to Port Hawkesbury; and

Whereas the other members of the team included Human Resources Development Canada, Inrich Development Corporation, Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation and Nova Scotia Business Incorporated;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate all those members of this dedicated team who helped to bring EDS to Port Hawkesbury.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 4915

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11997]

Whereas the Commemorative Medal for the Queen's Golden Jubilee was presented to six exceptional Nova Scotia teachers on November 21st; and

Whereas educators Greg O'Keefe of Sydney, Fred Crouse of Centreville, Ken MacDonald of Port Morien, École NDA Principal Leonard LeFort, Aspotogan Consolidated School Principal Patricia Helm, and Mulgrave Memorial Education Centre Principal Marlene Boyd were recognized for their distinguished service; and

Whereas the medal recipients were recognized as citizens who have made an outstanding and exemplary contribution to the community or to Canada as a whole;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Queen's Golden Jubilee recipients on this exceptional honour.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister responsible for the Nova Scotia Sport and Recreation Commission.

RESOLUTION NO. 4916

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Saint Mary's Huskies kept on rollin', rollin', rollin' despite the absence of the traditional morale booster, the Atlantic Bowl, in Halifax this year; and

Whereas the Saint Mary's Huskies met the University of Saskatchewan Huskies in Toronto for a well-matched contest to vie for the CIS national football championship prize, the Vanier Cup; and

[Page 11998]

Whereas the Saint Mary's Huskies won their second Vanier Cup for the second year in a row, and became only the third school in 38 years to win back-to-back cups and the only school from Atlantic Canada to do it;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House commend the players and the coaching staff of the Saint Mary's Huskies for their outstanding national championship win to double the thrill for fans who made the journey to watch it live, as well as the folks watching from home.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 4917

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas CPR courses provide the necessary tools for people to adapt their lifestyles to prevent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease; and

Whereas CPR provides the necessary skills to react in life-threatening situations; and

Whereas a 5 per cent increase in bystander CPR could translate into seven more survivors of cardiac arrest annually in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in acknowledging the Heart and Stroke Foundation for their efforts in advocating the significance of CPR, especially during November, which is CPR month.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 11999]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Economic Development.

RESOLUTION NO. 4918

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton recently released an interactive CD-ROM on community economic development that shows how people co-operate to help sustain and grow their communities; and

Whereas the UCCB Institute for Education recently introduced a new certificate program in educational studies in arts education that consists of 24 graduate level credits, so that teachers can learn how to integrate arts into the classroom; and

Whereas the UCCB has one of the fastest-growing research components within universities in Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the University College of Cape Breton on its innovation in program development and delivery, and its rating in the Canadian university research community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 12000]

The honourable Minister responsibile for the Nova Scotia Sport and Recreation Commission.

RESOLUTION NO. 4919

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 2003 IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship is being played in both Sydney and Halifax from December 26, 2002 to January 5, 2003; and

Whereas hosting this fantastic world-class event fires the imaginations of young Nova Scotians, develops Nova Scotians' skills to organize and manage major events, and creates economic opportunities for the service and hospitality sector; and

Whereas hundreds of Nova Scotia volunteers have given generously of their time and expertise to support the 2003 IIHF World Junior Hockey Championship;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House send best wishes for a successful championship, and congratulate President and CEO of the World Trade Centre Limited and Chairman of Events, Halifax, Fred MacGillivray; Event Manager, Chris Larsen; and the organizing committees, sponsors and volunteers for their outstanding contributions.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 4920

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, in my capacity as Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 12001]

Whereas Dr. Cheryl Bartlett, Professor of Biology, the University College of Cape Breton, has been awarded a prestigious Tier 1, Canada Research Chair in Integrative Science; and

Whereas Dr. Bartlett is recognized nationally for her role in the development and implementation of a unique, interpretative science program, combining science and Aboriginal knowledge, culture, social and environmental issues; and

Whereas the goal of this integrative science program has been its unique success in attracting young Aboriginal students into science and science-related degrees, and helping to retain them toward graduation;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly congratulate Dr. Cheryl Bartlett and Associate Chairman, Dr. Bernie Francis, a celebrated educator and linguist from the Mi'kmaw community of Membertou First Nation, for their innovative work in training future generations of scientists.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[12:30 p.m.]

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 161 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 4 of the Acts of 1991. The Members and Public Employees Disclosure Act. (Mr. Kevin Deveaux)

Bill No. 162 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 130 of the Acts of 1967. The Anglican Church Act. (Ms. Mary Ann McGrath)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 12002]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, with the unanimous consent of the House I move that Bill 162, the Anglican Church Act, be considered to be on today's order paper and printed, and the bill be distributed to the members of the House forthwith.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 4921

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in July 1999 one of the 243 promises in the Premier's platform book was that, "a PC government will ensure that input from seniors and the interests of seniors are at the forefront of all government decision making affecting the future of our province"; and

Whereas on November 15th seniors learned the importance of their input and interests when the Hamm Conservatives decided that nursing home residents will continue to be the only Nova Scotians who are forced to pay for their own health care;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier was wise when in 2001, he began to pretend that he had never promised to keep seniors in the forefront of his government's decision making.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

[Page 12003]

RESOLUTION NO. 4922

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas yesterday, November 25th, marked the beginning of 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence with the International Day Against Violence Against Women; and

Whereas this international event involves individuals and groups from around the world calling for and working towards the elimination of all forms of violence against women; and

Whereas December 10th, which marks the end of the 16-day campaign, is International Human Rights Day, a symbolic linkage that violence against women is a violation of human rights;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House be ever mindful of the powerful messages brought forward during the 16 days and cognizant of the impact program delivery and support plays in protecting women in violent situations.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 4923

MR. KERRY MORASH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ducks Unlimited is committed to conserving wetlands and other habitats for the benefit of North American waterfowl, other wildlife and mankind; and

[Page 12004]

Whereas private citizens Joan and Peter Bray of Liverpool are working with Ducks Unlimited and the Region of Queens Municipality to preserve an area adjacent to their home; and

Whereas they are working towards having the project complete by the summer of 2003, making this the third location jointly maintained by Ducks Unlimited and the Region of Queens Municipality;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House express their appreciation to Joan and Peter Bray, Ducks Unlimited and the Region of Queens Municipality for this worthy endeavour.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 4924

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Campaign 2000, a national coalition of groups dedicated to eliminating child poverty in Canada, released a report yesterday that shows 17.6 per cent of Nova Scotia children are living in poverty; and

Whereas the report calls on all levels of government to eliminate this disgrace by developing a comprehensive system of income supports to alleviate the financial misery of impoverished families and children; and

Whereas the report identified, however, that a low minimum wage is a key contributor to keeping these families in dire straits;

[Page 12005]

Therefore be it resolved that this government immediately revamp its minimum wage policy to help provide a living wage to poor working families in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4925

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia has the honour of hosting the 2002 Sobeys Art Award which provides a $50,000 award to a Canadian artist as well as $10,000 for the host gallery; and

Whereas five contemporary artists representing each region of the country have been short-listed to display their art at the AGNS next month where a panel of contemporary art curators will judge each work to determine who will receive the grand prize; and

Whereas Colleen Wolstenholme, a contemporary sculptor from Hantsport, has been short-listed to represent Atlantic Canada at this prestigious showing presenting a bronze sculpture entitled, Buspar Column;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia for hosting this event and wish Colleen Wolstenholme every success at this esteemed award.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 12006]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 4926

MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas for more than eight decades the Nova Scotia Home for Coloured Children, the oldest co-ed residential facility in Nova Scotia, has been a central part of the local community; and

Whereas its original purpose was to provide for the needy children in the Black community but today its doors are open to help all at-risk children, regardless of their racial origin, religious affiliation or ethnic background; and

Whereas each year the Nova Scotia Home for Coloured Children has reached out to our communities and the generosity of their citizens through its annual appeal, the oldest, continuous charitable telethon in North America;

Therefore be it resolved that all members show their support for the tremendous work of the Nova Scotia Home for Coloured Children by, hopefully, making a generous donation to the 71st Annual Christmas for Funds airing Sunday, December 15th, live from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Eastlink Cable, Channel 10, so that the home is able to continue to offer help and assistance to children in need.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Economic Development on an introduction.

[Page 12007]

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I thank you for having this opportunity to make an introduction in the House today. It's my pleasure to rise and introduce Councillor Mae Rowe and her husband. Councillor Rowe is with the Cape Breton Regional Municipality and she's in the east gallery. I ask all members of the House to afford her a warm welcome. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West on an introduction.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I would like to draw to your attention and to the attention of all members of the House, in the west gallery, three residents from Sydney River who are here to watch the proceedings and hopefully meet with the Minister of Health and the Minister of Environment and Labour to raise some issues later in the day, the water issue in Sydney River. I would like to introduce Mr. Dave Lionas, Mr. Glenn Munroe, Mr. Lesley Langley. I would ask that all members of the House would afford them the usual courtesy. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We certainly welcome our guests to the gallery today.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 4927

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Paul Martin's company, Canada Steamships Limited, has been ordered to pay a record high fine for leaving a 40-mile oil slick off the coast of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas, because the Liberals shut down the Cape Breton coal mines, Paul Martin's company makes new profits by importing foreign coal which is then trucked by Joe Shannon; and

Whereas Paul Martin's company stands to gain still more by shipping gravel from the proposed Digby Neck quarry which the Hamm Government sponsors despite community and environmental concerns;

Therefore be it resolved that in the opinion of this House, the oil slick left by Paul Martin's ship, CSL Atlas, is only a fraction of the oil slick that Mr. Martin is creating in Nova Scotia's political and economic waters.

MR. SPEAKER: Was there a request for waiver?

The notice is tabled.

[Page 12008]

The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 4928

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas with respect to environmental cleanup, attention at Sydney has tended to avoid many areas affected with current or potential environmental difficulties; and

Whereas in the case of coal shipping, a massive increase in the amount of imported coal is planned to be shipped to the International Piers at Whitney Pier, to replace the coal formerly mined in Cape Breton for electrical generation; and (Interruption)

Whose windmill sank. (Laughter)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova has the floor.

MR. MACEWAN: Whereas the Department of Housing does not have a mission to help people living adjacent to this coal stockpile, nor is any fund of money provided to deal with this situation similar to that provided the Sydney tar ponds cleanup; (Interruptions)

Mr. Speaker, I'll just be quiet until they're quiet.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. MACEWAN: Therefore be it resolved that all agencies concerned with housing and environmental standards should coordinate their efforts so as to see that all affected by the aftermath of steelmaking and coal shipping at Sydney are looked after.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Chester-St. Margaret's.

[Page 12009]

RESOLUTION NO. 4929

MR. JOHN CHATAWAY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas award-winning singer and songwriter Laura Smith has touched audiences around the world with her soulful songs and voice; and

Whereas Laura, who makes Chester her home, needed to take some time off from performing due to an injury she incurred last summer; and

Whereas Laura recently returned to the stage to participate in a concert at the Chester Playhouse and is now touring once again;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly extend their best wishes to Ms. Smith for her swift recovery and welcome her back to delighting her fans and audiences near and far.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 4930

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hubley senior Harry Beuree collected over 250 signatures for the long-term care petition presented in this House; and

Whereas Harry Bueree has had personal experience with this unfair system; and

[Page 12010]

Whereas seniors like Mr. Bueree are still worried and concerned about their finances in their golden years;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly thank and congratulate Harry Bueree for his initiative in collecting signatures for the long-term care petition tabled in this House.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4931

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas five-year-old Terri-Lynn Penney is in need of a new home to meet her special needs after being placed in a wheelchair due to complications from illness; and

Whereas the Terri-Lynn Penney Foundation has been able to raise much of the finances and have a great deal of the materials donated, but there is still a fair bit of work to be done in the coming weeks; and

Whereas community volunteer efforts are now being supported by Tim Hortons' locations in North Sydney and Bras d'Or who will sell Christmas tree cookies to raise funds from November 27 to December 3, 2002, in hopes of finishing the Penney home in time for Christmas;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this Legislature congratulate the Terri-Lynn Penney Foundation and Tim Hortons' locations for the tremendous efforts to have Terri-Lynn in her home for the holidays.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 12011]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4932

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Pictou County Christmas Wish Fund raised almost $51,000 on Sunday; and

Whereas hundreds of individuals took to the stage while many more worked behind the scene to make this year's event a smashing success; and

Whereas by raising $45,000 last year, the Christmas Wish Fund was able to assist 2,700 men, women and children of Pictou County in having a brighter Christmas;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs commend organizer Bob Curley, and all the people who gave so generously of their time on Sunday, to ensure many of the less fortunate families of Pictou County have a bright and happy holiday.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

[Page 12012]

RESOLUTION NO. 4933

MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[12:45 p.m.]

Whereas the Unama'ki Institute of Natural Resources was officially incorporated in July 1999 and celebrated its grand opening on September 6, 2002; and

Whereas the organization is representative of the five Cape Breton First Nations of Eskasoni, Membertou, Chapel Island, Waycobah, and Wagmatcook; and

Whereas it is the mission of the institute to promote and contribute to the protection of the Bras d'Or Lakes and its watershed and the marine system in and around the traditional territory of the Mi'kmaq people;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Director of the Unama'ki Institute of Natural Resources, Charlie Dennis, and all First Nation peoples for their initiative and stewardship of the natural resources in their traditional territory of Unama'ki.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

RESOLUTION NO. 4934

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Saint Mary's Huskies football team won their second-straight Vanier Cup on November 23rd, under the leadership of Head Coach Blake Nill, with a score of 33 to 21 against the Saskatchewan Huskies; and

[Page 12013]

Whereas this is the first time since 1977 that a Canadian university has won back-to-back national championship titles; and

Whereas the clinching touchdown was scored by Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia, native, running back Gabe Harvey; and

Whereas all Nova Scotians are proud of the hard work and dedication the team displayed allowing for this great achievement;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Saint Mary's Huskies, Head Coach Blake Nill, and all coaches and staff on winning their second-straight Vanier Cup.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury.

RESOLUTION NO. 4935

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Municipality of St. Mary's will celebrate the operation of an artificial ice facility at the RecPlex on Wednesday; and

Whereas the National Hockey League Players Association has generously supported this important project with financial assistance totalling more than $130,000; and

Whereas Mike Gartner, President of the National Hockey League Players Association, will be in St. Mary's to help local residents celebrate the new facility and to speak to local students who have been invited to skate;

[Page 12014]

Therefore be it resolved that this House join the residents of St. Mary's in celebrating the opening of the RecPlex and thank Mike Gartner and the NHL Players Association for being so generous with their time and financial resources.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 4936

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Marylin McKay has been a professor of Art History at the Nova Scotia College of Art & Design for 14 years, most recently as the chairperson of the Department of Art History; and

Whereas Ms. McKay has taken a particular interest in Canadian mural paintings, having conducted research of murals from coast to coast in Canada; and

Whereas Ms. McKay recently published her first book, A National Soul - Canadian Mural Paintings, 1860s-1930s, in which she explores this often-ignored component of Canadian art history;

Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize the work of Marylin McKay, congratulate her on the launch of her new book and wish her all the best in her future academic endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 12015]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 4937

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the performance of the Sydney tar ponds cleanup leaves much to be desired; and

Whereas in the case of the family of Rick Chisholm of 25 Hankard Street, Sydney, the tar ponds cleanup is proposing to lift his older home up into the air and then relocate it on a back field which is currently a swamp; and

Whereas the tar ponds cleanup do not know when they are going to do this work, do not know if they will have the budget to pay for it, and want the Chisholms to front the money and then they can seek compensation afterwards;

Therefore be it resolved that this performance creates the impression that these people do not know what they are doing and are making themselves a part of the problem they are supposed to be there to clean up.

I won't seek waiver of notice on that one. There seem to be some fans of that tar ponds agency . . .

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 4938

MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas humanitarian and industrialist Don Archibald passed away at his home in Wolfville on August 2, 2002; and

[Page 12016]

Whereas Mr. Archibald passed away at his home in Wolfville on August 2nd, 2002; and

Whereas Mr. Archibald was the owner of Archibald farms and Archibald farm products, which eventually became the second largest egg producer in Canada; and

Whereas Mr. Archibald was one of the founders of the Interchurch Housing Society and also volunteered with the Pine Hill Divinity School and King's County Children's Foundation, as well as many other charities;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House join me in expressing our condolences to Mr. Archibald's family and friends, and express our sadness at the loss of this compassionate Nova Scotia entrepreneur and citizen.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4939

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas community service caseworkers Brian Crawford and Archie Kennedy demonstrated great bravery by going public with their concerns on Information Morning today; and

Whereas the last time social workers came to this House to protest rising caseloads and lost positions in three communities they were docked a day's pay; and

Whereas supervisors informed social workers two weeks ago that if they spoke at a media briefing, there would be repercussions even though the workers were on their own time;

[Page 12017]

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Brian Crawford and Archie Kennedy for putting the needs of the children they serve over their own job security in demonstrating their right to free speech in spite of gag orders in the Department of Community Services.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4940

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 24th, the Montreal Alouettes won the Grey Cup Championship by a score of 25-16 defeating the Edmonton Eskimos; and

Whereas Alouette's kicker, Bridgewater native Terry Baker, assisted Montreal in securing their first Grey Cup Victory in 25 years by kicking a field goal, a single and three conversions; and

Whereas this victory was Terry's last after an impressive 16 year career in the CFL;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House congratulate Bridgewater native, Terry Baker for completing his pro football career with a Grey Cup Championship

and wish he and his wife Krista, their daughters Natasha, Ashley and Brianna the very best in their continued lives in beautiful South Shore.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 12018]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 4941

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Donald Zwicker has been a councillor for the District of the Municipality of Lunenburg, representing the interest of the residents of District 3 since 1991; and

Whereas Councillor Zwicker has been a representative for the South Shore at the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities for four years; and

Whereas Mr. Zwicker was recently elected President of the Union of Nova Scotia

municipalities;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Mr. Donald Zwicker of Lunenburg County on his election to this important leadership role and express our best wishes to him on his deliberations in the years ahead on behalf of Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 4942

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 12019]

Whereas Mount Allison University President Wayne MacKay addressed the Alumni Association of Halifax on Thursday, November 21st, 2002; and

Whereas the Minister of Economic Development and the MLA for Timberlea-Prospect, both Mount Allison graduates, hosted alumni at their table; and

Whereas the minister was at this event at the invitation of the member for Timberlea-Prospect;

Therefore be it resolved that this House acknowledge the leadership of Mount Allison and its President Wayne Mackay with sincere hope that the Minister of Economic Development gained valuable knowledge from the Mount Allison alumni members present at the Alumni Association's meeting on November 21st, 2002.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 4943

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I would like to do my resolution first in

French followed by the English translation please.

M. le Président, par la présente j'avise que je proposerai à une date ultérieure l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que le groupe Acadien Blou, qui a ses racines à la Baie Sainte-Marie dans la municipalité de Clare, a gagné le titre de, Artistes' étant le plus illustré hors Acadie; et

Attendu que ce groupe s'est illustré dans les pays suivants; France, Danemark, Norvège, Italie, Belgique, Allemagne, États Unis, Corse et la Hollande à plusieurs reprises; et

[Page 12020]

Attendu que ce groupe toute en se distinguant par son talent artistique contribue à faire la promotion de l'Acadie et de la Nouvelle-Écosse;

Qu'il soit résolu que cette Chambre exprime ses félicitations et transmet ces meilleurs v�ux de succès aux membres du groupe Blou en leur souhaite un plein succès.

M. le Président je propose une l'adoption de cette résolution sans préavis et sans débats.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Acadian group, Blou, originating from Baie Sainte-Marie in the Municipality of Clare has won the award of the most-recognized artist outside l'Acadie; and

Whereas this group has performed in France, Denmark, Norway, Italy, Belgium, Germany, United States, Corsica and Holland several times; and

Whereas this group is promoting the Acadian culture and the rich background of this province;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate the Acadian group, Blou for their achievements.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Energy.

RESOLUTION NO. 4944

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 12021]

Whereas the people of the Village of Bear River, when faced with a security problem in their community, got together and formed a citizens action committee; and

Whereas this community has proactively worked with all three levels of government and two detachments of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to formulate a strategy to address this issue; and

Whereas this effort, as noted by the CBC, is making strides in fighting this long-standing problem;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House applaud the dedication of the members of the Bear River Community Action Committee to this just cause and recognize that this commitment is vital to the development of a safe community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4945

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Eskasoni Band has had its first budget surplus of $2.3 million, allowing the Band to pay down the debt and increase the development of various economic and social initiatives; and

Whereas the Eskasoni Band has built 21 new homes, a $1.5 million community hall and musical processing facilities, all in the efforts to improve the quality of life for First Nations people; and

[Page 12022]

Whereas these new initiatives will greatly improve both the economic and social situations throughout this Native community in developing adequate housing and a location for the community to gather;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Eskasoni Band Council for their efforts to improve the lives of their Band members through community economic development.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Preston.

RESOLUTION NO. 4946

MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the holiday season can be a stressful time for many and, far too often, this may lead to violence and abuse in our communities; and

Whereas various groups have been involved in the promotion of a peace-in-our-homes initiative known as, the 14 Days in December, Gentle Ways are Best; and

Whereas once again this year, local organizations will be marking this campaign with public tree-lighting ceremonies throughout our communities, including one in Lake Echo, with a tree donated for the cause by Donald and Sally Dube, and boom truck services to raise and decorate the tree donated by Brian Pennington;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House commend the efforts of this campaign, thank donors like Mr. and Mrs. Dube and Mr. Pennington, and support local efforts by attending a tree-lighting ceremony in your community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 12023]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4947

MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas visitors walking along Canning's Main Street will see it much as it looked prior to 1914; and

Whereas the Fieldwood Heritage Society, along with the Canning Library and Heritage Centre, have taken advantage of this unique community feature by developing a brochure entitled, A Historical Walk Along Main Street, Canning; and

Whereas the mandate of the walking tour and the Canning Library and Heritage Centre is to market the community as a unique heritage destination, as well as promoting the preservation of these historical buildings;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House commend the members of the Fieldwood Heritage Society and the Canning Library and Heritage Centre for their efforts to promote and preserve the history of Canning.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 12024]

The honourable Minister of Justice.

RESOLUTION NO. 4948

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on November 1st, the Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour elected 11 Nova Scotian members, who will now have the opportunity to exhibit at exclusive national and international shows; and

[1:00 p.m.]

Whereas those chosen as members of the Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour are deemed to be artists highly proficient in the water colour medium; and

Whereas the society is honoured to have water colours by 75 of its members in the royal collection of Her Majesty the Queen at Windsor Castle in England;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the new members of the Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour, including Carol Whitcombe of Mahone Bay and Don Pentz of Pleasantville.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury.

RESOLUTION NO. 4949

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 12025]

Whereas Canso owes its very existence to the fishing industry since it was first settled in 1604 by Basque fishermen, but under federal fishery regulations that existence is threatened; and

Whereas a group of stakeholders, calling themselves Team Guysborough, along with a newly hired community facilitator, Clarrie MacKinnon, are working towards that town's survival; and

Whereas members of the Trawlermen's Co-op, the Guysborough County Inshore Fishermen's Association and various municipal bodies are also working towards finding solutions to the serious economic situation in Canso;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House express their commitment to the people of Canso to work towards the survival of this historic, picturesque and vibrant Nova Scotia community and continue to encourage the federal government to re-evaluate its damaging position to the area's vital fishing industry.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: Question Period will begin at 1:02 pm. and will end at 2:02 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

HEALTH - LONG-TERM CARE:

SENIORS' SAVINGS - SEIZURE CEASE

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, on Friday, the Minister of Health announced changes to the way the province takes the savings of those entering a nursing home. These are half-hearted measures designed to take the heat off the minister. However,

[Page 12026]

at the announcement the minister's bureaucrats had to admit that under the new rules, the government will take $2 million a month from the savings of seniors. I hate to be the bearer of bad news to the minister, but the heat is still on. There will be no rest on this issue, in fact, the volume of calls to my office since the announcement has actually gone up.

My question to the Minister of Health is this, according to your own figures, 80 per cent to 85 per cent of seniors' savings will still be taken from them, so when will you stop taking the savings of seniors to pay for health care?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, over the past three years this government has committed $90 million of new money to care. The advancements in continuing care and in the long-term care portion of that have been great. The announcements that we made on Friday further enhance our commitment.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, the minister knows that the announcement on Friday was a failure and endemic in that failure, the minister has not mentioned what items are still going to be used to pay for health care that is free in all other circumstances. If you're a single senior, all your savings still go. Gifts to families or to charities must be returned to the senior or they don't get into a nursing home. Your house, cottage, farmland or woodlot is only protected if you've owned it for more than two years and if you bought a new car in the last two years, it's still subject to investigation by the Department of Health enforcement unit. My question to the Minister of Health is, why can't you admit that your policy is still so very unfair to seniors?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, what the honourable member has said, there's a considerable portion of that that is not entirely accurate. What I can tell you is that the steps that were announced on Friday are good steps and they are recognized as such by people in this province.

MR. DEXTER: You know, Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health has repeatedly referred to parts of the policy of the government as irritants. Well, getting soap in your eye is an irritant. Losing your life's savings to pay for health care is simply devastating, not irritating.

Mr. Speaker, I'm here today to tell the government that this fight is not over - not over by a long shot. I ask the Premier to explain to the thousands of Nova Scotians who support covering health care costs of long-term care, why do you continue to refuse to listen to them?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Health.

[Page 12027]

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, this government has made $90 million of commitments over the past three years and what the honourable member fails to recognize, or I think he recognizes it, is this government pays 80 per cent of the cost of nursing homes in this province. There are 50 per cent of the people who enter homes who, quite frankly, have no assets and when he's talking about paying health care costs, I think it would be a fair question to him, should the government pay the total cost of nursing care with no participation from residents?

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

TOURISM & CULTURE - TOURISM IND.:

GOV'T. (N.S.) ASSISTANCE - DETAILS

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question today is to the Minister of Tourism and Culture. Yesterday we heard from the Tourism Industry Association of Nova Scotia and other tourism operators that there is a need for Sunday shopping in this province. Tourism industry officials want to double industry revenues in the next 10 years. To help do this they need Sunday shopping. Yet this government continues to ignore their needs. Instead they reduced the tourism marketing budget by over $1.4 million and since coming to office the industry has grown overall by only 1 per cent. My question to the minister is, how is this government going to assist the tourism industry with its growth target when it won't listen to the needs of the industry?

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, obviously the member has his facts wrong with respect to the growth of tourism in this province and this government has shown its commitment over the last three years. That is why with the partnerships we have with the tourism industry, with the Tourism Partnership Council and the vision put forward yesterday, that vision will become a reality in the next 10 years.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it's not me who has the facts wrong, it's the minister and I will table the facts for the edification of members of this House. My first supplementary is again to the Minister of Tourism and Culture. TIANS' statistics suggest the retail industry in this province would make 23 per cent more in profits from tourism activity alone. That equates to $24 million a year. TIANS has even taken their concerns to the Nova Scotia Ombudsman. The Metro Halifax Chamber of Commerce, 83 per cent of them also support Sunday shopping, stating it would pump much-needed revenue into the province's economy.

Mr. Speaker, for tourism to grow this province needs Sunday shopping. My question again to the minister, why is the minister unwilling to fight at the Cabinet Table on behalf of the industry he is supposed to advocate and represent?

[Page 12028]

MR. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, that's the very reason why we set up a separate Department of Tourism because they needed a voice at the table because they didn't have one before that.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, what we have here in this province is the height of hypocrisy. In this province you (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton South has the floor.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: I refer to the fact that one block away from a church in my community the casino is open at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday morning. You can lose a shirt there. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I am talking (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please. (Interruptions)

Order, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton South on his final supplementary.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my final supplementary, while it's true that the casino was open on Sunday long before they came to power, that doesn't say I agree with it, but they can close the casino on Sunday or at least give consumers the chance to go to the grocery store or a . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Question, please. (Interruptions)

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question to the Premier is, is the Premier pressing his personal agenda and opinion here over Sunday shopping instead of listening to the legitimate concerns of the tourism industry and other advocates, such as the chambers of commerce, who recognize the positive economic impact Sunday shopping would have on this province? I would like the Premier to answer that question.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite does provide an interesting question today. I have spent the summer travelling about Nova Scotia, seeking the opinion of Nova Scotians on many issues. I have sought their opinions on Sunday shopping. The member opposite would be extremely interested to see the daily correspondence that I receive. I acknowledge the fact that the chamber of commerce in Halifax has come out in favour of Sunday shopping, TIANS has come out in favour of Sunday shopping and, as well, the Hotel Association of Halifax has come out in favour of Sunday shopping. But if the

[Page 12029]

member opposite is suggesting that those are the only opinions that we will seek, he is sadly mistaken.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

HEALTH - NURSING HOME CARE:

SENIORS - ASSESSMENT EQUALITY

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, now that we're off of the very weighty social policy issue of Sunday shopping, we can continue.

On Friday, the John Hamm Government revealed its response to the avalanche of calls (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition has the floor.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, on Friday the John Hamm Government revealed its response to the avalanche of calls to change the financial assessment for seniors entering nursing homes. What their plan revealed is a series of unimpressive half-hearted measures that have failed to address the fundamental unfairness of the long-term care system. Seniors paid for health care in nursing homes last week and they still are the only Nova Scotians who pay for their health care this week. I want to ask the Premier, why is your government treating seniors requiring nursing home care differently than any other person in this province?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, this government has put $90 million of new money into continuing care over the past three years and it's roughly, in the nursing home sector, around 38 per cent (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable Minister of Health has the floor.

MR. MUIR: Indeed, Mr. Speaker, the province does pick up about 80 per cent of the costs of care in nursing homes in this province and we will continue. As I said on Friday, our goal obviously is, as a province, to be able to do what they do in some of the other jurisdictions and that is to pick up the nursing or the care costs of the fees - let me try that again - to pick up the health care portion of nursing home costs.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I'm really frankly amazed that he has to continue to read that briefing note - I would have thought he had it memorized by now.

[Page 12030]

The Department of Health couldn't even apply the new rules to all its current cases. Friday's announcement came too late for dozens of families who are losing thousands of dollars because their assessment was launched prior to November 1st and it came too late for seniors and their families who have already been impoverished because they required nursing home care. I want to ask the Premier, where is the fairness in telling one family that they will lose the farm while letting another family keep their farm for the sake of only a few days?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the improvements that we announced on Friday are good steps forward. They are a step forward to our ultimate goal of being able to cover the medical portion of nursing home costs for all residents in this province. I don't know, maybe the honourable member is suggesting that we should withdraw that regulation so that the people who are being assessed after November would be the same as the people before. I don't know.

[1:15 p.m.]

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, what I'm suggesting is that seniors in this province should be treated fairly, like everyone else in this province. What's clear about these changes is that they are not about addressing inequities in the system, they are about damage control. If it were about fairness, the Minister of Health would apply the new policy as broadly as possible. This is poor administration of a poor policy. I want to ask the Premier, why won't your government apply these new policies to all residents of nursing homes in the province?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I welcome an opportunity to remind the member opposite that it has been the intention of this government to address this issue all along. You will recall that on April 1st, the Minister of Health actually presented to the Romanow Commission a request that we cost share the health care costs in nursing homes in the Province of Nova Scotia. I look forward to the response that we will get on Thursday to that very issue that we raised with the commissioner. I would also like to remind the member opposite, while he would cast disparaging remarks on the step forward that we took last Friday, we now have the fairest asset-assessment process in Atlantic Canada, the fairest in Atlantic Canada.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

HEALTH - LONG-TERM CARE: ANNOUNCEMENT - DETAILS

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. At a media briefing about three weeks ago (Interruption) Sorry, this is a very serious matter, I refer to my colleague, the minister indicated that he would be making changes to long-term care, "everyone will be happy." Late last week the minister announced his changes, but he

[Page 12031]

fell short of his commitment to make anyone happy. How can this minister say that he made everyone happy, when he failed to address the issue most important to seniors - covering the health care costs of long-term care?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I would be tempted, I suppose, to table a blank piece of paper to talk about the Liberal achievements and advances in long-term care, however, that would not answer the question. We have made a number of advancements in the past three years, people understand that, the seniors. When we developed the changes, it was not listening to members of the Opposition, it was out consulting with people who actually know what's going on, and that would be the people who are affected, seniors primarily.

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, the minister knows full well that last week during his announcement he missed the mark. While the minister added to his list of exemptions, he failed to realize that to the majority of seniors in this province these additions to the list are merely but a dream. These comments aren't coming from myself, they're coming from a senior in New Glasgow who called my constituency office yesterday morning to say that this government has missed the mark. My question to the minister is, why did the minister not focus his attention on the real issue for seniors and that is covering the health care costs of long-term care?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, about 50 per cent of those who enter residence, go into long-term care in the province, never contribute, basically, to what we'll call the medical portion of long-term care. They don't do it because they don't have the income. We do provide 80 per cent of the costs of long-term care. You're right, there are some people who are going to benefit more from this, but you have to remember that when we're looking at numbers, starting off there are at least 50 per cent of the people who enter long-term care who do not bring enough money with them, nor have enough money on a regular monthly basis to cover health care costs, they just don't have it.

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, the seniors are interested in what this Tory Government is doing and it's this Tory Government that will have to be accountable at the polls not too far down the road. So why did this minister fail to address the number one issue on the minds of seniors - the issue of fairness and when it comes to covering the health care costs of long-term care?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, a person goes into long-term care, I guess, you could divide the costs in two. One is for what we will call room and board or hotel costs, the second sector would be the health care costs. There are about 80 per cent of the people who are in long-term care who don't cover their health portion of those costs.

[Page 12032]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

PREM. - POLITICAL ADVERTISING: SPENDING - DETAILS

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. I want to remind the Premier of some of the things he and his Party said during the 1999 election about a "publicly-funded propaganda campaign." On Page 18 of the Tory blue book, they make hay of the fact that the Liberals spent $100,000 on politically-motivated advertising. Well, the Hamm Government makes that look like pocket change. Between Bill No. 68 and the recent Tory education blue book, this government has spent nearly $200,000 on political advertising. As the election nears, the taps are flowing even faster. Mr. Premier, in just two days you have spent $31,000 on advertising for your so-called solution to the long-term care crisis. I want to ask the Premier, how much more are you prepared to spend to spin your partisan message?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite brings an interesting subject to the floor of the House. What it is, does the public of Nova Scotia have a right to know what it is that government is doing? The member opposite made reference to our lifetime of learning initiative, and it's interesting that we had 4,000 of those printed and they have been asked for by Nova Scotians who are anxious to learn what the government plans to do with the education system in this province; 4,000 have been requested. We have set up an e-mail site and as recently as two weeks ago there had already been 11,000 hits by Nova Scotians on that Web site who have looked for that kind of information. Nova Scotians want to know what this government is going to do with education and we are telling them.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it's not Web sites that are being hit, it's seniors that are being hit. Not only is this Premier spinning his wheels, but his head must be spinning with all the high-paid Communications staff he's got wandering around him. He likes to talk about priorities. Let me outline Tory priorities for just a second. They're prepared to spend more than $2.5 million on spin doctors, yet the Premier cries poor when seniors ask him to stop plundering their life savings. I want to ask the Premier, what justification can you give to Juanita MacKinnon and all the other Nova Scotians you're impoverishing by spending more than $2.5 million on spin doctors, while refusing to cover health care costs in nursing homes?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I will have the minister responsible for Communications Nova Scotia respond because he will have an interesting message to give the member opposite. We have fewer communicators than the previous government, but I will refer that to the minister.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, as the Premier indicated in his earlier message, this government in fact . . .

[Page 12033]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable minister has the floor.

MR. BAKER: Mr. Speaker, as it was indicated earlier by the Premier, this government actually has fewer communicators than previous. We've been very, very efficient in organizing our Communications budget in this province. Indeed, as do all governments, we have a duty to communicate with our stakeholders, the people of Nova Scotia, what government is doing. What we are doing, and we are doing, by the way, what NDP Governments, what Conservative Governments and governments of every stripe in this country have a duty to do, is communicate to the electors.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I would like to table one more item from the Tory blue book. On Page 19 of that hollow document, the Premier says, "During its first mandate a PC Government will: Stop spending taxpayers' money on politically-motivated advertising." Well, Mr. Premier, that's one more broken promise. I would like to keep this question simple. I want to ask the Premier, why is it so important to spend money convincing people you're doing something? Why don't you spend the money on actual programs?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is aware but fails to acknowledge the fact that the government has actually reduced spending in those non-essential areas to make more money available for the very things that she supports, the programs of government. Getting back to the issue of, do the people of Nova Scotia have a right to know what we have done to improve asset assessment before entering nursing homes? Yes, Nova Scotians have a right to know that. Do Nova Scotians have a right to know the improvements that are made in the health care system? Yes, Nova Scotians have a right to know. Do Nova Scotians have a right to know what we're doing in education, how we're going to make this the best-educated province in Canada? Yes, they have a right to know, and we will continue to tell them.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

TOURISM & CULTURE - TOURISM IND.:

GOV'T. (N.S.) RESOURCES - ADEQUACY

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Tourism and Culture. Yesterday the minister confirmed that his government was onside with TIANS and the Tourism Partnership Council in their document, their vision for the future of Nova Scotia, Nova Scotia's Vision for Tourism, to double the market of the industry in the next 10 years. In doing so, this minister has committed to providing the resources in training, infrastructure, marketing and financial assistance, and more. Well, the minister's record is not strongest in this suit. In fact, he lost $1.4 million out of the budget in regard to the marketing budget for his department this year alone. In light of the minister's public commitment by his government yesterday, does the minister have the support of his Cabinet

[Page 12034]

to provide the resources that the industry needs to grow the industry, as he committed yesterday?

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it gives me a chance to talk about the Tourism Partnership Council and the vision they've put forward for the next 10 years. Indeed, it's a document that not only the industry but government played a valuable part in. If the member is asking me if I endorsed that document, the answer certainly is yes.

MR. DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, by endorsing this document, it means that they will be a partner. He indicated yesterday that they will be a partner. In order for the tourism industry to grow, it needs true partnership, and that is industry and provincial government. It needs money for marketing, it will need money for infrastructure, whether it's ports or rails or a stronger leadership in airlines. It needs the ability for the motel and bed-and-breakfast industries and the restaurant industry to be able to borrow from the government, because they can't borrow through the banks. These are all issues that were brought up yesterday, and there's a lot more.

My question to the minister is, what is the dollar figure the minister is talking about when he discussed with his Cabinet that he is committed to making this industry double to a $2.57 billion industry 10 years from now? What is the dollar value that his Cabinet is prepared to give to this industry?

MR. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, the member well knows that we're going through the budget processes. I will give you an example of the commitment of this government, my colleague in Transportation and Public Works, $23 million more in Transportation and Public Works, making a difference in every single part of this province. Those are the indicators that this government is onside.

MR. DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, my final question is to the Premier. Mr. Premier, for a minister to endorse a strategy that commits his government to substantial dollars of investment in infrastructure, in programs, in marketing and in training means that Cabinet would have had to approve this. They would have had to realize that you're talking tens of millions of dollars on behalf of the government. My question to the Premier is simple, in order for your minister to say yes, as a government, we support this vision, will the Premier commit today that this minister in fact has had the approval of Cabinet to commit millions of dollars over the next number of years to double the tourism industry in Nova Scotia?

[1:30 p.m.]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I know the good member, the member for Lunenburg West, has a full understanding that budget analysis does not occur on the floor of the House. It occurs after the budget is tabled in the House, which will occur early next Spring. But also I would remind the member opposite that he seems to be trying to pursue a role that is not

[Page 12035]

shared by his Leader, because his Leader indicated quite clearly that he would be cutting health care administration to provide debt reduction. Does his Leader endorse the fact that what he is asking is to increase the administrative costs of government at the same time as he seems to be purporting that he supports the government in its quest for a balanced budget? So, clearly, where is that Opposition Party - are they there to support good fiscal management or are they there to increase administrative costs?

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH - LONG-TERM CARE:

COSTS - MACKINNON FARM DETAILS

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it's difficult to believe that in this day and age a government would force a family to sell a farm to pay, among other things, for health care, yet that's exactly what this government is doing to the MacKinnon family in Pictou County. Over the past few days people around Pictou County are offering their support and encouragement to Juanita and Alan MacKinnon as they try to hold on to their farm and woodlot.

Mr. Speaker, I understand that this issue has been brought directly to both the Premier and the member for Pictou West. I want to ask the Premier, will he commit to this House today that his government will not force this Pictou County family to sell their farm to pay for the long-term care costs of a parent?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Health.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, there is an assessment process. There are a couple levels of appeal for people who are unhappy with assessment processes and that's the nature of it. The assessment process is a fair process (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable minister has the floor.

MR. MUIR: It does build in safeguards for any Nova Scotian who is going through an assessment process.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, the Premier can try to dodge this question all he wants, but he will not dodge the people of Pictou County and their anger about this issue. The MacKinnon situation reveals a major flaw in this government's arbitrary November 1st deadline. They applied for nursing home placement for their father just 14 days earlier when they got that decision. Now, why is the Premier being so stubborn, why is he insisting on hiding behind red tape and bureaucracy while his government takes this family's farm?

[Page 12036]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, there's a protocol to the assessment procedures for residents entering long-term care either through continuing care or into nursing homes through adult protection. There is a process, the process will work and any Nova Scotian who is unhappy with the decision has an appeal process to go through.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, sadly under this Premier it's becoming very important in Pictou County to be on the right side of politics, I guess. If you're a friend like Eric Barker, you can get a $200,000 pilot project grant to set up a rest stop and subsidize your business. If you're not, you have to sell your farm to pay for your father's health care in a long-term care facility. I want to ask the Premier, why don't you establish a pilot project for the MacKinnons that will see the government cover their father's health care? If it works, you can apply it to all of the other seniors going into long-term care facilities.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, it's obvious the member opposite has a complete disregard for highway safety. I would like to refer that question to the Minister of Transportation and Public Works. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

ECON. DEV. - OCEAN NUTRITION: LOAN - DETAILS TABLE

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the minister responsible for . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. MACKINNON: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister of Economic Development. In Nova Scotia Business Inc's. corporate business plan it states that a requisite of our work is ensuring a high level of public accountability through sound business principles and stringent internal controls. The business expertise of our board of directors will provide support as we introduce private sector corporate governance practices.

It seems the issue of concern is public accountability. Nova Scotia Business Inc. is refusing to name the members of the panel that reviewed the deal regarding Ocean Nutrition, and is also refusing to discuss any of the details of the loan deferral. So my question to the minister is, would the minister please table all non-proprietary details of this particular loan and reveal the names of the members of the panel who reviewed this particular decision?

[Page 12037]

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for the question and I do commit to report back to the member and to this House on the basis of his question.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, that's a bit of a contradiction to what the minister indicated in the media yesterday. He indicated that he was quite satisfied with the actions of the review panel and he wasn't prepared to go any further. My question to the minister is, why is he stalling and essentially blocking the right for the public to know? It's a total contradiction to what he said yesterday.

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, we have maintained that this is a transparent process. There has been a third party review and I've committed to reporting back to this House and I will.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I guess the question we would ask the honourable minister is, will the minister undertake to provide that detail before the House rises, presumably, on Thursday afternoon?

MR. CLARKE: Consistent with our message on this and consistent with my obligation to bring information forward and keep the process transparent, I will commit to try and make sure that is done.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East.

ECON. DEV. - RISLEY LOAN DEFERRAL: GRANTORS - NAME

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I think as the Minister of Economic Development might guess, my question will be directed to him. The case is simple, Mr. Minister, Mr. Risley sits on the same board that gave him a multi-million dollar loan deferral but the minister says there's no possibility of undue influence because Mr. Risley wasn't in the room. I'm sure he must have been somewhere on the planet though, so I will say that influence would still be there. So I want to ask the minister, in light of his comments and in light of the colleagues opposite he has who have indicated the right for Nova Scotians to get the information they know, the right for the government to communicate to Nova Scotians, in light of their attitude of transparency, I want to ask the minister if he'll release the names of those involved in giving this loan deferral today? Today.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member for that question, a question to which I've already provided an answer to the honourable colleague from the Liberal caucus. Consistent with an open and transparent process, we will report back to this House. I would, however, offer an invitation to the member from the New Democratic Party to come to Dartmouth and see the employees of Ocean Nutrition, to come to Mulgrave and see the 110 employees and what they're doing to grow the economy and ensure that exports -

[Page 12038]

90 per cent of that business exports out of this province, to come and see what that investment's about.

MR. MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I want to say to the minister, maintain your composure. (Interruptions) I would be more than happy to go around the province with the minister, if he has points he wants to show me, but I want to say this is not about the people who are employed there, it's about taxpayers' dollars and it's about those people who don't get a chance to create jobs in this province because the competition gets all the money. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.

MR. MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, the minister doesn't realize what an unequal playing field he creates when he gives preferential treatment to some people in this province and not to others. My question to the minister is, the Hamm Government has decided that Mr. Risley deserves a break but that the MacKinnon family should lose their farm, so I want to ask you why your government will support the John Risleys in this province but not Nova Scotians like the MacKinnons?

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, the member of the New Democratic Party is talking about conflict of interest. Well, there is a conflict of interest and it lies within that caucus, because they talk about the need for jobs, for health care, for education. Well, you do it by creating jobs that improve the ability for quality health care and education. That's what we've done, that's what we will continue to do. When good business deals come forward, good business deals will be seen to fruition in this province.

MR. MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, it's a question of fair deals for all Nova Scotians, not just a few, a handful of this government's buddies. NSBI has just granted a multi-million dollar loan referral to one of its own board members, yet the Minister of Economic Development says there's nothing unusual about this situation. I say that Nova Scotians have no confidence in this government or the way they will hand out taxpayers' dollars, so I want to say come clean, provide us with the information today, which you haven't admitted that you will do. Do that today, Mr. Minister.

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I have committed to bringing information before this House, I will. More specifically, it would beg of the Opposition to focus on the jobs and opportunities that our investments are creating here in the province and creating an environment that will increase, but instead they choose to drive business away. They're saying, if you're not of the ilk, but I would welcome a business idea or plan or venture that the NDP could possibly even conceive of to give consideration.

[Page 12039]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

COMMUN. SERV. - WOMEN'S CTRS.: FUNDING - COMMITMENT

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services. This past weekend, the Minister of Community Services indicated that he can't guarantee to women's centres and transition houses that funding will remain unchanged next year. However, the Minister of Education and the Minister of Health have been able to make funding announcements that will take them into next year's budget and beyond. My question to the Minister of Community Services is, can the minister please explain why other departments can commit funding into next year, but when it comes to making a commitment to vulnerable women and children, this minister cannot?

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, the member's question was, why the minister said that funding wouldn't be guaranteed for next year - I can't remember his quote. I did not make that quote. What I have done is written a letter to the transition houses, and that letter was sent out last May. It told them about the funding this year, it told them about the plans that we had, it told them where we were going in the future. That's our commitment to those organizations.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, this minister is quoted as saying that these are essential services, services that we need to keep. Given those comments, my question is, will this minister guarantee that he will maintain the services offered by women's centres, transition houses and men's treatment programs as distinct and essential services?

[1:45 p.m.]

MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, what we have told the organizations, the transition houses, the women's centres and the men's program is that we want to work with them to be able to provide those services, not only in the locations where they are but all across the province. Those services have to be looked at, as all services do, that's what our commitment is and that's what we are going to do to help provide those services to all Nova Scotians.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, this minister knows full well that services and programs provided to women and children through women's centres and transition houses and through men's treatment programs are not only essential but they are being delivered effectively and efficiently in communities.

I will try again, Mr. Speaker, my question to the minister is, given that other ministers are able to make announcements into the next fiscal year, why is he not able to commit to adequate and stable funding that will provide programs and services to vulnerable women and children?

[Page 12040]

MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member provides me with the opportunity to talk about some of the things that we have done with those centres over the last couple of years. That member will know that when we came to power, the women's centres weren't all getting the same money and we ensured that they all went up to $100,000. We made sure they were all treated equally. We have put out the money to those other areas so that they can provide those programs. They know that we are there to support them. In the redesign we will come up with a plan and we will support it.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

EDUC. : LOAN REMISSION PROG. - STATUS

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, this is for the Premier. Nova Scotians pay some of the highest electricity rates in the country but I'll table documents showing that we also pay higher than the national average for fuel oil and gasoline. Rental rates in Halifax are the highest anywhere east of Ontario and that report shows also that only Toronto has higher car insurance premiums. Our seniors pay the highest long-term care per diems, our students pay the highest tuition and our minimum wage is the second lowest. So I would like to ask the Premier, where is his loan remission program? Where's his fuel oil rebate? What's his plan to deal with sky-rocketing property assessments? What has been going on?

MR. SPEAKER: There were several questions, the honourable Premier can answer one, please.

THE PREMIER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto would lead us to believe that he could solve everything overnight. I believe this government has made good progress in solving a number of serious issues that affect the lives of Nova Scotians.

SOME HON. MEMBERS: Name one.

THE PREMIER: Relative to one of the interesting issues that he brings forward (Interruption)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.

The honourable Premier has the floor.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I can remind the member opposite that we are blessed with a good university system here, one that consistently attracts more out-of-province students than we provide to other parts of the country. We have two of the top three undergraduate universities in Nova Scotia and, as the minister has said, we will be bringing forward a loan remission program to help Nova Scotia students.

[Page 12041]

MR. EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I count my blessings every day but the gifts of this government are not on the list. I don't think the Premier of this province understands how hard it is for many families to just pay the bills these days. I don't think he understands just how expensive it is to be an ordinary Nova Scotian. If he did, this Premier would not have compounded these escalating costs with $144 million in new user fees and taxes. If he did, he would have come up with a real plan to cover the health care costs of long-term care.

My question for the Premier is this, why is it that this Premier chooses - and he does choose - to allow all these problems to grow for ordinary Nova Scotians while at the same time allowing John Risley and Donald Sobey to help themselves to millions of taxpayers' dollars?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite continues to show that he has no vision as to how this province can grow. The member opposite continues to bring something to my attention that I really believe in and I do believe that working families are struggling. I do believe that Nova Scotians are having difficulty paying the bills. That's why this government continues to work towards tax relief for working families in Nova Scotia. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto on your final supplementary.

MR. EPSTEIN: Here's the list, Mr. Speaker - electricity, fuel oil, property assessments, car insurance, the minimum wage, gasoline, tuition, rent, long-term care costs, and it goes on. This Premier has not dealt with any of these problems. Instead he tinkers and hopes people will think that he's really doing something. What I want to know from the Premier is this, what has he actually done on any of those pocketbook issues over his three years other than add to the mounting burden facing ordinary Nova Scotians?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member brings an interesting issue to the attention of the House and that is the cost of electricity in Nova Scotia. The current federal government plan to go forward with greenhouse gas emissions without a good burden-sharing process in place will, in fact, create huge increases in electricity costs here in Nova Scotia if the Nova Scotia electricity purchaser has to pay all the conversion costs for a coal-fired generator. So I hope that the member opposite is prepared to support the government's position, that is without burden-sharing Nova Scotia taxpayers will, in fact, pay huge increases in electricity costs, and is prepared to support this government in demanding from the federal government a burden-sharing process.

[Page 12042]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - SYDNEY RIVER WATERSHED AREA:

PROBLEM - RESOLUTION DETAILS

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Environment and Labour. In the province's provincial water strategy entitled, A Drinking Water Strategy for Nova Scotia, under the minister's message it clearly outlines that the Department of Environment and Labour is the lead agent in developing and implementing policies, regulations, and also the lead agent for activities for the protection of Nova Scotia's drinking water. So my question to the Minister of Environment and Labour with regard to the problem in the Sydney River watershed area, particularly for the issue that I've addressed on a number of occasions here in the House, would the minister be kind enough to apprise all members of the House as to what activities his department has undertaken to bring a resolve to this problem?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for bringing forward his concern about his residents in the Sydney River area, a concern that I would also say that I share with him for their welfare. He brings up the new provincial drinking water strategy and I'm very pleased with what we've done with the drinking water strategy. This government has actually increased the number of professionals who are available to assist water utilities in solving their problems and tracking them down from seven to 21 and I would suggest that's a very significant investment in health and safe drinking water for Nova Scotians.

MR. MACKINNON: Well, well, well, Mr. Speaker, that's very disappointing. We don't have 21 inspectors on site in Sydney River. We're lucky if we can find one or two and that's the reality of it and the residents will certainly concur with that. The residents in Sydney River have been left to their own devices in many cases, having their water tested over and over again. One day the test will come back with fecal coliform, the next day it won't, the next day after that possibly it does. We have a serious problem here. So I would ask the minister once again, what specific action is he taking collaboratively, both within his department with his colleague, the Minister of Health, and their respective provincial departments and also with the local municipality to resolve this problem?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, on November 1st, it was a Friday, at 4:15 p.m., the department first became aware that the fecal coliform problem was not unique to one property. It became apparent to us through a telephone call that a number of neighbours had been sharing their concerns. They had tests done, and as soon as we were aware of that, within two hours and 15 minutes, there was a meeting held that brought in not only the senior management of the local office, but also brought in the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, and from there they immediately went out, they in fact spent the weekend knocking on doors, giving out pamphlets, taking water samples, they made arrangements to have the lab open,

[Page 12043]

and there has been an impressive number of accomplishments by the dedicated staff of the department in the Sydney office.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I believe the minister is well aware of the fact that this problem is far more widespread than initially thought. It's not a dozen, it's not five homes, it's not even 20 homes - the last count that was brought to my attention was there were at least 36 homes with fecal contamination, and at least perhaps 50 or so with non-fecal contamination. This problem is expanding well beyond the initial site. The minister knows this and I'm sure his staff knows it. It's not a problem that's going away unless it's dealt with effectively and efficiently by all government departments. We need leadership and we need it now.

Mr. Speaker, I would also ask the minister if he and his colleague, the Minister of Health, would be willing to meet with the residents who have attended today's session at the Legislature to hear some of their concerns on the front line in a very professional and detailed basis.

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I think the member opposite would acknowledge that the local media has been covering this, and in fact the provincial media, and in their coverage they've been very complimentary to the efforts both of the medical officer of Health and the department. Following this, we are meeting with the community and I would also like to say that in terms of his request to meet with his constituents, I would be pleased to meet with them.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

EDUC. - UCCB: WATER QUALITY - ACTION

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Education. For the past few years the students at UCCB have been forced to live with drinking and showering in brown water. The former president of UCCB once characterized this water by saying there's junk in the water, but not junk that will harm you. Well, these students are paying some of the highest tuition in the country, yet they're forced to live with junk in their water. It's turning their clothes a different colour, they can't wash their dishes in it at the residence, so I want to ask the minister, what action has his department taken to deal with the situation and improve the water quality at the University College of Cape Breton?

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I will take that question under advisement and report back to the House.

[Page 12044]

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hope it's sooner than later, because you know the water at UCCB is piped over from the campus at the community college at Marconi. These students also have to live with this problem and the owner of that water supply is this very province and it's being managed by the Department of Transportation and Public Works. So I want to ask that minister, what action has he taken for the students so they're no longer forced to live with junk in their water? What have you done, Mr. Minister?

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I, too, will have to take the question under advisement, because I'm not just too sure whether or not the water system that I'm thinking of is the one, and if it's the old Sysco - Sydney Steel (Interruption) No, it is not, the honourable member is shaking his head. So in that case I will have to take the matter under advisement.

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, while I appreciate the earnestness in their answers, I'm worried because this is not a new problem; as I said, it's three years old. Where has this government been? We just heard a series of questions regarding fecal coliform in water and they didn't react to it. This is a three-year-old problem. Now we hear students have been forced to live with this problem and students should not be forced to pay tens of thousands of dollars in tuition and not have decent water in which to wash their clothes or themselves. The Minister of Education has done nothing but stall on post-secondary education issues. Will she now commit to a meeting with the students, the faculty and administration at the University College of Cape Breton and Marconi Campus to address this very serious situation? Will you do that, Madam Minister?

[2:00 p.m.]

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, what I will commit to is discussing the matter with the Minister of Transportation and Public Works to see exactly what is the matter with the water, and what can or can't be done about it within a certain time frame, and I will certainly do that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

KYOTO PROTOCOL - PREM.: PLAN - EXPLAIN

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Earlier today, before the Resources Committee, staff from the Department of Natural Resources indicated that they had not carried out a detailed analysis of the impact of the Kyoto Protocol, vis-á-vis that particular department and natural resources, i.e. forestry. How can the Premier indicate that his government has a plan when various departments within his government continually come before committees of this House and indicate that they have not carried out an analysis?

[Page 12045]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the question didn't get to this side of the House clearly, but what I understand the member opposite is asking is what evidence do we have that the Kyoto Protocol will, in fact, affect our economy.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, various departments are coming before committees saying that they haven't done an analysis of the protocol, how can you say you have a plan when they don't know themselves?

MR. SPEAKER: Ten seconds.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Energy.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time allotted for the Oral Question Period has expired.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. During Question Period, the honourable member for Halifax Needham asked the Premier a question respecting a constituent in her constituency and stated that the Premier had given a negative reply to that constituent, simply because of their political beliefs. I would suggest that this is clearly imputing motives and as such is a breach of parliamentary procedure. I would think that the honourable member should apologize and withdraw those remarks.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I would ask that you review the transcript of that question because I think the honourable member misheard the question.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, no, I did not. In that case, I would make it a point of privilege that you look at Hansard.

MR. SPEAKER: I will review Hansard and report back to the House.

Order, please. I see the hands flying there, I'm not sure why.

The honourable Minister of Environment and Labour.

MR. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, with the Government House Leader's indulgence, I would like to make a couple of separate introductions to the House. Would this be the appropriate time?

[Page 12046]

First of all, Mr. Speaker, in the government gallery, I notice my friend and accountant, Ian Crowe, who also happens to be one of the best competitive bridge players in Nova Scotia. I would ask Ian to stand up and accept the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, as long as we're on a roll, in the same gallery, I notice that a friend of this province and the current Acting Chairman of the Workers' Compensation Board, Oscar Wong is in attendance. I would ask Oscar to stand up and accept the warm greetings of the House. (Applause)

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Private and Local Bills for Second Reading.

PRIVATE AND LOCAL BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 162.

Bill No. 162 - Anglican Church Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Bedford Basin.

MS. MARY ANN MCGRATH: Mr. Speaker, I rise for just a moment to speak on Bill No. 162. First, I want to thank the House for their co-operation in allowing this bill to go through. As we go through second reading, as you might recall, we did amendments to the Anglican Church Act in the Spring, and inadvertently there were a couple of things omitted from that bill. That's why we're here today. With those brief comments, I would move second reading of Bill No. 162.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I would just very briefly indicate to the member that, of course, this side of the House is always co-operative when proper requests are brought forward, and I would just indicate that we will be supporting the bill going forward.

[Page 12047]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, just briefly, on behalf of our caucus, Bill No. 162, I simply want to put on the record that this bill did arrive here at the House today, which hasn't given us an opportunity to do the vetting of this. So I just want to put on the record that we are assuming that the government has done the necessary consultation in bringing these changes and that there is support in the Anglican community for the changes being requested. But, for the record, certainly we're willing to allow this to go forward but we want the record to reflect that this is the government bringing this in in a rather hasty fashion and not through normal procedure. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the honourable member for Halifax-Bedford Basin it will be to close debate.

MS. MARY ANN MCGRATH: Mr. Speaker, I would move we close debate on Bill No. 162.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 162. Would all those in favour of the motion, please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Private and Local Bills.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that with the unanimous consent of the House that Bill No. 162 move from second reading directly to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for Bill No. 162 to be passed, with the agreement of the House, to Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

So ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

[Page 12048]

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[2:07 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Chairman Brooke Taylor in the Chair.]

[4:09 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bills:

Bill No. 155 - Workers' Compensation Act.

Bill No. 142 - House of Assembly Act/Elections Act.

Bill No. 144 - Justice Administration Amendment (Fall 2002) Act.

Bill No. 162 - Anglican Church Act.

Bill No. 160 - Public Trustee Act.

Bill No. 154 - House of Assembly Act.

Bill No. 158 - Elections Act.

Bill No. 152 - Université Sainte-Anne-Collège de l'Acadie Act.

and the chairman has been instructed to recommend these bills to the favourable consideration of the House, each without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a third time. When should they be read? Thursday.

The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 12049]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now rise, and that the House Leader for the Liberal Party provide us with the hours and the order of business for tomorrow, Wednesday.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable House Leader for the Liberal Party.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, we will meet from the hours of 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. tomorrow. We will be calling Resolution No. 4781 and Resolution No. 4775. I move that we do now adjourn until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is the House adjourn until 2:00 p.m.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

We have reached the moment of interruption.

ADJOURNMENT

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH - DETERMINANTS:

NORTH END RESIDENTS - ADDRESS

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to have an opportunity to debate a resolution that I put forward, the operative clause which reads:

"Therefore be it resolved that the John Hamm Government commit in this House to working with the Halifax North community to address the serious issue of the determinants of health that underpin the health status of its residents."

There's a little bit of background to this resolution that I would like to first speak to and that is that one day last week, in this Chamber, I introduced a very similar resolution that was based on a report that had been done with respect to the health status of Nova Scotians. This report was brought to my attention by Dr. David Rippey, who is a well-respected

[Page 12050]

physician who you would be very well familiar with, Mr. Speaker, because of his involvement in the health care field in your beautiful part of this beautiful province.

Dr. Rippey, some time ago, had told me about this report, and then drew it to my attention again when I had seen him in Yarmouth, and what was important about this particular report was that the Department of Health and some of its affiliated research organizations have been looking at health status of people around the province and they were quite surprised when they saw the results of some number crunching they had done, when the numbers came back that indicated that part of my constituency in North End Halifax had the second-lowest rate of life expectancy in the entire province, second-lowest to Cape Breton.

We often know that the health status of Nova Scotians in Cape Breton, measured against some particular features, often shows very poor health status and life expectancy being one of these things, Mr. Speaker, and lo and behold, were very close to similar findings in the part of the province that I represent, and I'm very proud to represent. Although there hasn't been extensive research done on the peninsula, we know that the income levels are very low. There's a very high number of elderly people living in low income and rental housing, there's a great concentration of single-parent families, a large African Nova Scotian population, and an inner-city core where there have been issues with regard to income poverty.

Mr. Speaker, I introduced the resolution last week about this report in the hope that I could bring it to the attention of members of the government and that there would be a general commitment to work with the community to address these issues. I was very disappointed, in fact I was somewhat angry when members of the government benches nayed the resolution as an indicator that the government members aren't interested in working with the Halifax North community to address the determinance of health, things like poverty and income that contribute to poor health, housing, these kind of issues. This is why I've brought this resolution here to the floor today.

Mr. Speaker, I want to talk a bit about the hits that this community has taken over a number of years as a consequence of both policy and cuts specifically, cuts that have resulted in changes in that local community, measures that have been taken by both this government and the previous Liberal Government that have resulted in a decline in personal disposable income for individuals and families in this area; income being the most significant, I think, determinant of health. It determines one's educational attainment and opportunity and certainly, in terms of income transfers around pensions and income support programs, whether or not the minimum wage is adequate for people who are trying to eke a living out by engaging in employment in the economy.

[Page 12051]

[4:15 p.m.]

The former Liberal Government removed indexing from the social assistance program and that has meant that people who are in the unfortunate situation of having to rely on social assistance for their income, have seen no increases in social assistance to keep pace with the actual cost of living over a fairly extensive period of time - close to 10 years in this province. That has resulted in families in need falling deeper and deeper into poverty and this has been very well documented by a variety of researchers, including Dr. Lynn McIntyre, a doctor of epidemiology and professor at Dalhousie who has been studying the matter of food security, child hunger and maternal hunger. She is publishing the results of her study which demonstrates that food banks and soup kitchens have become institutionalized and are the response to poverty and hunger in communities like mine. It's an inadequate way to ensure that people are getting the nutrition that they require - children, mothers and other members of the community.

In spite of the rigorous opposition that members of this caucus put up in terms of the erosion of social programs, this government has maintained its position in terms of clawing back the child tax benefit, not increasing minimum wage in any substantial way. Many families in my community are in the labour force and working at poverty wages.

The other way in which government policy has disadvantaged people in this community has been through the cuts to education, specifically the loss of student support workers in our schools to the extent that the few student support workers who are left attempting to deal with behavioural issues and also trying to provide support to young people so they can stay in school if they're dealing with situations in their homes that would be tough for any of us to deal with. Those student support workers have diminished in number to the extent now that they're unable to provide the level of service that's meaningful, that could really help kids stay in school.

Mr. Speaker, the other area that has suffered tremendously and we've heard a fair amount in the news in the last few days with last week being the national day on housing and homelessness, is the erosion of housing. We could talk a lot about the need for better social programs, but what I would like to encourage this government to do is to turn its mind to the need for economic development in the inner city and parts of the North End that I represent; to work with some of the really forward-thinking entrepreneurs, many of them young, some who have opened the Halifax Backpackers Café on Gottingen Street, the Persian Bazaar which is co-owned by a young woman, Maggie, who was a former Page here in this House, as well as others.

We need to work with the community, to listen to the community about what their needs are and so I would encourage the government members who defeated this motion last week - this resolution which was merely to ask the Hamm Government to work with the

[Page 12052]

community - to reconsider their position of last week and to work with this community that has so much to offer, given a chance, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

DR. JAMES SMITH: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, for the opportunity to address this resolution this evening. A couple of issues, one is the determinants of health mentioned, dealing with the area of the North End community of our HRM, or our Halifax area. As all members know, it is a very proud community and it has contributed greatly to the economy of this area, in the earlier days tradespersons and now a changing community with persons of a professional nature; a very mixed community. I think therefore, the comments are very fitting relative to the determinants of health impacting on a community, how a community in turn can impact on the health of the individuals.

These determinants do not exist in isolation from one another. In reality, the social

and economic factors interact with the physical environment of a place such as the north part of Halifax. Yet, taken together, all these factors interact in a complex system to determine the health of our communities.

As government knows and as the Health Minister knows, these determinants that make people healthy or not, include many: we know that social status shows very clearly that poor people are less healthy than rich people; and we know that income distribution in a society is also a very key element. The greater the gap between the richest and poorest people in our communities, the greater difference in the health of those persons.

We know that support from families, friends and communities are also linked to better health. I think that's been a very strong part of the north part of Halifax. You need people who grew up in that community several decades ago, that was of very much pride for them that it was such a community, supportive to each other. This kind of support helps people handle difficult situations. We know that physical environments such as healthy communities, access to health care, economic development, education, community development, social support, among other things, all contribute to good health.

This government needs to understand that by working with the Halifax north community, it can contribute to address one of the most powerful determinants of health, improving how children grow and develop with better health and well-being. As the government knows, health factors have an impact in determining the health of its residents

and the Halifax north community is no different from any other in that regard.

So again I ask, who is responsible for addressing the health determinants in our Nova Scotian communities? One aspect that cannot be overlooked is the important contribution that a government is willing to stress on improving people's health. What this government must do is to realize that what's good for the health of Nova Scotians, from the community

[Page 12053]

of Halifax north to North Sydney is good for the health of all communities. The government must show the residents of the Halifax north community that it is committed to providing the necessary resources and programs that go to improving the determinants of health in these communities.

Mr. Speaker, what may be lost on this government in its cuts to programs is that without these improvements, our communities cannot be sustainable, cannot begin to develop opportunities for its residents such as the Halifax north community. If we are interested in a system that generates health and improves health, we need to look beyond the medical care system and lifestyle factors. These are very important factors. We all would agree in the House that that is so, but we must look beyond. Instead, we must learn to work across various sectors of our society as well as many systems that work within it, the various departments of government.

The Department of Health alone cannot address those determinants of health that impact on the health of those persons in the Halifax north community and throughout all the communities within our province. No one department can do it alone and the government cannot do it alone. This is a community issue and it's an issue of all our agencies and social networks, our churches, our schools, our institutions, and our universities that have responsibility to address the determinants of health that will determine the health of those persons in our communities such as Halifax north.

Mr. Speaker, the governments - federal, municipal and provincial - can implement policies that promote health in our communities. For example, they can regulate how resources are distributed, policies that address the gap between the rich and the poor. We have all seen the latest result of child poverty in this country, as just recently reported in the media. Canadians have less sickness, longer life expectancies and improved health as their income levels increase and the economy stabilizes within our country. Indeed, studies suggest that the distribution of income in a given society is a more important determinant of health than the total amount of income that's actually earned by those society members. So the distribution of that income within any one community within society is what makes the strong determinant of health. Large gaps in income distribution lead to an increase in social problems and poorer health among the population as a whole.

Mr. Speaker, employment has a significant effect on a person's physical, mental and social health. It provides not only money, but a sense of identity, purpose, social contacts and opportunities for personal growth. When a person loses these benefits, the results can be devastating to both the health of the individual and to that family. Unemployed people have a reduced life expectancy and suffer significantly more health problems than people who have a job. A mental illness, for instance, such as depression, in the main wage earner in a family will drop that family deeper and longer into debt than any other illness, even that of cardiac disease and heart attacks. The government can assist communities by supporting employment practices that strengthen economic and social supports such as quality public

[Page 12054]

education, literacy and quality health care that includes health promotion, prevention of disease, care and treatment, and decent affordable housing for persons of all ages.

This is only the beginning, Mr. Speaker. To improve the health status of a community we must have the courage to commit to supporting programs that promote health and child development and implement policies and regulations that promote physical activity for people of all ages within their community setting.

On this, Mr. Speaker, I will conclude my comments with a personal plea for those health initiatives that impact with our youngest, our children, the newborn and the children, and if we recognize the rights of the child, and by recognizing the rights of the child I believe, in turn, we will recognize the health of all our communities to provide adequate shelter, adequate nutrition, literacy that's meaningful and perhaps most of all, personal safety both to our youth and people of all ages within our community, primarily for children, but for all those within a healthy community. I thank the honourable member for bringing the resolution forward for debate this evening.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I thank you and I thank the honourable member for Halifax Needham for the opportunity to rise and speak on the issue of the health and the determinants of health for Nova Scotians and, in particular, with reference to a part of Nova Scotia that she represents in this House of Assembly.

Before I specifically address the subject of the late debate, Mr. Speaker, I want to remind members of the House about the health care services that are available to residents of the Halifax north community. There needs to be more done, Mr. Speaker, but residents of this area do have excellent access to a wide range of health care services. For example, I know there are more than two dozen physicians in the metro area who are accepting new patients. Thus, in general, access to a family physician for residents of the North End or, indeed, anyplace else in the peninsula City of Halifax should not be too difficult.

[4:30 p.m.]

The honourable member for Halifax Needham knows the North End Clinic, which would service the needs of many people up there in her constituency, was one of the pilot sites where the province put in a nurse practitioner. There were four demonstration sites in the province, and the North End Clinic was one of them. It's a project that this government is proud to continue supporting. Indeed, I can say that people at the North End Clinic and the government are so pleased with the service that is being delivered there. It was a site that we ensured the federal Minister of Health visited in one of her recent visits back home to Nova Scotia. I can tell you that she was most impressed with the people and the services she saw there. I did hear her talking specifically about that to the media.

[Page 12055]

Access to primary care is simply not an issue here. As a matter of fact, residents of that community probably do have more primary care resources than are available in many communities in our province. We find as well, Mr. Speaker, that two of Canada's best hospitals are a short distance away, where a range of health care services and programs are available to infants, children, adults and other members of the community.

We are well aware, Mr. Speaker, that the health status of many Nova Scotians is below what we would like to see and that people living in the Halifax north community are no exception. I was interested to hear the honourable member for Halifax Needham report that once we get by the statistics about health in the industrial Cape Breton area, which are certainly the ones that have been made most prominent, the deficiencies up there, that her community was number two or second-worst, however you look at it, the top or the bottom.

Mr. Speaker, chronic disease is an extremely important issue for our government and for everyone. I want to tell you that we recognize this, and in our submission to the Romanow Commission - I don't know, we're going to hear from the commission on the future of health care in Nova Scotia. I'm not going to table this, because I think everybody has had access to it - one of the things that we talked about, given the large variation in health need indicators between Nova Scotia and other provinces, there's a corresponding variation in health service demand. There's obviously a strong relationship between the utilization of health services and the health status, health needs of the community.

In response - and I believe this is what the honourable member was promoting in her resolution - in Nova Scotia we are moving towards an integrated community-based health care system with a focus on population health. Many interrelated factors and conditions determine health. It is clearly appropriate that Nova Scotia improve the health status of the whole population as well as specific groups, including the group in the Halifax north community.

What we are trying to do is to address the broad determinants of health such as social, economical and physical environments, and healthy child development. In terms of healthy child development we have announced a number of initiatives including one this morning that we announced over on the other side of the water, which is to improve home visiting for newborns and their mothers to ensure that everybody - all mothers and newborns - is visited if they so desire. They will be visited as frequently - well I won't say as frequently as they would perhaps like, but the schedule of visits will be worked out on the basis of need.

Thirdly, personal health practices. This government has put a fair bit of emphasis and will continue to put more on individuals' responsibility for their own health. I think the anti-smoking legislation, which will come into effect on January 1st, is a perfect example of our commitment and despite the fact that the two Opposition Parties did not support that legislation on the floor of the House on the vote, I do know that the two people who are here today, once you get passed the vote on the floor of the House, would say any steps to curtail

[Page 12056]

smoking would be good steps for the health of their constituents. I know that (Interruption) That's right.

Mr. Speaker, the other thing, individual capacity and coping skills and the other thing that we have to look at in terms of population health is the issue of biology and genetics. Although we know that about 96 per cent of a person's health is due to factors in their environment and how they manage their lives personally, there is still the issue of genetics - genes are not something that you can toss away at birth. If you are by heredity or genetically susceptible to a condition, then we have to deal with that.

We've put a lot of emphasis on health and wellness, and among the other things that have been talked about on the floor of this House - and in the community of Halifax north too - was the emphasis on physical activity in youth, which is being launched in conjunction with the Sport and Recreation Commission. Taking steps to prevent falling for seniors which is a problem, there's research going on in that. Anyway, there are a number of issues that we're trying to treat through community-based things.

The other thing which I would like to draw to the attention of the House, I recognize that there are a number of issues up there, but with consultation with the community, one of the things under the legislation that created the district health authorities, the community health boards have a defined and mandated role to provide input to the district health authorities so that the needs of the community can be taken into consideration. I can tell you that there is a community health board up in that area - and the member for Halifax Needham would be well familiar with it - I do know that it does put the needs of that community to the capital health on a regular basis. The capital health has, I think, a very good system of consulting with the community health boards and receiving community input. Thank you very much.

MR. SPEAKER: I would like to thank the honourable member for bringing the issue forward tonight and the members for the debate.

We are adjourned until 2:00 p.m. tomorrow.

[The House rose at 4:39 p.m.]

[Page 12057]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 4950

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bridgewater born but long-time Colchester County resident Terry Baker played his last game of professional football on Sunday for the Grey Cup Champion Montreal Alouettes; and

Whereas place-kicker Baker played 16 seasons in the CFL under 13 different head coaches on four different teams; and

Whereas Terry scored seven of Montreal's 25 points in their championship win connecting for a 42-yard field-goal, a 68-yard single and three converts, to go along with his career 2,162 regular season points and 87,529 yards in punting;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs in this House of Assembly commend Terry Baker for an outstanding CFL career while wishing him and his wife Krista every success with the gift shop they have opened in Lunenburg called the Admiral Benbow Trading Company.

RESOLUTION NO. 4951

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 21-year-old Pictou Landing resident Andrea Dykstra has obtained funding for a study of a hot spring running through the Pictou Landing reserve; and

Whereas Ms. Dykstra, a third-year biology student at St. Francis Xavier University, began her study last February as part of her honours project and is the first undergraduate at the university to receive funding for such a study; and

Whereas Kimberly-Clark has contributed $5,000 and the use of their laboratory for the study and the Maritimes and Northeast Pipeline and the Pictou Landing band have also made contributions;

[Page 12058]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend our congratulations to Andrea Dykstra on obtaining funding for this worthwhile study and wish her success in her future studies.

RESOLUTION NO. 4952

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Lawrencetown celebrated the official opening of the Dr. Frank W. Morse Library on August 29, 2002, what would have been its namesake's 89th birthday; and

Whereas an avid reader, the late Dr. Frank W. Morse was the fourth in his family to practise medicine in Lawrencetown and a firm believer in education; and

Whereas the new facility is 3,000 square feet, fully accessible, air conditioned and has a community room;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House express our appreciation to the Morse family for their generous donation of the Frank W. Morse Library and congratulate all those involved in this worthwhile project.

RESOLUTION NO. 4953

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the member for Clare has expressed his concern over the condition of a local bridge in his constituency; and

Whereas the member for Clare was part of the Executive Council in 1995 when a report from the Association of Professional Engineers of Nova Scotia indicated to his government their concerns with the conditions of bridges across this province; and

Whereas despite those concerns, the Liberals cut funding for highways and bridges by millions of dollars during their stay in government;

[Page 12059]

Therefore be it resolved that the member for Clare appreciate the real work being undertaken by the present administration such as the $10 million increase in funding for highways and bridges and look at the work presently underway that includes work on the Rice Mill Bridge in Annapolis County, the Folly River and the Kavanaugh Bridges in Colchester County, the Bruce Brook, Canterbury Truss and Shad Bay Bridges in Halifax County, the Ryans Creek Bridge in Hants County and the Margaree Harbour Bridge in Inverness County.

RESOLUTION NO. 4954

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Oxford Volunteer Fire Department Auxiliary once again showed its generous support to its fire department; and

Whereas the auxiliary presented the department a cheque for $2,000 plus about $5,500 in equipment during the annual awards banquet on November 16, 2002; and

Whereas that equipment included a 1,500 gallon porta tank, 10 pair of extrication gloves, two survivor lights, three four-foot pyke poles, six portable radio batteries, 20 pair of nomex coveralls, plus some B/A equipment;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Oxford Volunteer Fire Department Auxiliary for its generous donations and wish them the best of luck in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4955

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Canadians played an instrumental role in freeing Holland from German control in World War II; and

Whereas an Advocate Harbour resident, Doug Allen, has received the Dutch Medal of Remembrance for his efforts in liberating Nazi occupied Holland; and

Whereas Doug Allen has earned the honour of being a recipient of this medal;

[Page 12060]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Doug Allen on receipt of the Dutch Medal of Remembrance and express our gratitude for the noble service that he provided to our country as well as so many other nations during World War II.

RESOLUTION NO. 4956

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the students of Parrsboro Regional High School did participate by writing essays for the November 11, 2002 Remembrance Day Program in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 45 did reward these students at the annual Remembrance Day banquet on November 11, 2002; and

Whereas the winners in the essay division were: Sarah Critchley, 1st place junior division; Garret Clarke, 2nd place junior division; Andrew Rector, 1st place senior division; and Rachel Harroun, 2nd place senior division;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate all of the students from Parrsboro Regional High School who participated in this event and thank them for their contribution to making this a more memorable Remembrance Day.

RESOLUTION NO. 4957

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the students of Parrsboro Regional High School did participate by writing essays for the November 11, 2002 Remembrance Day Program in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 45 did reward these students at the annual Remembrance Day banquet on November 11, 2002; and

Whereas the winners in the poster division were Cory O'Byrne, Brian Stewart, Caleb Goguen, Evan Canning, Jonie Milligan, Kayla Orr, Tyler Fulton, Jessica Duhamel, Nikita Sequin, Spencer Pritchett, Brooke Wood, Rachel Yorke and Louisea Duhamel;

[Page 12061]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate all of the students from Parrsboro Regional High School who participated in this event and thank them for their contribution to making this a more memorable Remembrance Day.

RESOLUTION NO. 4958

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the students of Parrsboro Regional High School did participate by writing essays for the November 11, 2002 Remembrance Day Program in Parrsboro, Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 45 did reward these students at the annual Remembrance Day banquet on November 11, 2002; and

Whereas the 1st place winner in the junior division was Ian McCallum, 2nd place in junior division was Carmen Cameron, 1st place in intermediate division Ashely Cameron, 2nd place in intermediate was Stephanie DesJardins, 1st place in senior division was Gloria McPhee and 2nd place in senior division was Terry Neves;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate all of the students from Parrsboro Regional High School who participated in this event and thank them for their contribution to making this a more memorable Remembrance Day.

RESOLUTION NO. 4959

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ted and Joan Godfrey, owners and operators of the True Blue Fitness Centre in Oxford, Nova Scotia, have received an award from the Cumberland Corporation and Human Resources Development Canada during a recent Self-Employment Coordinators Conference; and

Whereas Ted and Joan Godfrey opened their health and fitness centre in September 2001. It offers several services, including cardio, weights, swiss ball, yoga and they also offer customized training programs; and

[Page 12062]

Whereas Ted holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Economics and Joan has a Bachelor of Science in Physiotherapy and they are both trained in weight training and continually upgrade their skills;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Ted and Joan Godfrey of the True Blue Fitness Centre for receiving their award and we wish them continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4960

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Connie's Financial Services of Oxford, Nova Scotia, have received the TAP award from the Cumberland Corporation and Human Resources Development Canada during a recent Self-Employment Coordinators Conference; and

Whereas Connie graduated from Mount Saint Vincent University with a Bachelor of Business Administration and has continued her education throughout the years with the Canadian Institute of Financial Planning, H&R Block Income Tax courses and Simply Accounting updates; and

Whereas Connie has her own financial services business in Oxford, Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Connie on her well-earned award and wish her continued success in the future.