Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 01/02-121

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Murray Scott

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Annual subscriptions available from the Office of the Speaker.

Second Session

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2002

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
Speaker's Ruling: Accuracy of facts presented in House by member.
(Pt. Of Priv. By Mr. Manning MacDonald [Hansard p. 11170]) 11207
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Health - Nursing Homes: Health Care - Cover,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 11208
Justice - Electoral Boundaries: Lun. Co. Communities -
Changes Oppose, Mr. D. Downe 11208
STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS:
Serv. N.S. & Mun. Rel.: Veterans - Licence Plates, Hon. A. MacIsaac 11209
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4523, Postcard of Thanks Prog. - Veterans Affairs Comm.:
Efforts - Recognize, Hon. J. Purves 11211
Vote - Affirmative 11212
Res. 4524, Agric. & Fish. - New Entrants Prog. (N.S.): Importance -
Recognize, Hon. E. Fage 11212
Vote - Affirmative 11213
Res. 4525, Gaelic Dev. Steering Comm.: Efforts - Recognize,
Hon. Rodney MacDonald 11213
Vote - Affirmative 11214
Res. 4526, Commun. Coll. (N.S.) - Talent Pool: Provision -
Recognize, Hon. J. Purves 11214
Vote - Affirmative 11214
Res. 4527, Jost, Hans Christian/Family - InterVin Int'l. Wine Comp.:
Awards - Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 11214
Vote - Affirmative 11215
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4528, Health - Nursing Home Applicants: Fin. Assess. - End,
Mr. D. Dexter 11217
Res. 4529, Kristallnacht - Anniv. (64th), Mr. Manning MacDonald 11218
Vote - Affirmative 11218
Res. 4530, New Glasgow - Monument: Planners - Commend,
The Premier 11218
Vote - Affirmative 11219
Res. 4531, Agric. & Fish. - Pork Producers: Loan Prog. - Implement,
Mr. J. MacDonell 11219
Res. 4532, Remembrance Day - Statutory Holiday: All-Party -
Comm. Form, Mr. D. Downe 11220
Res. 4533, Search & Rescue - Hercules/Labrador Crews:
Emergency Response - Praise Offer, Mr. J. Carey 11221
Vote - Affirmative 11221
Res. 4534, Econ. Dev. - C.B. Rail Demise: Economy - Effect,
Mr. F. Corbett 11221
Res. 4535, Rumsfeld, Donald - Patron Saint: Tory Choice -
Appropriateness, Mr. P. MacEwan 11222
Res. 4536, Postcards of Thanks Prog.: Participants - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Langille 11223
Vote - Affirmative 11223
Res. 4537, Serv. N.S. & Mun. Rel. - Jack Lake: Proj. Tax Revenue -
Dart. North Remit, Mr. J. Pye 11223
Res. 4538, Health - Strait-Richmond Hosp.: Physician Recruitment -
Plan Lack, Mr. M. Samson 11224
Res. 4539, Coady, Pearl/Pictou Dist. W.I. - Pictou/N. Col. Exhibition:
Efforts - Congrats., Mrs. M. Baillie 11225
Vote - Affirmative 11225
Res. 4540, Liberal Leader - Liberal Admin.: Mistakes - Enumerate,
Mr. H. Epstein 11226
Res. 4541, Sydney Mines & Dist. Commun. Rink: Bd. of Directors -
Congrats., Mr. B. Boudreau 11226
Vote - Affirmative 11227
Res. 4542, Balser, Wendy & Jill - Family Fall Classic (2002):
1st Place Finish - Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 11227
Vote - Affirmative 11228
Res. 4543, Hackett, Vance/Zinck, Tim/Myra, Gary/Lakeside Vol. FD:
Service - Recognize, Mr. W. Estabrooks 11228
Vote - Affirmative 11229
Res. 4544, Rumsfeld's Rules - Quotations: Source Verify,
Mr. P. MacEwan 11229
Res. 4545, St. James Catholic Church (Hammonds Plains):
Anniv. (150th) - Congrats., Mr. B. Barnet 11229
Vote - Affirmative 11230
Res. 4546, Sports - NSSAF Baseball Championship: Breton Educ. Ctr. -
Boys Team Congrats., Mr. F. Corbett 11231
Vote - Affirmative 11231
Res. 4547, Ocean Nutrition Canada: Expansion - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11232
Vote - Affirmative 11232
Res. 4548, Klefenz, Catherine & Erich - BLT Rails to Trails Proj.:
Efforts - Congrats., Mr. W. Estabrooks 11232
Vote - Affirmative 11233
Res. 4549, Hill, Bruce/Atl. Acura - Hfx. West HS: Scoreboard -
Donation Congrats., Ms. M. McGrath 11233
Vote - Affirmative 11234
Res. 4550, Doiron, Paul - Softball Can.: Coach of the Yr. - Congrats.,
Hon. A. MacIsaac 11234
Vote - Affirmative 11234
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 1240, Health - Seniors: Asset Assessment - Cease, Mr. D. Dexter 11235
No. 1241, Health - Physician Recruitment: Rural N.S. - Location Ensure,
Mr. M. Samson 11236
No. 1242, Health - Firefighters: Ambulance Fees - Cease,
Mr. D. Dexter 11238
No. 1243, Health - Mental Health Services: Children -
Access Time Frame, Dr. J. Smith 11240
No. 1244, Health - Seniors: Asset Seizing - Unjustness Admit,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 11241
No. 1245, Fin. - Restructuring Fund: Expenditures - Detail,
Mr. D. Downe 11242
No. 1246, Serv. N.S. & Mun. Rel. - Road Safety: Funding -
Reduction Explain, Mr. F. Corbett 11243
No. 1247, UNSM - Municipalities: Cooperative Approach -
Delay Explain, Mr. B. Boudreau 11245
No. 1248, Serv. N.S. & Mun. Rel. - Fuel Oil: Low-Income Residents -
Plans Detail, Mr. G. Steele 11246
No. 1249, WCB - Dorsey Report: Recommendations -
Implementation Update, Mr. P. MacEwan 11248
No. 1250, Educ. - South Shore Schools: Helicopter Trip - Details,
Mr. W. Estabrooks 11249
No. 1251, Gov't. (N.S.) - Debt Reduction: Promise - Breach Explain,
Mr. D. Downe 11250
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 142, House of Assembly Act /Elections Act 11254
Mr. R. MacKinnon 11254
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 11266
Mr. P. MacEwan 11272
Adjourned debate 11278
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5):
Kyoto Accord - Nat. Gas: Value - Effect:
Mr. H. Epstein 11279
Hon. G. Balser 11282
Mr. R. MacKinnon 11285
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Fri., Nov. 8th at 9:00 a.m. 11287
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 4551, Austin, Wendell - Masonic Order: Membership (55 yrs.) -
Congrats., The Speaker 11288
Res. 4552, Ripley, Ralston - Masonic Order: Membership (55 yrs.) -
Congrats., The Speaker 11288
Res. 4553, Spencer, Fred - Masonic Order: Membership (55 yrs.) -
Congrats., The Speaker 11289
Res. 4554, Dobson, Jasmine/Hunter, Crystal - Wigs for Kids:
Contribution - Congrats., The Speaker 11289
Res. 4555, Advocate Dist. HS Coyotes - Girls Soccer: Championship -
Congrats., The Speaker 11290
Res. 4556, Kaye, Mike: Maritimer of Wk. Award (10/04/02) -
Congrats., The Speaker 11290
Res. 4557, Children's Wish Fdn. (Cumb. Co.) - Poker Rally &
Music Fest: Participants - Congrats., The Speaker 11291
Res. 4558, Oxford Golden Bears - NSSAF Championships: Boys Soccer -
Silver Medal Congrats., The Speaker 11291
Res. 4559, McNutt, Bill - NSSAF Championships: Boys Soccer -
Player of the Game Congrats., The Speaker 11292
Res. 4560, Hoffman, James - NSSAF Championships: Boys Soccer -
MVP Award Congrats., The Speaker 11292
Res. 4561, Chipman, Emma/Doeber, Hannah - Westminster Prep School
(Conn.): Scholarships - Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 11293
Res. 4562, Chipman, Ryan - Victoriaville Tigers Hockey Team:
Position - Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 11293
Res. 4563, RCL: Kings 6 Branch (Kentville) - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Parent 11294
Res. 4564, RCL: Habitant Branch 73 (Canning) - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Parent 11294
Res. 4565, RCL: Mt. Uniacke Branch 165 - Congrats., Mr. B. Barnet 11295
Res. 4566, RCL: Cornwallis Branch 13 (Dartmouth) - Congrats.,
Hon. T. Olive 11295
Res. 4567, RCL: Somme Branch 31 (Dartmouth) - Congrats.,
Hon. T. Olive 11296
Res. 4568, RCL: Centennial Branch 160 (Dartmouth) - Congrats.,
Hon. T. Olive 11296
Res. 4569, RCL: Colchester Branch 26 (Truro) - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Muir 11297
Res. 4570, RCL: A.L. Patterson Branch 87 (Caledonia) - Congrats.,
Mr. K. Morash 11298
Res. 4571, RCL: Mersey Branch 38 (Liverpool) - Congrats.,
Mr. K. Morash 11298
Res. 4572, RCL: Yarmouth Branch 61 - Congrats., Mr. R. Hurlburt 11299
Res. 4573, RCL: Wallace Branch 104 - Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 11299
Res. 4574, RCL: Branch 97 (Malagash) - Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 11300
Res. 4575, RCL: Branch 60 (Pugwash) - Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 11300
Res. 4576, RCL: Branch 134 (Maccan) - Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 11301
Res. 4577, RCL: Amherst Branch 10 - Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 11302
Res. 4578, RCL: Calais Branch 162 (Sackville) - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Barnet 11302
Res. 4579, RCL: Windsor Branch 9 - Congrats., Hon. R. Russell 11303
Res. 4580, RCL: Argyle & Pubnico Branch 94 (Argyle) - Congrats.,
Hon. N. LeBlanc 11303
Res. 4581, RCL: West Pubnico Branch 66 - Congrats., Hon. N. LeBlanc 11304
Res. 4582, RCL: Normandy Branch 34 (New Glasgow) - Congrats.,
The Premier 11304
Res. 4583, RCL: Stellarton Branch 28 - Congrats., The Premier 11305
Res. 4584, RCL: Trenton Branch 29 - Congrats., The Premier 11306
Res. 4585, RCL: Scotia Branch (Halifax) - Congrats., The Premier 11306
Res. 4586, RCL: Vimy Branch (Halifax) - Congrats., Hon. J. Purves 11307
Res. 4587, RCL: Maccan Branch 134 - Congrats., The Speaker 11307
Res. 4588, RCL: Parrsboro Branch 45 - Congrats., The Speaker 11308
Res. 4589, RCL: Oxford Branch 36 - Congrats., The Speaker 11308
Res. 4590, RCL: Springhill Branch 17 - Congrats., The Speaker 11309
Res. 4591, RCL: River Hebert Branch 14 - Congrats., The Speaker 11310
Res. 4592, RCL: Joggins Branch 4 - Congrats., The Speaker 11310
Res. 4593, RCL: Port Maitland Branch 143 - Congrats., Mr. R. Hurlburt ^Res. 4594, RCL: Carleton Branch 11311
167 - Congrats., Mr. R. Hurlburt 11311
Res. 4595, RCL: Atlantic Branch 153 (White's Lake) - Congrats.,
Ms. M. McGrath 11312
Res. 4596, RCL: Parrsboro Branch 45 - Congrats., Ms. M. McGrath 11312
Res. 4597, RCL: Fairview Branch 142 - Congrats., Ms. M. McGrath 11313
Res. 4598, RCL: Loyalist Branch 63 (Shelburne) - Congrats.,
Mr. C. O'Donnell 11314
Res. 4599, RCL: Cape Sable Island Branch 148 (Shelburne Co.) -
Congrats., Mr. C. O'Donnell 11314
Res. 4600, RCL: Lockeport Branch 80 - Congrats., Mr. C. O'Donnell 11315
Res. 4601, RCL: Arras Branch 59 (Antigonish) - Congrats.,
Hon. A. MacIsaac 11315
Res. 4602, Walter Duggan Elem. Sch. - Grade 3 Students: UNICEF -
Fundraising Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 11316
Res. 4603, RCL: Centennial Branch 160 (Westphal-Cole Hbr.) -
Congrats., Mr. D. Hendsbee 11316
Res. 4604, RCL: Pictou Branch 16 - Congrats., Mrs. M. Baillie 11317
Res. 4605, RCL: River John Branch 108 - Congrats., Mrs. M. Baillie 11318
Res. 4606, RCL: E. Ship Hbr. Branch 120 - Congrats., Mr. W. Dooks 11318
Res. 4607, RCL: Sheet Hbr. Branch 58 - Congrats., Mr. W. Dooks 11319
Res. 4608, RCL: Chezzetcook Branch 161 (Head of Chezzetcook) -
Congrats., Mr. W. Dooks 11319
Res. 4609, RCL: Eureka Branch 75 - Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 11320
Res. 4610, RCL: Hopewell Branch 137 - Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 11320
Res. 4611, RCL: Westville Branch 35 - Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 11321
Res. 4612, RCL: Ortona Branch 69 (Berwick) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Carey 11322
Res. 4613, RCL: Alvin Foster Branch 98 (Kingston) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Carey 11322
Res. 4614, RCL: Port Royal Branch 21 (Anna. Royal) - Congrats.,
Mr. F. Chipman 11323
Res. 4615, RCL: Bridgetown Branch 33 - Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 11323
Res. 4616, RCL: Middleton Branch 1 - Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 11324
Res. 4617. RCL: Lawrencetown Branch 112 - Congrats.,
Mr. F. Chipman 11324
Res. 4618, RCL: Dieppe Branch 90 (Waverley) - Congrats.,
Hon. P. Christie 11325
Res. 4619, RCL: Bedford Branch 95 - Congrats., Hon. P. Christie 11326
Res. 4620, RCL: St. Margarets Bay Branch 116 (Seabright) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Chataway 11326
Res. 4621, RCL: F.E. Butler Branch 44 (Chester) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Chataway 11327
Res. 4622, RCL: Everett Branch 88 (Chester Basin) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Chataway 11327
Res. 4623, RCL: Harding Branch 144 (Western Shore) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Chataway 11328
Res. 4624, RCL: New Ross Branch 79 - Congrats., Mr. J. Chataway 11328
Res. 4625, Hubbards Area - People: Remembrance - Efforts Congrats.,
Mr. J. Chataway 11329
Res. 4626, RCL: C.B. Lumsden Branch 74 (Wolfville) - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Morse 11330
Res. 4627, RCL: Wedgeport Branch 155 - Congrats., Hon. N. LeBlanc 11330
Res. 4628, RCL: Port Hawkesbury Branch 43 - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11331
Res. 4629, RCL: Sherbrooke Branch 56 - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11331
Res. 4630, RCL: Guysborough Branch 81 - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11332
Res. 4631, RCL: Liscombe Branch 86 - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11332
Res. 4632, RCL: Torbay Branch 117 (Charlos Cove) - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11333
Res. 4633, RCL: Mulgrave Branch 37 - Congrats.,
Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11334
Res. 4634, RCL: Canso Branch 46 - Congrats., Mr. Ronald Chisholm 11334

[Page 11205]

HALIFAX, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2002

Fifty-eighth General Assembly

Second Session

2:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Murray Scott

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Brooke Taylor, Mr. Kevin Deveaux, Mr. David Wilson

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of privilege. Yesterday, the member for Cape Breton South took exception to some of the remarks I made about the Cape Breton economy, describing it as the best in many years and indicating the tremendous degree of optimism that I now find on Cape Breton Island.

I wish to table a series of documents that support and justify the remarks that I made in the House yesterday. The first document that I wish to table, Mr. Speaker, is dated November 1st and it is under the heading of the Greater Halifax Partnership. I have one short quotation and this is relevant to the information that I received in talking with enumerable business people on Cape Breton Island who tell me business is better than it has been in many years, who tell me, when I talk to the car dealers, that car sales are very strong in Cape Breton because of the great economy. What this document says, "This year, Nova Scotia is leading the country in department store sales increases, . . ." - leading the country, Mr. Speaker - ". . . indicating increased consumer confidence about the economy. Nova Scotia is also leading Canada in the percentage increase and building permits issued this year over 2001.", and I table that.

11205

[Page 11206]

Mr. Speaker, the Department of Tourism and Culture issues, on a regular basis, Tourism Insights and I want to table this. The reason I want to table it is because it talks about, Heritage activity: A strong August helped improve the yearly numbers at national parks and historic sites around the province. Cape Breton Highlands (+9%) . . . Alexander Graham Bell (+5%) and Fortress Louisbourg (+3%) . . ." I wish to table that. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, I have in front of me a copy of an article in the November 7th Cape Breton Post and I will quote from that to indicate why I'm tabling it. "Meanwhile, Cape Breton got some attention in the Canadian Senate Tuesday when Senator Alasdair Graham, the Liberal leader's father, made a speech dealing with the economic transition the region has gone through in the last several years since the closure of the steel plant and the coal mines. He said between 1998 and 2001, more than 500 new businesses have begun on the island and there is more opportunity on the horizon after a recent international business summit held in Baddeck.", and I table that. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, in the second week of October I had an opportunity to attend the Cape Breton Business Summit which was held in Baddeck. I want to table a document relative to the release that went out prior to that particular summit and a brief quotation to indicate why I'm tabling it. This is a quotation from Mr. Rick Beaton, the Vice-President of ECBC. "Cape Breton has experienced significant economic growth and new employment in the past two years and it is evident that new and innovative approaches to economic development are a key component of this growth." I will table that.

Mr. Speaker, I have in front of me another document which is the April Economic Region Synopsis put out by HRDC and I will read a short excerpt before tabling. "The labour market started its seasonal upturn in April in Cape Breton as employment increased significantly. This larger than usual employment increase, combined with the strong employment situation which the region has experienced over much of the past few months, has resulted in one of the highest employment levels for April in over 15 years." I table that.

Mr. Speaker, tomorrow I will have the privilege of participating in the opening of another new business on Cape Breton Island that will increase employment there over the next short while by over 400 full-time jobs. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: I want to congratulate him, but I also want to take exception to his answer to my statement of yesterday. I questioned the departmental figures in the Department of Finance which stated that the unemployment rate was rising in Cape Breton and the Premier today did not tell this House whether those figures were correct or incorrect. It's either one or the other, either the Finance Department's Web site is wrong, and

[Page 11207]

if that's the case then they're putting out propaganda to one section of this province while trying to convince Cape Bretoners that they're doing something.

Mr. Speaker, the only job in Cape Breton that that government has created is Alfie MacLeod, since they took office down there. The rest have been all federal initiatives, every single job that went into Cape Breton has been a federal initiative. (Interruptions) Cape Bretoners will be the ultimate judge as to whether or not that Premier continues to toe the line on telling Nova Scotians that all is great in Cape Breton. All is not great in Cape Breton, unemployment is rising, and this government is doing absolutely nothing about it. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I would ask that you simply rule that these productions put on by both of the other Parties cease. This is not a matter of privilege, and we are tired, and I think the people of Nova Scotia are tired, of watching this government and the former government apportion blame back and forth between the two of them, because surely there's enough blame for both of them. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Yesterday the honourable member for Cape Breton South rose on a point of privilege, which I believe we would all agree in this House that when facts are presented to the House by members that they're accepted as being the belief of the member submitting that they are factual. Members disagree from one time to another on both sides of the House whether they agree with the facts or not. I do not believe it constitutes a prima facie case of a breach of privilege.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I would like somebody to address this House as to whether or not those figures from the Department of Finance are correct or not. That's all I'm asking in this House. Either the Department of Finance's Web site is correct or it isn't correct. I would like the Finance Minister, at some point in these proceedings, to address that matter. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: If the honourable Minister of Finance wishes to respond to that, I'm sure there's lots of time during Question Period or some other proceeding of this House. Yesterday in this House the honourable member for Lunenburg West rose on a point of privilege as well, in regard to a debate earlier in the day.

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, I rise today on a point of privilege, as well. Yesterday, after I had left my spot here in the Chamber, the member for Lunenburg West rose on a point of order in regard to an answer to a question. I would like to clarify. Certainly, there was a NISA program in 1997, and my response was referring to an enhanced NISA

[Page 11208]

program, which began last year, which put double the amount of money going towards those farmers. That's what I was referring to, and I would like to clarify that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

MR. DONALD DOWNE: I will accept that, but what he said to the House was, in reference, that there was no NISA program. Now he has clarified the fact that he made a mistake and didn't say enhanced NISA program. I accept that.

[2:15 p.m.]

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition, the operative clause which says: "We, the undersigned, hereby ask the Premier, Government and Legislature of Nova Scotia to end the unfair treatment of nursing home residents and their families by agreeing that the Department of Health will cover the health care provided in nursing homes just as it covers health care provided in hospitals and home care."

Mr. Speaker, this petition has 274 signatures. I have affixed my signature to it. This brings to total the signatures on this petition to 18,863.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition signed by some 222 residents and the operative clause reads, "We the undersigned residents of the communities of Italy Cross, Middlewood, Crousetown, Petite Rivière, Broad Cove, Cherry Hill and Voglers Cove who oppose the proposed boundary changes in the final report of the Nova Scotia Electoral Boundaries Commission Report dated August 2002 and request that they go back to the original boundaries set forth by Nova Scotia Legislature Assembly (1992) . . ." This brings a total of 742 signed to these petitions to which I have affixed my signature to all those petitions.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture on an introduction.

[Page 11209]

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, if I may, I would like to make an introduction to the House. In the gallery opposite, it's my pleasure to introduce to the House the CEO of Cumberland County, Rennie Bugley, as well, to his right, is the Deputy Warden, John Kellegrew. It's a pleasure to have you here. They're attending meetings here in the city with UNSM and it is a pleasure to have you here in the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: I certainly welcome the guests in the gallery today.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: Just before we go onto the Statements by Ministers, the subject for this evening's late debate was submitted by the honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage:

Therefore be it resolved that this government recognize that the Kyoto Accord will make Nova Scotia's natural gas more valuable; and that the government take more active steps to control greenhouse gas emissions regardless of what happens to the Kyoto Accord.

This is to be debated this evening at 6:00 p.m.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, November 11th, Canadians will remember the brothers and sisters, friends and relatives who fell in armed conflicts around the world. In the battlefields of the Crimea, the trenches of Europe, the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, the mountains of Korea and Afghanistan.

This morning our government honoured the soldiers, sailors and air crews who did their duty and came home to their loved ones. Earlier this year, the Nova Scotia/Nunavut Command of the Royal Canadian Legion asked for a special licence plate to honour veterans. Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations staff worked with Legion officials to make their dream a reality.

Service Nova Scotia also met with Waldale Manufacturing in Amherst, the Nova Scotia firm that makes licence plates for our province and several jurisdictions throughout the world. The design was from Mike Hanlon of Halifax.

[Page 11210]

Today Mr. Speaker, we are making the fruits of these labours public. Starting in February, eligible veterans may begin using a special veterans' licence plate on their cars and light trucks. The fee for this service will be $5. (Applause) Earlier today, Deputy Premier Ron Russell; Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman, Bill Langille; and the President of the Nova Scotia/Nunavut Command of the Royal Canadian Legion, Fred Mombourquette, unveiled Nova Scotia's newest licence plate.

If I may take a moment, Mr. Speaker, I want to offer my congratulations to the people who made this program a success. From the Royal Canadian Legion, Fred Mombourquette, Clarence Dawe, Steve Wessel and Frank Fudge. From Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations, my thanks go to Graham Poole, Nancy Cragg-Noddin, Andrew Goodwin and Paul Benoit. I also want to thank the member for Colchester North who was the Chairman of the Veterans Affairs Committee and his fellow committee members for their efforts. (Applause)

I should point out, Mr. Speaker, that honouring veterans is not something new in this province. In 2000 this government designated the stretch of Highway No. 102 between Miller Lake and Truro as the Veterans Memorial Highway. On behalf of the Government of Nova Scotia, I would like to thank the veterans across the province for their courage and their tenacity. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea Prospect.

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: As the proud son of a World War II veteran who landed on Normandy on that fateful day, June 6, 1944, as a member of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch Whites Lake on the Prospect Road and as you well know, Mr. Speaker, as the proud teacher of a young man who just recently returned from Afghanistan as a member of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and I certainly appreciate the time that you gave to Jacob Harrie that day. The photo that was taken has been forwarded on to him as he has returned to work in Edmonton.

In all of those roles, I would like to compliment the members of the committee. I would like to compliment the chairman of the committee. I would like also to pass on, from this caucus, my compliments to the member for Dartmouth North and the member for Sackville-Cobequid who serve on this important committee in this Legislature and to the chairman of the committee, as a proud legionnaire, I compliment that particular member.

Mr. Speaker, it's important that year round we remember our veterans, remember the commitment that they gave and that we don't, only on one day, on November 11th, gather at cenotaphs and remember. The consequences, of course, will be that young people around this province, around the region and hopefully around the world will recognize the fact that that is a veteran's licence plate and that comes from the Nova Scotia/Nunavut Command.

[Page 11211]

My compliments to Mike Hanlon of Halifax on the design and to Legionnaires Fred Mombourquette, Clarence Dawe, Steve Wessel and Frank Fudge. A job well done and let's all recall that on Monday, November 11th, we must remember after all, Lest We Forget, history could repeat itself. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I, too, want to express my thanks to the government for honouring the people who participated in the armed conflicts around the world. Although the minister indicated about the people coming home, I would like to remind all members that we have to remember those who did not come home as well. I also would like to thank the Nova Scotia Command of the Royal Canadian Legion for initiating this process.

Also, although the honourable chairman, Mr. Langille, the member for Colchester North, does deserve honourable mention because he certainly contributed a great deal here, I would remind the honourable minister that the Veterans Affairs Committee has worked very hard, all members of that committee. In regard to the fee structure, Mr. Speaker, our members will be watching very closely. Of course this is the government of fees and we will be watching that fee in particular very closely.

On behalf of my caucus, I want to thank the government for recognizing the good work that the veterans do in this province.

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 4523

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs of this House has again coordinated the Postcard of Thanks Program for Veterans which has provided Nova Scotian students with an opportunity to send individual messages of appreciation to our veterans; and

Whereas this project represents a collaboration between all Parties of this House, educators, the Nova Scotia Teachers Union, the corporate sector, EnCana and J.D. Irving, and the students themselves; and

Whereas throughout this month our veterans will be receiving these tributes from Nova Scotia students;

[Page 11212]

Therefore be it resolved that this House formally recognize the efforts of the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs and the parties responsible for this initiative and join with them in extending our own profound appreciation of the commitment of those who have served this country in times of conflict.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries.

RESOLUTION NO. 4524

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Government unveiled the New Entrants to Agriculture Program as part of its 2000 budget as a way to put critical dollars in the hands of new farmers to purchase farms and develop successful farm operations in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries worked with the Nova Scotia Federation of Agriculture and the agricultural community at large to develop a new entrants program that would meet the needs of Nova Scotia's agricultural industry; and

Whereas in its first two years of implementation under the administration of the Nova Scotia Farm Loan Board, the New Entrants to Agriculture Program has disbursed nearly $1.5 million of program benefits to 80 new participants in the agricultural industry for farm purchases, on-farm improvements, and leveraging an additional $22.5 million from other industry lenders;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House recognize that the Nova Scotia New Entrants to Agriculture Program is a critical investment in the future of a successful and vibrant agricultural industry in Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 11213]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture.

RESOLUTION NO. 4525

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Gaelic Development Steering Committee has been working over the past two years to identify the challenges facing Nova Scotia's Gaelic culture; and

Whereas the committee produced a discussion paper as a further step towards creating a plan for developing Gaelic in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the committee now seeks advice from the public on the contents of this paper and is holding a series of public meetings around the province from November 5th to November 27th to gather opinions and build a consensus on the future of Gaelic in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House join me in recognizing the efforts of the steering committee and I encourage all members with an interest in Gaelic culture to attend the sessions and encourage members of your community who are interested to attend as well.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 11214]

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Education.

RESOLUTION NO. 4526

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Nova Scotia Community College has experienced a 10.9 per cent increase in enrolment over last year; and

Whereas the demand for college education in Nova Scotia has grown steadily for the past several years; and

Whereas a key factor of the Nova Scotia Community College's growth is its responsiveness in meeting the emerging needs of the knowledge economy in our province;

Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize that the Nova Scotia Community College continues to be a provider of an impressive talent pool for employers in this province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries

RESOLUTION NO. 4527

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas retail sales of the Nova Scotia farm wine industry is approximately $3.6 million and considered to be an industry still in its infancy; and

[Page 11215]

Whereas Jost Vineyards Limited of Malagash, Nova Scotia, is the oldest winery in the province, having sold its first bottle in 1985, and whose owners are key participants in the growth and development of the industry; and

Whereas Jost Vineyards recently won top awards in all five categories it entered among hundreds of other companies in a 2002 InterVin International Wine Competition in Toronto;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House extend congratulations to Hans Christian Jost and his family for their most recent awards at the 2002 InterVin International Wine Competition and for helping to put Nova Scotia on the international map of top quality wine producers.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I rise in my place on a point of personal privilege. As you would be aware, yesterday I brought an issue to this House, a very important issue, not only for my own constituency but I would argue for the province itself, the issue of recruitment of physicians to rural Nova Scotia.

[2:30 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, as you're aware, there was a physician slated to arrive at the Strait-Richmond Hospital and had signed a contract, my understanding is, and somehow that physician came to this province, got a billing number, ended up in Dartmouth without the Strait-Richmond Hospital or the minister or his staff being advised of that. I've risen in this House numerous times to speak about the issue of physician recruitment in my county, which remains a very serious issue. There remains a need for doctors in L'Ardoise, at the Strait-Richmond Hospital, and especially in the community of Arichat.

[Page 11216]

Mr. Speaker, my last supplementary to the minister. In his reply he stated: "Mr. Speaker, the honourable member does point out that there has been difficulty providing a person in the Strait-Richmond Hospital to act as an emergency room physician. He has not pointed out that another community in his constituency, that of Arichat, has never been so well doctored as it has been under this government."

Mr. Speaker, I and everyone in Isle Madame, Louisdale, and in Richmond County, know that this is not true. If the minister is not aware that this is incorrect, then shame on him and his staff. A quick review of the complement of physicians that have been in Arichat over the years clearly shows that the physicians who are there now, the amount of them, is insufficient.

Mr. Speaker, the minister also inferred that it was his recruitment efforts, this government's recruitment efforts, that were responsible for the two new physicians who have arrived on Isle Madame, in Arichat; once again, that is incorrect. The fact is that Dr. Rose MacKay, who arrived there, a six-year medical student, was recruited through Dalhousie Medical School by Dr. Laurie MacNeil, the local physician who has been carrying the weight of providing medical services to the people of Isle Madame and Louisdale for the last number of years. The other doctor, Dr. , was attracted to the area by another former physician on Isle Madame, not the Department of Health. So for the minister to suggest that he or his government had anything to do with this is clearly incorrect. In his statement, the minister indicated that there were more doctors in Arichat than before . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please. As members know, I've stated on many occasions in this House a point of personal privilege is a very serious matter. As I understand a point of personal privilege, it actually has to prevent a member from carrying out his duties in this House. I'm not going to allow the time of the House to be taken up by members getting on the floor just to make statements in regard to issues that can be brought before the House in another manner. (Interruptions)

The honourable Premier was responding to a point of personal privilege that was brought against him. I took it under advisement, and I will take this matter under advisement. However, unless the honourable member has more information than what he's already provided to this House, then I would ask him to take his place and I will take it under advisement and report back to the House.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, the point is, I've stood in this House numerous times to talk about the plight of the requirement for doctors. By the minister inferring in this House that the community of Arichat has a full complement of doctors, which it does not and has not had for a significant number of years, is clearly incorrect, and it violates my ability to stand in this House and tell Nova Scotians and tell this House about the need for physicians in my area. (Interruptions) So for the minister to suggest that there's a full complement . . .

[Page 11217]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please. I will take the matter under advisement and report back to the House.

The honourable Premier on an introduction.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to point out to the members of the House that in the Speaker's Gallery we have a special guest, Sarah MacLeod. Sarah is the daughter of Senior Policy Advisor, Moira MacLeod, at the Treasury and Policy Board. Sarah is visiting here today with her mother. I would ask the House to give her a warm welcome. (Applause)

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 4528

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Liberals and Conservatives are apportioning blame among themselves for the government's cruel policy that strips nursing home residents of virtually everything they own; and

Whereas the record shows that in 1994 the Savage Government announced the service exchange, taking over municipal nursing homes; and

Whereas the record also shows that on April 1, 1998, the MacLellan Government adopted new uniform procedures for assessment and financial review of nursing home applicants;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Minister of Health should recognize that they were wrong to make the financial assessment even more cruel in 2000-01, and take responsibility by immediately ending these harsh practices.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

[Page 11218]

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

RESOLUTION NO. 4529

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today marks the 64th Anniversary of Kristallnacht, a date regarded by historians as the commencement of the Nazi Holocaust against the Jewish people; and

Whereas the candlelight vigil this evening will remember not only the victims of the past but will urge everyone to take a stand against intolerance in our world today; and

Whereas the ceremony this evening will take on added significance with the many events taking place in the international arena currently;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House reflect on Kristallnacht as a reminder of how fragile our freedoms are and how important it is to do what is necessary to protect and value them.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 4530

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a monument to honour all of New Glasgow's Second World War veterans for their service, valour, gallantry and sacrifice, will be erected; and

[Page 11219]

Whereas the plans for the monument were unveiled Tuesday evening; and

Whereas in local neighbourhoods like Stewart Street, New Glasgow, approximately 40 residents served in the war and of those, six were killed in action, one was taken prisoner of war and one received the Distinguished Service Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House commend Mayor Ann MacLean, town council and the citizens of New Glasgow for planning this prestigious monument, in honouring the war heroes of their town.

MR. SPEAKER: Was there a request for waiver?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried

The honourable member for Hants East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4531

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Minister of Agriculture stated yesterday that pork producers had no NISA program to draw on in the 1998 pork crisis as justification for his support of a loan program for pork producers by the government of the day; and

Whereas the minister claims now that the pork producers don't need a loan program to get through the current crisis, that the existing agricultural safety net, including the NISA program, will protect them; and

Whereas the Governments of Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island, whose pork producers have access to NISA as well but are still facing ruin just like ours, implemented loan programs to help their producers through the current crisis;

[Page 11220]

Therefore be it resolved that this House advise the Minister of Agriculture to implement a loan program for pork producers to show, as have some of his provincial counterparts, his ongoing support for the Nova Scotia hog industry and our rural economy.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4532

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotians have been strong and loyal in their support of Canada's veterans and in observing Remembrance Day, the day set aside to honour the bravery and valour of those who fought and died to preserve our rights and freedoms in World War I, World War II, the Korean Conflict, the Gulf War, Afghanistan and in international peacekeeping activities; and

Whereas the Remembrance Day Act was established to ensure Nova Scotians continue to pay tribute to those who sacrificed their lives and health on our behalf and for those of future generations; and

Whereas under the provisions in the Remembrance Day Act and the Nova Scotia Labour Standards Code this special day does not have the distinction of a statutory general holiday;

Therefore be it resolved that this House call for the formation of an all-Party committee to investigate and consult with Legions and all Nova Scotians and have them report back to the Legislature with recommendations on declaring November 11th, Remembrance Day, a statutory holiday for all Nova Scotians.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Kings West.

[Page 11221]

RESOLUTION NO. 4533

MR. JON CAREY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this past weekend a search and rescue air team fought through winds of up to 90 kilometres an hour and icy temperatures to successfully bring an injured Halifax-based fisherman to medical aid; and

Whereas the 27 year-old-man was badly injured when a watertight door slammed, hitting him about 370 kilometres east of Halifax; and

Whereas a Labrador helicopter and Hercules aircraft dispatched from Canadian Forces Base Greenwood, faced five-metre-high seas when they reached the fishing vessel - a mission described by a military spokeswoman as very tricky because of the weather;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House offer our praise for the crew of both the Hercules and the Labrador for showing their usual true grit in responding to any emergency in any condition and once again bringing the injured quickly to medical aid and wish the fisherman a full recovery.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 4534

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today marks the 116th Anniversary of The Last Spike when Canada's dream came true of a transcontinental railway that would in the years to come play a huge part in the development of our country; and

[Page 11222]

Whereas even the Tories at the time realized the absolute necessity of creating this transportation miracle if we hoped to develop into a strong and prosperous nation; and

Whereas Sir John A. Macdonald must be turning in his grave as this Tory Government sits idly by as the railroad disappears in Cape Breton and Pierre Burton should consider a tragic sequel to his famous book;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier admit that by allowing the railway to die in Cape Breton, he is driving the last spike into the heart of the economy of Cape Breton Island.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 4535

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP were expecting a resolution today on Ivan the Terrible but instead we shall move to former U.S. Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld; and

Whereas Donald Rumsfeld has become the moving influence behind the latest Tory image improvement plan leading up to the upcoming provincial election; and

Whereas Donald Rumsfeld was the guiding force leading to the development of the B-1 bomber, the Trident nuclear submarine and the MX ICBM in his efforts to promote world peace;

Therefore be it resolved that the Tories have chosen well to choose Donald Rumsfeld as their patron saint as he seems to epitomize even more than Ivan the Terrible the type of development one might expect if the crew opposite should get re-elected.

Mr. Speaker, I don't know if I should seek waiver on that or not.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

[Page 11223]

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 4536

MR. WILLIAM LANGILLE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas again the Standing Committee on Veterans Affairs has co-ordinated the Post Cards of Thanks to Veterans Program for elementary students; and

Whereas this initiative would not be possible without the assistance of Veterans Affairs Canada, Nova Scotia school boards and their educators and the generous financial contributions of our postage sponsors, EnCana, the Nova Scotia Teachers Union and J. D. Irving; and

Whereas this unique co-operative effort provides each student with a personal concept of remembrance;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House convey their appreciation to the classroom teachers, the school boards, Veterans Affairs, Royal Canadian Legion and the postage sponsors for making it possible for young people to send meaningful personal expressions of appreciation to our veterans who so rightfully deserve our recognition and praise.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

RESOLUTION NO. 4537

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11224]

Whereas the Halifax Regional Municipality staff have rejected a proposal to build a municipal golf course at Bedford's Jack Lake on the original site of the correctional centre now located in Dartmouth North; and

Whereas the chairman of the Bedford Waters Advisory Committee suggested that such a course might allow the municipality to make enough money to pay for its entire yearly recreational budget, as was done with the course in Saanich, B.C.; and

Whereas if any local community deserves the added tax revenue from any project built on the Jack Lake site, it should be the same community that has to host the correctional centre after this government took it out of Bedford;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations request that the Halifax Regional Municipality turn over any tax revenue to Dartmouth North from any project built on Bedford's Jack Lake.

[2:45 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 4538

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the failures of this government's physician recruitment strategy for rural Nova Scotia became apparent yesterday when a doctor slated for the Strait-Richmond Hospital ended up in Dartmouth; and

Whereas the Tory member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury, in a press release dated August 22, 2002, heralded the arrival of the new doctor and asked that I and others recognize the success of his government's recruitment efforts; and

[Page 11225]

Whereas when asked yesterday for his thoughts on the embarrassment created by his government, the member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury clearly displayed his commitment to the Strait-Richmond Hospital and comprehension of the issue with his statement, "At least the doctor stayed in the province.";

Therefore be it resolved that yesterday's events clearly demonstrate to Nova Scotians that the MLA for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury, the Minister of Health, and this entire Tory Government do not have a plan for physician recruitment either at the Strait-Richmond Hospital or any other rural community in Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4539

MRS. MURIEL BAILLIE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas each year county fairs and exhibitions are significant economic and social strands that help to strengthen the fabric of rural Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Pictou District Women's Institute tirelessly coordinated the produce, floral, photography, and handcraft displays in the Kinsmen Building for the Pictou/North Colchester Exhibition Fair held in September; and

Whereas Pearl Coady recently accepted the Fair Person of the Year Award on behalf of the Pictou District Women's Institute;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Pearl Coady and the Pictou District Women's Institute for dedicating their volunteer time and effort to such an important showcase that helps our rural communities to grow and thrive.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 11226]

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

RESOLUTION NO. 4540

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas it was the Liberals who introduced the system of long-term care that discriminates against nursing home residents by charging them for health care costs; and

Whereas the new Liberal Leader has blamed his own Liberal colleagues for making that unjust mistake; and

Whereas the Liberals made numerous other mistakes in government, such as bad offshore and casino deals, getting rid of thousands of nurses, phoney bookkeeping, and secret backroom deals;

Therefore be it resolved that this House encourage the Liberal Leader to tell Nova Scotians what other mistakes he admits the Liberals made besides charging nursing home residents for their health care costs and what he plans to do about it.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4541

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Board of Directors for the Sydney Mines and District Community Rink has worked extremely hard over the last 10 years to upgrade the Sydney Mines and District Community Rink - installing a new lighting system, hospitality room with a kitchenette, also purchasing a Zamboni and ice edger; and

[Page 11227]

Whereas this summer the board took on the major renovation of the flooring and cooling system for the ice surface and the removal and strengthening of the boards; and

Whereas these renovations, in conjunction with the new more efficient plant equipment, will extend the life of the centre for 30 years, ensuring the community a home for minor hockey and skating for future generations;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Board of Directors of the Sydney Mines and District Community Rink for their continued effort to improve the community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou West on an introduction.

MRS. MURIEL BAILLIE: Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to introduce to the House this afternoon two councillors from my area. I will ask Ron Baillie and Wayne Murray to stand up and receive a welcome from the House, please. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome our guests to the gallery today.

The honourable member for Annapolis.

MR. FRANK CHIPMAN: Mr. Speaker, before I begin, I just want to say that my resolution is indicative as to where the true golfing talent lies in this family. I might add that the two individuals are directly related to the member for Digby-Annapolis.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 4542

MR. FRANK CHIPMAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11228]

Whereas the 2002 Nova Scotia Annual Fall Classic golf tournament was held in Cheticamp; and

Whereas Digby's Wendy and Jill Balser have won in the mother-daughter category at this two-day tournament with a score of 89 for each day; and

Whereas this is the sixth year that Wendy has won the two-day tournament partnering with one of her two daughters;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Wendy Balser and her daughter Jill, on their first-place finish at Nova Scotia's 2002 Family Fall Classic.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 4543

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Saturday, September 14, 2002, the Lakeside Volunteer Fire Department held its annual awards night; and

Whereas firefighters were acknowledged for their contributions to our community at that event; and

Whereas Gary Myra was chosen as Firefighter of the Year, Tim Zinck was announced as Officer of the Year, and Vance Hackett was selected as Rookie of the Year;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly recognize firefighters Vance Hackett, Tim Zinck and Gary Myra and all members of the Lakeside Volunteer Fire Department for their dedicated service to the Beechville-Lakeside-Timberlea communities.

[Page 11229]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

RESOLUTION NO. 4544

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Tories have sponsored an election plan known as The Corporate Plan dated September 19, 2002; and

Whereas this election plan concludes with a page headed "Plan Implementation - Rumsfeld's Rules", quoting former U.S. Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld as commenting on this Tory Government's performance in office; and

Whereas the Tories claim Donald Rumsfeld said, "Be sure the staff is working on what you move to them from the Premier. Otherwise, the Premier will be reacting, not leading";

Therefore be it resolved that the Tories opposite should be challenged to demonstrate that Donald Rumsfeld ever said anything of the kind or indeed that they have any licence to use his good name and portrait as a prop in their undistinguished efforts to slide back into office for second term.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank.

RESOLUTION NO. 4545

MR. BARRY BARNET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11230]

Whereas the congregation of St. James Catholic Church recently celebrated its 150th Anniversary in Hammonds Plains; and

Whereas members of the congregation were joined by guests, including Archbishop Terrence Prendergast, for this celebration; and

Whereas the 150 years of this faith's community was highlighted and presentations were made to hard-working volunteers within the church community;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the St. James Catholic Church on 150 years of service to the community of Hammonds Plains.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Would the honourable member allow for an introduction?

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Yes, no problem.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. I would like to bring to the attention of the members two distinguished people who are in the Speaker's Gallery today, Councillor John Read and Councillor Kathy Redmond, who are municipal councillors for the Municipality of Cumberland. They are in Halifax attending UNSM meetings and they are here to see the House in operation today. I would ask them to rise and receive the warm welcome of the House please. (Applause)

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: It's always a pleasure to see the good people from Cumberland County, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: It shows their good thoughts in regard to voting the way they . . .

MR. CORBETT: I used to question their wisdom.

[Page 11231]

MR. SPEAKER: That's right.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 4546

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas high school athletics is an important part of students' overall learning experience; and

Whereas this year marked the first ever Boys Triple A Nova Scotia Student Athletics Federation Baseball Championships; and

Whereas this tournament was held in New Waterford and captured by the Breton Education Centre boys' team;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Breton Education Centre, players, coaches and parents for a successful season and a much-deserved victory in the Boys Triple A Nova Scotia Student Athletics Federation Baseball Championship.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury.

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, in the east gallery we have four people from the Town of Port Hawkesbury, councillors and the deputy mayor. We have Deputy Mayor Finn Armsworthy, Councillor David Hanhams, Councillor Eileen Carrigan, and we also have Quinn Taggart who is now the acting CEO of that municipality, I believe. I would ask the House to give them a warm welcome. (Applause)

[Page 11232]

RESOLUTION NO. 4547

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Hamm Government is helping Mulgrave's Ocean Nutrition Canada build on its success and create new jobs by authorizing $6.2 million in working capital for ONC through amendments to existing loan terms and conditions to support the company's four-year multimillion dollar expansion; and

Whereas the expansion will increase the capacity of ONC's Mulgrave facility and increase the workforce from 100 to about 300; and

Whereas the Mulgrave facility produces concentrated long-chain Omega 3 fatty acids that are naturally found in the oil of fatty fish like salmon, sardines and anchovies, and are scientifically and clinically proven to significantly reduce the risks of heart disease - I'm going to get some;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the management and staff of Ocean Nutrition Canada upon their upcoming expansion and recognize them for their record of excellence and job creation in this fast-growing field.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 4548

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the White Hills Summit Award is awarded annually to a Nova Scotian by the Nova Scotia Trails Federation; and

[Page 11233]

Whereas this award recognizes Nova Scotians who have made a significant contribution to the development of trails in the Province of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Catherine and Erich Klefenz of Timberlea are this year's recipient of the White Hills Summit Award;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate and thank Catherine and Erich Klefenz of Timberlea for their dedication and hard work in the development of the Beechville-Lakeside-Timberlea Rails-to-Trails project.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Bedford Basin.

RESOLUTION NO. 4549

MS. MARY ANN MCGRATH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bruce Hill, owner of Atlantic Acura, has donated a $10,000 scoreboard for the new Halifax West High School; and

Whereas the new scoreboard, at almost eight feet square, is designed for basketball, sporting an LCD lighted score, time, foul and player number sections; and

Whereas this continues Atlantic Acura's tradition of supporting Halifax West, having, over the past few years, also donated computers, monitors for the school's hallways and sponsoring the production of 1,200 course guides for the students;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Halifax West High School on the receipt of a new scoreboard and applaud the generosity of Bruce Hill and Atlantic Acura for their continued support of their community high school and its students.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 11234]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

RESOLUTION NO. 4550

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Paul Doiron of Antigonish is recognized as one of the top softball coaches in Canada, most recently leading the Antigonish Central Home Improvement Warehouse Midgets to a national championship; and

Whereas after 20 years of coaching, Mr. Doiron has been named Coach of the Year by Softball Canada; and

Whereas highlights of his coaching career include the national championship, and watching several of his charges enjoy successful careers in the NCAA in the United States;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Paul Doiron on being named Softball Canada's Coach of the Year, and thank him for his years of dedication to local youth.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[3:00 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 11235]

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: Question Period will begin at 3:00 p.m. and end at 4:00 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

HEALTH - SENIORS: ASSET ASSESSMENT - CEASE

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. So far the Premier has not told Nova Scotians what he intends to do about the scandalous financial assessment of nursing home residents and he has not said when he will do it. While the Premier stonewalls, people are coming forward with their own real-life stories, trying to convince the government to act now.

Last month, Mr. Speaker, I met Muriel Presant of Richmond County. Her husband has Alzheimer's and for years she cared for him at home. When it became obvious that her husband needed to enter a nursing home, Mrs. Presant discovered that this government expected her to turn over much of what she and her husband had managed to save during their working lives. She made the very difficult decision to place her husband in an Ontario nursing home where his family only has to pay room and board.

My question to the Premier is, why won't the Premier make a commitment here and now to end the assessment of seniors' assets when they become so ill or disabled that they must enter a nursing home?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Health.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the issue to which the honourable member refers is one that this government is well aware of and we've been addressing issues of continuing care now since we've been in government and we've made a remarkable number of advances and we will continue to push forward with these advances.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, seniors understand very well that those of modest means who put some money away throughout their working lives get hit hardest by this government's financial assessment of nursing home residents. Muriel Presant gets to see her husband about four times a year; she describes this situation as a second death. She and her family have learned what it means when a government cares more about budgets than it cares about people. Why won't the Premier even commit to making a change in the nursing home system while the House is sitting this Fall?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Health.

[Page 11236]

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, this government has worked and made a number of advances in continuing care since we've been in office, and I think they are changes for the better. Among those was the introduction of a single-entry access system and, secondly, the guarantee that - we've concentrated on care in the time we've been in office - as further adjustments are able to be made, we will make them.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, the fact is they have concentrated on budgets and they have left people to fend for themselves. Muriel Presant is not the only Nova Scotian who has been forced to place a loved one in another province; the fees are lower and the financial assessment is less harsh in every other province.

Last night the Premier quoted the law of inverse relevance: The less you intend to do about something, the more you have to talk about it. It's a very good explanation of his stonewall tactics on this issue. I ask the Premier - will he answer this? - why is he doing so little about nursing home financial assessments that he dare not reveal his decision while he faces questions in the House?

THE PREMIER: I refer that to the Minister of Health.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I will say this again, and I said it yesterday, we have an extremely competent and caring staff that will make assessments. For that member to criticize them as being harsh, is really shameful.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

HEALTH - PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT:

RURAL N.S. - LOCATION ENSURE

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, yesterday we learned that a physician who was recruited by the Strait-Richmond Hospital to practise in the area is not coming to the Strait; instead he has received a billing number and has set up shop in Dartmouth. The minister says there's nothing he can do about the situation even though the doctor had signed a contract with the Strait-Richmond Hospital and was sponsored by the hospital and the district health authority to get into the province. So, once again, the people of the Strait area are without a full-time emergency room doctor to serve the community, and their health and safety is in jeopardy as a result.

Mr. Speaker, this minister takes this issue so seriously that a recent printout in the last half-hour of the government's Department of Health Web site on recruitment fails to even list the Strait-Richmond Hospital as a hospital in need of a doctor here in this province. My question to the minister is, why aren't there measures in place to ensure that if a doctor is recruited by a hospital in rural Nova Scotia, that that doctor will end up practising medicine in rural Nova Scotia?

[Page 11237]

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member refers to an unfortunate situation. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable Minister of Health has the floor.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member refers to an unfortunate situation. I can tell the House that there is a contract in place for the gentleman who was to go to the Strait-Richmond Hospital. I have been in contact with the Medical Society, my staff has contacted the College of Physicians and Surgeons and I can tell you that the contract is a valid contract.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, the question is which contract is the valid contract? Is it the contract which he signed in good faith with the Strait-Richmond Hospital or is it the contract that he now suddenly has with the Dartmouth General that the minister and staff had absolutely no idea about? I would like the minister to make that clear to us.

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the minister stated to the press that this isn't the first time this has happened, that a doctor recruited for rural Nova Scotia has not come to rural Nova Scotia. That makes it clear that there are obvious gaps in this minister's recruitment process that they currently have in place. Yesterday the minister said that he had never thought about whether it was fair that physicians could obtain billing numbers before they had settled in the community in rural Nova Scotia that had actually recruited them. My question to the minister is, after sleeping on it, could the minister inform the members of this House if he now believes that the province's recruitment policy is fair and ensures that rural hospitals will be able to recruit and keep physicians without fear of being poached by other hospitals?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the recruitment efforts of this government and the recruitment successes are really I think something that we can be proud of. Now, obviously, we would like to do more. Obviously, the honourable member doesn't understand things, but we passed legislation last year, indeed it passed in this House, and it talked about contracts for physicians. One of the reasons that that was passed is that when a physician has signed a contract, it does circumvent or at least restrict their ability to do certain other things while they are under contract.

MR. SAMSON: So once again, Mr. Speaker, the question becomes why is he in Dartmouth and why is he not at the Strait-Richmond Hospital which the minister has refused to answer. If this minister wants to talk about the success of his recruitment policy, the statements he made yesterday about the complement of doctors in Arichat, let him call Dr. Laurie MacNeil who has been alone for months taking care of Isle Madame's 5,000 patients. To take credit for recruiting two physicians to that area and saying there's a full complement is an absolute disgrace for this minister to stand in this House and to do that.

[Page 11238]

Mr. Speaker, the plan is not working. That's why communities in Richmond, Kingston, Pugwash and Weymouth are without doctors. Something different must be done immediately by this government. My final supplementary is will the minister commit here today to taking the necessary steps to change the province's recruitment policy so that doctors recruited to hospitals in rural Nova Scotia must actually practice in that community before they will be given a billing number by this government?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, we have more doctors per capita than just about anybody in the country and the honourable member knows that. Secondly, and he has mentioned Arichat, I didn't mention anything about a full complement and I can tell you there are more doctors there now than there were two years ago. He should be grateful for that rather than criticizing for it. Thirdly, in terms of contracts, it has been an issue. We've talked with the Medical Society and we've talked with the College of Physicians and Surgeons and indeed last year we took steps that needed to be taken to ensure that the contracts that were held by physicians in Nova Scotia were somewhat consistent. I can tell the honourable member that the parties to the contract to which he refers are the Strait-Richmond Board, the Department of Health and the Medical Society of Nova Scotia and none of the three parties (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable member of the Official Opposition.

HEALTH - FIREFIGHTERS: AMBULANCE FEES - CEASE

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Firefighters in this province give their time and risk their own safety to save the lives and property of others while the rest of us go about our daily routine. That's why I find it very troubling that this government doesn't see it that way. Why else would they insist on billing local fire departments if firefighters are injured in the line of duty and require an ambulance. Mr. Speaker, I want the Premier to commit to this House that his government will stop billing injured firefighters for ambulance transportation. Will he make that commitment today?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Health, who is responsible for ambulance service.

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I know where the honourable member got that. I think it was on the floor of the Nova Scotia municipalities last night. Indeed, I did hear the radio clips this morning and I assume that you did as well. You will note that in those radio clips there were two sides presented, he's only talked about one. I can tell you that this is a matter that our department is aware of. It may not suit everybody, but there is a policy in place which does address this.

[Page 11239]

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, firefighters are the backbone of many of our rural communities. They deserve our support and our respect. The Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities passed a resolution at their meeting last night which I would like to table. It calls on the government to forgive all outstanding fees and to exempt firefighters from fees in the future. Now the government may say that it's okay to continue billing firefighters because they're insured. I want to ask the Premier, why do you force firefighters to face higher insurance premiums because they insist on making them pay to be transported to hospital if they're injured and hurt in the line of duty?

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I didn't hear the question, but I will assume it was one for the Minister of Health.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, nothing has really changed. If a medical first-responder is injured on an EHS call and is transported by ambulance, indeed, for a certain amount of administrative detail, there is a bill generated. The medical first-response agency pays that bill and EHS donates the money back to the medical first-response agency. This is all done electronically now.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, if the Premier is going to attend Question Period, he might as well listen to the questions. Firefighters are often the first responders to an accident scene. They work co-operatively with ambulance crews to save lives. Even the EMC recognizes that this policy is wrong because in some cases, they reimburse the fire department after the fact. My question to the Premier is this, if you reimburse some of the fire departments for these costs, why do you needlessly force them to pay in the first place?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, again I will refer this to the Minister of Health. He's having trouble getting through to the Leader of the Opposition but if he tries often enough, he will.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, anytime . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. MUIR: Nothing has changed. The issue is that anybody who is transported by ambulance, there is an electronic bill generated, and it's sent, in this case, to first responders. They can pay the bill and get reimbursed. For the majority of people, that is not an issue. I can tell you that our staff has met with representatives of that group and they've discussed it. On the other hand, there are some times where insurance companies pay this too and they do it.

[Page 11240]

[3:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

HEALTH - MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES:

CHILDREN - ACCESS TIME FRAME

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Health. Yesterday the minister stated that mental health was an important issue for this government. He stated, ". . . we are deeply concerned about the mental health services for children in this province . . .". Being deeply concerned does nothing to address the fact that his plan committed to those services in September 2002. Being concerned does nothing to address the needs of children, who are disrupting a classroom, who have to wait six months to a year for services. My question to the minister is, can the Minister of Health explain to the families and children, who need these services now, when they will be able to access treatment in this province?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, in contrast to the previous administration, when we received a report for recommendations, in this case the Bland/Dufton report, we put together a steering committee to recommend to government how the suggestions in that report could be implemented. We expect to receive the draft of that very soon. We are committed to implementing those recommendations. Now it's not going to be all at once, because it's not possible, but we will be implementing them.

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, we spoke yesterday of the minister's plan for mental health. According to the plan, part of phase I, development of a provincial mental health residential treatment program was to be up and running by September 2002. This part of the plan was expected to reduce the need for the out-of-province placements that continue on and on. My question to the minister is, given that the minister's plan is already two months late, will the minister please tell Nova Scotian families when they will be able to access a provincial mental health residential treatment program?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, that was one of the recommendations that is being adopted by the government. We are currently in negotiation with agencies who actually have a facility that would house and be appropriate to accommodate that type of population. I'm optimistic that we will be able to make an announcement on its location within the next month.

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, now that we're two months behind we have another month, and I will just hold the minister to that. I expect the House will be adjourned by that time, but maybe there are other ways we can hold them accountable. My final supplementary is to the Minister of Community Services. We know the Department of Community Services is paying large amounts for out-of-province residential care, probably near $2.5 million a year. Can the minister please tell the House the number of children who have been sent out

[Page 11241]

of province for treatment this past year, and the total cost of that treatment? Can the minister inform the House today?

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, the numbers range, as the honourable member knows, from time to time, but on average it's been about 26, and the cost of that is about $1.8 million.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH - SENIORS: ASSET SEIZING - UNJUSTNESS ADMIT

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question, through you, is to the Minister of Health. I want to table documents that show exactly how this government is impoverishing seniors across this province. The senior in question spent 18 months in a nursing home before passing away recently. To pay for his care, this government forced this senior to pay more than $86,000. This government billed this man $5,060 for a 31 day month. He lost every penny he had, leaving nothing for his family when he died. I want to ask the Minister of Health, why can't you admit that what you're doing with this ruthless seizing of seniors' assets is wrong?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the issue of the cost and the distribution of costs for long-term care is something that's been a concern to this government since we came into office. We have spent about an additional $90 million on long-term care in the past three years. We have made, I think, considerable improvements in care, Mr. Speaker, and the matter which the honourable member mentions, we will deal with that fully as circumstances permit.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I'd like to table two receipts. One is for slightly more than $54,000 and the other for almost $32,000. This money kept this senior in a nursing home for 18 months. He passed away at the end of 18 months, meaning the province has paid virtually nothing for his care. Instead, it left him impoverished and his family without the benefits of any assets, including his family home. I want to ask the Minister of Health, is this the type of situation you were referring to in your OptED article of October 4th when you wrote, "This is the time when seniors need to make an investments in themselves."

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the continuing care policies that are in place are constantly being reviewed. As I have indicated, we have made tremendous commitment to care improvements in the past three years but believe it or not, and she perhaps may not understand it, or the honourable member may not understand it, that some people don't mind making an investment in themselves.

[Page 11242]

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, just 33 days ago this minister wrote an OptEd piece that said seniors had seen, "the best and the worst of human endeavours". Well, seniors are saying that this government's nursing home charges are among the worst endeavours that they have had to suffer through. They are telling us that they are taking their farms, their cars and in some cases, their homes, to pay for health care and this must stop now.

Yesterday the minister said, "There are some seniors who, by choice, put everything into their care because they believe in an ethic that does not want government support." He just repeated that basic claim here. I want to ask the Minister of Health to produce evidence today, now, of a single senior in Nova Scotia who wants you to impoverish them to pay for their health care with this kind of policy.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member knows that she is asking a rhetorical question because it would not be appropriate for me to bring any individual cases to the floor of the House.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

FIN. - RESTRUCTURING FUND: EXPENDITURES - DETAIL

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, the Rumsfeld/Hamm play book indicates that Nova Scotians need to feel good about their government. Now I am giving the Minister of Finance a chance to demonstrate why they should feel good about an open government. My question for the minister is, in the last three years, this government's restructuring fund has widely fluctuated from anywhere from $16 million in one year, to over $130 million. In the year 2000 I had asked the minister about the $88 million fund and where those dollars were specifically spent. As normal, the Minister of Finance was not very clear with regard to that restructuring fund. I know that this fund was used for salary increases and severance but it was also possibly used for other activities. My question to the minister is, will the minister table in the House, before the end of today, what exactly the restructuring fund has been spent on in each of the last three years?

HON. NEIL LEBLANC: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite was intending for me to be able to table that today, obviously he should have given me some notice on it. It is a good question but I should point out that he is a former Minister of Finance himself. The restructuring funds details are not divulged in advance because the fact of the matter is they are used for negotiations. You don't tell the unions first how much you have to negotiate because somehow they would sort of figure out that's the bottom line they should be asking for. Subsequent to the events of those years going by, I will take the question as noted and I will see what I can do.

[Page 11243]

MR. DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, this is past the period of time that the question was originally asked and I know that this minister has this information available to him and has it available to him now. All the minister simply has to do is to contact his appropriate staff and I'm sure, I'm confident, that he could bring that information to the floor of the Legislative Assembly here today. My question again to the minister, will he come clean with Nova Scotians and release an itemized list of restructuring funds spent over the last three years covering the number of people laid off, the number of people that he had to pay severance, the dollars spent for pay raises and a list of any other dollars that were spent for other purposes under this so-called fund of restructuring?

MR. LEBLANC: Mr. Speaker, there are about six or seven questions in there so I will answer the one that I want. The one I should point out, the member opposite is saying that we should be open. Now, the fact of the matter is that we have brought about our financial statements in compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. That is openness versus what that member, who was a former Minister of Finance, tabled in this House just before his government was defeated. The situation in regard to the other questions that he had, the list was long, if he wants to repeat them, I will try one more time to get back at them, but like I said, usually you ask one question. He asked about six on that one. So I will try to endeavour on his final supplementary.

MR. DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, it's very evident that this Minister of Finance is not prepared to be open and accountable to the public of Nova Scotia. So now I will try the Premier's integrity and he talks about integrity a lot. My final supplementary is to the Premier. The Premier claims to have an open and an accountable government. Now I want to put that to the true test. The information I want should be easily accessible by his Finance Minister, his Treasury and Policy Board Minister, or even the Premier's own deputy minister. Since this Finance Minister doesn't know where the money has been spent, will the Premier call upon his Deputy Minister of Treasury and Policy Board and instruct him to release the itemized list of restructuring money to the House this afternoon?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I've been listening to the dialogue between the two members. I did hear the Minister of Finance indicate that he would research that material and the material that's available will be provided to the member opposite. What I would say to him is that the information will be forthcoming and he knows perfectly well that that information couldn't be delivered in 32 minutes which is the remaining time in Question Period.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

SERV. N.S. & MUN. REL. - ROAD SAFETY:

FUNDING - REDUCTION EXPLAIN

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, this government made a conscious effort to stand by and watch car rate auto insurance climb. We had to drag this government down to

[Page 11244]

the URB to get some satisfaction on this matter. Meanwhile the Minister of Finance has announced with great joy that skyrocketing premiums have put an extra $7 million in this province's coffers. Despite this windfall the province has not turned any of that extra money into highway safety. In fact, the two budget areas that this money should have gone to, their budget was slashed by $5 million. I want to ask the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations why he slashed funding for road safety and all the while collecting money from auto insurance? Why did you slash those budgets?

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, we work very diligently at establishing safe highways in this province. We work with the RCMP. We're involved continuously in discussions with them. There is an ongoing effort to create a consciousness in the minds of Nova Scotians about the need to drive safely and behave safely on the province's highways.

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, we know where that money went and it didn't go to the safety of Nova Scotians, not for the driving public. I want to direct my question now to the Minister of Environment and Labour because today my office checked into the URB again and learned that companies are still raising their rates while that minister just twiddles his thumbs. Accident insurance introduced a 6 per cent increase effective November 1st of this year. That's the fifth increase they've had in one year, five increases. It did so on November 1st and so on right up to August of last year. My question to you, minister, is what are you doing to protect the public, the auto insurance premium payers in this province, what are you doing besides sitting on your backside?

[3:30 p.m.]

HON. DAVID MORSE: It's nice to see that the NDP and the government agree on one thing and the way to do this was to send the rising insurance rates to URB to get an independent arm's-length opinion on this. It was good to hear that they were supportive of our decision and we have done it, we are following through on it. They're still going through the process and we look forward to hearing the results of the deliberations. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. CORBETT: I don't know if they drive cars on Sesame Street, but I will tell you what, it was my insistence that that go to the URB, not the minister's.

The Minister of Finance is projecting the province will take in a whopping $4.3 million and counting because of insurance premiums - the average - $4.43 million - $43.3 million, anyway you say it, it's a lot of money - the average car premium in Nova Scotia has gone from $574 in 1997 to over $1,000 this year. Meanwhile the facility association which this guy is locked arm-in-arm with, is looking for a 31 per cent increase.

I recently wrote you, Mr. Minister, about one family's plight, who have to give up their car because of rising insurance rates and you didn't have the dignity to answer. So I

[Page 11245]

want to ask you, why you can't understand that sky-rocketing car and health insurance costs are causing terrible hardships on families in Nova Scotia, why don't you protect families?

MR. MORSE: As the honourable member would be aware, in addition to referring this matter to the quasi-judicial body, the URB, to get an opinion as to the appropriateness of the current rates, we also invited the industry in here to a legislative committee so that they could question them. We are meeting with our counterparts in Atlantic Canada and we are following what actions are taken in other provinces so that we can move forward once we get the report back from the URB. It's nice that the member opposite gives me the chance to show that this government is taking action on the insurance question and I appreciate once again his giving me the opportunity on behalf of the government.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

UNSM - MUNICIPALITIES:

COOPERATIVE APPROACH - DELAY EXPLAIN

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: My question is to the Premier. It is obvious that the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities is not pleased with its relationship with this provincial government. In fact, the Premier is quoted as saying that a more effective dialogue is needed between the government and the UNSM; this despite the Tory's blue book promise to have a true working partnership with municipal governments. We must remember that this government has been in office for over three years. My question to the Premier is, why is it taking more than three years to develop a cooperative approach to working with the municipalities and the UNSM?

THE PREMIER: I appreciate the question from the member. It would appear that the member has forgotten some of the successes that this government has achieved in its relationship with the UNSM. For example, when we came to power, the misdirected service exchange of 1994 had not been corrected. Small towns were suffering and our current minister developed an equalization plan that has allowed small towns and, in fact, large cities like CBRM to continue to operate and provide good services for their citizens.

I would also remind the member opposite that this government has co-operated with the federal government and municipalities to date have announced 75 projects that are part of the Canada-Nova Scotia Infrastructure Fund at a value of $120 million.

MR. BOUDREAU: I noticed the Premier didn't indicate the rural municipalities out there in this province.

My question again is to the Premier. A meeting is taking place next month between

this government and the municipal units. At this meeting, the Premier says he will work at strengthening the relationship between these two levels of government. My question to the

[Page 11246]

Premier is, what does he plan to bring to the table that will assist in developing better relations between these two levels of government?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister responsible.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question. We have worked very closely with the UNSM and if the honourable member was there last night and if he listened carefully to the President of the UNSM, he would have heard that the first part of his speech was dedicated entirely to the accomplishments that we have achieved together which the Premier referenced in his first answer and he did make reference to work that (Interruptions)

The Premier just named him in the first answer, Mr. Speaker, and the President of the UNSM also referenced the fact that we are embarking upon a process of consultation and discussion to establish a set of principles which would guide the relationship between the province and the UNSM in the future and I can tell you that members of the UNSM are looking forward to that process and they are eager to embark upon it.

MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, this government has saddled municipalities by sticking them with the costs for services not under their jurisdiction. Assessment services, education, correctional services, housing costs are just a few. The result is higher property taxes in this province. That's the result. My question is, what assurance can this Premier give to this House that the UNSM will be treated with the level of respect that it deserves and that a successful working relationship will be developed with these municipalities in this province.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the minister responsible.

MR. MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, if the honourable member, again, were to listen carefully to the comments that are being made with respect to the relationship, he would recognize that we assumed the last of the Community Services upload of $6 million last year. If he listened carefully, he would have recognized that municipalities in this province are better off by an amount of $8 million as a result of our equalization program and that rural municipalities have been red-circled and are receiving as much in equalization as they had previously. I look forward to more questions so that we can trump our record on relations with the municipalities of this province.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

SERV. N.S. & MUN. REL. - FUEL OIL:

LOW-INCOME RESIDENTS - PLANS DETAIL

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier and it is a suitable question for the day after the first winter storm of the year has blanketed Nova

[Page 11247]

Scotia. In our province, the majority of people heat with oil. This year there is a looming oil crisis, an expected jump in heating costs and thousands of Nova Scotians are barely getting by, if they are getting by at all. My question for the Premier is, what are this government's plans for helping low income Nova Scotians get through the winter?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, we have been monitoring and continue to monitor the fuel prices in this province. In the past, when there were spikes in the price of fuel, we have responded accordingly. I want to point out that the industry is also keenly aware of the changes that are out there and they have come forward with programs. For instance, you can contract ahead of time for a fixed price for fuel oil and that's being made available to consumers in this province. The fuel companies have set a minimum delivery, or lowered the minimum delivery requirement. Those are things that are in place. We will continue to monitor the situation and we're watching it very carefully.

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, I find it a little ironic that the Premier would toss this question to the minister because we learned today that the government will not have a heating fuel rebate program. So how can you have a minister responsible for a program that doesn't exist? This government's past efforts to implement a fuel rebate were failures because far too many people didn't know about it or couldn't navigate the paperwork, so take-up rates were very low. It is possible to design a system that works with the help of seniors, with the help of people on low incomes, and with the help of the industry. So my question to the Premier - not to the minister for the program that doesn't exist - is, why is this government refusing to implement the heating fuel rebate this year?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is aware that in previous winters, when prices were extremely high, the government did make a fuel rebate program available to the citizens. We will monitor the situation as we did in the past and when it is necessary for government to intervene, government will intervene.

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, that is simply not good enough. It's simply not good enough. People can't heat their homes with the government's good intentions. They can't heat their homes with the government's words. We have been advocating a fuel rebate program that works from the point of sale. It would work much better than the government's past failures because it would really reach the people who need it the most. My question to the Premier is, what will it take, under what conditions will this government do the right thing and reinstate a heating fuel rebate for those who need it the most?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the government, on a regular basis, monitors what's going on at the gas pump. We monitor what's going on relative to the cost of furnace oil. I was pleased to hear, just within the last 48 hours, that the price of crude has in fact dropped to just under $26, which is a $4 drop in recent weeks. I would hope that that will be reflected,

[Page 11248]

actually, this winter in lower fuel costs than we had dealt with two winters ago. However, it's a little too early for us to make that determination, but again I say to the member opposite, when it is necessary for this government to intervene, it does intervene.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

WCB - DORSEY REPORT:

RECOMMENDATIONS - IMPLEMENTATION UPDATE

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, a question to the Minister of Environment and Labour. I have here in my hand a copy of a report called The Nova Scotia Workers' Compensation Program. It's 390 pages long. It cost $0.5 million to produce and it took over a year to get ready. It's known as the Dorsey report, after the chairman of the body that produced it. It doesn't exactly endorse the Workers' Compensation Program. It states under the heading of Executive Summary at Page xi, "The committee found the workers' compensation program to be overly complex, highly technical, excessively legal, rigidly compartmentalized and poorly coordinated." It states at Page xii, "Today, Nova Scotia employers pay the second highest rates among Canadian provinces but the benefits paid to injured workers are the country's second lowest." Now, that volume is on file in the Legislative Library, Mr. Speaker. I trust by having quoted from it, I don't really need to table this copy because it took a lot of time to make that photostatic reproduction.

In any event, I want to ask the minister, through you, can he provide the House with an update on the implementation of the report's recommendations?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, the member refers to the Dorsey report. It was a very comprehensive document. In fact, it was the most comprehensive review of the Workers' Compensation Board, I understand, in the history of the board or at least the modern history of the board. There were multiple recommendations on the part of the committee and we have acted on the governance aspects and in terms of the insurance aspects, they have been referred to the board to come forward with the strategic plan which they are working on with the stakeholders to determine the priorities and the timetable.

[3:45 p.m.]

MR. MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I think I will depart from the prepared text at this point and get into what the minister just said. My understanding is that the board, yes, has indeed done what he said but that they require legislation to be able to implement some of those proposals, specifically with reference to supplementary benefits. I would like to ask the minister - he can indicate if it is his wish to do this - does he intend to introduce a bill at this session of the Legislature to implement at least some of the recommendations of this 390-page report?

[Page 11249]

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I am looking forward to getting the recommendations back from the Workers' Compensation Board through the chair and when I get them I will be in a position to comment.

MR. MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I trust that the gentleman that he's referring to is not the one who's in London right now for six months. I think he's the Chief Executive Officer over there. Anyway, I want to indicate that to date, the government's response to this report of 390 pages has been these four pages of press release, two press releases - one dated July 16th and the other April 16th. So every 16th, every third month they issue a two-page press release saying this is a good report and we're looking into it. I wonder if the minister could comment specifically on the fact that the Workers' Compensation Board has already passed its recommendations with respect to supplementary benefits and is looking to this government to act on those recommendations and can the minister indicate to the House whether his government will act on these supplementary benefits at this session of the Legislature? Yes or no?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for his concern about the clients of the Workers' Compensation Board, specifically the injured workers. As the member would be aware, we have been meeting with the injured workers' groups and as I indicated in my last answer to the first supplementary, I look forward to getting some guidance from the new chair, Mr. Louis Comeau and I would like to acknowledge the comments on the part of the member for Cape Breton South when asked about the appointment. On that, the Liberal Party and the Government Party completely concur. He is the right person for the job.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

EDUC. - SOUTH SHORE SCHOOLS: HELICOPTER TRIP - DETAILS

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Education. We have been informed that the Deputy Minister of Education recently took a $2,000 whirlybird whirlwind visit to troubled Barrington Municipal High School. This community has requested that the minister and her senior department officials come to Barrington, listen to the students, meet with the staff, meet with the community and learn about their troubled school. My question to the minister is, did you approve this expenditure of Helicopter Hamm as the latest improvement on Air Buchanan?

HON. JANE PURVES: Yes, Mr. Speaker, the deputy and the deputy of Transportation and Public Works and another official did take a trip to Barrington last week by helicopter to visit four separate schools in the area, not just Barrington. The deputy had been to Barrington in the Spring and we are in daily contact with the principal.

[Page 11250]

MR. ESTABROOKS: This latest helicopter trip with destinations to four schools in two Tory ridings - we have a visit to Shelburne, a visit to Yarmouth County - yet, when there's an emergency in Dominion, when there's an emergency in the riding of the NDP member for Cape Breton Centre, it's decided as a priority, there will be no one from the senior department level at that meeting. My question for the minister is, could you identify for this House the priority when it comes to the use of your senior officials of Helicopter Hamm?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, on the contrary, there was a senior department official at the school in Dominion, the person who lives up there. So there was no need for him to take a helicopter or otherwise. This House should know that aside from the issues at the school in Barrington, there are three schools in that area that had deficiencies that two deputy ministers had to have a look at, had to look at protecting $40 million of taxpayers' money. I think that trip was cheap at the price.

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Justice has told me personally, you don't have to apply through freedom of information, just ask us. The Minister of Natural Resources, in a personal, I guess, comment to me said, if you've got a problem with the pathway to the Swissair Memorial, just call me, I will give you the answer. So here's your opportunity, new Minister of Natural Resources, will you table in this House the log for the use of the helicopters that you're responsible for in the Department of Natural Resources since this government was elected in 1999, today in this House?

HON. TIMOTHY OLIVE: Mr. Speaker, I find it quite extraordinary that the honourable member would not recognize the value of the air services in the Department of Natural Resources. He talks about the amount of money that it costs to fly a helicopter, the fact is that we have a mandate to fly over many areas of the province and we take advantage of every situation we can. We take advantage whenever we can to fly over isolated areas. This flight, while providing opportunity for senior government civil servants, also provided us with an excellent opportunity to inspect sites in isolated areas of Nova Scotia that we would not otherwise have access to.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

GOV'T. (N.S.) - DEBT REDUCTION: PROMISE - BREACH EXPLAIN

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. During the last election on June 26, 1999, the Premier answered a series of questions from local newspapers where he was asked the question, will you ensure the provincial debt does not go up during your term. The reply by the Premier himself was that a Progressive Conservative Government is committed to reducing the provincial debt. Over our first four-year mandate, we will ensure the debt, that being the true debt that includes all on-book, off-book borrowing, will not - will not - increase.

[Page 11251]

In the last two years alone the Premier has added close to $300 million in new debt, including $100 million more this year alone. In fact, since we started Question Period, the debt has risen by $11,000. Mr. Premier, this is about your integrity. My question to you is, will the Premier indicate why his promise has no meaning, since he is still borrowing money?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, it is a good question, even if it comes from a former Minister of Finance who, in one year, when he was Minister of Finance increased the debt by over $1 billion. (Interruptions) What the former Minister of Finance is asking is, is this government following the financial plan that it promised the people of Nova Scotia, and absolutely. We have introduced, thank you to the Minister of Finance, the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles that have been lauded from one end of this country to the other. We have balanced the budget, and that has been verified by any number of third party agencies. We will continue that strong fiscal management to address those issues that we committed to in the election of 1999.

MR. DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, the Premier has just misspoken to this House, as he referred to jobs in Cape Breton, he has misspoken about the reality of the fiscal situation in the province, and he knows it. I can't say it's a lie, but it's certainly not a truth. (Interruptions) The Premier chooses not to answer the question. The Premier can duck his own word that he gave to Nova Scotians, but I can tell you Nova Scotians will not forget what he promised them.

Mr. Speaker, on November 28, 2001, the Premier delivered a State of the Province Address in which he said quite clearly, "We've done a lot of borrowing over the past 40 years and it's cost us - It cost us plenty . . . it's crystal clear why it has to stop." Your government continues to borrow each and every year. My supplementary question to the Premier is, what year will your government stop borrowing money for your government spending? What year, Mr. Premier, will you stop borrowing money as a government in the Province of Nova Scotia?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I'm sorry that I didn't bring some information to the House today that indicated that many others have verified that this province has in fact, in Canada, improved its financial position the past year, more than any other government in Canada. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, I wish I had brought to the House, as well, the documentation that that member continually tries to refute that indicates that this government has in fact, for the first time in 40 years, balanced the budget, something that that Minister of Finance was unable to do. (Applause)

MR. DOWNE: That's the Premier of a government that led an operating deficit in excess of $1.4 billion per year under the Buchanan/LeBlanc Government. He sits there with the gall to make a statement like he just did. The Premier's own words are that he's still

[Page 11252]

borrowing more money than he's taking in. He's spending more than he takes in and he's increasing the debt. I don't care how you want to look at it, Mr. Premier, that doesn't make sense in my household and it doesn't make sense in your household and it doesn't make sense in the household of Nova Scotians. My question to you, Mr. Premier, is (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.

Would the honourable member for Lunenburg West repeat the question only for the record, please. I believe your microphone was off. (Interruptions) The question only. (Interruptions) It was off because I called the House to order. The microphone shuts off when I call the House to order, when it gets out of control. That's why it was off.

MR. DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, my final supplementary is, this Premier knows that he can't . . .

MR. SPEAKER: The question, please. Everything else is on the record, we just need the question.

MR. DOWNE: I thought I could have a chance to bring again the reality of what he's doing. My question to the Premier is, why is the Premier not living up to his personal commitment to stop borrowing money?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I did hear the question and the question has changed. What the member does not want to debate is the fact that the way this province does its books is the way the banks do their books, the way that General Motors does its books. As a matter of fact, it does its books the way that any responsible turkey farmer does his books. We have capital expenditures that we amortize over a period of time, and we remove that amortization, we book that amortization . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please. (Interruptions)

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre. You have about 15 seconds.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Environment and Labour. Mr. Minister, we've been talking to injured workers. Louis Comeau told them that you were going to pass supplemental benefits? Where is it?

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time allotted for the Oral Question Period has expired. I have several requests for introductions.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

[Page 11253]

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, in the west gallery is a former resident of the Town of New Waterford. I believe it's fortuitous to see this gentleman in the gallery today, because his late father, Dr. Dan Nathanson, was probably one of the finest municipal administrators and mayors that this province has ever seen. I would like to have the House welcome Mr. Garth Nathanson to our gallery today. (Applause)

[4:00 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture on an introduction.

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, in the east gallery, it's my pleasure to bring the House's attention to a councillor from the Mabou-Port Hood area. Joining Mr. Jim MacLean is Margie MacInnis, also from Port Hood, and I would ask them to rise and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East on an introduction.

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, it's indeed a pleasure to be able to introduce a councillor from the Municipality of East Hants. I would like to have Daphne Goodine rise and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West on an introduction.

MR. JON CAREY: Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure today to introduce councillors from Kings County who are in Halifax for the meetings: Deputy Warden Diana Brothers, Wayne Atwater, Ted Stoddart and Chris Parker. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury on an introduction.

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to introduce some former colleagues of mine in the District of St. Mary's. We have Don Dunbar, councillor; Fred Jack, councillor; and the one who always kept a good set of books and I called her the minister of finance for St. Mary's, Helen MacDonald. (Applause)

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

[Page 11254]

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 142.

Bill No. 142 - House of Assembly Act/Elections Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise to speak on Bill No. 142, an amendment to the Elections Act. This particular piece of legislation reflects on a number of issues: number one, it reflects on the changing demographics within the Province of Nova Scotia; the changing economies within the Province of Nova Scotia; and, to a certain measure, changes within our social fabric, as we once knew it, both in urban and rural Nova Scotia. Within this particular piece of legislation there are changes that do affect the constituency of Cape Breton West, the constituency that I represent. This is not the first time that this particular constituency has seen some changes; in fact, going into the next election, it will be the third set of boundaries that I, should I be fortunate enough to have my name on the ballot, for whatever reason, would be entering into the provincial arena once again.

Ironically, just to give a little bit of a background on the constituency of Cape Breton West, it was indeed part and parcel of a constituency that encompassed the vast majority of Cape Breton Island; in fact, it stretched into the reaches of Guysborough County and was referenced at one time as being the constituency of Richmond. Through the period of time, Mr. Speaker, that particular constituency was divided, subdivided and further divided to the point where we have it today.

Just to recap back to the early 1920s until the late 1930s, for example, the community of Main-à-Dieu and part of Louisbourg were part of the constituency of Richmond when, in fact, the rest of the constituency that I represent and indeed the entire constituency of Cape Breton The Lakes were encompassed all as the constituency of Cape Breton West. It wasn't until the mid-1970s that Cape Breton West was subdivided so as to be defined as Cape Breton West, as I knew it going into the 1988 election, and Cape Breton The Lakes as we know it today.

Of course, in 1992 the constituency of Cape Breton West was further subdivided. District 19 of the old Municipality of the County of Cape Breton was severed off and placed in the adjoining constituencies of Cape Breton Nova and Cape Breton Centre and also part of District 17. Now, to understand what I mean when I reference district numbers, Mr. Speaker, within the original Municipality of the County of Cape Breton at that particular juncture there were approximately 16, 18, 20 district boundaries and I represented nine out of the 20 districts at the provincial level. So effectively 1.5 were severed off. What this

[Page 11255]

particular redistribution reflects is a further division of this constituency taking about one-half of one district again in the very populated community of Sydney River plus including part of Cape Breton The Lakes which is coming back to Cape Breton West, as well as the community of Eskasoni. It's amazing how things keep changing.

There's an old adage in life, the more things change the more they stay the same, but before I dwell on the three points for the rationale upon which this particular piece of legislation is formulated, Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to recognize the residents from Cape Breton West as it exists now. This particular constituency represents 26 communities spread over a distance of 62 miles from one end to the other on a round trip. That's a fairly significant constituency size in land mass. It's perhaps one of the larger ones in the province notwithstanding the fact that the reason for the division of the constituency, as we know it now, is to reflect the changing demographics. In Cape Breton West, as my colleague, the member for Cape Breton The Lakes, has indicated, it's one of the constituencies that really had an increase in population growth, particularly in the Sydney River and the Mira districts, two growth areas in industrial Cape Breton from a residential point of view, as well as the Coxheath-Westmount area of Cape Breton The Lakes.

So I go back to my other point and before I leave that, I wanted to recognize the residents from these 26 communities. I want to thank them for the many years that they've given me the honour of coming before this House to represent their interests. I think sometimes we come here and after, quite frankly, what I've witnessed here today, you know, your interventions on a number of occasions there during Question Period, Mr. Speaker, sometimes I wonder if the only good statesman we have is a dead politician. That's an old saying the British parliamentarians would use every time there was a little ruckus in the House. (Interruption) Mr. Speaker, yes, dead men do walk.

It's a very humbling experience, and it's perhaps one of the greatest honours that could be bestowed on any individual in Nova Scotia. When you think that we have 944,000 Nova Scotians and out of that total population 52 were selected to come and represent, reflect, defend and advance the interests and the causes of so many people, I think sometimes, whether we mean to or not, we forget that. I think it is at times like this, through this particular piece of legislation, that we do reflect on that, and when we go back to our communities, we really understand the importance of the three points that I made at the introduction of my remarks.

What we've witnessed in industrial Cape Breton, particularly in the urban core, the industrialized centres, is a collapse of the industrial economies of steel and coal, and that has had subsequent effects on the economy and the population and, indeed, the social fabric of our communities.

Mr. Speaker, the constituency boundaries have been changed because, for all intents and purposes, urban Cape Breton as we know it has collapsed, and that's the long and the short of it - we can word it any which way we want. Since the last redistribution more than

[Page 11256]

10,500 people have moved off Cape Breton Island, and that's why the redistribution. Yes, we heard speeches the other day on a number of issues relating to this. Certainly, I would argue, there's been a considerable amount of passion, and emotion in some cases - one becomes very subjective in the way they react to some of these issues. I think that was demonstrated the other evening, and I think we all recognize that.

That aside, Mr. Speaker, we're not here to try to build mini-fiefdoms for our own political self-interest. We can look at this a dozen different ways. We can go back to the days prior to 1992, the years and days before, and the outcry from any Opposition member of any Opposition Party was the government was always trying to gerrymander the boundaries to make sure that they would have a political advantage going into the election. We saw those arguments in Inverness, we saw them in other jurisdictions of Nova Scotia, and I would argue perhaps with a considerable measure of truth, but how do you put your finger on it? That's yesterday's argument.

I'm very proud of the constituency I represent. I like to think that I take my job very seriously. I like to think that the residents from Cape Breton West, when they raise an issue with me to come before this House, they raise it because they believe it's important, not just for themselves or for their community but for the best interests of the community at large, that being Cape Breton and the Province of Nova Scotia.

[4:15 p.m.]

I always argue, Mr. Speaker, it's always been my position that he who serves his community or his constituency best, he - or she - serves their province best. It is that single entity that comes together with the other 51 entities that in my view provides the best legislation of any provincial jurisdiction in this country. I know it gets rather unruly in this place at times. I know it seems pretty bizarre if you're a visitor to the gallery and you come and you see some of the antics that are carried on on the floor at any given moment, but you know something very, very unique about this place, that when all the eccentricities and the irregular behaviours, that are perceived or real, are here on the floor, when all that is said and done, the collective will comes together and I would argue against any provincial jurisdiction of this country, we get some of the best legislation. Notwithstanding the fact that there are some flaws. We see it. We get good governments on both sides.

I think the collective will, for example, with the reform of the workers' compensation system, back in 1999. That was a good effort. There were some reforms in health care over the years administered by different political stripes. That all came as a result of the fact that we had the House of Assembly Act reflecting in the best possible context the fabric of Nova Scotia as per the terms of reference that were laid out by the all-Party committee of the Legislature.

[Page 11257]

I think one can ask, is it a perfect system? I don't believe, but this is human. If we were all so perfect there would be absolutely no need for any of us to be here because we wouldn't need any laws. That's effectively one of the primary reasons for being here. So, the process - is it perfect? No, but it's a good process, it's the best process that we have. I have full confidence in that process. I have no doubts whatsoever that the nominees from the various political Parties who went into the mix, so to speak, would try to reflect their philosophies to the best possible measure that they could.

We are just not political Parties just for the sake of a group of men and women to get together and rush for a quest for power. We reflect a philosophy and a belief in how we see society, our community, our province, the administration of justice, the administration of law and how our finances of this province should be managed and there's a balancing act. So, the NDP have their philosophy, the Liberals have theirs, the Conservatives have theirs.

AN HON. MEMBER: They are ideologies, not philosophies.

MR. MACKINNON: Well, they are philosophies because you advance those ideologies and they become so ingrained sometimes they lose perspective as to really what is their blueprint. If you were to compare the ideology or the philosophy, vis-a-vis the ideology from one province to the next, you'd be absolutely astonished to find that a socialist philosophy in British Columbia would be much different than that in Nova Scotia. Or a Conservative philosophy in Ontario would be much different than that in Newfoundland. (Interruptions)

I'm not going to be bothered by the frivolous sidetracks of some of the socialist members who would rather lower the decorum and the level of debate on this very serious issue. In many cases they've done that consistently.

Mr. Speaker, this is, perhaps, one of the most profound pieces of legislation that will come before this House for years to come, because what we're seeing is a shift. We're seeing a population shift from rural Nova Scotia to urban Nova Scotia. That's why there will be one additional seat in metro Nova Scotia, essentially in and around our capital city. (Interruptions) And that's right, that's where the people are. It would just be astonishing for someone to walk down the Barrington Street or over on Woodland Road in Dartmouth or what have you or go to one of the local malls here, and you wouldn't be able to walk through one store of any mall in metro and not find someone that you know from your community back in industrial Cape Breton, whether it be Glace Bay, Sydney, Mira, North Sydney, Inverness. I'm sure it's the same if you went down to Queens, Kings, Yarmouth, Digby or Cumberland County, because the numbers reflect what's happening in Nova Scotia.

This bill is a measure of that reflection. I hear people sometimes complain, well, Halifax gets everything. We need a strong capital city to be one of the best of the best, and I believe we have it. Compare it to any other jurisdiction. I compare Halifax much to Ottawa and to Vancouver. They seem to have about the same symmetries, if I could be so bold to

[Page 11258]

extrapolate that reference point. I think we can grow and we can build on the success of metro Nova Scotia, we really can. We can't always complain about what happened yesterday, Mr. Speaker. We can't, and to expect that to change anything within this particular piece of legislation is living in a dream world. That's a fool's paradise.

We also have to recognize that in rural Nova Scotia, we have an aging population for the most part. The age demographics across Nova Scotia reflect that. In metro Nova Scotia, which is effectively HRM, we have the younger population, the majority. In rural Nova Scotia, we have an aging population. The needs and the issues for those individuals have to be looked at, they have to be addressed and they have to be constantly in the forefront. That's why, despite the fact that we see our children and our children's children move away from our birthplace, we can take pride that they are now contributing to the growth of one of the greatest cities in this country.

Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 142, in my view, is a bit of a watershed piece of legislation, because we can look at each and every member in this Legislature and behind every face that represents a constituency there is a story. There is a story of stories; there is a history, a deep, rooted, unique history that is unparalleled in any other constituency. That uniqueness, ironically, is what comes together and what makes us so strong, because of this democratic process that we have here in Nova Scotia. I have a lot of sadness when I see what's happening in industrial Cape Breton and, indeed, right across rural Nova Scotia, because things are changing. It's amazing how we can put a man on the moon, but we can't look after hungry children who are sleeping in the streets of Barrington and Spring Garden Road. It's amazing how we can write a letter and have it delivered in Japan or Korea or Germany within 20 seconds, but yet we can't grapple with the deficit and the debt of this province the way we would like to and the way we should be able to.

Will Bill No. 142 in any measure help to reflect that? I hope it will because every time there's an election there's a considerable turnover, there's a renewal of talent in this Legislature and, as a rule - I think there are senior members to myself in this House who could correct me on that - I think the life expectancy of a provincial politician is six and a half, seven years on average. I would say seven years. I don't know if it's because seven years brings bad luck, if that's where it came from, or vice versa, but the fact of the matter is - maybe I'll go with the six figure, I don't want to be ominous for some people - the life expectancy is not very long so we have to ensure a continuum of that experience and wealth of knowledge that's built up over the years that sometimes is lost when long-serving members with considerable experience leave this House.

I look in the House presently, and I know the Minister of Transportation and Public Works has probably forgotten more about issues on the floor the Legislature than three-quarters of all the new members will ever consider or remember. The member for Sackville-Cobequid, the member for Cape Breton Nova - this is absolutely invaluable - we may not agree with their philosophy, we may not agree with their politics, but I think I would be remiss if I say, well, I don't know if I would fear to miss the rather spirited debates that

[Page 11259]

we've had over the years, particularly between myself and the member for Sackville-Cobequid, but that day will come and we, to a certain measure, irrespective of our political differences, we have an obligation to make sure that new members that come into this House are taught the Rules of the House, are ensured that the history and the precedents, the rules and the laws that are here are provided for them to absorb and to be able to ensure that history and tradition of what makes Nova Scotia as good as it is, is forthcoming and continued.

Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 142 is just one step in that continuum, because we've also seen changes in the Elections Act. It will be the first time in the history of Nova Scotia that there will be no proxy votes - I'm not so sure how many people really understand the implications of that - that coupled with the fact that the time for an election campaign has been shortened. Now, you consider the amount of time that will be allowed for individuals to access these so-called mail-in ballots. There is a process, I would think it would be a rigid process. I hope it won't be like in Florida where all these questions will come into focus after the fact.

MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: No hanging chads here.

MR. MACKINNON: Well, the member for Preston says no hanging chads here, but there's still a chance under that process for manipulation, I would argue - there certainly is. All you have to do is go back to the 1930s when Harrington had his rather unusual election, when all the people who didn't have their names on the voters' list were precluded from voting. This would have a similar impact, because now we're going to certain registries to ensure that people's names are on the voters' list. For example, the last federal voting list or the last registry from certain municipalities or the 911 list, or what have you.

[4:30 p.m.]

I can foresee a lot of problems with that. I can see that is going to be a problem, and this particular piece of legislation will be an issue of concern because of what happened in the last election here in metro Nova Scotia, with the concerns about returning officers and proxy votes and so on, when people didn't have their names on the list. People won't be able to mail in their ballots if they don't have their name on the voters' list, that's one of the requirements.

There will be a considerable number of individuals who won't be able to participate in the election through no fault of their own. There will be selected enumeration, and it will be a rather unique process. That's why, Mr. Speaker, Bill No. 142 will offer some rather modern challenges as to how we run elections in this province. The power of the vote - I've heard one commission member make the argument that in the last election voters in Victoria County had the equivalency voting power twice that of urban Nova Scotia. I think that is not correct in the full context.

[Page 11260]

You have to live in rural Nova Scotia to appreciate the unique challenges that are before the people. I am sure the Minister of Tourism and Culture knows, down through Inverness and St. Joseph du Moine and Cheticamp, Grand Etang, all those places, the challenges there are very unique. If, for example, for whatever reason, in one poll or two or three streets in one of those villages, names happened to be excluded because for whatever reason they didn't show up in the 911 list, and there were 25 or 30 people who couldn't get out to vote and they wanted to do a mail-in ballot, they couldn't do it.

They can't do it, because the time factor for that registration to be able to get that mail-in ballot is so tight, it's so restricted, the time factor is too short. First of all the time for an election has been reduced down to 30 days, and the distribution of those mail-in ballots won't be for - and I do stand to be corrected - somewhere around three weeks prior to the election. You can just imagine the problems that would be incurred in rural Nova Scotia. Urban Nova Scotia, a little different. That can be handled because you only have to walk, put your shoes on and walk for five minutes and you're at the point of resolve. Whereas if you're in Cumberland County or Digby or Gabarus, you have to gas up and you have to drive for half an hour.

There will be some challenges, and that will disadvantage rural Nova Scotia even more. So that suggestion about the power of the vote in Victoria County being worth twice that of urban Nova Scotia, I don't agree with that. But then again, that's one commissioner's point of view and I respect that. I don't agree with it, but I can understand, perhaps, that commissioner was raised in an urban environment so that would be all that he would know, and I appreciate that.

Mr. Speaker, what this particular piece of legislation also reflects are the changing economies. For example, on the Island of Cape Breton, which the members from the Canso Causeway to Scatarie Island would well know, there has been considerable job losses over that period of time, and just in the last three years we have lost a lot of employment in Cape Breton. How do we compensate for that? We need this strong urban core. We need it to be able to compete, not just here in Nova Scotia or nationally, because we only represent, nationally, 2 per cent of the total population. So you can well imagine what happens when we cross over the American border down to the New England States and then over into the European market, we are, in many cases, 2 per cent of 2 per cent of various factors.

Mr. Speaker, I heard the member for Halifax Chebucto suggest that we shouldn't be questioning the information in this particular commission's report, but rather coming in and ratifying that particular commission's report. Well, that completely defeats the whole intent of what the legislative process is for, because it's only a report, it's a recommendation to the Legislature and he knows that. A man with a legal background sitting in this Legislature as a policy-maker, as a lawmaker, coming in and saying that we should not debate the merit of a report, a recommendation, albeit that it's supposed to be an independent report, I mean that's absolutely silly, but sometimes that's what you get; you get silly comments from silly thought processes.

[Page 11261]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I wonder if the member would allow for an introduction, please.

MR. MACKINNON: Yes, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury on an introduction.

MR. RONALD CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for giving me the time to do this introduction. In the west gallery are two councillors from the Town of Mulgrave. We have Mr. Lorne MacDonald and Mr. Bill Hemmings, and they're in town to take in the UNSM meetings. I would ask the House to give them a warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, for example, I will tell you why I would question one of the recommendations in the commission's report, and it's not to be critical of the report per se. For example, in the new constituency boundaries of Cape Breton West, where part of the constituency that now exists from the Trans Canada into the original old City of Sydney boundaries, has been transferred over and included in the constituency of Cape Breton South, and Cape Breton West picks up part of Cape Breton The Lakes - Northside, East Bay and Eskasoni - and that's fine, but it also includes, over in the Grand Lake Road district, a small number of homes that are completely isolated from the rest of the constituency. I believe perhaps a half dozen homes, which are, effectively, on the Grand Lake Road district which is right centred in the constituency of Cape Breton Nova. So why wouldn't they be left there. In my view, other than the fact that they were just looking to get the numbers to match the terms of reference of the plus or minus factor, it makes, from my perspective, not good sense to have these half a dozen families or so completely isolated from their next door neighbour. I could see if there was another constituency or another subdivision or something where there was a lot of interaction, but there isn't, it's just pocketed right out. It's just like somebody went in and cut a little hole in your jacket. It just doesn't seem to make any sense.

That would be the only critique that I would have. It's not because I wouldn't appreciate having them come back into the constituency of Cape Breton West, because they were all in the constituency at one time, but if you're going to put just a small handful in, you're better off putting the whole street on, not just half a dozen, because they're completely isolated. It just doesn't seem to make any sense.

Mr. Speaker, there will be, as a result of Bill No. 142, significantly important changes in the way public policy will be derived here in the Province of Nova Scotia. It will be changed quite significantly because the community of interest will change quite considerably as well, because there will be 25 out of 52 constituencies or members from metro Nova

[Page 11262]

Scotia. The interest of metro Nova Scotia, when in conflict with other parts of Nova Scotia, can be easily addressed. It's a numbers game. I hate to use that analogy, but this is a numbers business and the majority rules. We have to respect that, that's the democratic process, because, without that, what do we have? We have anarchy. (Interruptions)

Mr. Speaker, I'm just not going to go with the silly comments from the member for Preston, because he's not adding anything constructive to a rather serious issue. He will have a full hour to debate this issue. I'm not interested, at this juncture, in frivolous sidebars. What we are witnessing here today, with Bill No. 142, and I will stand by these comments, is perhaps one of the most profound pieces of legislation that will change the fabric of Nova Scotia for generations. (Interruptions) Yes, Mr. Speaker, I've always taken questions from my colleagues.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Preston with a question for the honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. DAVID HENDSBEE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the honourable member for Cape Breton West, he was talking earlier about the abandonment of having proxy votes and now having the mail-in ballot process, would the member not agree that with the mail-in process it gives a greater opportunity for those voters in an area to cast their ballot when they're not available to cast their ballot on a regular voting day? A lot of times we have had so many people who either had work commitments or vacations and could not participate. The mail-in ballot process gives them that opportunity. Would the member have an answer to that question?

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I will allow the question, but I'm giving a great deal of latitude here regarding relevance to what we're supposed to be debating. Order, please. I said I will allow the question.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I can only speak from experience. I will answer it in that context and try to come back right in on Bill No. 142.

There is equal opportunity both with the proxy vote and the mail-in ballot. It's been demonstrated with the mail-in ballot that there's a greater opportunity for improper conduct. I will leave it there. There is greater opportunity for manipulation in many respects. Rather than sidebar at this point, I will certainly agree to speak with the member directly after I finish my speech. I will give him numerous examples of why I think that is so.

[Page 11263]

[4:45 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, with regard to what's happening with this particular piece of legislation, as we know throughout rural Nova Scotia - let's look at the Annapolis Valley, and there are some growth centres in the Valley, particularly in Kings County. But we're also noticing that the family farm is in jeopardy as well. The farms have to get larger, and there are less farms in the agricultural community for them to be able to sustain that way of life. Will modern technology be able to revitalize parts of rural Nova Scotia such as down through Kings and Annapolis Counties and other parts of western Nova Scotia? We don't know, and we don't know how that issue will be addressed in future years when you know that the demographics are shifting quite critically. So all the more reason to make sure that there's that interconnection between urban and rural Nova Scotia.

When the policy decision was made several years back to focus on the buildup of urban Nova Scotia, we look back 10 years and we ask ourselves, did we not look at the other side of the equation, what the significant impact would be on rural Nova Scotia? Look at Cumberland County. Cumberland County has many, many challenges. I know the Minister of Natural Resources, for example, in the last number of months the province has acquired considerable pieces of prime real estate for the preservation and the history and the future of our province, and a whole lot of reasons.

If you go across rural Nova Scotia where there are seniors' concerns on Pharmacare and nursing homes, where there are lot of challenges on roads and infrastructure, they're saying, how is it that we have millions of dollars to spend on recreational lands and we don't have enough to be able to fix the roads so we can drive to work. These are the challenges that urban Nova Scotia has to come to understand. That doesn't detract from the importance of that policy decision, but it certainly brings into focus what Bill No. 142 will do; it changes the emphasis, the dynamics of how we think about the entire province, and it's not easy.

When you come here as a member, your first and foremost concern is to protect the interests and advance the causes and put forth, before this Legislature and your colleagues, the concerns that come from your constituency, Mr. Speaker. And even when you become a Minister of the Crown, although you have that provincial responsibility, you're constantly at a struggle with yourself to try to meet both of those responsibilities, and it's not easy. Yes, you have the benefit of having staff within a department, sometimes a very effectively-operating department and you have a ministerial executive assistant, but, as an MLA, people want to see you and they want to know you're there and they want to feel that they can reach out and be able to touch you - metaphorically - and that you are accessible to them in a real sense.

I'm sure that if the member for Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury couldn't go down to Canso to listen to the concerns of the people in the Town of Canso, it wouldn't take long for him, if he were to miss one or two meetings, regardless of whether he was able to achieve anything or not, the perception would become the reality and the reality would be, he doesn't

[Page 11264]

care. It doesn't matter. You see, Mr. Speaker, these are the challenges that we sometimes forget. That's right, you would have to pull a bag over your head just to be able to drive through that community on a future day. These are tough issues, they're tough issues because they are major issues for rural Nova Scotia but are also major issues for urban Nova Scotia. The Kyoto Protocol, we all know down through the Valley, all the drought problems that we're having, we know that in the forestry industry the effects of greenhouse gases and then the arguments about sinks and sewers and all that sort of stuff, we know that we've had considerable problems there. The conflicts that that will have with the energy industry and how that will be a competing interest when the future leaders sit down at the table to decide what policies will be put in place.

These are the issues that we have to reflect on when we vote on Bill 142. It's not for ourselves for today or whether we're going to be secure running in the next election. Forget about all that, this is only but a moment in time for us, our presence in this Legislature. We have an obligation to look into the future and to make sure that the terms of reference and the legislative framework and all the tools to get the job done are in place for those who will come back to this Legislature after the next election. That's what I'm concerned about.

We also have the issues on education. I know the Minister of Education has competing interests. The concerns in rural Nova Scotia are much different than urban Nova Scotia. Yet in many respects they're much the same and they are the same because the objective and the principles upon which our educational system is founded are the same, they have to be. Some of the senior members would remember reports that came before this Legislature such as the Graham Royal Commission Report on Education, the Walker Commission and so on. That's the type of issue that will come back to the forefront on a future day because somewhere between what the minister's policy is today and what it was back during the Regan Administration will be, in my view, the resolve.

The problem for urban versus rural Nova Scotia is, will the funding be appropriate. When the competing interests from urban Nova Scotia sit down knowing that they have 25 out of 52 before the debate even starts, we have to ensure that the future generation of leaders for this province understand the significance and how it will negatively, and I emphasize negatively, impact on urban Nova Scotia if the concerns of rural Nova Scotia are not met.

We've been very fortunate over the years that on balance that has taken place. We've seen some good government in this province and we've seen some pretty rugged government. I would argue that the Harrington Government back in the 1930s was perhaps one of the worst when it comes to following the, well I'll leave it at that because anyone who is really interested will go read the history books at the library.

In terms of financial management I would have to say the Buchanan Administration was the worst. It had to be because look at the situation. Then again you also have to consider the dynamics of the times. People wanted governments to spend money and they spent money and they probably spent money recklessly in many regards without proper

[Page 11265]

accountability. It's easy, yes and federally too. It's an accountability process that we have to ensure for the next generation.

Whether we will be able to meet those demands by ensuring that Bill 142 is the best possible legislation coming before this House for our approbation, is something that we have to carefully consider. I've seen members of the Legislature reading the redistribution maps with great anticipation because - you know all three Parties were, I'm sure, and I can say mea culpa here because I'm probably just as guilty - it's a political instinct. You want to see what your chances are in the next election and that's a natural instinct, but when you get beyond that, Mr. Speaker, the duty and the obligation that we hold here is one of the reasons that we now have to rely in part on such bodies as the Electoral Boundaries Commission because they help to guide us on that path to making sure that Nova Scotian's interests are reflected in a fair and equitable fashion.

[5:00 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I realize my time is pretty well coming to a close. I do want to again recognize and express my appreciation to the people of Cape Breton West who have shown their confidence in me in four consecutive provincial elections and some of them with rather considerable support. I know in one election I was fortunate enough to win 60 out of 60 polls, and as a rule I usually won - with the other three elections - on average, 50 out of 60 polls. (Interruption) That's right, it may be 55 out of 55, as the Minister of Health just suggested, but it's not for me to predict what people will do, and I think it would be foolhardy as politicians to think that we can dictate what a person's will is and what they want and who they want to represent them.

Mr. Speaker, there's one thing I found in political life in this Legislature, particularly over the last three and a half years, especially when we go outside this Chamber when we're scrummed by the media and all those who like to criticize the politicians on both sides of the House, and that is I found that it's much easier to be critical than it is to be correct, and I think when we remember that we'll reflect on the fact that the obligation for us to make sure that this bill, Bill No. 142, is the best . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Could I ask the members, please, just to refrain from their private conversations in the Chamber. The member for Cape Breton West has three minutes left.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I can appreciate honourable members carrying on some of these discussions, because I think we may have stimulated some of them into wanting to get up and speak on Bill No. 142. I can see the enthusiasm in their faces as they rifle through this particular piece of legislation and say hey, there's a point of view there that I never thought of, and I'm sure the members in the Progressive Conservative caucus, especially from rural Nova Scotia, would want to rise to their feet and participate in this debate, and some of the urban members, particularly some of the Cabinet Ministers, would

[Page 11266]

like to allow the people of Nova Scotia to be able to hear what they have to say on Bill No. 142, because I think what we are setting here in this session of the Legislature is a blueprint for the future; it's a blueprint on how our province will be governed.

Just to think that it's just moving boundaries around is what we're doing for the sake of people moving from one community to the next, that doesn't even come close to what the real issue is. It's not even close. What's happening here is far more profound, and it has an impact. I know the member down the Eastern Shore, on a number of previous days, has expressed those concerns. I'm sure his concerns will be reflected today and in future days.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I thank you for the opportunity to speak on this particular piece of legislation and I look forward to moving it on to the Law Amendments Committee and, eventually, return to the House. I have no problems, I certainly will be supporting this legislation.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it's with a great deal of pleasure that I stand in my place to speak for a bit on Bill No. 142, House of Assembly Act/Elections Act. As other members of our caucus have indicated, we will be supporting this legislation.

I listened with interest to the former speaker who made a statement that I completely agree with, that we're here for a moment in time. This is probably not going to be - if you look at the probability based on statistics, people won't be here forever and ever, but we have an obligation to look to the future. (Interruptions) The Minister of Health says, absolutely. He's probably one of the people whose moment the clock is ticking on - tick, tick, tick. That's fine by us, Mr. Speaker.

The Electoral Boundaries Commission has done its job, and I think it's important to thank the members of the Electoral Boundaries Commission. They had a difficult task in many ways. I think we would all agree that it's always difficult when you introduce change to the electoral system in our province. I think, because we all represent constituencies that we care about and we come to know fairly extensively, we all feel our constituencies, as they are currently constituted, are unique and have their own features that are important to preserve and have recognized and what have you. Certainly that's sometimes the sentiments that an Electoral Boundaries Commission will be up against as they are given the task of trying to decide how to redefine electoral boundaries and bring forward a proposal that is fair and that will be acceptable to the people in the province.

I had an opportunity to go to one of the Electoral Boundaries Commission's meetings when it was here in the HRM with other members from my constituency of Halifax Needham. The person who spoke on behalf of Halifax Needham at that presentation talked a bit about the North End of Halifax or a constituency that people perceive to be the North End of Halifax, but which, realistically, is much more than the North End of Halifax. It's a

[Page 11267]

constituency that is bounded by Windsor Street where, the first time I ran in 1984, the boundary was Robie Street. So, it takes in now a chunk of centre of Halifax Peninsula.

With the changes that are being proposed here, Halifax Needham will extend its southern boundaries into a small area of Halifax that is currently, until this legislation passes, in the Minister of Education's Halifax Citadel constituency. I believe that in reconstituting Halifax Needham in this way, I probably will become the MLA in this House that has the most number of MLAs living in her constituency, because in addition to my colleague, the member for Halifax Chebucto who currently lives in Halifax Needham, and the Minister of Education who currently lives in Halifax Needham, I believe that quite a number of members in the Chamber who maintain residences here for when the House is in session and when they're here doing business in the various caucuses, they probably also will be in Halifax Needham. It will be my privilege to represent all of your views, and I'm sure if I don't do a good job I will hear about that. Thank heavens quite a few of you won't be voting in Halifax Needham in the next election. (Laughter)

Mr. Speaker, I wanted to take this time, though, not to talk so much about the process of the electoral boundaries or even to talk about the uniqueness of my constituency, which I believe is very unique and I feel a great deal of pride and privilege in being able to represent this area, but I really wanted to talk about the things that we as legislators need to be thinking about beyond the redrawing of geographic lines in terms of improving our democratic process and representative democracy. This is a very good time, I think, to think about what are the other kinds of changes that will be required to make our system work better.

I think central to the whole idea of making our system work and making it fair has been this idea of equal weight of electors - one person, one vote - the idea that a wealthy person's vote is no greater or no more important than the vote of a poor person. We have to ask ourselves to what extent does our system really do this. On some level our system does do this, but in a variety of ways our system doesn't address that really important principle. It certainly doesn't address that really important principle if you look at the reality, for example, that in areas of low income, the actual level of participation in elections is getting smaller and smaller all the time. People aren't voting. The geographic redefinition of constituencies does not really address the very important question of making our democracy work and making it fair with respect to this problem, which I think is a problem that we can all at least accept the existence of.

Mr. Speaker, when we look around the Chamber, we have to ask ourselves how representative is this democracy right now. I say this not to reflect on any individual or any political Party. We're all here, we're all elected, we've all faced our electors, and we will do it again with respect to whether or not people in our constituencies think we've done a good job and whether they feel we're worthy of re-election. Really, how representative are we of the province? We may be representative of the province geographically, but we all know that we are not representative of the province in relation to the actual population of this province.

[Page 11268]

We have a number of things that we have to think about and we have to confront and we have to find ways to deal with, with respect to the lack of real representation of our province in our elected Chamber. This is not a new idea. The whole question, for example, of the major failure of our Legislature, and indeed other Legislatures and Parliaments with respect to the representation of women, is a very serious issue.

Historically, I think there have been less than 14 or 15 women ever elected in the history of Nova Scotia and while we've failed to be very representative with respect to the gender diversity in our Legislature, it's not a peculiar situation, it's a situation that exists right across the country. However, the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women, as you probably know, has done a bit of research on the situation and they have found that Nova Scotia, in fact, has the worst record in the country with respect to women's representation in electoral politics and being elected in the provincial Legislature. In the last six or eight months, they have embarked on a process of trying to meet with women in small groupings around the province to generate some discussion and actually encourage women to get involved in the electoral process - municipally, provincially, federally - as candidates, in the hope that we can make a difference, or that this process can make a difference in the actual representation of women in provincial Legislatures.

I want to take the opportunity, obviously, to applaud the advisory council for taking on this very important task. This is something that we will have to continue to work on if we really want the Legislature to reflect more than the geographic areas where people live, but to also bring different kinds of experiences and perspectives into our Legislature.

Mr. Speaker, another area where we need to make some dramatic change, I think, is with respect to the representation of race and ethnicity in our Legislature and here in the Chamber. We are a province that has three Acadian constituencies, three protected seats - Richmond, Clare and Argyle - and I think it's a matter of a pride for most, if not all Nova Scotians and certainly members of this Chamber, that we have such fine representatives, quite frankly, of Acadian ethnicity who are here representing those constituencies. We also have some fine Acadian representation that isn't representing a protected seat in the person of the honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

Mr. Speaker, this is a Chamber that is really lacking in representation both from the Aboriginal community and from the African-Nova Scotian community in terms of having people from these backgrounds represented in the Legislature, speaking from the perspective of someone who has lived an African-Nova Scotian experience, who has lived an Aboriginal experience. I don't say this to demean, or diminish in any way, people who are here in the Legislature, who genuinely represent and work hard to understand and to bring the concerns and the issues from those communities forward. But it's not the same as it would be if you had people who actually lived the experience and could bring the voices directly to this Legislature from that lived experience.

[Page 11269]

[5:15 p.m.]

This is another way of looking at how you organize your representative democracy so that it actually is representative. The geography once again is not the only criteria that we use. We could go on, we could look at the fact that we haven't had, in the history of the province as far as I know, a member here in this Legislature who is visually impaired, or a member from the deaf community, although we certainly have had members with disabilities.

I think that, once again, we should in the coming years turn our attention to how we can improve the representation of people in this province by having means to ensure that the diversity of the province is actually represented in the Chamber. I think this would be a goal that may not be something that you can achieve quickly, but it's certainly a laudable goal and wouldn't it be wonderful if this Chamber actually was more representative of the province than it is right now.

If you speak with people in these various groups that I've named - women, African-Nova Scotian, disabled people - they will tell you that the situation as it's currently constituted, the current system as it's structured is structured in a way that presents many barriers to their participation. They believe - I think members of this group believe and so do many members of the public generally - that the time has come for us here and people in the community to grapple with the need for real change. Real democratic change.

My fear is that if we don't take up the need for real fundamental democratic change to ensure greater diversity of representation, if we fail to address this important issue, then the result will be even greater dissatisfaction with electoral politics. Even greater dissatisfaction with our present system. If that occurs, the whole system becomes endangered of losing its legitimacy in the public. If the public loses its trust and its faith in representative democracy, then we will all be much worse off - I don't think there's any question about it.

As we approach Remembrance Day and we're all here wearing poppies and if you talk to the veterans, they will tell you about their fight on behalf of Nova Scotians and Canadians. They fought for representative democracy. They fought for a multiple Party system. They were fighting a one-Party state in terms of fascism. We can't forget that. We cannot forget what that fight was fundamentally about.

Although the Electoral Boundaries Commission, in terms of their terms of reference and their mandate, were asked to look at the geography and the population of the province and some other issues around the protected seats in the Preston area and in Acadian communities, there are other ways that we can go in terms of addressing the issues I've raised here. Of course, one of those ways is if we move to a system of proportional representation. While proportional representation does not offer a panacea in terms of the issues I've raised, they certainly are an approach or a way of addressing representative democracy that captures a way to better represent the diversity of ideas, viewpoints and perspectives that exist in any given electoral jurisdiction.

[Page 11270]

Mr. Speaker, there are two excellent Web sites that people may be interested in looking at to find out more about proportional representation. In August 2002 in Canada there was the launch of a new organization called Fair Vote Canada. It was founded with a view that it would provide citizens, community leaders and activists with an organizational framework to build a campaign for proportional representation in the voting system in Canada. If you go to the Internet and you type in fairvotecanada.org, you can get information on it - and I will table this - and you can find out how you can get involved and what's involved in proportional representation.

Mr. Speaker, there's another Web site that gives a very good working outline and definition on what proportional representation actually is and it's an American Web site also called fairvotecanada.org, and this particular Web site points out that proportional representation is well established in more than 41 democracies across the world and is being very highly rated by human rights organizations for a number of reasons.

Canada, the United States and Great Britain are actually three countries that cling to this old system of first past the post where the person with the most votes, even though they don't constitute a majority, takes all, the idea being that you can go ahead and implement your agenda even if you don't have a majority, or even if you have a small majority you don't have to take into consideration the viewpoints of the minority, not unlike the situation we have right now in this House of Assembly where you have two Opposition Parties who combined in the last election, secured 60 per cent of the popular vote in the province, but the governing Tories with 40 per cent of the popular vote have formed the government. So essentially 40 per cent of the population elected the government that is now behaving as if it had 100 per cent of the support of the people of the province.

Proportional representation, Mr. Speaker, would challenge a government's ability to do that with respect to the way the allocation of representation would occur and it means that there is a greater possibility for other voices to be heard and other perspectives to have to be taken into consideration. Proportional representation would mean that smaller political Parties would actually have an opportunity to develop their agendas, to bring them forward, and to find their place in an elected Assembly where they would be able to participate in this process and have their viewpoint represented.

It's a system that is not perfect by any stretch of the imagination. There are more than one form of proportional representation, but they're very well-established democratic processes that are now operating in many parts of the world - in Australia, New Zealand, in the European countries, in the Scandinavian countries and so on, Mr. Speaker. This is certainly something that we need to learn more about, we need to have more public discussion about and more debate around. With the growing desire on the part of the electorate and citizens, generally, in our province, we need to respond to their wishes that we try to find ways to improve the system that we have so that it works better for everyone and not only for certain people.

[Page 11271]

Mr. Speaker, I'm not going to take much more of the House's time with this particular issue. I would like to say that I'm looking forward to the Law Amendments Committee process. I understand that there are some small pockets of dissatisfaction with the actual lines that have been drawn in parts of the province. I think, in fairness, to people from communities that have been affected, we need to very respectfully and carefully listen to what they have to say because, after all, this redrawing of the boundaries is something that we will all have to live with for 10 years, which is quite a significant period of time.

I want to say, in thinking about my own constituency, Mr. Speaker, which upon completion of this process and the passing of the report of the Electoral Boundaries Commission, Halifax Needham will be, at the moment of passing of this legislation, the second-largest seat in the province, I believe, if my memory serves me right. Mr. Speaker, we are a constituency that although compact geographically, is very dense in terms of population, and building continues to occur in my constituency. The diversity of issues and the challenges that an MLA faces in adequately communicating with, and reflecting the interests and the viewpoints of people in that part of Halifax, are considerable.

This is a constituency where it may not take much to drive from one end to the other, Mr. Speaker, but certainly you can go from the inner city of Halifax Needham, where, if you read the news, you know there are many issues, complex and difficult issues, that people are grappling with; you can leave that community and go to another part of the constituency where the issues are significantly different. You have to practically have a complete change in your thinking, because even the language, in some ways, shifts, because the concerns, the culture, many things are different. It represents a significant challenge even though it's in a small geographic area.

Mr. Speaker, I frankly wonder what the situation will be in 10 years' time for Halifax Needham in terms of the population in that community if the trend continues; the population trend, the trend that that constituency will continue to grow in the next 10 years, and we're already pretty well at the threshold for how large a constituency should be, then I think that whoever the MLA is in 10 years' time - perhaps it will be me, perhaps it will be somebody else, I really can't say at this stage - I think that it represents a significant challenge. Right now the number of electorates, based on the electoral boundaries report, is over 15,000 electors, and I can see that in 10 years' time the number of electors in that seat could be considerably higher than that if the current trends continue in terms of increases in population.

[5:30 p.m.]

Many people think that there isn't the possibility for much growth in a constituency like Halifax Needham, but I assure you that as you come across the new bridge and you see new housing being built on the old CN lands and you see a new development happening up where the oil tanks were - I think they were the Gulf Oil refinery tanks - overlooking the Halifax Shipyards up near the Narrows, then there are plenty of places inside my

[Page 11272]

constituency where residential development can still occur, and will still occur, because all along the waterfront is prime land, and certainly many people and families would like to be on the peninsula and close to the downtown, and we're seeing a real renaissance and revitalization and much development.

Mr. Speaker, I do worry a bit about what will occur and the degree to which this constituency will fall far beyond the 0.25 size of an average constituency in Nova Scotia. However, having said that, I recognize the limitations - not the limitations, the challenges - that the Electoral Boundaries Commission faced in trying to accommodate all of the various factors that they had to figure into the redrawing of the boundaries. So I'm sure that the people who are concerned will have an opportunity to come to the Law Amendments Committee and say their piece. As this bill goes forward it certainly will have my support. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I believe under the Rules of the House that there is an hour for each member . . .

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. If the honourable member would allow me, I wanted to wait until the previous speaker finished her speech. Earlier during Question Period, the member for Cape Breton Centre made reference to my not responding to a letter that he sent me. As I try to be quite conscientious in responding to letters from all Nova Scotians, including the member for Cape Breton Centre, I wanted to bring to the attention of this House, and the member - and if the member disagrees with anything I say, I would invite him to stand up and speak.

Anyway, the purpose for this, Mr. Speaker, is to say that in fact the letter just came today. It was dated October 31st, it was with regard to the insurance matter, and it was actually received on November 7th, delivered to the House this afternoon, and I think the member would have known that a one-week turnaround period from the point of time of mailing a letter to expecting a receipt, it's not reasonable to be one week. It was addressed to the Hon. David Morse, Minister responsible for the Utility and Review Board, and then the salutation says, Dear Premier Hamm, which may have also slowed it down. I would like to table that and bring that to the member's attention.

MR. SPEAKER: Obviously that's not a point of order, it's a clarification of the facts for the House.

The honourable member for Cape Nova has the floor.

MR. MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I bring greetings to you from the great constituency of Cape Breton Nova. I would like to say with reference to this bill and some of the debate that's taken place on it and some of what's in it and the fact that in the Liberal Party there's

[Page 11273]

a free vote permitted on this bill and members can vote their consciences. It is not my intention to support this bill and I want to explain to you some of the reasons why.

In the first place, I ask the question of, what is going on here? We all know that there's a general preparation for a provincial election being undertaken by the Tories, by the NDP and yes, by also the Liberals, that is where we're at. In baseball if a pitcher is getting ready to throw the ball there's a phase called wind-up and we're in the wind-up phase here. This is being delivered as part of the electoral wind-up of the government and of their NDP partners, which is why you will find the two of them in solid coalition. I was warned not to compare that to the Molotov-Ribbentrop alliance of 1939, but I mention that in passing, that I was warned not to compare the PC-NDP coalition to that particular alliance, notorious as it was. So, I must compare it to something else. I must compare it perhaps to simply a meeting of like minds because we all know that this government is in power because of the NDP, because of what they did in the years 1998 and 1999. So, the alliance continues and its deeds continue to unfold.

Here they have a government bill introduced by the Minister of Justice, presented as a piece of government legislation which the NDP are only too happy to say, yes us too, we support that. As our friend from Halifax Chebucto said, because it is the right thing to do. New definition of the word right. I don't subscribe to it. I believe in democracy. I believe in the right of members of this House to debate legislation, and yes also to oppose legislation if they don't agree with it. If they don't agree with it either in content or in terms of timing because I would agree with the last speaker, who I think is an excellent speaker and speaks from the heart.

AN HON. MEMBER: Is that from your previous Party affiliation?

MR. MACEWAN: No, she wasn't in it at that time, that's perhaps why it went down the wrong path. (Laughter)

I might say that you could agree with the content of the bill but not agree with the implementation of it as part of a pre-election warm-up, that's what I take exception to. I'm not opposed to the boundaries that are in the bill necessarily. I don't oppose them in terms of my own constituency or in terms of other ridings. Although I'm very unhappy about the Cape Breton The Lakes situation. I'm very unhappy about the Lunenburg situation. I'll get to that as I get warmed up. I just want to say, I'm not against these boundaries, but I'm against the electoral map being manipulated as part of a pre-election warm-up, that's what I'm against. I think that if we had any common sense, may I say, we would delay the implementation of these recommendations until after the next provincial election has been completed and then . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Oh, come on.

[Page 11274]

MR. MACEWAN: I have a right to express my views, sir. You do too, get up on your feet and express them. Then there would be adequate time for all political Parties and the infrastructure necessary for running an election to get things properly done and produce good results. We all know that if you change the electoral map on Tuesday and call an election on Wednesday that on Thursday you're going to have absolute and total chaos. I trust that even the NDP would agree with that, maybe even some Tories. I don't think they really intend to do it because they have a clause in this bill - I know we can't debate clause by clause in second reading, but we can debate the principle of the bill, and one of the biggest principles of any piece of legislation is implementation, when does it come into effect?

Does it come into effect on Royal Assent? Does it come into effect by being proclaimed by the Cabinet at some future time? Does it come into effect after certain pre-conditions have first been met? Or does it just come into effect? The answer to that question is we don't know. We don't know, because if you read in the bill Clause 7(1), which is the implementation of all these boundary changes and the meat of the bill, "has effect on or after." Now it gives three scenarios. The dissolution of the House of Assembly, that's number one. Call an election, the Act comes into effect right on the call of the election; that's scenario one.

Scenario two is "or the determination by the effluxion of time of the present House of Assembly." Now what does that mean? As I read it - and I invite the members of the government, especially the sponsor of the bill to explain this to the House - that is a piece of enabling legislation that would enable the Minister of Justice, after this bill is passed and receives Royal Assent, to introduce a resolution into this House saying, and with respect to Bill No. 142, the implementation of this bill shall not take effect until after the next provincial election - which is just what my friend opposite chastised me for suggesting, yet the power to do that is given that government by this bill that he, I suppose, will vote for. That is number two. The government could say it could come into effect in the year 2014 or maybe never. All those powers are given to the government by Clause 7 of this bill.

The third option is "on or after the first day of March, 2003" - the bill will come into effect "whichever" - get this now, Mr. Speaker - " whichever is later." Not whichever is first, but whichever is later. So, March 1st comes, well that option is ruled out because it's not later, it's sooner, so then the House, if after that time it still exists, is still in session, they can pass the resolution saying this bill doesn't come into effect until the year 2005, or the Premier could dissolve the House and, on the day the House is dissolved, this bill will come into effect with an election, by the Elections Act, scheduled 30 days thereafter.

Can you imagine a greater formula for chaos than that? I can't, not even when I look through the Rumsfeld report can I see greater opportunity for chaos than is contained in this particular bill.

[Page 11275]

Now, I didn't write the bill; the government wrote the bill. Is the bill a direct implementation of the report of the Electoral Boundaries Commission? I suggest that it is only in part, because the ultimate draftor of this bill - the Legislative Counsel I suppose, or someone in his office - carried out the instructions of the government, of the Attorney General who introduced this bill and dreamed up Clause 7 about this threefold possibility of how it could come into effect the 1st day of March, the determination of the House by the effluxion of - whatever that word means, we could get into a debate on that - or the dissolution of the House. Take your pick, whichever comes later.

That's what they've introduced for us to pass. That's what the NDP is saying yes we agree with it because it's the right thing. Well, it's not the right thing. The professor of law ought to know that. Surely a professor of law if he's lecturing at the Law School should be teaching his students better ideas about the drafting of legislation than is contained in this particular bill. I don't think that I'd pass his law course anyway, so I won't get diverted to side matters. The fact is that anyone familiar with the law should recognize this bill as a formula for disaster.

Now, why do I care about all that? I've been up here for over 30 years and won election nine times in a row. I mean what concern is it of mine? Well, Mr. Speaker, the answer is that I put all those years into this process because I believed in it. I believed that by doing this with my life rather than teaching school in the City of Sydney, I could do more to help the people. I believe in the process, I believe in this institution and I believe in the electoral process by which you get here and I know that for the electoral process to maintain its integrity it has to be carried out right. You don't carry it out right by implementing legislation like I see in Clause 7 of this bill.

[5:45 p.m.]

I don't know why, since we're probably in the final phases of the life of this Legislature, that this bill has to be at the head of the government's legislative agenda. Even if Clause 7 was taken out and replaced with a clause saying, and this bill shall come into effect on receiving Royal Assent or upon proclamation or some other such usual formula for the passage of legislation, even with that, I cannot understand how it will help us have a proper, legitimate, respected election whenever we go to the polls, and I don't think it's going to be this year now, but I did for quite awhile. It may be next Spring, you know, this could be the last time we ever meet, could be, I don't mean this day but this session. We could go home for Christmas and perhaps never see each other again until we meet on the hustings.

With that as the background to this piece of legislation, I ask myself and I ask this House why now, why not at a more opportune time such as when there isn't an election on the horizon, such as when we have the time to do this thing right, such as when we have the time to examine the proposed boundary changes in detail and see if they truly reflect the needs of the people. I see no rush. Haste makes waste. That's the old saying that I was

[Page 11276]

brought up by - haste makes waste. If you jump into a thing pell-mell without knowing what you're doing, best way I know of to get into trouble.

Now, let me say a bit about the House of Assembly and its makeup of 52 constituencies. When I was first elected to this House, there weren't 52 constituencies and there really aren't now, Mr. Speaker, because if the Mi'kmaq people of this province exercised their legal right now to simply designate a person to represent them here in the House, we would have 53 constituencies. That's in the law and I don't think that this bill changes that aspect of the law. It provides for 52 reconstituted seats, but the 53rd seat is still theoretically there. So there's nothing magic about the number 46 or 52 or 53. They're simply numbers.

Now, do all the constituencies have to have the same number of population? I say no. Why not? Well, number one, they never have. What kind of a world have we lived in? That's not the system. I remember when I was in school learning about the five Reform Bills that changed the way in which people voted and got elected, there was the first Reform Bill of Great Britain back in 1832 and it abolished such things as the rotten boroughs and the pocket boroughs and I wondered what were the rotten boroughs and what were the pocket boroughs. Well, I found that one of the pocket boroughs - or was it rotten, I forget which - was actually underwater and had nobody living in it, but it somehow chose a member to sit in Parliament on its behalf. Then there were the rotten boroughs and they were areas that at one time had had a large population, but because of shifts in population had a very small population, maybe two or three voters who could vote. (Interruption)

Well, my honourable friend opposite is now advocating vote for the mermaids. He can pursue that theme when he gets his turn in this debate, Mr. Speaker. Now, let me get back to the reform of the electoral processes carried out in Great Britain in the 19th Century and 20th Century and during the course of five Reform Bills it led from a situation where only gentlemen of property could vote to a system where everybody could vote. It led from a system where there were rotten and pocket boroughs, some of which had no population at all, to a system of some 600 seats or so, I think it is, in the House of Commons in London which are more or less equal in population, but they're not absolutely and there still are seats reserved for the universities in England, and Oxford University elects so many MPs and Cambridge elects so many. That's their system and they don't deny it.

If you look at legislation in Canada, and Legislatures, and the Parliament we have in Ottawa, you will notice that the members there don't all represent the same number of people. Prince Edward Island has a constitutional guarantee of four seats in Parliament regardless of how many members there are in Parliament, because that number has gone up and up over the years, but Prince Edward Island is guaranteed four seats. The Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory are all guaranteed one seat each irrespective of their population. There has been provision made by federal redistribution commissions for ridings that have a large area and they're isolated and perhaps in the far North. If you represented an area in northern Alberta would you honestly expect to have the same number

[Page 11277]

of people to represent as somebody from downtown Toronto? I don't think so. That's not the Canadian way. It's not the way we do it.

It's not the way they do it in Australia either, Mr. Speaker, or for that matter in any of the other countries in the world that I know of. I can tell you when God created humankind there were two kinds made, males and females. They weren't all the same. It wasn't unisex. It was males and females. Then, if you look at the people who resulted, are they all the same? The answer is no. Some are large, some are small, some are short, some are fat, some are thin, some are this and some are that. That's the way God made this world. Now, who are we to say that we're better than God? I don't know. We've never had ridings in this province with equal population and I don't think we should, and I want to tell you why; because there is a difference, Mr. Speaker, between urban on the one hand and rural on the other and on the workload of representing urban versus rural areas. If someone lives in the City of Halifax and they have a pothole in the street, they don't call their MLA.

AN HON. MEMBER: Want to bet?

MR. MACEWAN: Ha! You're not in downtown Halifax, you're out in Preston, a protected riding I might add, but let us not get sidetracked by distractions. The fact is that if you represent an urban area, people do not call you about street conditions at all, about paving, about that kind of thing that is done by the municipality. Whereas, if you represent a rural area, they have to call the MLA because those services are provided by the provincial Department of Transportation and Public Works, except for J-Class roads,which is another problem, but with the main arterial roads and side roads in rural areas, they are provincial. They're not federal. They're not municipal. They are provincial, and that means that an MLA who represents a rural area has twice as much work to do as an urban one does because they have additional responsibilities.

Now, Mr. Speaker, in any job that I know of where there comes additional responsibilities there is some reflection made in either the terms of employment, or the wages paid, or some recognition is given. If one person has to work twice as hard as another person, you either pay them twice as much money for doing it or provide them with extra help or in some way compensate for the extra job that they have to do. Rural MLAs have to work harder that urban. That is a fact. It's also a fact that in the more outlying areas of this province people there look to their MLAs to do things that here in Halifax they would never ask an MLA to do at all. Go downtown and get me my birth certificate. How many Halifax MLAs get that kind of a call? I know Maureen does, but aside from her how many of the rest of them do?

AN HON. MEMBER: I do.

MR. MACEWAN: Oh, I'm sure the odd one does, but in my constituency people don't know where the birth certificate office is, they just know it's in Halifax. They know I go up to Halifax every week, so while I'm up there doing nothing, twiddling my thumbs, I

[Page 11278]

can find time to go down to the birth certificate office and get them their birth certificate. Do you see the point that I'm trying to make? The urban area members from downtown Halifax don't generally have the workload. I recognize in Halifax Needham that's not the case but in the rest of the city it's quite true, it's quite true that they don't have the workload. Now then, why should they have an equal number of members without the workload as compared with the rural areas of the province? I raise that point as a philosophical point, maybe even as an ideological point, but I raise it anyway. I see looking at the clock it's getting handy closing time. Do you want me to keep going for another few minutes or wind it down? I'm not quite through my remarks yet. What would you suggest?

MR. SPEAKER: Did you say you're through?

MR. MACEWAN: No, I am not, I'm just getting warmed up.

MR. SPEAKER: Would the honourable member like to move an adjournment of debate?

MR. MACEWAN: I would so do.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is to adjourn debate.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Government House Leader on tomorrow's hours and business.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move the House do now rise to meet again on the morrow at the hour of 9:00 a.m. The House will sit from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. The order of business will be Bill No. 142 again, second reading. If we finish with Bill No. 142 we will go on to Bill No. 143. We will have a relaxed quorum tomorrow because of the UNSM and a number of people will be down there attending the panels. I wish everybody a good night.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for the House to adjourn until tomorrow morning, from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 11279]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House is adjourned until 9:00 a.m. tomorrow morning.

[6:00 p.m.]

We have reached the moment of interruption. The subject for this evening's late debate was submitted by the honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

ADJOURNMENT

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

KYOTO ACCORD - NAT. GAS: VALUE - EFFECT

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, thank you very much. I am pleased to be able to speak to this particular resolution and I want to read it into the record immediately. It should focus all of us on an issue that's very pressing. It's the question, of course, of the Kyoto Protocol. Let me give you the exact wording.

"Therefore be it resolved that this government recognize that the Kyoto Accord will make Nova Scotia's natural gas more valuable; and that the government take more active steps to control greenhouse gas emissions regardless of what happens to the Kyoto Accord."

Now, there's a huge amount of debate in the press about whether the Kyoto Protocol should be ratified, yes or no. Canada is not yet one of the parties that has ratified the Protocol. Of course many other nations have. The European Union has, Russia has, Japan has and Australia has. What that means is that virtually all of the nations, except Canada, that were parties to the Protocol which was originally negotiated five years ago in Kyoto and which was subsequently developed in its detail at further talks among the signatory parties, including up to last year's meeting in Marrakesh at which point the details were finalized. As I say, almost all of the parties have now signed on, the one major country, the one major polluting country that has not signed on, the one major emitter of greenhouse gases who has not signed on, of course, is the United States and given the attitude of the current administration, it seems very unlikely that it will.

Nonetheless, the question for us in Canada is whether we ought to sign on and there has been huge debate back and forth. I think it's as well that one admits immediately that there are weakness in the Kyoto Protocol. I think that we can identify these. For one thing of course, our commitment is entirely too low given the nature of the problem. For Canada

[Page 11280]

to talk about going 6 per cent below 1990 levels is a ridiculously trivially low amount. Our Party at the time, five years ago, was saying minus 20. In fact, because of growth in our greenhouse gas emissions in the intervening years, Canada is going to have to go minus 20 now in order to reach the minus six. Minus 20 compared to where we are right now. In fact, to have any kind of significant impact on the effect that greenhouse gas emissions have, we're probably, and all nations, are probably going to have to go much greater reductions than that. I look forward to seeing that happen. So that's a weakness, but it's not the weakness of those who criticize Kyoto most often and suggest that we ought not to implement it.

I see another weakness. The baseline data is not wonderful, of course the non-participation of the United States and many of the southern nations in the world is a weakness. I don't much find myself being a fan of the trading of emission credits. Nonetheless, even recognizing that there are some weaknesses in the Kyoto Protocol, it's the major international agreement that we have and we ought to sign it because it is a step forward. That's the basic fact, it is a step forward. It is a positive step and it's one that we ought to take. Indeed, regardless of what happens to the fate of the Kyoto Protocol, Canada ought to be moving aggressively and so should this government in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions regardless of what happens to Kyoto.

I will tell you what isn't a weakness about Kyoto. The science is not a weakness. Despite the fact that there have been criticisms made, the overwhelming opinion among responsible scientists is that the phenomenon of the emission of greenhouse gases tied to human activity is causing global climate change. That phenomenon is well-established indeed in Alberta, the province that has, through their provincial government, been saying the most against Kyoto. Every major scientist at the universities in Alberta who deals with things like wetlands, biology, chemistry, physics, who studies the impact of things that are involved in global climate change, has said to their Premier in a long letter that was just issued a week or so ago, that they do not support his position. They urge him to take a different position. They urge him to take urgent action with respect to global climate change, and they point out that in their very own Province of Alberta it is going so dry that drought in the southern part of the province, which they tie to global climate change, which they tie to greenhouse gas emissions, is a major problem now.

For us here, just as an aside, let me point out that the way it's going to affect us in Nova Scotia will probably be, as a coastal province, we are going to have problems when the sea level rises.

I will tell you another thing that isn't a weakness of Kyoto, it's that there isn't going to be a loss of jobs. Those modellings that have been done have, in fact, been very misleading in the way they've been presented. What they've suggested is, if you look 30 years into the future, the growth of the Canadian economy may be slightly affected and there might not be as many jobs. In terms of future job growth, it's not a question of decreasing jobs that are out there right now. I have to say that I don't even agree with that modelling

[Page 11281]

because many other models have been put forward that suggest that what they've left out are the offsets, the jobs that will be saved, the money that will be saved, new jobs that will be created in other ways in the economy when we transform ourselves to a new energy economy. That's what's coming and the history of new transformation of technologies is that they create more jobs and that's exactly what's happening. Indeed, there will not be any overall harm to the economy, in my view.

I will tell you what is a myth around the Kyoto Protocol as well. The myth that has been put forward a number of times is that the federal government didn't consult about its plan. Let me tell you that this is absolutely wrong. There have been non-stop roundtable consultations headed by the federal government for the last five years. And you know one of the major participants? The government of the Province of Alberta. They've been at that table year in and year out. They've been stalling at that table and so have the major industrial actors in this country. They've been at that table and they've been stalling.

We've just seen a ridiculous scenario played out in the last week or two, led by the Minister of Energy in this province in which he's essentially suggesting that our offshore is somehow going to be negatively impacted, the development of our offshore will be negatively impacted if Kyoto goes ahead. The evidence that he seems to put forward when I asked him in the House yesterday, is because the head of EnCana told him so.

Well, you know what? The head of EnCana said two different things to two different audiences. When the head of EnCana on September 24th was giving a speech in London, Ontario, to the Ontario Chambers of Commerce, he said that his company was very well positioned to deal with a Kyoto world even though he was criticizing it, he didn't like it - I will be clear about that - he said that his company was very well positioned because it had natural gas interests and its natural gas interests were so valuable that it was going to offset anything that might harm the company otherwise.

But he came down here three days later on September 27th and he put out local news for the local rubes who might not understand the overall picture. What he said was - and it wasn't just for us, it was to try to bring the government here onside with Alberta's government's attempt to try to stall the Kyoto Protocol. What he said was, the offshore, our natural gas resources might be delayed because of Kyoto; quite a bit different from what he was saying in Ontario three days before. It kind of left out the fact that offshore gas here, our offshore gas that they're involved in exploring for, is hugely valuable. Now, why did he want to do that? Why did he want to get our government onside with that and he was very successful as were others who had brought pressure on our government to get onside.

Well, do you know what, you've got to ask the question whose interests does it benefit to talk in that way and delay Kyoto? It benefits the oil companies only, not natural gas companies, not energy-generalized companies, but purely those who are tied to oil which means Alberta. And do you know why they want to delay it - because they are looking forward to the time when oil and coal will probably no longer be the main sources of energy

[Page 11282]

and they know that day is coming. They want the opportunity to try to get control of the mechanisms that are going to be the new forms of energy in the future plus they want the delay so that they can get as much coal and oil out of the ground and burned before they become the fuels of the past. That's their agenda and for us in this province, our government, that minister to stand up and fall in line with that agenda shows an amazing naïveté that follows their agenda, that company's agenda, those companies' agenda, not what's best for the people in Nova Scotia. That is our resource. It's not oil, it's gas, and that gas is very valuable.

So I say to that minister that he should get onside, understand the details of the portfolio that he is administering and do it for the benefit of the people of Nova Scotia. Do what's best for them and not what seems to be best for the people out in Alberta or for their government which are, in any event, taking a very short-sighted, short-term view of it.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Energy.

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, it's a privilege to be able to stand here this evening and follow the tirade that just preceded this opportunity. I guess I would like to start by saying that obviously the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is a significant undertaking and a major problem facing this nation and the entire globe. I would like to also say that the fundamental first line of the resolution is in fact flawed. The premise is that the Kyoto Accord will in fact make Nova Scotia gas more valuable. That may or may not be the case because, as everyone realizes, in an open-market economy the value of something is determined by a myriad of factors. It can be supply, demand, regulation. It can be factors well beyond the ratification or non-ratification of an accord agreement.

So to simply say that this will happen as a matter of course is erroneous and, in fact, the resolution would be more appropriate had it used a word like may or could when relating to the Kyoto Accord and the potential ratification. But having said that, it seems a natural progression given that the stance taken by the New Democratic Party on any number of issues certainly reflects that they have no appreciation for the real world-market-economy initiative, that Party has in the past number of months and, in fact, in this past week talked specifically about reducing fees for ambulance services.

They have talked about the need for government to reduce taxes. They talked about the need for government to freeze student tuitions. They have talked about the need for government to introduce loan remission programs. They have talked about the need for government to reduce the Pharmacare premiums. They talked about the need for government to introduce any number of expenditure reduction or fee reduction programs and at the same time that Party has talked about the need for the government of the day to increase funding for health care, to put more money into education, to put more money into home care, to put more money into the arts council, to put more money into highways, to put more money into community services, to put aside money for wage package settlements, to increase funding for child poverty programs, to increase expenditures in infrastructure programs.

[Page 11283]

So they, in fact, show no appreciation for the real world and the fact that governments every day have to make hard decisions. Governments every day have to weigh their expenditures and their revenues and they have to act accordingly. So the whole debate about Kyoto is, in fact, rooted in the need to ensure the economy of this nation continues to grow and I don't want to be sidetracked here around that discussion because, in fact, this does present an opportunity for us to talk about a very real and very serious initiative. I'm very appreciative of the fact that the person who introduced this resolution, along with a great many Nova Scotians and a great many Canadians, a great many people around the world have come to accept that this is not an issue about ratification or non-ratification of an accord

agreement, that we have to come together as a global community and deal with a very serious and very real issue and that is a long-term strategy to deal with greenhouse gas emission reduction.

The member opposite is correct in saying that natural gas can provide a clean fuel alternative for the world. That's not the point of this discussion. Natural gas is not the only answer to this issue. The issue is far more complex. In fact, there is a tendency to try to oversimplify this very significant and complex issue. We become mired in a debate about ratify, don't ratify. We become mired in a debate that if Kyoto is ratified that all of our problems related to greenhouse gas emission reduction will be solved and that's a very simplistic analysis to put in place.

Kyoto, in and of itself, is only one tiny, tiny step on the road to solving this issue. Nova Scotians understand clearly that climate change is a real and serious issue. It's a problem for this entire planet. It's a problem that's going to require all of us doing our part. Regardless of whether or not the federal government decides to ratify Kyoto this Fall, climate change is going to continue to be a major issue. An issue that requires a national response. An issue that requires a response that involves participation - participation by every one of the provinces and territories; participation by every nation on the globe. That's exactly why this government, our government, has been participating in a national climate change process.

In fact, I had the opportunity to be co-chair of a joint ministers' energy and environment meeting here in Halifax. At that particular meeting we were able to bring every one of the provinces and territories together around 12 fundamental principles; principles that every one of us could agree to; principles that have to be the hallmark of a participatory solution to this issue. I'm very pleased and proud to be able to say that we had a hand in making that happen right here in Nova Scotia. We were working towards a real plan; a plan of action that would be made in Canada; a plan of action that would cut greenhouse gas emissions and ensure at the same time that no one region or sector would have an unfair burden placed upon them.

[Page 11284]

That's tremendously important because we have to have a national agreement on the impacts of the actions and how climate change will be shared. We cannot create a situation where provinces and jurisdictions have unfair advantage or disadvantage as a result of the strategy. We were moving towards that.

Let me be perfectly clear. Kyoto or no Kyoto, this government has been taking action and will continue to take action regarding climate change. The member opposite has asked for a commitment to act. I would urge the honourable member to take the time to look at Nova Scotia's Energy Strategy. If he took the time to look at that document, he would understand full well that we have been talking about and dealing with this issue for some time. Long before it became a media event - unlike the member opposite who has simply captured an opportunity to pander here in this Chamber to an audience.

Our strategy talks about taking responsible action in response to climate change. Our commitment to climate change has come not from an opportune media moment, it's come from a plan; a plan that began some number of months ago; a plan that was laid out clearly in the framework that acts as a basis for our initial action regarding climate change.

Our energy strategy lays out 10 commitments that we have made for addressing climate change. They include participating in a national climate change process, negotiating with other governments to ensure the impact on our region is taken into consideration, that the strategy will be shared equally and fairly by all jurisdictions. We talked about launching a provincial program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through government operations. We supported the creation of a public education program on global climate change. We're maintaining a regulatory framework that encourages the use of clean fuel, such as natural gas. We're working with the union of municipalities to promote a greater awareness of how they can help in this process. We've also talked about looking at key areas of promoting the development of innovative new technologies; practices to reduce emissions and making climate change a key part of government's decision-making processes.

Mr. Speaker, we're working with government to establish a system that ensures credit to businesses and industry for early action on climate change. We're encouraging research because the answer lies in new technologies. This is an extensive and exhaustive list, but it's by no means the end of what we're doing as a province in terms of creating a national solution for Canada.

[6:15 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, our government also understands that it's critical for our province, for our future generations, for the entire planet, to take action today to set a course ahead that will pave the way for the future. There's a great deal of work to be done, there's a great deal of work that has been done. We've made progress, to date, on this very difficult problem. In August of 2001 the Premier joined the other Eastern Canadian Premiers and the New England Governors in signing a joint Climate Change Action Plan that established goals and

[Page 11285]

was outside of Kyoto. In fact, that was an initiative undertaken here in the Atlantic Region, on the Eastern Seaboard; doing our part well in advance of the Prime Minister's posturing about ratification of Kyoto.

We are well on the road and, in fact, are leaders on this road, and for the member opposite to dismiss what this government has done is unfair and inappropriate. Mr. Speaker, the member opposite used this opportunity simply to pander, not to offer any real long-term solutions. Thank you Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Still, it's not on, Mr. Speaker. The sound is on, I presume.

AN HON. MEMBER: Your lights are out.

MR. MACKINNON: Well, yes, Mr. Speaker, and the lights will be out for a lot of other Nova Scotians if this government continues to go at the rate it's going. We will all be in the dark, that's what's wrong. The minister stands up and says, we have a plan. Where's the plan? Where's the plan? Has he put it in writing? The only thing we have so far is Rumsfeld's plan to manage its stakeholders, to gag the Civil Service of this province. Do you know why, Mr. Speaker? Because one of the issues on this corporate strategy is, promote outcomes, not the process. For example, Nova Scotia Business Inc.; that is a pure admission that their economic development strategy for Nova Scotia is a failure, so they have to bring in Mr. Rumsfeld from the U.S. military to try and tell the people of Nova Scotia how bad things are in a very fine way.

So, let's look at Kyoto. Yes, look at Kyoto. Where is your Kyoto plan? At least Alberta put one out, they put it in black and white. Newfoundland put one out. Where's yours? All we get is that bafflegab coming from the minister. We don't get anything from that minister. We don't get anything substantive, Mr. Speaker. The oil companies are riding roughshod over this government. Do you know why? Because the regulatory process, which they are advocating, is so convoluted and so disproportionate to reality that that makes it easy for EnCana to come to Nova Scotia and ride roughshod over that minister. That's like the U.S. military coming in and fighting Boy Scouts. I mean, talk about arguing with an unarmed man.

It's terrible, and they talk about, in their corporate strategy (Interruptions) Yes they talk in their corporate strategy, yes, moving Deep Panuke along. Now what are they going to do, push it out to sea? Is that what they call a strategy? Are they going to drag it in with a tugboat? What are they talking about, move it along. What kind of a corporate strategy is that?

[Page 11286]

They want local gas distribution. Well, isn't that wonderful? In the next 10 years we will gas up, what, 400 homes? Isn't that riveting. Tens of thousands of homes and we're going to gas up, less than what, a couple of percentage points? How does that tie into Kyoto? Yes, Mr. Speaker, look (Interruptions) Well, the Minister of Economic Development, no, they took that away from him because they saw what he did with the department and so they just left him with the Department of Energy and when he's finished with this, we won't even have that. The Americans will be just taking our natural gas down to the United States. We know how important natural gas is to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and CO2 emissions to be able to meet our targets for the Kyoto Protocol and what do we hear from the minister? He didn't quantify one particular aspect of what Nova Scotia's strategy is, not one aspect. He talked about an educational program. (Interruption)

Yes, Mr. Speaker, listening, well, by the time they finish listening, I mean, I think they're tone-deaf to what's happening in the real world because we don't need to listen to a propaganda thing that Donald Rumsfeld from the U.S. military is putting forward for the Nova Scotia Government. We need to see a substantive action plan. How many industries do we have in Nova Scotia that are contributing to the greenhouse gas emissions? What is their strategy to deal with it? How is government working with industry? What about domestic consumers? (Interruption)

The Minister of Natural Resources says tell us. Well, yes, we'll tell you because after the next election we'll be in a position to do what you people can't do although you're in power and have the mandate and the resources to do it. It's absolutely shameful that we've got Ministers of the Crown asking the Opposition to do their job. Isn't that a pitiful admission that the Minister of Natural Resources doesn't comprehend the issue surrounding greenhouse gases on the sinks and the sewers, all the issues in the forestry industry, on reforestation, silviculture. They slash and they just about annihilated the budget on silviculture in this province and now they're harvesting forests in this province like you wouldn't believe and saying nothing about it.

AN HON. MEMBER: Check your facts.

MR. MACKINNON: Check my facts, Mr. Speaker. Well, staff from his own department came before the Resources Committee and advised us of that very fact, that they're only reseeding, what, less than some 20 per cent at best of what they're harvesting in this province and he's saying check your facts. I would say go back and talk to your staff and find out if you know the difference between a spruce tree and a hardwood tree because it's evident from that minister he doesn't know what he's talking about. That's why they don't have a strategy on Kyoto because they don't even understand. They're not sure if it's a city over in Japan or some kind of a foreign vehicle of if, in fact, it's a very important document that has to be addressed. I mean talk about a bunch of clowns on a serious matter. I mean they take it so frivolously.

[Page 11287]

Mr. Speaker, how have they broken down this issue domestically, commercially, industrially? How have they responded to the issues surrounding gas versus coal, oil versus coal, oil versus natural gas? They haven't done anything. Do you know why and do you know what's even a more startling admission of their inaction, they took it out of the hands of the Department of Environment, the regulatory body that's mandated to protect the environment of the Province of Nova Scotia and for the people of Nova Scotia. They have that little confidence. It was bad enough the water strategy they brought in. Well, that you could drive a Mack truck through it and only weeks afterwards we have a major water contamination by the minister's own admission and he doesn't know how to deal with it. So how can we have any faith in what this minister is saying? We don't because he has nothing. Where is his document? Where is his plan? When is he going to table it?

Energy strategy, well, well, well, Mr. Speaker, well, have you ever seen the likes. (Interruption) Have I read it? I have read a lot more of it than you have, my friend, I can assure you that and I can tell you that this government has a regulatory regime that makes it easy for industry that wants to come and take advantage of our resources to do it and frustrating other industries to the point that they're packing up and leaving; that's such a convoluted approach. Talk to the real experts in the industry and they will tell you that they're dealing with Boy Scouts who don't know what they're doing on a major, major issue that will impact on our economy, our social fabric and the environment of this province.

Mr. Speaker, we're not going to pay too much attention to the bafflegab from the Minister of Natural Resources. Maybe when he's there a little longer he will realize that trying to manipulate public opinion is not the way to go. This is not what the people of Nova Scotia want - hiring high-priced people. We don't know if he's hired or what. It says, the Rumsfeld plan, thank you. So, I don't know, maybe they're so impressed with George Bush. I know the Minister of Justice thinks there's nothing like him.

Is it that bad that we have to go and hire the chief operations manager who overlooked the war in Afghanistan, going into the caves, that we have to come down and manage the Civil Service of this province? Is that the type of mindset that we have, that we have to have mind control on our Public Service and tell them, we don't want your opinion. Here's our opinion, you follow it or you go to the door. We don't want any more of the John Buchanan Government. We had enough of that rubbish. We want a real strategy on Kyoto. We want a real energy strategy. We don't want that bafflegab. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time for this evening's late debate has expired. I would like to thank the honourable members for taking part in the debate.

We are adjourned until 9:00 a.m.

[The House rose at 6:27 p.m.]

[Page 11288]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 4551

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Wendell Austin has been a faithful member of the Masonic Order, Widow's Son Lodge No. 48 in River Philip, for the last 55 years; and

Whereas Wendell Austin is being honoured on November 8th for his 55 years of service to the Lodge at the Collingwood Hall; and

Whereas members and honoured guests will gather in Collingwood to pay tribute to Wendell Austin which demonstrates his commitment to Lodge, family and community, where he is respected by all;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Mr. Wendell Austin on his 55 years of membership to the Masonic Order and wish him all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4552

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ralston Ripley has been a faithful member of the Masonic Order, Widow's Son Lodge No. 48 in River Philip, for the last 55 years; and

Whereas Ralston Ripley is being honoured on November 8th for his 55 years of service to the Lodge at the Collingwood Hall; and

Whereas members and honoured guests will gather in Collingwood to pay tribute to Ralston Ripley which demonstrates his commitment to Lodge, family and community, where he is respected by all;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Mr. Ralston Ripley on his 55 years of membership to the Masonic Order and wish him all the best in the future.

[Page 11289]

RESOLUTION NO. 4553

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Fred Spencer has been a faithful member of the Masonic Order, Widow's Son Lodge No. 48 in River Philip, for the last 55 years; and

Whereas Fred Spencer is being honoured on November 8th for his 55 years of service to the Lodge at the Collingwood Hall; and

Whereas members and honoured guests will gather in Collingwood to pay tribute to Fred Spencer which demonstrates his commitment to Lodge, family and community, where he is respected by all;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Mr. Fred Spencer on his 55 years of membership to the Masonic Order and wish him all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4554

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas five-year-old Miss Jasmine Anne Dobson from Oxford, Nova Scotia, and her mother Crystal Hunter did unselfishly donate the hair from Jasmine's first haircut to the Wigs for Kids Program; and

Whereas it was a very emotional moment for Jasmine and also for her mother, Crystal Hunter, when they thought of others less fortunate than themselves by making another child's life just a little more bearable; and

Whereas Jasmine and her mother Crystal were aware of the importance of donating hair for cancer victims and had the initiative to be a part of this plan that helps restore the self-confidence in children less fortunate;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Jasmine Dobson and Crystal Hunter of Oxford, Nova Scotia, for their unselfish act of contribution to the Wigs for Kids Program and wish them all the best in the future.

[Page 11290]

RESOLUTION NO. 4555

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Advocate District High School Coyotes won the Cumberland County Soccer League for the fifth time in six years in Advocate, Nova Scotia, this year; and

Whereas the Advocate District High School Coyotes girls soccer team ran their record to 9-0 on October 7th in Advocate with a 4-1 win over River Hebert; and

Whereas the Advocate Coyotes have achieved a winning record consistently over the last five or six years;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Advocate District High School Coyotes on winning the Cumberland County Soccer League Championships and wish them continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4556

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mike Kaye of Springhill, Nova Scotia, received the Maritimer of the Week award on Friday, October 4, 2001, from the ATV News Live at Five program; and

Whereas Mike Kaye was recognized for his volunteer efforts with the fire department, Royal Canadian Legion, AA Bingo and All Saints Springhill Hospital; and

Whereas John Hopkins, a Springhill fireman, said that Mike Kaye is more than just a dedicated volunteer, but the "walking encyclopedia" of the town, knowing hundreds of citizens' names and the current "news on the streets";

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Mike Kaye on receiving this award and thank him for all he has done for the Town of Springhill.

[Page 11291]

RESOLUTION NO. 4557

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Wish Foundation Poker Rally & Music Fest did participate in the 6th annual fundraiser and raised $17,000 from the enthusiastic participants who attended the rally, hosted again by Keith and June Blenkhorn and 12 sponsors; and

Whereas nearly 50 volunteers took the time, days and weeks, before the event to clear and mark trails for the ATV riders, some directed traffic on the day of the event, ran the canteen, took registration and drew names for the prizes; and

Whereas the Cumberland County Chapter of the Wish Foundation continues to raise money and awareness for its project for youth coping with chronic illness thanks to the support of the many sponsors, numbering 43, who donated 163 items for prizes;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the members of the Cumberland County sub-chapter of the Children's Wish Foundation in their dedication to such an important cause, as well as to Keith and June Blenkhorn, co-organizers, Norma Rutledge, and all who took part, donated time or helped in any way to make this such a successful event.

RESOLUTION NO. 4558

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Oxford Golden Bears boys soccer team participated in the NSSAF Division IV Provincial Soccer Championship in early November 2002; and

Whereas the Golden Bears performance was outstanding and they showed great effort all weekend and came home with the silver medal, being very close to gold; and

Whereas the Golden Bears defeated Cape Breton Highlands in the first game, putting them in a position to play Colchester Christian Academy for the title;

[Page 11292]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Oxford Golden Bears boys soccer team for participating and winning the silver medal in the NSSAF Division IV Boys Provincial Soccer Championship and we wish them continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4559

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Bill McNutt participated in the NSSAF Division IV Boys Provincial Soccer Championships in November 2002, with his team the Oxford Golden Bears; and

Whereas Bill McNutt was a major player for his team in the provincials where they took home the silver medal; and

Whereas Bill McNutt from Oxford, Nova Scotia, was chosen as Player of the Game;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Bill McNutt on receiving Player of the Game in the Provincial Championships and we wish him continued success in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 4560

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas James Hoffman participated in the NSSAF Division IV Boys Provincial Soccer Championships in November 2002, with his team the Oxford Golden Bears; and

Whereas James Hoffman was a major player for his team in the provincials, where they took home the silver medal; and

Whereas James Hoffman from Oxford, Nova Scotia, took home the distinction of tournament MVP;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate James Hoffman on receiving the MVP award in the Provincial Championships and we wish him continued success in the future.

[Page 11293]

RESOLUTION NO. 4561

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tupperville residents Emma Chipman and Hannah Doeber have won full scholarships worth $25,000 U.S. to an American prep school based on their exceptional hockey skills and academic achievements; and

Whereas Emma and Hannah will attend Westminister Prep School in Connecticut; and

Whereas this achievement has been accomplished thanks to each girl's dedication to both academic and athletic excellence;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Emma Chipman and Hannah Doeber on winning full scholarships to the Westminster Prep School in Connecticut and wish them continued success in their academic and athletic endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4562

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Tupperville resident Ryan Chipman has been invited to play with the major junior hockey team Victoriaville Tigers in Quebec; and

Whereas this achievement has been accomplished thanks to Ryan's dedication and hard work that was recognized by his coach and a Victoriaville Tigers scout who invited Ryan to the team's tryouts; and

Whereas after distinguishing himself at rookie camp, Ryan was offered the centre position with the Victoriaville team;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Ryan Chipman on earning a place on the Victoriaville Tigers hockey team and wish him continued success in following his dream of a professional hockey career.

[Page 11294]

RESOLUTION NO. 4563

By: Mr. Mark Parent (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Kings 6 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Kentville will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch Kings 6 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch Kings 6 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4564

By: Mr. Mark Parent (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Habitant 73 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Canning will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch Habitant 73 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11295]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch Habitant 73 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4565

By: Mr. Barry Barnet (Sackville-Beaver Bank)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Mount Uniacke Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Mount Uniacke will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 165 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 165 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4566

By: Hon. Timothy Olive (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cornwallis Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Dartmouth will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 13 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11296]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Cornwallis Branch 13 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4567

By: Hon. Timothy Olive (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Somme 31 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Dartmouth will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 31 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Somme Branch 31 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4568

By: Hon. Timothy Olive (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11297]

Whereas the Centennial Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Dartmouth will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 160 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Centennial Branch 160 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4569

By: Hon. James Muir (Health)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Colchester Branch 26 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Truro will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Colchester Branch 26 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Colchester Branch 26 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11298]

RESOLUTION NO. 4570

By: Mr. Kerry Morash (Queens)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the A.L. Patterson Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Caledonia will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 87 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 87 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4571

By: Mr. Kerry Morash (Queens)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 38th Mersey Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Liverpool will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 38 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11299]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 38 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4572

By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Yarmouth Branch 61 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Yarmouth will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 61 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 61 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4573

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Agriculture and Fisheries)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 104 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Wallace will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 104 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11300]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 104 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4574

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Agriculture and Fisheries)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 97 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Malagash will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 97 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 97 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4575

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Agriculture and Fisheries)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11301]

Whereas the 60 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Pugwash will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 60 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 60 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4576

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Agricuture and Fisheries)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 134 Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Maccan will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 134 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 134 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11302]

RESOLUTION NO. 4577

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Agriculture and Fisheries)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 10 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Amherst will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 10 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 10 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4578

By: Mr. Barry Barnet (Sackville-Beaver Bank)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Calais Branch 162 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Sackville will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 162 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11303]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 162 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4579

By: Hon. Ronald Russell (Transportation and Public Works)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 9 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Windsor will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 9 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 9 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4580

By: Hon. Neil LeBlanc (Finance)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Argyle and Pubnico Branch 94 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Argyle will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 94 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11304]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 94 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4581

By: Hon. Neil LeBlanc (Finance)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in West Pubnico will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 66 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 66 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4582

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11305]

Whereas the Normandy Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in New Glasgow will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 34 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 34 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4583

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 28 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Stellarton will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 28 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 28 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11306]

RESOLUTION NO. 4584

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 29 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Trenton will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 29 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 29 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4585

By: Hon. Jane Purves (Education)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Scotia Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Halifax will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 25 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11307]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 25 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4586

By: Hon. Jane Purves (Education)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Vimy Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Halifax will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Vimy Branch continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Vimy Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4587

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 134 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Maccan will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 134 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11308]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 134 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4588

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 45 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Parrsboro will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 45 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 45 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4589

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11309]

Whereas Branch 36 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Oxford will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 36 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 36 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4590

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 17 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Springhill will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 17 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 17 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11310]

RESOLUTION NO. 4591

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 14 of the Royal Canadian Legion in River Hebert will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 14 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 14 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4592

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 4 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Joggins will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 4 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11311]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 4 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4593

By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 143 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Port Maitland will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 143 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 143 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4594

By: Mr. Richard Hurlburt (Yarmouth)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 167 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Carleton will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 167 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11312]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 167 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4595

By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Atlantic Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Whites Lake will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 153 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 153 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4596

By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11313]

Whereas the Parrsboro Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Parrsboro will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 45 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 45 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4597

By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Fairview Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Fairview will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 142 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 142 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11314]

RESOLUTION NO. 4598

By: Mr. Cecil O'Donnell (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Loyalist Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Shelburne will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 63 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 63 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4599

By: Mr. Cecil O'Donnell (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cape Sable Island Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Shelburne County will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 148 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11315]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 148 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4600

By: Mr. Cecil O'Donnell (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lockeport Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Lockeport will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 80 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 80 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4601

By: Hon. Angus MacIsaac (Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Arras Branch 59 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Antigonish will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Arras Branch 59 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11316]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Arras Branch 59 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4602

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Grade 3 students at Walter Duggan Elementary School in Westville participated in an exceptionally worthwhile UNICEF fundraising campaign during the Halloween season; and

Whereas the students were encouraged to use any loose change they might be carrying and donate it to UNICEF, while choosing their favourite pumpkin on display at the school; and

Whereas UNICEF volunteer Jeanie Archibald visited the school to thank the students for their worthwhile effort;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs in this Legislature applaud the significant efforts of the Grade 3 students at Walter Duggan Elementary School in Westville, and wish them continued success for the duration of their school year.

RESOLUTION NO. 4603

By: Mr. David Hendsbee (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Centennial Branch 160 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Westphal-Cole Harbour will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

[Page 11317]

Whereas members and supporters of Centennial Branch 160 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Centennial Branch 160 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4604

By: Mrs. Muriel Baillie (Pictou West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 16 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Pictou will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 16 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 16 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11318]

RESOLUTION NO. 4605

By: Mrs. Muriel Baillie (Pictou West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 108 of the Royal Canadian Legion in River John will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 108 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 108 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4606

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Ship Harbour Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in East Ship Harbour will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 120 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11319]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 120 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4607

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Sheet Harbour Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Sheet Harbour will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Courcelette Branch 58 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 58 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4608

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Chezzetcook Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Head of Chezzetcook will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Eastern Marine Branch 161 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11320]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 161 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4609

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 75 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Eureka will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 75 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 75 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4610

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11321]

Whereas Branch 137 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Hopewell will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 137 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 137 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4611

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 35 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Westville will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 35 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 35 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11322]

RESOLUTION NO. 4612

By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Ortona Branch 69 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Berwick will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 69 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 69 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4613

By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Alvin Foster Memorial Branch 98 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Kingston will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 98 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11323]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 98 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4614

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Port Royal Branch 21 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Annapolis Royal will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 21 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 21 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4615

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 33 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Bridgetown will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 33 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11324]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 33 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4616

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Branch 1 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Middleton will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 1 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 1 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4617

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11325]

Whereas Branch 112 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Lawrencetown will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 112 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 112 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4618

By: Hon. Peter Christie (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Dieppe Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Waverley will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 90 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 90 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11326]

RESOLUTION NO. 4619

By: Hon. Peter Christie (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Bedford Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Bedford will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 95 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 95 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4620

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the St. Margaret's Bay Branch 116 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Seabright will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 116 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11327]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate St. Margaret's Bay Branch 116 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4621

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the F.E. Butler Branch 44 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Chester will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of F.E. Butler Branch 44 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 44 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4622

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Everett Branch 88 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Chester Basin will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Everett Branch 88 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11328]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Everett Branch 88 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4623

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Harding Branch 144 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Western Shore will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Harding Branch 144 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Harding Branch 144 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4624

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11329]

Whereas the New Ross Branch 79 of the Royal Canadian Legion in New Ross will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of New Ross Branch 79 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate New Ross Branch 79 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4625

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the people of the Hubbards area at Hubbards Library will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of people in the Hubbards area continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the people of the Hubbards area for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11330]

RESOLUTION NO. 4626

By: Hon. David Morse (Environment and Labour)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Dr. C. B. Lumsden Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Wolfville will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 74 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 74 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4627

By: Hon. Neil LeBlanc (Finance)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Wedgeport Branch 155 of the Royal Canadian Legion will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 155 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11331]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 155 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4628

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Port Hawksbury Branch 43 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Port Hawksbury will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 43 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 43 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4629

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Sherbrooke Branch 56 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Sherbrooke will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 56 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

[Page 11332]

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 56 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4630

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Guysborough Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Guysborough will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 81 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 81 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4631

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 11333]

Whereas the Liscombe Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Liscombe will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 86 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 86 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4632

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Torbay Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Charlos Cove will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 117 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 117 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

[Page 11334]

RESOLUTION NO. 4633

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Mulgrave Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Mulgrave will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 37 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 37 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.

RESOLUTION NO. 4634

By: Mr. Ronald Chisholm (Guysborough-Port Hawkesbury)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canso Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Canso will once again organize activities perpetuating the memory of those who died in the military, merchant navy and ferry command services of Canada; and

Whereas members and supporters of Branch 46 continue to ensure their community honours the supreme sacrifice made by so many and ensure that their memory and service to country is never forgotten; and

Whereas with more than 500,000 members, the Royal Canadian Legion is one of the largest community service organizations in the country and, in addition to keeping the memory alive, contributes millions of dollars and voluntary hours to help Canadians, particularly seniors and youth;

[Page 11335]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Branch 46 of the Royal Canadian Legion for their continued support and commitment to communities and salute their efforts to ever remind us of the young men and women who gave their lives for our country.