Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 01/02-116

Commemorating the Golden Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, 2002

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Murray Scott

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Annual subscriptions available from the Office of the Speaker.

Second Session

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2002

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
INTRODUCTION OF VISITORS 10735
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4181, DGH ER Expansion - Fdn./Chair: Efforts - Commend,
Hon. J. Muir 10736
Vote - Affirmative 10737
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4182, Harper, Stephen: Atl. Provinces - Characterization,
Mr. D. Dexter 10737
Vote - Affirmative 10745
Res. 4183, Access Awareness Wk. - La Caisse Populaire de Clare:
Hebb Award - Congrats., Mr. W. Gaudet 10738
Vote - Affirmative 10738
Res. 4184, RCL (Calais Branch 162) - Cobequid Commun. Health Ctr.:
Fundraising - Congrats., Mr. J. Holm 10738
Vote - Affirmative 10739
Res. 4185, DGH ER Expansion - Staff/Vols.: Commitment - Thank,
Dr. J. Smith 10739
Vote - Affirmative 10740
Res. 4186, Hamm Gov't. - Smoking: Public Places - Ban,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10740
Res. 4187, Who Else is Knockin' on Bras d'Or - Baddeck Acad.:
Production - Congrats., Mr. K. MacAskill 10741
Vote - Affirmative 10741
Res. 4188, Cole Hbr. HS CAVS - Wrestling Team: Championships -
Congrats., Mr. K. Deveaux 10741
Vote - Affirmative 10742
Res. 4189, Foley, Dr. Anita - Med. Soc. (N.S.): Distinguished
Service Award - Congrats., Dr. J. Smith 10742
Vote - Affirmative 10743
Res. 4190, Pol. Leaders: Divisive Reg. Attacks - Condemn,
Mr. F. Corbett 10743
Res. 4191, Eyking, Brittany - Millennium Dance Fest.: Award -
Congrats., Mr. B. Boudreau 10744
Vote - Affirmative 10744
Res. 4192, Macdonald, Sir John A., HS - Students : School Spirit -
Congrats., Mr. W. Estabrooks 10745
Vote - Affirmative 10746
Res. 4193, Forbes, Brian - NSTU: Pres. - Re-election Congrats.,
Mr. M. Samson 10746
Vote - Affirmative 10746
Res. 4194, Pick, Wayne - Mun. E. Hants: Recognition - Congrats.,
^ (by Mr. G. Steele), Mr. J. MacDonell 10747
Vote - Affirmative 10747
Res. 4195, Jones, Colleen: N.S. Female Athlete of Yr. - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Boudreau 10747
Vote - Affirmative 10748
Res. 4196, PC Gov't. - Working People: Safety - Ensure,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10748
Res. 4197, Glace Bay HS Band - Walt Disney World: Performance -
Congrats., Mr. D. Wilson 10749
Vote - Affirmative 10749
Res. 4198, Romkey, Frederick & Aletha: Anniv. (60th) - Congrats.,
Mr. K. Deveaux 10750
Vote - Affirmative 10750
Res. 4199, Samson, Yvon - NSSBA: Award - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Samson 10750
Vote - Affirmative 10751
Res. 4200, Westray Families - Fight for Justice/Brian Mulroney:
Equal Welcome - Extend, Mr. F. Corbett 10752
Res. 4201, Gaudet, Kris - Concours Signets Francophones: Win (1st) -
Congrats., Mr. W. Gaudet 10752
Vote - Affirmative 10753
Res. 4202, Legislative Staff: Dedication/Hard Work - Recognize,
Mr. R. MacKinnon 10754
Vote - Affirmative 10754
Res. 4203, Tobacco Leg. - Nova Scotians: Protection - Inequality,
Mr. D. Downe 10754
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 1191, Econ. Dev. - Sr. Executives: Employment - Explain,
Mr. D. Dexter 10756
No. 1192, Educ. - Aboriginal People: Initiatives - Details,
Mr. B. Boudreau 10757
No. 1193, Educ. - C.P. Allen HS/Sir John A. Macdonald HS:
Split Shifts - Plans, Mr. W. Estabrooks 10758
No. 1194, StoraEnso - Costs: Solutions - Gov't. (N.S.) - Plans,
Mr. M. Samson 10759
No. 1195, Health - Tobacco Access Laws: Fines - Number Explain,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10761
No. 1196, Health - Radiological Equip.: Action - Details, Dr. J. Smith 10762
No. 1197, Econ. Dev. - Whitney Pier: Coal Stockpiling - Details,
Mr. F. Corbett 10763
No. 1198, Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Bridge Inspections (2001-02):
Details - Table, Mr. P. MacEwan 10765
No. 1199, Health - Mountain Lea Lodge: Beds - Utilization Details,
Mr. J. Pye 10766
No. 1200, Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Sydney City Hospital: Sale -
Details, Mr. Manning MacDonald 10767
No. 1201, Health - Commun. Mental Health: Services - Status,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10769
No. 1202, Agric. & Fish. - Inspection Changes: Farmers' Business -
Ensure, Mr. W. Gaudet 10770
No. 1203, Environ. & Lbr. - Dart. Marine Slips: Employees -
Severance Ensure, Mr. D. Dexter 10771
No. 1204, Transport. & Pub. Wks. - Sydney Office Space: Tenders -
Status, Mr. R. MacKinnon 10772
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 11:36 A.M. 10774
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 11:37 A.M. 10774
CWH REPORTS 10774
PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING:
No. 9, Pension Benefits Act 10775
Hon. D. Morse 10775
Mr. J. Pye 10775
Mr. R. MacKinnon 10776
Hon. D. Morse 10776
Vote - Affirmative 10776
No. 125, Smoke-free Places Act 10777
Hon. R. Russell 10777
Mr. D. Dexter 10777
Dr. J. Smith 10782
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10787
Mr. R. MacKinnon 10791
Mr. J. MacDonell 10796
Hon. J. Muir 10799
Vote - Affirmative 10802
No. 129, Assessment Act/Municipal Grants Act 10803
Hon. A. MacIsaac 10803
Mr. H. Epstein 10803
Mr. D. Downe 10809
Mr. J. Pye 10814
Mr. B. Boudreau 10815
Mr. K. Deveaux 10818
Hon. A. MacIsaac 10819
Vote - Affirmative 10821
ARRIVAL OF THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 10822
BILLS GIVEN ROYAL ASSENT:
Nos. 9, 72, 87, 98, 101, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109 10822
Nos. 110, 111, 112, 113, 115, 117, 118, 119 10823
Nos. 120, 121, 123, 125, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134 10823
No. 124 10824
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again at the call of the Speaker 10825
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 4204, Ross, Lesley, Jessie, Mallory & Helen: Achievements -
Congrats., The Speaker 10826
Res. 4205, St. Thomas Univ. - Model United Nations Mock Assembly:
Springhill HS Participants - Congrats., The Speaker 10826
Res. 4206, Knights of Columbus Free Throw (Springhill HS) -
Boys & Girls Comp.: Participants - Congrats., The Speaker 10827
Res. 4207, Chouinard, Vonetta: Book Publication - Congrats.,
The Speaker 10827
Res. 4208, Deveaux, Danica: Jr. Musical Theatre Award - Congrats.,
The Speaker 10828
Res. 4209, McArthur, Rob: Ordination - Congrats., Mr. C. Clarke 10828
Res. 4210, Lake Echo Lions - Club Charter: Anniv. (25th) - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Hendsbee 10829
Res. 4211, PC Gov't. - Prop. Taxes: Increases - Stop, Mr. J. MacDonell 10829
Res. 4212, Knezevic, Sara: House of Assembly Service - Congrats.,
Mr. K. Deveaux 10830
Res. 4213, PC Gov't.: Environment - Clean Up, Mr. Robert Chisholm 10830
Res. 4214, PC Gov't. - Seniors: Costs of Living - Increases Stop,
Mr. J. Holm 10831
Res. 4215, PC Gov't.: Child Poverty - Alleviate, Mr. D. Dexter 10831
Res. 4216, PC Gov't. - Child Poverty: Alleviation - Ensure,
Mr. G. Steele 10832
Res. 4217, PC Gov't.: Highways - Improve, Mr. G. Steele 10832
Res. 4218, PC Gov't.: Higher Paying Jobs - Create, Mr. J. Pye 10833
Res. 4219, Anderson, Jean: Dedication/Compassion - Thank,
Hon. M. Baker 10833
Res. 4220, RCL (Branch 24) - Objectives: Maintenance - Recognize,
Mr. D. Downe 10834
Res. 4221, Pictou Co. Health Authority - Employees (225): Service -
Congrats., Hon. J. Muir 10834
Res. 4222, Henwood, Katie - Reg. Heritage Fair: Recognition -
Congrats., The Speaker 10835
Res. 4223, Principal's Peace Awards: Junction Rd./West End
Elem. Schools - Congrats., The Speaker 10835
Res. 4224, N.B./N.S. Mine Rescue Comp. - Participants:
Best Wishes - Extend, Hon. E. Fage 10836
Res. 4225, ALS Awareness Month (06/02) - Recognize,
Mr. D. Hendsbee 10836
Res. 4226, WTCC - Mulroney Fundraiser: Organizers/Vol. -
Congrats., Hon. A. MacIsaac 10837
Res. 4227, Anna. East Elem. Sch. - Peaceful Schools: Efforts -
Applaud, Mr. F. Chipman 10837
Res. 4228, Senior Games: Organizers - Thank,
Hon. Rodney MacDonald 10838
Res. 4229, SMU: Achievements - Acknowledge, Mr. D. Hendsbee 10838
Res. 4230, Shelburne Port Authority: Shelburne Town -
Transfer Acknowledge, Mr. C. O'Donnell 10839
Res. 4231, Northside Vol. FDs: Work/Determination - Commend,
Mr. C. Clarke 10839
Res. 4232, C.B. Dragon Boat Team: Efforts - Congrats., Mr. C. Clarke 10840
Res. 4233, Can. Assoc. of Med. Radiation Techs.: C.B. Convention -
Welcome, Mr. C. Clarke 10840
Res. 4234, Mitchell, Obbie: Contributions - Acknowledge,
Mr. C. Clarke 10841
Res. 4235, Windsor CIBC: Anniv. (120th) - Congrats., Hon. R. Russell 10841
Res. 4236, Wilson, Ken/Foodland Groc. (Greenwood)/Nat'l. Suppliers -
CAF: Donations - Congrats., Mr. J. Carey 10842
Res. 4237, Wefer, Donna - Queens Constit. Asst.: Dedication -
Congrats., Mr. K. Morash 10842
Res. 4238, Mingo Group: 2002 North Star Award - Congrats.,
Mr. J. DeWolfe 10843
Res. 4239, Thorburn Cons. Sch. - Teachers/Grade 5 Students:
Teaching Approach - Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 10843
Res. 4240, Tourism & Culture - Anna. Valley Apple Blossom Fest.:
Theme - Recognize, Hon. Rodney MacDonald 10844
Res. 4241, Saunders, Allan - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10844
Res. 4242, Smith, Caryn - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10845
Res. 4243, Getto, Carl - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10845
Res. 4244, Hill, Samantha - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10846
Res. 4245, Knight, Susan - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10846
Res. 4246, MacEachern, Mabel - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10847
Res. 4247, Francis, Chris - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10847
Res. 4248, MacDonald, Quentin - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10848
Res. 4249, Stevens, Calvin - UCCB: Graduation - Congrats.,
Mr. C. Clarke 10848
Res. 4250, NSLC/Global TV - TV Bureau of Can.: Award -
Congrats., Hon. Rodney MacDonald 10849
Res. 4251, Connors, Glenn P.: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Barnet 10849
Res. 4252, Archibald, Emily M.: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Barnet 10850
Res. 4253, Fletcher, Johnathan Andrew: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. B. Barnet 10850
Res. 4254, MacDonald, Amy Anna: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. W. Dooks 10851
Res. 4255, Jahn, Theresa: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Dooks 10851
Res. 4256, Brown, Brittany Fielding: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. W. Langille 10852
Res. 4257, Martin, Gillian Lee: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Langille 10853
Res. 4258, Mattatall, Justin Carl: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. W. Langille 10853
Res. 4259, Dean, Darrell Christopher: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. B. Taylor 10854
Res. 4260, Barr, Gregory Tyler: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Taylor 10854
Res. 4261, Benison, Katherine Diana: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. B. Taylor 10855
Res. 4262, Roy, Lilla Marjorie Cogswell: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. B. Taylor 10856
Res. 4263, Baker, Mark: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Hendsbee 10856
Res. 4264, Neily, Mark: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. D. Hendsbee 10857
Res. 4265, Batson, Alicia May Frances: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 10857
Res. 4266, Balcomb, Brandea: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. F. Chipman 10858
Res. 4267, Baker, Joshua Amos: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. F. Chipman 10859
Res. 4268, Sheehy, Meghan Alvaria: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 10859
Res. 4269, Steenken, Nikolas: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. F. Chipman 10860
Res. 4270, Lugar, Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. D. Morse 10860
Res. 4271, Ash, Fraser John Stephen: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. D. Morse 10861
Res. 4272, Dorn, Danielle Amaris Hillary: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 10862
Res. 4273, Smith, Laura Ashley: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. E. Fage 10862
Res. 4274, Jackson, Mark Gordon: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 10863
Res. 4275, Blades, Maximilian Jordan: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. E. Fage 10863
Res. 4276, Searle, Samuel Duncan: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. J. Muir 10864
Res. 4277, Gordon, Devin: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Purves 10865
Res. 4278, Jha, Sapna: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. J. Purves 10865
Res. 4279, Forbes, John Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Premier 10866
Res. 4280, MacKay, Margaret Rachel: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Premier 10866
Res. 4281, Proudfoot, Nicole Aileen: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Premier 10867
Res. 4282, Fraser, Peter Gordon O'Brien: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Premier 10868
Res. 4283, Dickie, Sean Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Premier 10868
Res. 4284, Rector, Andrew William Joseph: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10869
Res. 4285, McCabe, Ashley Dawn: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10869
Res. 4286, Roberts, Crystal Dawn: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10870
Res. 4287, Allen, Derek Lloyd: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
The Speaker 10871
Res. 4288, Hoffman, James Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10871
Res. 4289, Spicer, Kathleen Marie: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10872
Res. 4290, McDermott, Lacey Ann: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10872
Res. 4291, Scopie, Megan Dawn: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10873
Res. 4292, Quinn, Michael Joshua: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10874
Res. 4293, MacDonald, Scott Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., The Speaker 10874
Res. 4294, Ricketts, Chelsey Ann: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. P. Christie 10875
Res. 4295, Langille, David: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. P. Christie 10875
Res. 4296, Jang, Mee-Yeon: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. P. Christie 10876
Res. 4297, Brison, Alice-Dawn Charlotte: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. R. Russell 10877
Res. 4298, Sanford, Jeffrey Wade: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. R. Russell 10877
Res. 4299, Hines, Robert William: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Hon. R. Russell 10878
Res. 4300, Drake, Sara Nicole: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Hon. R. Russell 10878
Res. 4301, MacGregor, Alan William: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 10879
Res. 4302, Sharpe, Ashley Mildred: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 10880
Res. 4303, Anderson, Julia Dawn: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 10880
Res. 4304, Yorke, Matthew Jeremy: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 10881
Res. 4305, Findlay, Stacia Marie: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. DeWolfe 10881
Res. 4306, Bateman, Erika Candice: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. Chataway 10882
Res. 4307, Burke, Patrick Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. Chataway 10883
Res. 4308, Tweedie, Constance: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. J. Carey 10883
Res. 4309, Langelaan, David Nicholas: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. Carey 10884
Res. 4310, Grosvold, Leann Michel: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. J. Carey 10884
Res. 4311, Robar, Colin Neil: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Parent 10885
Res. 4312, Best, Lindsay Marie: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Parent 10886
Res. 4313, Hill, Nicole Candace: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Parent 10886
Res. 4314, Boland, Christopher: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Ms. M. McGrath 10887
Res. 4315, Thanasiou, Dimitri George: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Ms. M. McGrath 10887
Res. 4316, Parks, Natalie Elizabeth: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Ms. M. McGrath 10888
Res. 4317, Bate, Adam Frazer: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mrs. M. Baillie 10889
Res. 4318, Hilchey, Jeff Allan: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mrs. M. Baillie 10889
Res. 4319, DeYoung, Megan Kathleen: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mrs. M. Baillie 10890
Res. 4320, Reich-Burrill, Sophie: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mrs. M. Baillie 10890
Res. 4321, Patterson, Jeanette Marie: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. T. Olive 10891
Res. 4322, Fraser, Kathleen Claire: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. T. Olive 10892
Res. 4323, Peacocke, Neil Alexander: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. T. Olive 10892
Res. 4324, Marsh, Robert Gerard: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) -
Congrats., Mr. T. Olive 10893
Res. 4325, Moore, Sarah: Lt.-Gov's. Medal (2002) - Congrats.,
Mr. T. Olive 10893
Res. 4326, Can. Cancer Soc. - Ski Mt. Everest: Fundraising -
Applaud, Mr. C. Clarke 10894

[Page 10735]

HALIFAX, THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2002

Fifty-eighth General Assembly

Second Session

10:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Murray Scott

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Brooke Taylor, Mr. Jerry Pye, Mr. David Wilson

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Before we begin the daily routine, I would like to bring to the attention of all members five more of the Pages of this Legislature who are with us today and will soon be leaving. They are at the door today. We have Nick Cox, Talia D'Allessio, Jennifer Richardson, Jodi Sutherland and Sébastien. On behalf of all members, we would like to thank you for your great service to the Legislature of the province. You've done an excellent job for us. I'm very proud of you and we want to wish you all the best in your future careers. Congratulations, thank you. (Standing Ovation)

Just for the record, it's Sébastien Togneri.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order, if I may. A few weeks ago, about three weeks ago, in this House, the Premier, during Question Period, agreed that he would provide the contract for Roland Martin from Martillac on Intergovernmental Affairs. I am sure the Premier has been somewhat busy but over that period of time I think that it would have been sufficient time for him to ask his office to send over the contract to be tabled, as the Premier had promised to do. I rise on a point of order today simply to request that the Premier fulfill that commitment and we would like to have it before the House rises in the not too distant future.

10735

[Page 10736]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier, do you want to respond?

HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Thank you and I have already indicated to staff to have a look at that matter.

MR. SPEAKER: We will begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 4181

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas yesterday the Dartmouth General Hospital officially opened its new 47,000 square foot emergency department expansion, replacing the former outdated ER; and

Whereas this became a reality in large part thanks to the hospital's foundation and the community support through the very successful Reaching New Heights in Health campaign, which has already raised some $2.5 million towards the $11 million project under the Chairmanship of Mr. Neville Gilfoy; and

Whereas the Nova Scotia Government has also supported the impressive project through a commitment of $7.3 million to the new facility in support of the growing health care needs of the residents of Dartmouth and surrounding area;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House commend the continuing efforts of the foundation and its campaign chairman to reach their goal of $4.4 million and thank the staff and volunteers of the hospital for their work and patience during the renovations which have resulted in one of the finest ER facilities in our region.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 10737]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 4182

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Leader of the Canadian Alliance, Stephen Harper, has diagnosed Atlantic Canada and discovered a character flaw, which he describes as defeatism and a lack of optimism, without taking any opportunity to apologize or withdraw those remarks; and

Whereas Mr. Harper is the latest Albertan who seems to believe that it's his personal political viewpoint which gave Alberta abundant oil and gas; and

Whereas in this region, as in most of Canada, the Canadian Alliance record is one of constant defeat;

Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the Canadian Alliance Leader to distinguish between his own Party's unbroken string of defeats in most provinces and the reality of pride, achievement and optimism that characterizes both Nova Scotia and other Atlantic Provinces when he emerges from behind his Alberta firewall.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

[Page 10738]

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 4183

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas May 25 to June 2, 2002, has been designated Access Awareness Week, which profiles prominent issues for persons with disabilities; and

Whereas launched in 1992, the Mel Hebb Hourglass Action Awards recognize Nova Scotians demonstrating outstanding leadership and initiative in making the concept of full citizenship a reality; and

Whereas La Caisse Populaire de Clare Ltée received the Mel Hebb Hourglass Action Award for initiatives to make their business more accessible to persons with disabilities and for donating $750 in each of the last four years to assist the Clare accessible transportation system;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House recognize this week as Access Awareness Week and extend their congratulations to La Caisse Populaire de Clare and its Manager, Paul Emile LeBlanc, who accepted the award on its behalf.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

RESOLUTION NO. 4184

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10739]

Whereas the Cobequid Community Health Centre is being aided by many community groups to become the health services facility so needed by the community; and

Whereas the Royal Canadian Legion Calais Branch 162 in Sackville, which has a long history of community activism and support, is doing its part to achieve this worthwhile goal; and

Whereas the Sackville Legion generously donated $16,000 to the Cobequid Community Health Centre Capital Campaign toward the purchase of a blood gas analyzer;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Royal Canadian Legion Calais Branch 162 in Sackville for its generosity in helping the dream of an enhanced Cobequid Community Health Centre become a reality.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4185

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the official opening of the Dartmouth General Hospital emergency room expansion was held on Wednesday, May 29, 2002; and

Whereas both the construction of the Dartmouth General Hospital and the new emergency room expansion were positive initiatives of our previous Liberal Governments and carried on by the current government; and

Whereas since 1976, the Dartmouth General Hospital has provided excellent quality care to the residents of Dartmouth and surrounding communities as a nationally-recognized community hospital;

[Page 10740]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Dr. Todd Howlett, Chief of Emergency Medicine, the medical staff, nursing staff, allied health staff, administrative staff and all volunteers for their commitment to making the Dartmouth General Hospital a quality health care facility.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

RESOLUTION NO. 4186

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Department of Health's own statistics show that a third of Nova Scotians smoke and a quarter of teens aged 15 to 19 are smokers; and

Whereas thousands of Nova Scotians die each year due to the effects of tobacco use, including hundreds of non-smokers who die from exposure to second-hand smoke; and

Whereas May 31st marks World No Tobacco Day;

Therefore be it resolved that the John Hamm Government recognize World No Tobacco Day by giving its tobacco control legislation some teeth and banning smoking in all public places.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

[Page 10741]

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Victoria.

RESOLUTION NO. 4187

MR. KENNETH MACASKILL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas students from Baddeck Academy performed a collection of one-liners and songs in a performance entitled Who Else is Knockin' on Bras d'Or on May 23rd, 24th and 25th; and

[10:15 a.m.]

Whereas this performance included a cast of 16 and participation of many others; and

Whereas Director Jason Kempt and his crew were very pleased to see the dedication cast and crew gave to giving this show personality;

Therefore be it resolved that the cast and crew of Who Else is Knockin' on Bras d'Or? be recognized for their tremendous performance last week.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 4188

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10742]

Whereas this year has been another successful season for the Cole Harbour Cavaliers wrestling team; and

Whereas the Cavaliers swept through all competition they faced, winning the Parkview Invitational through to the provincial championships in Cape Breton this April, overcoming a spate of injuries along the way; and

Whereas Cole Harbour Cavaliers are proud to continue their strong presence in the sport of wrestling in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the Cole Harbour High School Cavaliers wrestling team on winning the Nova Scotia championships and pay special tribute to the individual wrestlers, their parents, teachers and coaches who made it all possible.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4189

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Medical Society of Nova Scotia Distinguished Service Award was presented to Guysborough Family Physician Dr. Anita Foley; and

Whereas this award is given to a doctor who has made an outstanding contribution to the medical profession and to the people of Nova Scotia, resulting in raising the standards of medical practice; and

Whereas Dr. Foley has been the anchor of primary medical care in Guysborough County for 25 years;

[Page 10743]

Therefore be it resolved that Dr. Anita Foley be recognized for her long-serving commitment to health care in Guysborough County and be congratulated for receiving the Medical Society Award for Distinguished Service.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 4190

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Premiers of all three Maritime Provinces, the federal NDP and Conservative Leaders and the members of this House have spoken out against the demeaning and divisive statements made by Canadian Alliance Leader Stephen Harper about Atlantic Canada; and

Whereas Mr. Harper's attack on the people of a disadvantaged region echoes earlier and equally disreputable attacks; and

Whereas the present Premier of this province played the same game when he said he would open up hospital beds by shutting down the steel industry in Cape Breton;

Therefore be it resolved that this House condemns all political leaders who weaken our society with divisive attacks on disadvantaged individuals and regions.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 10744]

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4191

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Britanny Eyking of Boularderie was the top soloist out of the 110 at the Millennium Dance Festive in Halifax; and

Whereas Ms. Eyking won a scholarship and top achievement award with her routine Ray of Light; and

Whereas Ms. Eyking, who dances with Kim Roper's Northside Dance, is the daughter of Janet and John Eyking;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Brittany Eyking on her award and wish her continued success in all her future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Sackville-Cobequid.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, I am just wondering if we could have the agreement of the House to revert back to the first resolution introduced by the Leader of the Official Opposition to request waiver of notice again.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. There is a request to revert back. Would the honourable member read the Therefore be it resolved.

[Page 10745]

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: "Therefore be it resolved that this House urge the Canadian Alliance Leader to distinguish between his own Party's unbroken string of defeats in most provinces and the reality of pride, achievement and optimism that characterizes both Nova Scotia and other Atlantic Provinces when he emerges from behind his Alberta firewall."

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 4192

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas students at Sir John A. Macdonald High School have suffered much discomfort since the closure of their school, but they have stuck together through these trying times; and

Whereas their sense of school spirit and solidarity is an inspiration to us all; and

Whereas Sir John A. students circulated a petition signed by 840 students asking they not be split up next year while their school's future is determined, which I had the honour and privilege to table in this House yesterday;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate the students of Sir John A. who have shown true solidarity and school spirit through the tumultuous times following the closure of their school.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 10746]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 4193

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Brian Forbes has been elected President of the Nova Scotia Teachers Union for a second two-year term; and

Whereas he has represented Yarmouth and Digby on the NSTU provincial executive and was a member of the Yarmouth local executive, and president; and

Whereas Mr. Forbes has been a teacher of mathematics and social studies for 30 years before becoming the NSTU President;

Therefore be it resolved that Mr. Forbes be commended for his dedication and commitment to education in Nova Scotia and be congratulated for being re-elected as President of the Nova Scotia Teachers Union.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

[Page 10747]

RESOLUTION NO. 4194

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: On behalf of the honourable member for Hants East, Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas being the chairman of a volunteer group or community project is a responsibility that too few will shoulder; and

Whereas Mr. Wayne Pick of Rawdon has accepted his share, and more, of such posts for the betterment of his community; and

Whereas Mr. Pick was awarded recognition for his outstanding sense of volunteerism by the Municipality of East Hants on April 26, 2002;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly join the Municipality of East Hants in recognizing Mr. Wayne Pick of Rawdon for his stellar volunteer efforts and congratulate him for taking on, time and again, the necessary burdens of leading community projects from idea to reality.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4195

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Colleen Jones has been named Nova Scotia's Female Amateur Athlete of the Year; and

[Page 10748]

Whereas Colleen made curling history in March when she won a fourth national title as the skip; and

Whereas she and her team won the world title last year and went to the tournament again this year;

Therefore be it resolved that Colleen Jones be congratulated upon being named Nova Scotia's Female Amateur Athlete of the Year, and be wished success in her curling career in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

RESOLUTION NO. 4196

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Needham calls for the Premier and his government to improve labour standards for all working people; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to ensure the safety of all working people.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 10749]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

RESOLUTION NO. 4197

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Glace Bay High School Band travelled to Walt Disney World to perform in Disney World's annual Magic Music Days this Spring; and

Whereas 104 students marched and played in Disney Village before crowds of thousands; and

Whereas the Glace Bay High School Band is the second Canadian band to perform in this event in the last four years;

Therefore be it resolved that the students of the Glace Bay High School Band be congratulated for their performance at Walt Disney World this year, and be wished success in all future performances.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

[Page 10750]

RESOLUTION NO. 4198

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas June 6, 2002, marks the 60th Wedding Anniversary of Frederick and Aletha Romkey of Eastern Passage; and

Whereas Frederick and Aletha, a native of P.E.I., were married at St. Peter's Anglican Church in Eastern Passage; and

Whereas daughter Lana Collier and their grandson will be celebrating this momentous occasion along with friends and family at the Eastern Passage Fire Hall on June 29, 2002;

Therefore be it resolved that this House congratulate Frederick and Aletha Romkey of Eastern Passage on their 60th Wedding Anniversary on June 6th and wish them many more years to come.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 4199

M. MICHEL SAMSON: M. le Président, par la présente, j'avise que je proposerai à une date ultérieure l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que Yvon Samson, natif de Petit-de-Grat dans le comté de Richmond, a été choisi comme récipiendaire du trophée intitulé School Board Member Recognition Award pour l'année 2002; et

Attendu que M. Samson est Président du Conseil scolaire acadien provincial ainsi qu' un des fondateurs du premier Congrès mondial acadien; et

[Page 10751]

Attendu que le trophée School Board Member Recognition Award a été créé pour reconnaître les membres du conseil scolaire qui ont montré de la persévérance pour l'amélioration du système éducatif;

Qu'il soit résolu que les membres de cette Chambre félicite M. Yvon Samson pour ses qualités de leadership dans le domaine de l'éducation et pour ses actions dans des domaines communautaires, culturel et économiques.

M. le Président, je propose l'adoption de cette résolution sans préavis et sans débat.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Yvon Samson of Petit-de-Grat, Richmond County, has been selected as the recipient of the Nova Scotia School Boards Association School Board Member Recognition Award for 2002; and

Whereas Mr. Samson is the Chairperson of the Conseil scolaire acadien provincial and a founding member of the first Congres Mondial Acadien; and

Whereas the Nova Scotia School Boards Association School Board Member Recognition Program, which is in its fourth year, was created to acknowledge outstanding school board members who have contributed exemplary service to public education;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend their congratulations to Mr. Yvon Samson on this accomplishment and recognize the invaluable contribution he makes to our education system.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

[Page 10752]

RESOLUTION NO. 4200

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas last night, May 29th, Nova Scotia Progressive Conservatives swallowed their pride for the sake of $900,000 in corporate largesse and welcomed back the man who virtually destroyed their Party; and

Whereas this was the same Brian Mulroney who used the good people of Pictou County and Central Nova to get his first seat in the House of Commons; and

Whereas Mr. Mulroney's reward for Pictonians was the political deals and heavy subsidies that resulted in the Westray Mine;

Therefore be it resolved that the Hamm Government should be as warm and welcoming toward the Westray families' fight for justice as it was to Brian Mulroney last night.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 4201

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: M. le Président, par la présente, j'avise que je proposerai à une date ultérieure l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que Kris Gaudet a été choisi comme gagnant pour la Province de la Nouvelle-Écosse au Concours signets francophones; et

Attendu que le Concours signet francophones était organisé par l'Association canadienne d'éducation de langue française dans le cadre de la Semaine nationale de la francophonie; et

[Page 10753]

Attendu que M. Gaudet, un étudiant de l'École Secondaire de Clare, a gagné pour son slogan intitulé "Pour moi, être actif et fier en francophonie, c'est faire connaître ma culture, mon héritage et mes traditions";

Qu'il soit résolu que les membres de cette Chambre félicite M. Kris Gaudet comme le gagnant pour la Province de la Nouvelle-Écosse et qu'on reconnait la fierté qu'il a pour sa langue et sa culture et qu'on lui souhaite bon succès.

M. le Président, je propose l'adoption de cette résolution sans préavis et sans débat.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Kris Gaudet won first place for and was the only winner from Nova Scotia at the Concours signets francophones; and

Whereas le Concours signets francophones is organized by the Canadian French Education Association during National Francophone Week; and

Whereas Mr. Gaudet, a student at l'École Secondaire de Clare, won for his slogan entitled "Pour moi, être actif et fier en francophonie, c'est faire connaître ma culture, mon héritage et mes traditions";

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend their congratulations to Mr. Kris Gaudet of Clare on his accomplishment and recognize his pride for his language and culture.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

[Page 10754]

[10:30 a.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 4202

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the second session of the 58th General Assembly will most likely be declared closed today; and

Whereas the Legislative Clerk, Deputy Clerk, Pages, Library staff, Hansard staff and commissionaires have worked diligently over the last two months; and

Whereas cafeteria staff of the Legislature have worked especially hard during this session, once again;

Therefore be it resolved that each of the staff persons of the Legislature be recognized for their dedication and hard work here at this House of Assembly.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried. (Standing Ovation)

I would like to thank the honourable member for Cape Breton West for that well-deserved resolution.

The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4203

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10755]

Whereas the Premier of Nova Scotia is clearly aware that smoking is indeed a health issue as he will make a presentation today at the Halifax Dunbrack Soccer Club in recognition of No Tobacco Day; and

Whereas the Premier had the chance to bring in a 100 per cent Smoke-free Places Act, but chose instead to make workplace distinctions; and

Whereas the Premier's recognition of No Tobacco Day comes on the same day as his government is expected to pass a flawed bill that won't protect everyone from the harmful effects of tobacco smoke;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier recognize this day with these players, and also realize that it's not acceptable that half of Nova Scotians are protected while the other half are not.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Minister of Tourism and Culture.

HON. RODNEY MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I would like to bring the members' attention to the east gallery. We all know how important our visitor information services are across the province. I would ask that members join with me in welcoming to the House, Nova Scotia Visitor Information counsellors who are doing some training. With them are leaders Alan Doyle and Jenn Brown. I would ask the House to give them a warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome our special guests to the gallery today, and hope you enjoy the proceedings.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: Question Period will begin at 10:34 a.m. and end at 11:34 a.m.

[Page 10756]

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

ECON. DEV. - SR. EXECUTIVES: EMPLOYMENT - EXPLAIN

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is going to be for the Premier. The Premier said that he was reducing the number of departments and reorganizing government to save money. Before the Premier got at the Department of Economic Development, there was one deputy minister who was paid about $105,000 a year to be the senior executive of the department. Through freedom of information, we find, now, five individuals at the deputy minister level getting $430,000 more in executive pay for a gutted economic development agency. I want to ask the Premier, how does the Premier explain his government's decision to add four senior executives to the gutted economic development agency?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, one way we could save money is that if the members of the New Democratic Party would simply ask for that kind of information instead of going through the expensive freedom of information process, then in fact they could help the province save some money. But in reality, if the member opposite would focus less on good competent people and focus more on what the government has done to provide services with less people, he would be doing the province a better service.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I've just tabled the list of the five senior executives who do now the work of one. This is the Tory version of the miracle of the loaves and fishes. I'm sure that these are fine individuals. I'm sure that they were hired on the basis of merit and through an open and transparent competition. But the question for the Premier is this, why did you add four senior executive positions to one department while you shut down hospital beds, while you allowed our schools to crumble, why did you make that decision?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the minister responsible for that department would be glad to respond. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, to the member opposite, he's confusing the issue. We created NSBI, the arm's-length body that's charged with economic development, and in order to staff that you have to hire personnel. The people we hired are remunerated at a level reflective of the competition in a private sector. There are no additional staff in total.

MR. DEXTER: Oh, perfect. Mr. Speaker, the Premier gave economic development three vice-presidents but they only have three loan officers. Did somebody tell the Premier that the department was bottom heavy, did somebody say, there are too many sailors, we need some more gold-braided admirals? No wonder, this department sends good money after

[Page 10757]

bad. Why can't the Premier understand - this is my question - that Nova Scotians want more of the services that matter and less money tied up in the executive suites of government?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, what Nova Scotians want is a system that works. What Nova Scotians want is economic development that works. This system will work better than the system that it replaces. That is the issue of the day. That is what Nova Scotians are interested in and what we're saying to Nova Scotians and we will be able, as the months proceed, to prove this; this system will work better than the old system.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

EDUC. - ABORIGINAL PEOPLE: INITIATIVES - DETAILS

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: My question is for the Minister of Education. Mr. Speaker, 16 per cent of Nova Scotia's Aboriginal population have less than a Grade 9 education; only 6 per cent have a university degree; four First Nations communities did not sign the Mi'kmaq Education Act and therefore receive their education policies through the Department of Education. My question to the minister is, what initiatives are underway to address these issues and ensure that Aboriginal people in this province get the education they deserve?

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, a great many of the First Nations people in Nova Scotia are getting the education they deserve. What we are doing in our department is something - actually to commend the former government, they worked at this too - but we have a Mi'kmaq Services Division in our department that pays very close attention to the kinds of matters the member for Cape Breton The Lakes refers to, and we take their advice.

MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, my question again is to the Minister of Education. Unemployment is higher in Aboriginal communities than the provincial average. Many communities are also in need of economic development initiatives to spark their economies. A higher level of education in these communities would assist in employment and economic development initiatives. Aboriginal people have ideas and solutions to raise education levels among their population. My question is, has the minister met with any individuals or groups to discuss possible options for raising education levels in First Nations communities and who were these individuals or groups?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, I have met with some people to discuss these and other issues relating to Aboriginal education. Many of those include my own staff. Last year I met here in this very House with Berndt Christmas and a group from his area to discuss a very interesting possibility on their reserve.

MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, my final question is for the Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs. As the Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs, can the minister explain what he is doing to ensure that Aboriginal people in Nova Scotia increase their level

[Page 10758]

of education to reduce unemployment and increase economic development in their communities?

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, the issue of Aboriginal education is an issue for the Minister of Education. I would defer that question to the Minister of Education.

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, as I said, we do have a Mi'kmaq Services Division in our department. We do have Aboriginal representatives on all the school boards and we continue with those initiatives. We care about our Aboriginal people and, again, we leave a lot of the initiatives to be drawn up by people in our department because they know best what is going to work with their people.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

EDUC. - C.P. ALLEN HS/SIR JOHN A. MACDONALD HS:

SPLIT SHIFTS - PLANS

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, my question, through you, is to the Minister of Education. Yesterday, the Minister of Education stated in this House it takes time to come to a decision about the future of dear old Sir John A. Macdonald High School. Every day she ponders the answer to an obvious question is another day students from Sir John A. Macdonald High School and the students from C.P. Allen High School have their education disrupted by split shifts. I can tell you that split shifts hurt students academically. That is a proven fact. The Minister of Education has known for months that it was possible Sir John A. Macdonald High School would never be reopened. Surely, during these months, she's had the time to develop a plan with the board to ensure split shifting does not continue next year. So my question - thank you for helping me get to it - for the Minister of Education is, could you share your plan with us today showing how and when your department plans to deal with the disruption of split shift of students between C.P. Allen and Sir John A. Macdonald High Schools?

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, yes, I've known many things for months about Sir John A. Macdonald High School and the difficulties at C.P. Allen High School. The member opposite well knows, because he's experienced it himself, that split shifts are very disruptive and that we are not in favour of them except on an emergency basis. But surely the member opposite is not suggesting that we just send the kids back to that school and forget all about the environmental assessment.

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, the fate of Sir John A. Macdonald High School is important not only to the students of that school and that growing community, but also to the school that takes in these students and the good member for Bedford-Fall River, who's involved in this particular issue as much as I am. Currently, C.P. Allen High School students and staff also have been disrupted. My question to the minister is, will the minister commit

[Page 10759]

today that she will provide the necessary funds and financial resources required by the school board to address this issue of split shifting at Sir John A. Macdonald and C.P. Allen High Schools?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, all the money and resources in the world are not going to provide a new school over the summer and the member opposite knows that.

[10:45 a.m.]

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, this is an emotional, personal issue. It's a personal issue for me, as the MLA for that area, and for that MLA opposite and for the MLA for Chester-St. Margaret's. The minister dithers about whether to replace a school that she knows should have been replaced years ago that that previous government didn't deal with and now we are forced into a position where we have to deal with the issue. She hadn't thought to put together a plan to address split shifting. The problem has been going on since March and she won't commit the resources required by the board to help solve the problem. That's inexcusable.

MR. SPEAKER: Question, please.

MR. ESTABROOKS: My question to the minister is, why don't you start solving these problems that will cause the serious disruptions and affect academically on the education future of these young people in our community?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite talks about this being an emotional issue and I agree with him, it is an emotional issue for many people involved, but I hope he is not suggesting that I should solve an emotional issue by being emotional. The earliest the students at Sir John A. could go back to their school, should it be renovated, would be in the second semester, next winter. Now I agree split shifting is not a preferred option. However, the member tabled a petition asking that the school population stay together. There is an option to split shifting and that is sending the students to a number of other schools until their school is renovated. If he would prefer that option, I think it's a good one, then perhaps he could say so.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

STORAENSO - COSTS: SOLUTIONS - GOV'T. (N.S.) PLANS

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, more than 1,400 individuals and families in the Strait area directly rely on StoraEnso for their well-being. As a result of a serious drop in sales and prices for newsprint and supercalendered paper, StoraEnso is forced to examine its major costs, that being electricity, wages and wood costs. The Stora President has made it clear that unless solutions can be found to the major costs they face, one of the options

[Page 10760]

Stora may need to implement is to permanently shut PM 1, which would mean the layoff of more than 450 employees, which would be devastating to the local economy. My question is, what leadership has the Premier and his government shown to work with StoraEnso and their employees to address these important issues?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, it is a good question and it is a responsible question. I would refer it to the minister who is working on the file.

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, it is a very serious and important question, not only for the Strait area but for Nova Scotia. This government certainly sees it in that light. A number of ministers and senior department heads have met with senior StoraEnso officials and we have a management committee of senior officials from a number of departments working directly with the company on those particular issues.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I find it very unfortunate that the Premier of this province doesn't consider himself responsible for companies such as Stora and the importance that they are to this province and to our economy. I stood in this House a few weeks ago and spoke on behalf of StoraEnso in calling upon the government to implement their new energy committee which the government committed to as part of their energy strategy. I am pleased that this committee did meet this week to discuss the issue of deregulating power supply in the Province of Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia Power's proposed power rate increase would cost StoraEnso an additional $10 million from the current $160 million they are already paying yearly. My question again, could the Premier advise this House as to what time frame his government has established to allow for competition and the supply of electricity in Nova Scotia?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I refer that to the Minister of Economic Development, who is responsible for the energy policy. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order. Order, please.

HON. GORDON BALSER: It's unfortunate members opposite would try to trivialize something as significant as this issue. It is a very important issue to the entire province and the committee has met. They're looking at what is possible. It's a very complex issue and it requires thought in determining the best go-forward. So there's not a definite date at this juncture, but I assure the members opposite and all members of this House that this government is treating this issue as a very, very significant one.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, as disappointing as it is to see that the Premier himself doesn't feel it's important enough to be briefed upon, now the government doesn't even know which minister in their own Cabinet is responsible for this very important file, which is disappointing to say the least.

[Page 10761]

In the mid-1990s, there was a question as to what StoraEnso's long-term future would be in this province. The provincial Liberal Government of the day worked hard with the company to address their concerns, which in the end led to StoraEnso undertaking the largest industrial expansion in the history of this province with the construction of their new PM 2 supercalender paper machine. My final supplementary is, in light of the uncertainty around StoraEnso's future that exists today, what assurances can the Premier give that he and his government are doing all they can to work with StoraEnso's management to preserve the company's long-term viability in the Strait area?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I would remind the member opposite that when this member sat in Opposition, he supported the then government in the package that they came forward with to support PM 2. I would hope that that member will support the efforts of this government to allow PM 1 to survive.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH - TOBACCO ACCESS LAWS: FINES - NUMBER EXPLAIN

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, yesterday, the Minister of Health corrected information he had inadvertently erroneously provided in this House on the amount of fines collected from retailers selling tobacco to youth under 19. We need to know the number of prosecutions for selling to minors because it's a direct reflection of this government's commitment to curbing teen smoking. One has to wonder the depth of commitment of this government when in 2000, a Canada-wide study showed that 26 per cent of retailers in Nova Scotia were still selling tobacco to minors. So my question to the Minister of Health is, why are there so few fines levied in this province if over one-quarter of our retailers are in violation of the tobacco access laws?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, in the last fiscal year, a total of 274 retailers were either charged or warned.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, the Tobacco Access Act allows for tobacco-selling privileges to be revoked if a retailer sells to minors, but we rarely hear of such an action being taken. In Ontario, retailers caught selling to minors face automatic suspension, as do repeat offenders in this province. It would be interesting to see how many repeat offenders are charged in this province. So I want to ask the Minister of Health, will he table in this House the number of retailers in this province who have had their tobacco-selling privileges suspended for selling to minors?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I will endeavour to get that information. I don't have it with me. I can tell you how many people were fined and the number of retailers that were charged and warned, but I don't have the number that actually had their licence suspended, but I can tell you how many were fined. I can tell you that nobody got up to the third warning.

[Page 10762]

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I have no idea how this government is going to be able to enforce their new tobacco laws when they seem to be having so much difficulty with the existing laws that are on the books. I want to ask the Minister of Health, if so many retailers in this province are breaking the law by selling to minors, why hasn't his department been more aggressive in pursuing offenders to the full extent of the tobacco access law?

MR. MUIR: The honourable member is talking about a high rate of non-compliance. I think it doesn't make much difference what you're selling, the degree of compliance is something I believe that most of the retailers in this province are honest business people who are trying to comply with the law. Notwithstanding that, I do recognize that probably there are some who are trying to get around the law. We have been relatively successful in terms of our prosecution rate - we laid 80 charges and had 59 convictions which, I think, those two or three people in this Assembly who have had some experience with the courts, they might indicate that's probably not a bad percentage.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

HEALTH - RADIOLOGICAL EQUIP.: ACTION - DETAILS

DR. JAMES SMITH: My question is to the Minister of Health. In a newsletter last year, the Chairman of the Nova Scotia Association of Radiology stated that she met with the Minister of Health to raise concerns over the province's aging radiological equipment. The issue of outdated radiological equipment is still as relevant this year as it was last year. My question to the Minister of Health is, can the minister please indicate what action his department currently has for addressing the aging radiological equipment situation in Nova Scotia?

HON. JAMES MUIR: There is some aged radiological equipment in this association. There's no question that the radiology association has been an active lobby group in trying to improve the equipment needs. I recognize that, and I just wish we had enough money to meet all of their needs. In addition to radiological deficit, there are other deficits equipment-wise, but I can tell you that within two weeks we will make an announcement that will go not all the way, but will make a major dent in that wish list.

DR. SMITH: I thank the minister for his answer, and we all know that the federal government is taking a leadership role and this government hasn't been able to catch up with that. This is an important issue because this issue impacts directly on patient care and quality of care. Without proper up-to-date radiological equipment, staff may have to cancel clinical appointments and again we will see wait times increasing. But that's only part of it, without this medical equipment there are also concerns about the ability to retain and educate staff. My question for the Minister of Health is, what proposals does this minister have for

[Page 10763]

ensuring this additional, but related, issue of radiological equipment is also addressed? I know he's going to announce something in a couple of weeks, but what proposals . . .

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, we have some very fine equipment in this province and some very skilled practitioners, and the difficulty with the question that the honourable member poses is it implies that we don't have any good equipment in the province and he knows as well as I do that is just not the case. The governments, both levels, have contributed to that, foundations and auxiliaries have contributed to that. Let's just take CAT scans. I believe there are two places in the province that need updated CAT scans, but every other regional hospital has an extremely modern, first-rate CAT scan. We've got enough CAT-scan capacity in this province to do other places as well.

DR. SMITH: CAT scans - the media pick it up and the people understand CAT scans. There's a lot more at issue here than CAT scans and the minister should know that.

A few weeks ago the Minister of Health told this House that his department would begin to decide how to spend the second $15 million federal monies once he received information. The minister indicated that he had asked the district health authorities to submit their request list and once he received those lists his department would buy the appropriate equipment. My question to the minister is, can the minister please provide this House with an update on how and where he is planning to spend the second instalment of funds from the federal government?

MR. MUIR: A couple of things about that. We did receive the information from the district health authorities and also long-term care facilities. One of the things that entered into it, we found a new buying plan and a number of the district health authorities decided to enroll in that. It was a very good decision because of considerable savings. I think if the honourable member is patient, within two weeks that will be disclosed in full.

[11:00 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

ECON. DEV. - WHITNEY PIER: COAL STOCKPILING - DETAILS

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, in 1987, the Cape Breton Development Corporation tried to stockpile 200,000 tons of coal in the Whitney Pier area. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. There's too much noise in the Chamber. I would ask the members to take their conversations outside if they have to talk, please.

[Page 10764]

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, in 1987, the Cape Breton Development Corporation tried to stockpile 200,000 tonnes of coal in the Whitney Pier area. The provincial government at the time, the Tory Government of the day, and the federal government stopped Devco because the environmental concerns were just too great. I would like to table some newspaper clippings from that period that will just show the story. This government, through the Department of Economic Development as partners, wants to stockpile 700,000 tons of coal on the site of the former Sysco Sydney steel plant. The Minister of Environment and Labour says it's not a provincial concern. I want to ask that minister, why are you giving in to pressure from the Minister of Economic Development instead of listening to the residents of Whitney Pier?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, we have been discussing this one on a number of occasions. As I pointed out previously, the member for the area has brought that up a couple of times in the House, and to try to answer his questions, I would say that a lot of consideration was given to this before we issued the approval and, indeed, the approval, I would point out, was issued by the regional office. A trip was taken out to the West Coast to see where much larger facilities handle this type of situation. I'm satisfied the appropriate protections are in place.

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, that minister has ducked responsibility for that site since it came to light. He's protecting the Minister of Economic Development instead of protecting the environment for the people of Whitney Pier. For too long that area has been an industrial guinea pig for Nova Scotia. This government nor previous governments care about the health and well-being of those people. The water sprayed on that coal to keep it from combusting will run into the harbour and into the groundwater, and the minister should know that. I would like to table the Whitney Pier and Area Development Association's notice to appeal that. I want to ask the minister, when will you meet with these residents and address their concerns outlined in this appeal? When will you do that, Mr. Minister?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, there is an appeal that has come forward. It will go through the appropriate process, and we will deal with it at that time.

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, over 15 years ago, both levels of government knew stockpiling 200,000 tons of coal was dangerous. Now this minister says 700,000 tons is no problem, we can go ahead with this, we don't care about the people of Whitney Pier. It effectively creates no jobs for those people, yet they've got to live with the impact of that pending environmental disaster. I want to ask that minister, why should those people trust you now that you're turning your back on them?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I want to make it absolutely clear, it's not the question of the number of jobs as was mentioned by the member opposite, it's a matter of protecting the environment and protecting the people who live in that area.

[Page 10765]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

TRANSPORT. & PUB. WKS. - BRIDGE INSPECTIONS (2001-02):

DETAILS - TABLE

MR. PAUL MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, I want to ask a question of the Minister of Transportation and Public Works. I would like to table a press release he issued back on January 14th of this year about bridge inspection. That press release indicated that his department had a year-round team of bridge inspectors who were following the highest standards employed by the United States federal highways. I want to ask the minister, can he table all details from bridge inspections carried out in the last year in Nova Scotia, including the names and locations of each bridge that was inspected?

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I see no difficulty with that. We inspect our bridges annually. We have a regime that we follow and we sent, I believe it was seven people last year down to the United States to examine their regimes for bridge inspection. I'm confident that we have the expertise in this province to carry out those inspections, but you can't avoid having collisions occasionally with bridges with, whether it be trucks or other vehicles, that does indeed contribute to the collapse of bridges.

MR. MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, yesterday we had a bridge collapse and I have here another press release; it's not from the minister himself, it's from Brian Flinn of The Daily News. It says that the bridge that collapsed yesterday had been inspected three weeks ago. So I think we should table that one too. A 1996 report showed that the average bridge in Nova Scotia was 51-years-old, while the average bridge in Canada as a whole was only 23-years-old. The minister is aware that some 200 bridges within the purviews of his department are in dire need of replacement. I'd like to ask the minister, will he review the department's inspection criteria to ensure that more bridges do not collapse?

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, the reason that the average bridge across Canada is only 21-years-old and they are much older in this province is simply because this province has been in existence for a lot longer than the other provinces. At the turn of the century the average Nova Scotian wasn't driving a 20-ton truck or driving an automobile, they were driving a horse and buggy. Indeed, these bridges were designed originally for a horse and buggy. If the NDP had their way, maybe we would go back to driving a horse and buggy in Nova Scotia. (Laughter) However, that is not so. I don't want to make light of this subject because it's a very serious subject and it's one that indeed the government has to address.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. MACEWAN: Mr. Speaker, as a final supplementary, I have two more press releases here from The Daily News, by Brian Flinn, the headings of which are, first of all, Nova Scotia bridges more than twice as old as Canadian average, because of that horse and

[Page 10766]

buggy approach we just heard; and the second one is, Nova Scotia bridges exceeding life expectancy. I would like to table those two press releases as well, for the minister's consideration and to remind him, through you, Mr. Speaker, that five bridges in this province have collapsed in the past two years; five in two years. Has the minister red-flagged those bridges that could collapse - and have not yet - and, if so, what is he going to do about it, other than advocating the return to the horse and buggy?

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, it's a very interesting question. I wish I had more time to answer it. If there are bridges that are red-flagged, I can assure the House, I can assure the people of Nova Scotia that they will be closed, period. Back again to the 1900s, if a person had to get from one side of the river to the other, the actual distance to travel might be considerable by horse and buggy but today perhaps we don't need a bridge in some of the locations that have steel-truss bridges because of the fact that we have faster means of transportation and a detour or a longer trip to get from one side of the river to the other of maybe two or three kilometres is not significant.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

HEALTH - MOUNTAIN LEA LODGE:

BEDS - UTILIZATION DETAILS

MR. JERRY PYE: I thought he was never going to sit down for a minute. Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Health. On April 8th, family members of residents at Mountain Lea Lodge in Bridgetown were informed that the daily fee had been increased because the facility was unable to keep its 112 beds full. In a recent letter from the NSGEU to the Annapolis Valley District Health Authority they indicated that there are approximately 30 people in Soldiers Memorial Hospital waiting for long-term care beds. That doesn't even factor in the people waiting in their homes for vacant extended care beds. Mountain Lea has empty beds but there seems to be a break in the line of communications. I ask the Minister of Health, why aren't the people in Annapolis County able to utilize this space at Mountain Lea Lodge?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I'm delighted that the honourable member asked that question because when we talk about long-term care capacity in the province, what he has just indicated is that there may be more capacity than a lot of people wish to acknowledge for various reasons.

In the case of Mountain View Lodge in Bridgetown, we now have the single-entry system, Mr. Speaker. I do know that there were some vacancies there and there were a couple of reasons for that. It was not necessarily the home of choice for some people. Secondly, everybody now has to be assessed to go into those institutions; regardless of your financial status, those who need to get into long-term care are the first ones to go in.

[Page 10767]

MR. PYE: Mr. Speaker, the minister did touch on the particular problem here. The district health authority's representative says that the tie-up in filling the beds is connected to implementing this single-entry access system. While the bugs are being worked out, beds are empty. The transitional care units and hospitals beds are full. Families at Mountain Lea are paying $10 more per day due to the funding recalculation with fewer beds. I ask the Minister of Health, is this his idea of how the single-entry access system is supposed to improve transition to nursing homes in this province?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I do apologize, I understand that the last time I was on my feet I did not say Mountain Lea I said Mountain Dew . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Mountain View. (Laughter)

MR. MUIR: My quick colleague here picked that up for me. Mr. Speaker, the single-entry access process is working fairly well right now. It's like any new process; it takes some time to get some of the bugs out of it. I'm pleased to say that each week, each month, the process is working better. I can also indicate that it will not be too long before we release Phase II of our clinical studies plan which has to do with long-term care, and that will give us an evidence-based direction for the future in the allocation of beds.

MR. PYE: Mr. Speaker, it should be fairly simple. A person is in hospital waiting for a bed, a nursing home has an empty bed and the problem should be solved. For some reason, the system isn't working and the private-paying families at Mountain Lea Lodge are footing the bill. My question to the Minister of Health is, what is stopping his department from filling the vacant beds and reducing the per diem rate to the previous level at Mountain Lea Lodge? I mean the previous level to March of this year.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, long-term care costs are going up and the honourable member is living in la-la land to think that health care costs aren't going up and you can go back and do what you did last year, to me that's a good example of why this group should not be government.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

TRANSPORT. & PUB. WKS. - SYDNEY CITY HOSPITAL:

SALE - DETAILS

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Transportation and Public Works. The Mayor and Council of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality have requested that the government sell the property at the site of the former City Hospital in Sydney. The minister has stated that the province has no use for this property but has rejected the Cape Breton Regional Municipality's request. The province bought the land for $1 and now the municipality would like to purchase it back for the same price. My

[Page 10768]

question to the minister is, in the spirit of fairness, why has this government refused to sell the property back to the Cape Breton Regional Municipality?

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, it's not the intent of the Department of Transportation and Public Works or the government to start selling property that is worth $140,000 for $1.

[11:15 a.m.]

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: You know, Mr. Speaker, that answer is very interesting because not only is the property, I believe, worth more than $145,000, but this government never even bothered to tender it to sell it. They just listed it with somebody so that somebody, that real estate, could go down the street to a friend of theirs and say here's the piece of property you're interested in for $145,000. They never even put the property up for tender.

The government talks a lot about fairness, Mr. Speaker, and the CBRM is not in a position to pay $145,000. The government has sold the parking lot at the lower end of that property for $1 to the United Church of Canada. So if they're not in the practice of selling property for $1, they just did, part of it, and that's a good move as far as I'm concerned. But my question is, why won't the government show the same fairness to the Cape Breton Regional Municipality?

MR. RUSSELL: Well, Mr. Speaker, back in, I think it was about 1970-something, the province purchased that piece of property from the City of Sydney when the honourable member for Cape Breton South was the mayor, and guess what? We gave him $1 in one hand and with the other hand we gave him $984,000.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: That just shows you, Mr. Speaker, what a great negotiator I was on behalf of the people of Sydney to get $984,000 for the hospital, and they took the City Hospital off my back at the same time. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, I might remind the minister that that government just sold a golf course for $1. If they can sell a golf course for $1, they can certainly make the residents of a neighbourhood in Sydney very pleased about the fact that it might be able to retain a green area. My final supplementary to the minister is, why won't the minister simply sell the land back to the municipality so they can make it available to residents surrounding the hospital area for a green area for their children for the future?

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, why don't we sell it back to the municipality? We would be delighted to sell it back to the municipality, although I'm having second thoughts now that I've been told that the property is worth a lot more than $140,000. Maybe we should jack the price up a little.

[Page 10769]

AN HON. MEMBER: Why don't you put it up for tender, Mr. Minister? (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable Minister of Transportation and Public Works on the answer only, please.

MR. RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I mentioned the fact that we gave $984,000, I think it was, to the city, but we also paid off another $3-some million of debts that the hospital had accumulated. As to why we sold the parking lot to the United Church for $1, it was simply because the United Church had been using that property as a parking space for many years.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH - COMMUN. MENTAL HEALTH: SERVICES - STATUS

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, last week I tabled a document that shows that mental health in-patient time has been cut by 85 per cent since 1993. The Minister of Health's response was that less hospital days mean more needs are being met in the community. Now, the minister has clearly got it wrong. I would like to table another document. This is an Annapolis Valley research document that clearly shows that the number of mental health cases has been constant since 1993, yet in-patient time has been cut in half.

Mr. Speaker, the truth is that community services are deteriorating for people with mental health, and so are the Department of Health mental health services. The southwest region alone is short seven psychiatrists. So I want to ask the minister, is he still willing to claim that community mental health services are in good shape?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, there is obviously more work we can do in mental health. Indeed, one of the blue book commitments we made was to improve mental health services, and we will be coming forth with an announcement about adolescents and youth some time in the very near future. I'm not so sure if the honourable member understands the question. The fact is that the model to treat mental illness is to do what you can in the community and in-patient resources are used only as a last resort. It is a good thing if we can treat people in our communities because that's the modern approach to mental health.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I understand only too well the new model of mental health services, which is to throw people into the community and give them no supports. That's what I'm talking about. Mental health services are on the verge of crisis. Ask front-line staff. They have no access to the financial health and home care that mental health people need and the risk of suicide is very high. People are in emergency rooms with long waits. The mobile crisis centre at the Abbie Lane Hospital only operates part-time. I could go on. The minister needs to answer, what is his department going to do to increase

[Page 10770]

some co-operation between himself and the Minister of Community Services to improve services in the community for people with mental health issues?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, our department has added money to mental health services this year. As the honourable member knows, the last report out was the Mental Health Review in Nova Scotia. She also is aware there were probably about 30 mental health studies and nobody had done anything over about a 20 year period, or not a whole lot. We have basically consolidated that work and we will be making, I think, an announcement everybody is this House will be very happy with before too long.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, we've been hearing about the forthcoming announcement, the forthcoming plan. There are people in the community right now with mental health needs that are going unmet and the crisis workers are unable to provide any of the services that are required. So I want to ask the minister today, what are your immediate plans to improve the diagnostic and community services for all age groups who have mental health needs?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the mental health services are devolved to the district health authorities. There are more mental health professionals being hired. The recruitment efforts are being stepped up. There have been enhancements to a good many of the community-based programs. I will go back to what I said in response to the first question. We know that there is room to go ahead and we are moving ahead as fast as we can.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

AGRIC. & FISH. - INSPECTION CHANGES:

FARMERS' BUSINESS - ENSURE

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries. The freezer beef industry in the province is important to rural Nova Scotia. Farmers often sell a limited amount of beef at the farm gate. Over the years, regulations with regard to inspection have been tightened for food health security. More recently, farmers across Nova Scotia have been concerned that the proposed changes to the regulations are so tough that they will put so many families and so many farmers out of business. Could the minister explain what the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries is doing to ensure that these proposed changes to the regulations will not put farmers out of business?

HON. ERNEST FAGE: Mr. Speaker, a very important sector of our agricultural economy certainly is beef farming in Nova Scotia. There are a number of methods in which farmers are able to get their products to the consumers and there are some large federally-inspected slaughterhouses in Atlantic Canada here. There are a number of provincially inspected slaughterhouses and then there are the freezer beef operations. We as a department put out a discussion paper on proposed regulation changes, obviously to ensure that health

[Page 10771]

and food safety are respected and that they are prudent. Those consultations have been held around Nova Scotia, concerns raised on that and we will take that into consideration before we move forward in any manner.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, recently, Statistics Canada has shown that Nova Scotia has lost over 500 family farms in the last five years. Changes to the regulations proposed will further erode the number of family farms in Nova Scotia. So my question to the minister is, can the minister assure producers and consumers that no undue harm will result through the implementation of these regulations to the farming community?

MR. FAGE: Mr. Speaker, obviously, all members of the House are concerned about health and food safety and those regulations are required to be enforced. From the perspective of the farm community, there will be many avenues and ample opportunities for them to market the high quality beef that they produce in this province. Certainly, the farm community is ready and will fill those needs.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, the bottom line here, Mr. Minister, is that these regulations will eliminate rural tradition and the rural small businesses, the family farm. So my final question to the minister is, will the minister commit to working with the beef producers instead of shutting them out all together?

MR. FAGE: I believe the honourable member is confused because we do work with the beef producers in this province continuously on an ongoing basis. We also work with the processing industry and the retail industry. We are making every effort to consult. That's why we've gone to public consultation. That is why we involve producers. That's why we involve processors and wholesalers in these consultations. Obviously the member didn't appear at any of the hearings.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - DART. MARINE SLIPS:

EMPLOYEES - SEVERANCE ENSURE

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, two years ago, the Irvings shut down the Dartmouth Marine Slips and they laid off more than 100 people. Since then, the Irvings stripped the site of machinery and equipment, but they refuse to admit the shipyard is closed because they don't want to pay severance. After more than 20 years of dedicated service, former Dartmouth Marine Slips employees have to fight to get the severance they are due, meanwhile the government does nothing. My question for the Minister of Environment and Labour is, why won't you step in and ensure that the Dartmouth Marine Slips employees receive fair severance?

[Page 10772]

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, this is the first time this has been brought to my attention, and I would be happy to enquire and get a briefing on this case.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I don't know where the minister was when this matter was discussed in the House. Certainly, this is an important matter for his department and he should be aware of it. I want to say it's been two years, the Irvings and this government continue to sit back and wait for the employees to go away. While they sit on their hands, many workers struggle to find work and are in danger of losing their homes. The workers just want this saga to end. They want the severance they are due. The shipyard is stripped bare, it's clear that there's no intention to reopen the site and the Irvings refuse to pay. My question for the Minister of Economic Development is, will the minister employ Section 4 of the Industry Closing Act and conduct an inquiry in this matter?

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I would remind the member opposite that the Irving presence in this province has created a significant number of jobs. In fact, there are in excess of 1,200 people working on the Eric Raude, there are some 400 working on the new supply ships that are being built, so the Irvings are employing people in this province.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, the Dartmouth Marine Slips have been closed. That's a reality. That is what Section 4 of the Industry Closing Act is for. It's been two years, and the Dartmouth Marine Slips' employees have no answers and no severance, and now they're being forced to fight for their pensions. The industry they helped to build refuses to do the right thing, and for some reason this government will do nothing. My question for the Minister of Environment and Labour is, when will you stop ignoring these workers and step in and ensure that they are treated fairly?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, as I indicated before, I have not been briefed specifically on this case, but the Labour Relations Board is in place. I'm presuming that this is a unionized workforce, and it would seem reasonable to me that the Labour Relations Board would provide the appropriate remedy for them. Thank you.

[11:30 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

TRANSPORT. & PUB. WKS. - SYDNEY OFFICE SPACE:

TENDERS - STATUS

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: My question is for the Minister of Transportation and Public Works. The Department of Transportation and Public Works has called tenders for 7,000 square feet of office space to house the new amalgamated Department of Environment and Labour staff in the Sydney area. My question, quite simply, to the minister is, what is the status of this proposal?

[Page 10773]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: When the Department of Environment was a stand-alone department, it occupied space on Charlotte Street in Sydney. When the lease on that building expired at the end of 2000, it was extended because of the pending merger of the Departments of Environment and Labour. So in May of this year we went to the market for space, 7,000 feet. We had two submissions and those two submissions are presently being evaluated.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I detect a bit of contradiction here. If he's extended the contract for the office space in the year 2000, I would be interested to know when it expires. As I indicated to the minister earlier today, the Department of Transportation and Public Works has office space in the Upper Prince Street area, the old Children's Training Centre. Some of the staff from the Children's Aid Society are now working there. The rest are in the Provincial Building, which is a government building. Why wouldn't the department transfer the Children's Aid staff from the Provincial Building to the children's aid centre, put them under one roof, and have the Department of Environment staff go to the Provincial Building with the Department of Labour staff under the new amalgamation?

MR. RUSSELL: The honourable member did mention that to me earlier today, Mr. Speaker, and it's an interesting alternative. The staff will be looking at that particular proposal.

MR. MACKINNON: A little concerning is the fact that the government has already called tenders. You would have thought that the government would have done that before it undertook to call tenders. So my question to the minister is, why has the minister not consulted with the front-line workers and staff in the two Sydney offices for their input on the recommendations for this amalgamated workforce, particularly in view of the serious problems in the Department of Environment and Labour, where there is a shortage of financial resources to address a lot of the problems in that department as outlined by the Auditor General?

MR. RUSSELL: The submissions have come in, and as I say, at the present time they're being evaluated. The market in Sydney has changed dramatically since the original tender back in the mid-1990s for that building for the Department of the Environment. I would suggest to you that this is one of the alternatives we have to have a look at.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto. You have about five seconds.

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: To the Minister of Environment and Labour. There's a whole series of sites in Coldbrook, on Old Guysborough Road, Highway No. 118 that all need . . .

[Page 10774]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time allotted for the Oral Question Period has expired.

Before I go to the Government House Leader, I would like to bring the attention of all members some special guests who are in the Speaker's Gallery today. We have some Grade 9 students from Oxford Regional High School. They're accompanied here by their teacher, Mr. Kendall Black. They're here to observe the proceedings of the House and I would ask the members to give them the usual warm welcome to the Legislature here today. Welcome to the students and the teacher. (Applause)

The honourable member for Halifax Needham on an introduction.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it gives me great pleasure to rise in my place and introduce a special guest we have in our west gallery today who has been my right arm for the past three years in my constituency office and whose contribution to my office and my work and the constituency of Halifax Needham is immeasurable. He is leaving soon to pursue graduate studies in the U.K. at the University of Manchester, so I would like to thank Leon Thomas for the work that he's done in my office and the contribution he's made to the community of Halifax Needham and to our province. I ask members of the House to join with me in wishing him well, and have him stand. (Applause)

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[11:36 a.m. The House resolved itself into CWH on Bills with Mr. Chairman, Mr. Brooke Taylor, in the Chair.]

[11:37 a.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and considered the following bill:

Bill No. 129 - Assessment Act/Municipal Grants Act.

[Page 10775]

and the chairman has been instructed to recommend this bill to the favourable consideration of the House, without amendment.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I would ask for unanimous consent to move Bill No. 129 on the order paper for third reading this day.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Third Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR THIRD READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 9.

Bill No. 9 - Pension Benefits Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Environment and Labour.

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I move third reading of the Pension Benefits Act, Bill No. 9.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I just want to speak briefly on this bill. I know that there are more than 1,000 Nova Scotians waiting for this pension bill to go forward and I'm pleased that the government has brought this pension bill forward. I do know that there are some deficiencies within the pension legislation that need to be brought forward, but they can be brought forward at a later date. I certainly thank my caucus because I do know that my caucus is going to support this moving forward and, hopefully, those many Nova Scotians out there who are waiting for the bridging section of this Pension Benefits Act to fall into

[Page 10776]

place so that they will no longer be penalized, both by their financial advisors and by the stock market as well, with respect to their investment losses that are now taking place.

So, Mr. Speaker, I thank the government for bringing this legislation forward during this sitting.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I, too, will be somewhat brief on this and I would like to acknowledge the co-operation of the minister's superintendent of pensions who forwarded that information requested.

Just to reiterate the points that my colleague, the member for Dartmouth North, has made, it would have been much preferred if there was some clarity in that amendment that was put forth by the government. I realize we're speaking on third reading and it's for the title, but I think given the general support on this, I will digress just slightly because I want the minister to focus on that particular amendment and, hopefully, on a future day we will be able to address the imbalance that this may cause, but that in itself may be corrected given the fact that there is pressure to bring in national legislation to deal with this and, in many ways, this legislation may be obsolete by the time it's actually put into force as I understand.

So with those points being made, Mr. Speaker, we will certainly be offering our approbation on this legislation.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. If I recognize the honourable Minister of Environment and Labour it will be to close debate.

The honourable Minister of Environment and Labour.

HON. DAVID MORSE: Yes, Mr. Speaker, I want to acknowledge everybody who has worked to make this possible here today, both within this House and without. I appreciate

their comments. I close debate on third reading of Bill No. 9.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 9. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 10777]

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please Bill No. 125.

Bill No. 125 - Smoke-free Places Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Minister of Health, I move third reading of Bill No. 125.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, the final piece of major government legislation that we dealt with last Spring was Bill No. 68; this year it is Bill No. 125. Both pieces of legislation were deeply flawed. Both pieces of legislation dealt with issues of life and death. On both pieces of legislation, the government has demonstrated that it is out of touch with Nova Scotians. On both pieces of legislation, the outstanding quality of the government's position is stubbornness. I said last June, in third reading, that Bill No. 68 was unsustainable and that it was unconscionable. Events quickly proved that this was true.

Bill No. 125 may last somewhat longer than three weeks, but it too is unsustainable and it too is unconscionable, as the Premier and some of his colleagues know very well. There is a now-familiar source that explains quite well why this bill is unconscionable. That source is the Department of Health. The department asks, and I quote,

"Second-hand smoke - why all the fuss?

You probably know that cigarette smoke clings to your clothes and hair, and lingers in a room long after a cigarette has been put out. But second-hand smoke is much more than an inconvenience or an irritation to non-smokers. It is a public health hazard. As Nova Scotians, we pay a high price for living with second-hand smoke - we pay with our health, we pay with our health care dollars, and in some cases we pay with our lives.

Cigarette smoke contains a deadly mixture of carbon monoxide, nicotine, and more than 4,000 other chemicals, many of which cause cancer and heart disease. The smoke that appears off the end of an idle burning cigarette is even more toxic than the inhaled smoke because the tobacco is smouldering at a lower temperature and is therefore burning less efficiently.

When you sit in a smoky room, office, restaurant or bar, you can't help breathing in some of these toxic gases, particles, and chemicals. Some of the tar stays in your lungs. Small amounts of nicotine and carbon monoxide pass into your

[Page 10778]

bloodstream. After half a hour, your blood pressure and heartbeat rise measurably. This means that extra stress is being placed on your heart.

Over the long term, living or working in a smoke-filled environment can lead to serious health problems, such as lung cancer and heart disease. At least 80 nonsmoking Nova Scotians die every year from exposure to second-hand smoke. Many more suffer from bronchitis, ear infections, pneumonia, heart problems, and other diseases that could have been avoided. Asthma, allergies, and environmental illnesses are all aggravated by tobacco smoke."

[11:45 a.m.]

Those are not my words, that comes from the Department of Health. This bill and this debate have been about whether or not it makes sense any longer to force workers, or for that matter people who just want to go out for a few hours, to endure the immediate and long-term impairment of their health that is caused by second-hand smoke. The fundamental issue is this. Does the right to smoke in public outweigh the consequent danger to the health and life of other citizens?

This Party, the New Democratic Party, says that health and life must prevail. Right up front I want to place on the record the position of the New Democratic Party. An NDP Government would legislate a total ban on the involuntary exposure of anyone in Nova Scotia to second-hand smoke. No smoking in workplaces, no smoking in public places, clear definitions to ban smoking near entrances and to otherwise buttress the public smoking ban. My colleague, the member for Halifax Needham, has done an excellent job on this issue. She tabled NDP legislation last Friday. If enacted, our bill would put that total ban in place. The legislation represents our position and our determination on this issue.

Our position represents the considered decision of Nova Scotia New Democrats in convention. It is the democratically-adopted position of our Party that all involuntary exposure to second-hand smoke should be ended. I am proud, Mr. Speaker, to lead a Party whose members took that progressive stand. My caucus colleagues and I are guided by Party policy and by the overwhelming expression of public opinion in favour of a total ban.

A number of businesses must now consider if they are going to invest heavily in renovation and ventilation systems that will meet the irrational requirements of Bill No. 125. They should consider themselves to be on notice that it is only a question of when, and not if, Nova Scotia bans smoking in all public places and in all workplaces. Our caucus supports a comprehensive anti-tobacco strategy, including smoking cessation programs, legislation establishing the liability of tobacco companies for the illness and death that they cause, and workers' compensation for those suffering lung cancer and other work-related diseases caused by exposure to second-hand smoke. We are particularly conscious of the dangers to workers and to the maxim that an injury to one is an injury to all.

[Page 10779]

The government Web site tells us that working in a smoke-filled environment has about the same long-term effect on a person's health as smoking 10 cigarettes a day, and that restaurant workers have a 50 per cent higher risk of lung cancer than the general population. Mr. Speaker, this is the modern equivalent to black lung disease, with one notable exception: It was impossible to mine coal without being exposed to coal dust and, therefore, being susceptible to black lung. It is possible to work in a restaurant, a bar, an office, a casino, a warehouse, or anywhere else, without being exposed to second-hand smoke. But it takes a government with courage and integrity - to use the Premier's own words - to legislate a total ban.

I regret, Mr. Speaker, very much that this government has failed to dig deep and to find the required courage and integrity. The Premier has gone so far as to describe as extreme the position taken by every health care organization in this province. Mr. Premier, if one extreme is life and the other is death, you should not be trying to find firm footing in some middle ground. Our province was once a world leader, the birthplace of Slocum, the builders of tall ships that sailed the world. Now we have governments that are too timid to take the lead, even when it comes to lifesaving legislation. The political calculation that gave us Bill No. 125 is the very same political calculation that let Nova Scotians die for the lack of seat belt legislation, until everyone else had passed seat belt legislation and the then government felt politically safe for them to follow the leaders.

It is the same political calculation and the same backroom dealers who confounded Ron Stewart when he thought that the doctor-dominated Liberal Government of John Savage would pass Canada's first-ever legislation dealing with the exposure to second-hand smoke. It's the same political calculation that we saw when the Liberal Government in British Columbia stepped in and cancelled that province's absolute ban on smoking in workplaces. Those Liberals also listened to the self-interested lobbyists rather than to protect public health.

One of my colleagues commented on the irony that in Nova Scotia a bar owner must serve meals, even if it's against their will and even if it robs the nearby restaurants of business, but only a few of us notice that infringement on personal liberty mainly because we are accustomed to it. Yet, to require a healthier smoke-free environment in that same bar is a change that this government will not make. You will force the owners to serve meals, but you expose his workers and patrons to the deadly effects of second-hand smoke.

The political calculation and timidity that the government demonstrated on this bill reached its lowest point with the filibuster, the sole purpose of which was to prevent the possibility that a non-partisan coalition would improve the legislation. This is the Premier who promised non-partisan courage and integrity. The Premier who knew that governments can always find reasons for inaction. The Premier who was going to liberate the members of his own caucus so that they could freely vote their conscience. The Premier who would put paid to the old-time politics of governments that enforced the Party line.

[Page 10780]

Now we know that Conservatives are expected to vote for government legislation even if they believe it is wrong. Now we know that maintaining the appearance of Conservative unity is the supreme and overriding objective of the government caucus. The display put on in this Chamber by Conservative MLAs during the Committee of the Whole House tells everyone just how tough it is to be a member of the backbench in this government. How difficult it is to watch a small clique run the show. How frustrating it is to see the government drift along with no sense of direction. How demoralizing it is to realize that your job is just to go down with the ship in order to show unity. It's just like those long forgotten Mulroney, Buchanan and Savage Government backbenchers.

The orders went out, keep talking. You could hear them whispering, if we don't keep talking we might have to vote on Barry's bill, keep talking. Keep talking or we might have to vote on a total ban on smoking in workplaces. Keep talking or we might have to vote to ban smoking in the casino. Keep talking or we might have to vote on putting the patio ban back in place. Keep talking or we might have to vote on workers' compensation for those who are injured or killed by second-hand smoke that we permitted. Keep talking or we might have to explain to doctors, nurses, cancer survivors, community health boards why we didn't take the golden opportunity to enact a total ban.

Nova Scotians didn't elect a single one of the members opposite to prevent votes in the House of Assembly. They didn't elect a single Conservative for the purpose of making sure that other Conservatives couldn't move amendments. We saw a perversion of our democratic system and it's no excuse to say that Richie Mann rode roughshod over the rules and the precedents of this House to impose a rule that could make the blockade possible.

The greatest fear on the government side seems to have been that there were five or six or seven or maybe even eight Conservatives who were willing to stand up for the health and lives of their constituents; fear that an all-Party coalition led by the NDP and joined by Liberal and Conservative MLAs would heed the wishes of Nova Scotians and enact a total ban on involuntary exposure to second-hand smoke; fear that on this issue this House would rise above the everyday partisan bickering and really listen to the concerns of Nova Scotians, really listen and do the right thing; and fear that somehow, even if it was clearly an all-Party effort, some crotchety voters would be reluctant to re-elect Conservative MLAs if a total ban was enacted.

We saw the effect that testimony at the Law Amendments Committee was having on the Conservatives and the general public. We saw this government face its greatest nightmare: an open, democratic process. We saw them move with every means at their disposal to make sure that Conservative MLAs stopped listening. Mr. Speaker, I am one who says that in many cases half a loaf is better than none at all. If we had fought the good fight, if the health organizations, individuals and health care workers had all done their best and failed to gain enough votes in the House for a total ban, many of us on this side would have said Bill No. 125 is better than nothing, so we will support it.

[Page 10781]

Certainly, on second reading, when only the principle of banning exposure to second-hand smoke was before the House, we did vote for it. But we listened also. The government had no answer when people came forward and said that the province should not make smoking more attractive for teens by turning it into a rite of passage at age 19. Those people were right and this bill is wrong. The government had no answer when people came forward and said that second-hand smoke is just as deadly to a 20-year-old restaurant patron after 9:00 p.m. as it is to an 18-year-old patron at 8:00 p.m. Those people were right and this bill is wrong.

The government had no answer when people came forward and said that the 50 per cent increase in lung cancer for casino employees is just as serious as a 50 per cent increase in lung cancer for employees of a family-style restaurant. Mr. Speaker, those people are right and this bill is wrong. The government had no answer when people came forward and said that employers who expose their workers to second-hand smoke are endangering those employees just as surely as any mine operator ever endangered the lives of the mine's employees. Again, those people are right and this bill, sadly, is wrong.

The government had no answers when teachers said it was impossible to tell students that smoking will kill them if the government permits public smoking and exposure to second-hand smoke in a wide range of situations for no rational reason. Mr. Speaker, those people are right and this bill is wrong. That is why the NDP caucus has concluded that we must vote against Bill No. 125. It is not simply a compromise, as the Premier has claimed. It has provisions that are deadly. It has provisions that are dead wrong. We cannot in good conscience hold our noses and vote for them, especially after a government blockade of any and all avenues for further improvement of the bill.

[12:00 noon]

In the year 2002, with all that we know about the effects of tobacco smoke, the economic and social costs of smoking and second-hand smoke, and the business benefits of a smoking ban, it would be wrong for us to give this government and this Premier a fig leaf to cover up the errors of judgement that have been made with Bill No. 125. This bill will go down in history as a tragic miscalculation.

I regret, Mr. Speaker, every cent that any business owner may spend to try to meet the ill-considered requirements of this legislation. The Premier calls it a first step; unfortunately, Bill No. 125 is more like a sidestep. It trails public opinion rather than matching or leading it. The struggle to end the scourge of exposure to second-hand smoke and to bring Nova Scotia's smoking rate down to one of the lowest in Canada will continue despite the missed opportunities and setbacks that are contained in Bill No. 125.

[Page 10782]

Mr. Speaker, the day will come, and perhaps sooner than some in this House think, when this bill will be wiped off the Statute Books and replaced by a total ban. We will vote no as our best way to hasten that day.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, thank you for the opportunity to rise to speak and commence third reading debate on behalf of our Liberal caucus on Bill No. 125, the Smoke-free Places Act. I was thinking today, I received a press release from Communications Nova Scotia where the Premier and the Minister responsible for Sport and Recreation will be at the soccer pitch, Halifax-Dunbrack Soccer Club mini program, today at 5:00 p.m. This will be to celebrate events connected with "World No Tobacco Day." I thought what a great way it would be if the Premier would be there to announce a 100 per cent ban on smoking in public places and workplaces. Also that maybe he, as a physician, and the Minister responsible for Sport and Recreation would also look at those young people there and realize that in that group alone, even though they are engaged in athletics at this time, that maybe they could save one or two lives there in the future by doing the right thing here today and to bring in a 100 per cent ban.

So, Mr. Speaker, it is a lost opportunity and that really is pretty relevant when we look at the last few weeks here in this House of Assembly relative to Bill No. 125. Over those last few weeks, most of us in the Legislature have become all too familiar with the devastating affects of smoking and particularly, the devastating affects of second-hand smoke. Even the Minister responsible for Sport and Recreation has admitted that 1,900 people die each year in Nova Scotia from the effects of smoking, either second-hand smoke or primary smoking.

We in the Liberal caucus, Mr. Speaker, have listened very carefully as a large majority of groups appearing before the Law Amendments Committee called on this government to strengthen Bill No. 125 by legislating a 100 per cent ban on smoking in public places, to create a level playing field and to not further weaken the flawed bill with their amendments. When the dust settled at the Law Amendments Committee, they settled on that process, we in the Liberal caucus came to the conclusion that the health and wellness of all Nova Scotians is and must be the priority. We know that there will be people on the other side of the House who will argue that something is better than nothing. We also know that members of the government will tell us that we should be embarrassed in not supporting the government's amended Bill No. 125.

Well, Mr. Speaker, I'm here today to tell you that I and this Liberal caucus will never be embarrassed in taking a position that protects the health and well-being of all Nova Scotians. We know that governing is about making tough choices and decisions and we in the Liberal caucus are prepared not only to make the tough choice, but the right choice. We heard time and time again through the Law Amendments Committee process that this legislation does not go far enough. We heard that it's wrong to introduce legislation that

[Page 10783]

draws a distinction between the health of the young and the health of the old, the difference between nighttime patrons and daytime patrons, and food service workers in smoking sections and non-smoking sections.

After considering what we heard through the Law Amendments Committee process, we cannot, in good conscience, support the present legislation in its form today. We heard, through the Law Amendments Committee, what the government apparently did not hear. We heard industry call for a level playing field time and time again, representatives of industry around this province. We heard health groups state that they want legislation that protects the health and well-being of all Nova Scotians. Municipal leaders told us that they want leadership from the provincial government. They want legislation that supports and complements their own bylaws, not compromises them, such as Bill No. 125 such.

The Premier and the Minister of Health have stated time and time again that this legislation is one of the strongest in the country. What a sad statement for these individuals to make. Wouldn't it be better to state that we have the strongest piece of legislation in the country? What's wrong with being number one, Mr. Speaker? Isn't the health and the wellness, our most precious resource of our people, worth making that statement? It is what the people wanted to hear from their government and this government fell short of delivering. It blinked. It lacked courage and it lacks leadership. The sad truth about Bill No. 125 is that it is not as strong as municipal bylaws introduced in this province. Throughout the course of deliberations on this bill, both the Minister of Health and the Premier acknowledged that a total ban may be inevitable in the long run, the question is timing.

Mr. Speaker, that time is now. It is unfair and it is illogical to ask businesses to make investments in ventilation systems and enclose smoking areas that may well be largely wasted. It is unfair and it is illogical to ask workers to perform duties, whether they want to or not, in enclosed areas that despite the size and type of ventilation, is unsafe. It is unfair to ask the municipal units who have shown true leadership on the issue of smoking; it's unfair to ask the municipal units to continue to support bylaws that have been compromised by a provincial law. Under Bill No. 125, everyone loses. Businesses lose. Workers lose. Municipalities lose. Nova Scotians lose. As legislators, we will all lose. We have lost an opportunity to do the right thing.

As I stated yesterday, Mr. Speaker, the issue of whether a government backbencher, or even us, as Opposition, are afforded any opportunity to bring forward amendments has overshadowed the content of Bill No. 125. It is fairly unusual in the British parliamentary system that a majority government brings in a bill and then filibusters for 20 hours within a Committee of the Whole House on Bills. That may well be unheard of. That may be a first, but it was done by your Tory Government and perhaps was this the plan? Maybe the Premier breathed a sigh of relief, as a medical doctor, when the internal discussions in his caucus around Bill No. 125 surfaced. He then could duck the issue as to why he has failed to protect all people, not just some. If you create internal intrigue and intention, people soon forget

[Page 10784]

what you are debating, what is the content. What a sad day in Nova Scotia politics if this in fact was the case.

I understand that some persons have said, well, they weren't that smart to do that, but maybe while not smart, maybe they were cunning enough to do that. However, all Nova Scotians lose if that is the case. Mr. Speaker, fortunately for all of us, Nova Scotians are smarter than that. Nova Scotians today, right now, are willing to accept a total ban on smoking in restaurants, bars and all other public places. It is beyond my comprehension why government would fail to legislate what people are demanding. This bill, three years ago, would have been avant-garde. It would have been ahead of the times. It would have been ahead of the thinking of the people of Nova Scotia. Today, however, once proclaimed, it could very well be behind the times. By the time it gets enacted, if we're third place now in Canada rather than the number one that we have the opportunity to be, we could well be further behind the times when it takes effect. That is what visionary leadership in provincial politics is all about, making sure that what is proposed, debated and enacted not only represents the wishes of the people but protects all of the people.

We all know too well that governing is about making tough decisions, but Mr. Speaker, governing is also about making the right choice. Is doing the right thing so wrong? Why would that be so wrong? You know that I have sat in this Legislature now for 18 years. I like to think that I've worked hard. I've tried to be truthful in all matters and forthright and open. However, I personally fail to comprehend why the Premier would stand in his place and blame other Parties as a justification for not going the full distance. Why would someone in such a prominent leadership role as the Premiership of this province, someone with so much power and clout stoop to such a level where he defends his bill by claiming that it's better than what you did?

Mr. Speaker, again, fortunately for us, Nova Scotians are smarter than that. This Premier, as a medical doctor, knows full well that ventilation systems don't protect people. The Premier also knows full well that he will be sending workers into an environment where they will still be exposed to cancer-causing toxins. Why then is it appropriate for the Premier to blame others for a bill that fails to protect all people? Thankfully, I will be able to face my medical colleagues and my constituents because I know that I and our Liberal caucus are doing the right thing.

I know that when the dust settles, people won't be calling our caucus or my constituency office to say, why didn't you bring in legislation? They will simply say, thank you for trying to do the right thing. This will be disappointing, perhaps, for the Premier and the Premier's game of passing the hot potato, the hot ticket items, to someone else and blaming someone else. He wanted to hide his lack of action. He wanted to hide his unwillingness to allow his backbenchers to do the right thing. He wanted his government to block Opposition Parties from bringing in amendments by slinging political mud, blaming others for his indecision and blaming others for his inaction. Shame, I say, on this Premier.

[Page 10785]

Mr. Speaker, with a bill like Bill No. 125, everyone loses. Workers lose. Businesses lose. Municipalities lose. We have exhibited over the last few days that even democracy in this British parliamentary system of which we are so proud, democracy loses. The Premier has stated that the greatest endorsement that you can have for a bill, in his opinion, is that something is too tough, something is not tough enough. So that means the government probably has it just about right. Hello? Try to go down the middle of the road, Mr. Premier, and you end up being road kill. That's well known. I challenge the Premier, as a medical doctor, to explain why balancing the interests of all parties becomes justification for not protecting the health and wellness of all Nova Scotians. Quite simply, having designated non-smoking and enclosed smoking areas is inadequate. I do believe in a book by Rob Cunningham entitled Smoke & Mirrors, he likened this to having chlorine and non-chlorine sections in a swimming pool and that's exactly what happens when you try to address this issue and duck the tough decision and speak in terms of ventilation systems. Even the companies that make them, such as Honeywell and others, do not stand behind them, will not take that liability risk of supporting them that they in fact work.

[12:15 p.m.]

The laws pertaining to health and safety should never be optional. We have laws on our books for a reason and they should not be optional. Health and safety matters are a prime concern. As a society, we expect our hospitality businesses to adhere to standards for fire protection or cleanliness. We expect that to be happening in our society. Why wouldn't we expect them to provide a healthy environment? Does health and safety legislation not apply here? The Premier and the Minister of Health have used young people as their primary target for protection in this legislation, largely by excluding them from areas, plus the punitive possession part of this bill that is just not able to be understood by most of us.

From my travels, however, I've been approached by older people who have said, isn't my health worth protecting? Doesn't government view my health as important? Again, youth issues relative to senior issues, but aren't they all the same? Aren't we interested in the well-being and the health of all Nova Scotians? We in the Liberal caucus believe it is. The government will spin this bill as one that protects young people. If you examine this bill on closer reflection, however, does this bill really protect young people? One hundred per cent smoke-free places create an environment where non-smoking is the norm, it's the model, it's the norm. Enclosed, designated smoking areas create an aura of mystery for teens going into restaurants and bars. For a young person, an enclosed area gives the impression of a private club and young people, being prone to adventure as some of us may remember back that far, will likely want to enter and join that club.

Why would you bring in legislation that could potentially create a magnet for young people? And what about those teens who have made the wise decision of not smoking? Wouldn't they want to be with their smoking friends when they go out? Surely the Premier doesn't believe that these young non-smoking teens are going to be protected in a ventilated

[Page 10786]

room. This government had the chance to denormalize smoking by not making it acceptable to smoke in public places. They had the opportunity. They have lost or are losing that opportunity. They chose not to.

Then we see clauses that make it illegal for youth to possess tobacco - no penalties, just an offence. Talk about waving a red flag in front of our young people. At first, personally, I thought these clauses were a mistake. Then I remembered we are dealing with a Tory Government. A government that loves, across this country, to introduce laws that appear tough on justice issues, no matter what the consequences and no matter if they work or not. Why would a government tinker with a smoke-free places bill by introducing clauses that have the potential to encourage young people to take a chance, to overstep the bounds? Risk taking is a teenage hallmark and this government has walked right into that trap.

Why does this government see it as acceptable to create a law that young people view as a joke and unenforceable even though an offence? Shouldn't government be encouraging young people to respect the law and restrictions? Not make a mockery of them. You talk about mixed messages, these are mixed messages to a very vulnerable age group.

Mr. Speaker, this is simply beyond comprehension. Our youth deserve, and you know, they expect more from this government. One would think that these clauses were added so when the government fields phone calls on the fact they have a watered down bill, they could say, oh no, we don't, we made it illegal for young people to possess tobacco. That's how tough we are. The Health Minister has repeatedly said, this is the toughest legislation in Canada. He's done it. The toughness in this bill is on the backs of our youth and adolescents. (Applause)

I think it's fair to say, Mr. Speaker, that the institution of government is extremely fragile in the eyes of our young people and probably so. We should do everything as legislators that we can to earn their respect. Personally from me, youth have earned respect, practising as a family physician and now as a legislator. Why doesn't the government have respect for youth? We in our Liberal caucus do.

Mr. Speaker, in closing, this Premier and this minister have one final chance today. Very easily, in the next few minutes, this Premier could recommit the bill to the Committee of the Whole House and discuss Clause 6, the clause that the honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank was interested in amending. If this did not meet with his liking, he could play hero in the eyes of all Nova Scotians by recommitting the bill to the Committee of the Whole House and adding one simple clause that states that one year from the proclamation date of this legislation, all bars, restaurants, pubs, taverns, casinos, public places and workplaces will be required to be 100 per cent smoke-free. He could then allow all of his caucus to vote their conscience and do the right thing.

[Page 10787]

The Premier has nothing to fear when what would be accomplished would be doing the right thing to protect the health and well-being of all Nova Scotians. The Premier stated yesterday, that if it was solely up to him, the bill would be different. Mr. Premier, this is very doable. This bill could be different with very little commotion, if he would only show leadership. You, Mr. Premier, would have our support because it would be the right thing to do. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to have an opportunity to rise in my place and say a few words about Bill No. 125 before we have an opportunity to vote on this bill. I don't have a prepared text. I have followed this bill with a great deal of interest, even prior to the introduction of this legislation. I had, as the Health Critic in the NDP caucus, an opportunity to receive, from the Canadian Cancer Society, Nova Scotia Branch, regular updates on information that they wanted members of this Legislature to have and to consider and to try to understand. I would like to thank them for providing me with that information. I found it very useful in preparation for what has become probably the most significant public policy issue in this Legislature in this Spring session.

Mr. Speaker, as previous speakers in the Opposition Parties have said, this government had an opportunity, which they missed, to make an enormous contribution to population health in the Province of Nova Scotia, in terms of bringing in a 100 per cent ban on smoking in public places. Prior to the introduction of the legislation, I was very hopeful that the government would go all the way and introduce a 100 per cent ban. Even if they couldn't have done that, I was hoping that their legislation would at least set out a timetable, a very short timetable, that would bring us to 100 per cent smoke-free places if they were unable to bite the bullet and do it immediately.

Mr. Speaker, I was disappointed when I saw the proposal from the government, but I still was hopeful that the Law Amendments Committee process, which is a very important process here, would provide an opportunity for all members of the House to become more aware of the importance of this issue and more resolved to take this incredible opportunity we had to go 100 per cent smoke-free. These opportunities don't come all that often when you have public opinion so overwhelmingly behind significant public policy change and you have political Parties prepared to work together across what are often highly antagonistic ideological perspectives.

In this case, this is an area where there is a great amount of agreement between members of political Parties. We all know the devastating, devastating impact of smoking on probably many individuals who are family members, co-workers, members of our community, our workplaces, our friends. An opportunity to make a difference in the population's health in Nova Scotia is one that we certainly all need to be cognizant of and

[Page 10788]

looking forward to, Mr. Speaker. So in that way this government had an opportunity, had an amazing opportunity, and dropped the ball.

Mr. Speaker, I sat through most of the Law Amendments Committee process and the concern I had that this bill didn't introduce 100 per cent smoke-free and the resolve that I had that this is an important direction for government to go in only grew in that process. It wasn't only the presentations from the health community, which were knowledgeable and compelling in terms of laying out their expertise and their experience. I have to say that I really became much more informed and clear about the importance of a 100 per cent ban, as I listened to the representation that we received from local government, the municipal leaders, who have shown great foresight in introducing bylaws for a 100 per cent ban in their respective municipalities, and indeed representatives of the hospitality industry who came and, although they were opposed to any change in the status quo, were in the final analysis asking members of the Legislature for a fair and level playing field. They were very clear about the inadequacies and the failures of this particular piece of legislation to address that inequality, that inequity, that distortion in the market that this bill implies.

There were a number of things about those particular representatives from the hospitality industry that I found quite interesting, Mr. Speaker, including the fact that the vast majority of the hotel/restaurant/bar owners who came forward to present at the Law Amendments Committee are themselves individuals who don't smoke, who when they take their families out prefer to go to non-smoking establishments, and they readily acknowledged the absolute importance of protecting their health and the health of their family members.

[12:30 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, others have spoken to their anger and their frustration at not having an opportunity to debate this bill clause by clause here on the floor of the Legislature because of the government's filibuster on their own bill, preventing amendments and preventing all of the information and the unfolding of a very well-rounded debate with respect to the implications of Bill No. 125. I want to say that I too share those frustrations that we didn't have an adequate opportunity to fulfill our role as Opposition in terms of taking the occasion of speaking in Committee of the Whole House on Bills to address ways that this bill will have an impact and to look at ways that the bill could be strengthened.

Mr. Speaker, one of the things that I want to say about the speeches that we heard from the government members was that it provided great insight, as a member of the Opposition, in some ways into what government members are really thinking about Bill No. 125, really thinking about what it is that they're doing and why they're doing it that I found somewhat disturbing. Through that whole filibuster by the government members not one member of government ever spoke about the impact of second-hand smoke on workers. I think that was a very tragic and very telling situation when not one member of government seemed to have

[Page 10789]

any concern whatsoever about the impact of second-hand smoke on workers working in the hospitality industry.

Mr. Speaker, there was a common theme in what members of government had to say during the debate. They consistently talked about children and talked about how this bill is designed to protect children. I want to ask members of the government, what about the mothers and fathers of those children who work in the hospitality industry? What about the parents of those children who are exposed to second-hand smoke that your bill will not protect? What about those moms and dads who, because of exposure to second-hand smoke in the hospitality industry, will develop diseases, illnesses. Some of them will die as a result of the exposure that they will suffer to second-hand smoke in the workplace, the deadly consequences of that exposure. What about those kids?

This is a government who consistently talks about how much they care for children, but this is a government whose policy, when it comes to addressing the needs of children, can be characterized as shallow and simplistic, and this is the situation here. We have a complex social issue which requires a thoughtful and comprehensive response. What we have with respect to children, in fact, is a fairly shallow and simplistic response, measures in this bill that have no enforceability and that, in fact, may cause or contribute to outcomes that we do not desire for our children and our youth.

Mr. Speaker, I tried to understand why it is that this government was unprepared to bring in 100 per cent smoke-free legislation when in fact public opinion is so overwhelmingly in support of such legislation. The only conclusion I can reach is that the tobacco lobby and the impact and the influence of the tobacco industry continues to be strong and it ultimately played a role in what occurred here in terms of Bill No. 125. We know that the tobacco industry in 1996 alone, at that time, was worth about $163 billion in this country. We know that this is an industry that invests heavily in public education campaigns that don't work and have a way of providing financial backing to others to become their mouthpiece in terms of . . .

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Halifax Needham has the floor.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, that becomes the mouthpiece for the industry. I had an opportunity here two weeks ago to question members of Cabinet about contributions to their Party from very large tobacco companies. In fact, I think that it's important and I think that I would like to issue a challenge to the Premier and to the Leader of the Liberal Party to just say no to tobacco money as contributions to their Parties. I would like to remind the Premier and the Leader of the Liberal Party that the tobacco money is dirty money. I have no reluctance or hesitation in saying that here today. This is money that is realized through the selling of a deadly substance that contributes to untold financial and

[Page 10790]

other forms of hardship in our community. It is high time that all political Parties in this country say no to tobacco contributions.

Mr. Speaker, there are aspects of this bill - and I've said this in debate in the Committee of the Whole House on Bills and elsewhere - that I sincerely hope will make a difference, for example, no smoking on school grounds and in a variety of places where there has been some smoking. But we all understand that many of the places where there will no longer be smoking were already places where smoking had been banned, largely due to municipal bylaws or because of the enlightened management of various establishments and the desire of people who no longer smoke not to be exposed to second-hand smoke. So these aspects of the legislation we wish every success in their effect, but we have a very long way to go.

The last thing I would like to say, Mr. Speaker, before I take my place is that this government likes to talk about how they are leading the way and how this legislation is the most progressive in the country. I would like to challenge that assertion and point out to members of this Legislature that, in fact, banning smoking in public places has been around in this country for a considerable period of time. According to the author of Smoke & Mirrors: The Canadian Tobacco War, the first jurisdiction to ban smoking in restaurants in this country was the City of Guelph in 1995.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to table this book, Smoke & Mirrors: The Canadian Tobacco War, for our Legislative Library, courtesy of its author, Rob Cunningham, who published this book in 1996. I'm hoping that he will find an opportunity to update it sometime, because certainly the developments that have occurred since the publication of this book are a fascinating piece of the ongoing tobacco wars in this country, which are far from over. I think this Legislature and certainly this Party, the NDP caucus, put the tobacco companies in this country on notice that if we have an opportunity to form a government in this province in the near future, 100 per cent smoke-free legislation will be a high priority on our agenda, so that the health and the well being, the population health of this province gets the kind of public policy response that is required, so that we don't have the health report card that we currently have.

I don't need to remind you of how our health status is considerably worse than most provinces in the country. A proactive government committed to strong legislation is the only way to turn this around. With that, I will table this book for the Legislative Library, and join with my colleagues in this caucus in expressing our regret that Bill No. 125 did not yield for Nova Scotians the 100 per cent ban in public places they desire, until another day. We will wait another day for that. (Applause)

[Page 10791]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to rise and speak on Bill No. 125, this piece of legislation to restrict smoking in public places. I guess this piece of legislation can be compared to a grass fire. (Interruptions) Very much so, and I will explain. On a hot summer afternoon, when somebody lights a match and then you have a grass fire, one or two persons stand around and say, well, we can put that out with a few spruce boughs or a spade shovel or something like that. All of a sudden, half an hour later, as the grass approaches the woods' edge, they're getting a little concerned, so they're calling for some reinforcements from their family members and their friends, possibly the volunteer fire department. Then next thing you know, the forest is burning.

Mr. Speaker, much the same analogy as what's happened with Bill No. 125. When the government introduced this piece of legislation, they felt in their hearts - and I really believe that they did - that this was the best piece of legislation that would be saleable and acceptable to the people of Nova Scotia. But as time went by, over the days and the weeks, as they started to hear back from Nova Scotians, the fact that more than two-thirds of all Nova Scotians want a complete ban on smoking in public places, and as they heard the numerous presentations that were made before the Law Amendments Committee, again, they started to realize, like the grass fire, this issue is not the same as it was when it first started.

Again, Mr. Speaker, as the Opposition Parties, members in both Opposition Parties, came to reflect the views of their constituents, essentially giving full opposition to this legislation without a 100 per cent ban. The government again had to retrench and what did it do? It brought in some weak measures that effectively made it easier for young people to be exposed to direct smoking activities and second-hand smoke. Again, the Opposition stood fast, as with the people of Nova Scotia, and said the government was wrong-headed in what it was doing.

[12:45 p.m.]

So, what did the government try to do? It filibustered its own piece of legislation. It prevented the only member in the Tory caucus who wanted to do the sensible thing, the correct thing, the thing that people in Nova Scotia wanted to do and that was to put an amendment for a 100 per cent ban. So what did they do? The only way they could gag that honourable member was to filibuster their own bill. As the Opposition members watched in total dismay, what did the government do? Day in and day out they talked about the evolution of smoking in Nova Scotia and in society in an attempt to keep that honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank gagged. Then they kept throwing back at the Opposition Parties, well, why didn't you do it when you were there? You had a chance to do it and you refused to do it.

[Page 10792]

Let's deal with that, Mr. Speaker. That's a famous cliché of the Minister of Health and the Minister of Finance and especially the Premier, who always likes to muse about the fact that he heard some discussions in an elevator several years ago by some members of the Liberal caucus. I hope he's a little more fruitful with the compilation of the details of that than he was with the memo he burnt in a fireplace back in June 1999. Heavens forbid, what was somebody doing with a fire in his fireplace in June 1999 with about 82 outside. So, I hope he has better capacity to deal with that information than he did then.

Let's look at the Minister of Health and the Minister of Finance and the Premier and them throwing back to the Opposition all the time, you had your chance and you didn't do anything. You didn't do anything. Well, Mr. Speaker, the evidence is quite clear to the contrary. The Minister of Health is the same minister, when he was on this side of the House, who voted against, voted against I emphasize, taking tobacco out of pharmacies. So where was his commitment? Where was the sincerity of making Nova Scotia a smoke-free place?

Mr. Speaker, all the smoking cessation programs that were commenced under the previous administration were very effective. It wasn't just one initiative. What about the Municipal Government Act that empowered the municipalities from one end of this province to the other to be able to bring in no smoking bylaws? Because that's what the municipalities asked for. That, in essence, is really what government is all about, listening to the people. The municipal politicians in many, many instances are closer to the people and can identify with some specific local needs, whether it be in business, domestic, commercial, you name it.

Mr. Speaker, that was an excellent initiative. It must have been, the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, the second largest municipality in this province adopted a no-smoking ban; a no-smoking ban. In Kings County, where the Minister of Labour and Environment and two of his seatmates represent, we have Wolfville and Kentville with a 100 per cent smoking ban. (Interruption) Berwick, I'm sorry. So, what's the problem? Why is the government weakening its own attempts, so they claim, to eliminate smoking in Nova Scotia?

Well, Mr. Speaker, I'm disappointed. I'm really disappointed. I'm even more disappointed at the Premier because he's saying if it was up to himself, it would be a 100 per cent smoking ban. We listened to his dissertation the other day during his attempts to filibuster the Minister of Health's legislation and he referred to a letter that was sent to the Minister of Health, himself; and the Clerk of the Law Amendments Committee; the Hon. Angus MacIsaac, MLA; Ronald Chisholm, MLA; and Michel Samson, MLA. He quoted the first paragraph, "On behalf of the Guysborough Antigonish Strait Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee, congratulations on introducing strong legislation in Nova Scotia that will protect many Nova Scotians from the toxic effects of environmental tobacco smoke.". Well that seems pretty good, doesn't it? It sounds like this organization is endorsing the Premier and the Minister of Health on such strong legislation.

[Page 10793]

But you know what, Mr. Speaker? He didn't read the rest of the letter and I wonder why? You wonder why the Premier deliberately did not complete analysing this particular document. Let us remind the Premier that in Paragraph 2 "The exceptions in this legislation however, do concern us for a number of reasons. . . Secondly, this exception may influence some business owners to change the status of their establishment. . . Thirdly, leaving smoking in bars will associate the behaviour of smoking with other adult behaviours. . . ", and so on and so on. In the end, do you know what this advocate group says? "Please reconsider the legislation and make Nova Scotia's public places 100% smoke-free.". Well, by golly, if it was good enough for the Premier to read Paragraph 1, why didn't he tell all Nova Scotians how this advocate group really felt about the legislation. That's the type of double-talk that's been coming from that side of the House.

Mr. Speaker, we heard the Premier just moments ago stand before the media and say that it will be anywhere from 10 to 20 years before the province would start to realize any savings from this legislation. Why wouldn't he go with a 100 per cent ban and start helping out the Minister of Finance, start helping out the Minister of Health in making Nova Scotia a safer and healthier Nova Scotia? On one hand, he's saying this is the next best thing since sliced bread; it's the best in the country. Yet, he will go out and tell the media that it's a half a measure. That's essentially what he has said because if we have to wait 20 years for the province to realize one penny in savings, then this government, this Premier, this Minister of Health have been an absolute dismal failure on this piece of legislation.

The Minister of Tourism and Culture said that smoking will kill 1,700 Nova Scotians every year and he says that's okay because we're going to accept a half a measure. He says another 200 will die as a result of second-hand smoke; 1,900 Nova Scotians will die every year because we don't have a complete ban and he's prepared to support that. Where is the coherent logic coming out of that government, Mr. Speaker? You can't help but wonder how sincere the Tory caucus really is about this particular piece of legislation. The Premier himself has said that his caucus has caucused this issue seven times before they came to a conclusion as to how they were going to proceed with the anti-smoking legislation. Clearly, not all members in the Tory caucus were on the same song sheet. Certainly, the member for Sackville-Beaver Bank isn't. What happened? Within three minutes of the vote,

three minutes, it took enough time - and you count - it took three minutes for the member for Sackville-Beaver Bank to summon a meeting with the Premier over in the Premier's Office to express his displeasure. And what do we get? Absolute silence. The honourable member had a chance to really stand up and count for something.

The member for Halifax Bedford Basin, she says she allows smoking in her home because her husband pays 50 per cent of the mortgage. Well, is that some logic to support half a measure, because 50 per cent of her mortgage is being paid for by her husband so she relegates him to the basement? Is that the logic that's being imposed on the people of Nova Scotia on matters of public policy of such profound significance? I would hope not.

[Page 10794]

Mr. Speaker, this organization, GPI Atlantic, I made reference to that particular document the other day, about all the savings that would be realized as a result of a complete ban on smoking in Nova Scotia, $20 million a year to the health care system, and produces total economic losses which could be turned into a saving of $80 million annually. Even if this think tank was off by 50 per cent, can you imagine the total saving realized at the end of the day? If they're right, it would be $60 million a year; if they're wrong by at least 50 per cent - and Heaven knows, we wouldn't think they would be off by that much - you would still save $30 million by going with a 100 per cent ban. So why, in Heaven's name, would the government go for anything less? You would save 1,900 Nova Scotians. We would certainly have more people who would be physically active and who would be able to participate in sport and recreational activities. It just doesn't make sense.

Mr. Speaker, we're disappointed the government caucus refused to meet with the Nova Scotia Medical Society. They met with the Liberal caucus and the NDP caucus. Why wouldn't the government caucus meet with them? Why? It was a predetermined position. You see it's an old trick, it's an old Tory trick, and I guess other governments have done it as well. If you want to achieve your goal, usually you take a whole lot of different components to a piece of legislation, some are good and some are bad, and under the Buchanan Administration they were quite famous for this. They would put two or three good little things in there and they would put one or two real bad things in there and they would say this: Mr. Speaker, the Opposition is against this good legislation, how dare they not support Nova Scotians, knowing full well there's an alternate agenda, and that's why we are so suspect of what's happening.

Mr. Speaker, we saw just in today's editorial alone, the Opinion page in The Chronicle-Herald, the so-called fat tax, and it has been referred to as Tax moronic ideas, Social scourge and so on and so forth. Well, if that's the type of logic that's being applied, going in to the articulation and development of this particular piece of legislation as well, is it little wonder the people have lost faith? The government, in particular the Minister of Finance and the Premier, is going around the country - they're certainly going around the province - saying we want everybody to support our Campaign for Fairness. It sounds pretty good, if you want everybody else to support your Campaign for Fairness, why wouldn't you support the people of Nova Scotia's campaign for fairness with a 100 per cent ban? If the overwhelming majority, an estimate of close to 80 per cent of all Nova Scotians, want a 100 per cent ban, why wouldn't you do it? Why wouldn't you do it?

[1:00 p.m.]

For the Minister of Health or the Premier to stand in their place and say that we're protecting young people who are working in smoking environments and they have the option to leave, that is hogwash. Look at that employee who used to work at Casino Nova Scotia and was forced to work in a smoking environment. If she didn't work there, there's the door. What happened when she went to the Occupational Health and Safety Division within the

[Page 10795]

Department of Environment and Labour? They turned a blind eye and a deaf ear to her, so to say that's what can be done, it's not true and it's not fair to the young people of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, the Premier makes reference to the 12 students he came upon at a Tim Hortons in Reserve, Cape Breton, when he was canvassing during the election in 1999. He said to himself, as he reiterated with the media today, someday I'm going to bring in a piece of no smoking legislation that will ensure that these young people won't be in Tim Hortons smoking. This legislation does not achieve that. It doesn't even come close to hitting the target. If this was a bull's eye, he wouldn't even hit; he wouldn't be in the firing range. He would be in the next field shooting at a tree. That's how far off the mark the Premier and the Minister of Health are on this issue.

Mr. Speaker, how any government can say that this legislation is everything that it's going to achieve and have individual members stand up; one member stood up and said, yes, I acknowledge this doesn't achieve a 100 per cent ban on smoking, but a half-measure is better than no measure. Well, isn't that profound. We send people to Halifax to protect the interests of Nova Scotians and that's the logic that's being applied? It's not the best, but a half-measure is better than nothing. Out of the 1,900 Nova Scotians, we will save half of them and maybe some-day we will get around to saving the other half. What's the logic? What's the value?

For the Premier to stand out there before the media and say that there will be absolutely no financial benefit to the people of Nova Scotia for between 10 and 20 years, it defies all logic. How can they stand and say it's the best legislation in the country? It's not. It definitely is not. We've had too many people from one end of this province to the other say that it's not good legislation. I would be remiss if I didn't remind the honourable member for Halifax Needham about her self-righteous position on the Liberal and Tory caucuses about accepting donations from different companies, including tobacco companies. I'm pleased that she's given me a lended ear on this particular issue. I would remind the honourable member that perhaps a lot of these unionized workers working for tobacco companies who contribute to the NDP caucus, perhaps her caucus or the NDP Party should also refuse to take donations on that particular issue.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order, please.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I believe we've pretty well made all our points. I think the government knows that the people of Nova Scotia are ahead of them on this issue. The government knows full well that the Opposition Parties are ahead of them on this issue. I think it would be fair to say that when the government first introduced this legislation, at the outset the optics were really good. Everybody believed that it was going to achieve a 100 per cent ban; but, as things unfolded, it was quite evident that it's not. We're no further ahead today than we were when they introduced the legislation. We're not. To have a Minister of

[Page 10796]

the Crown completely rehash history in a feeble attempt to defend the indefensible, I think speaks for itself.

So with that, Mr. Speaker, I conclude my remarks. Obviously our caucus won't be supporting this less than half-measure, at best.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East. (Applause)

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I checked the list and I realize the value of that applause. I'm glad actually to get a chance to speak to this bill and I want to say that I don't fault the government for trying, but I think the evidence is in that there was a simple way to address this issue and for whatever reason the government chose to sidestep or ignore it, I don't know what their thinking was.

I was amazed when I listened at the Law Amendments Committee to the businesses that had come before the committee and tried to make the case. They weren't in favour of the legislation at all, but they talked about an unlevel playing field. Some of them raised the concern that some of their patrons may move from their establishment to another neighbouring establishment to do business. Their concern was around the fact that those businesses that were more financially stable would have the ability to build a room or put in a ventilation system that was better than what they could afford to do in their establishment. As a matter of fact, I think some of them worried whether they would be able to afford to do anything.

I guess the question I had or the quandary I was in, was trying to figure out why it was that businesses weren't coming to the government to say look, we want a 100 per cent ban. To me, that would level the playing field. If there was a 100 per cent ban, then no one had to be put into a position of having to install a separate room or a piece of ventilation equipment that would supposedly remove the hazardous contents of cigarettes, the toxins.

Something that did happen at the Law Amendments Committee which I thought was interesting was that - I don't know the name, if it was the ventilation association or in particular, what it was - those who were specialists in ventilation presented and said there was no ventilation system that could remove the toxins from cigarette smoke. This fell in line with the claims that were made by those in the health sector that said that no amount of cigarette smoke was endurable, that even the smallest amounts over time would have a negative impact on the health of Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, in looking to the horizon, maybe a year, 2 years, 5 years, 10 years, we know that a 100 per cent ban on smoking in this province is going to come. If it doesn't come with this government, it's going to come with another government; maybe ours. (Interruption) The honourable Minister of Economic Development is saying it will be a long- time coming if that's the case. Well, he might be in for a surprise.

[Page 10797]

We know that the medical evidence is in. I think the Medical Society has made presentations, certainly, before the government; they came to our caucus and made a presentation and they made a presentation at the Law Amendments Committee. Their message was the same. As much as they thought this piece of legislation was a step forward, they didn't think it went far enough and they were still advocating a 100 per cent ban on smoking in public places.

Mr. Speaker, if it's going to come - and it is - then I'm surprised that the business community didn't say, do it now, don't force us to spend money acquiring ventilation systems that don't work, all they're talking about really is a system that allows you not to see the smoke, or to build a room for smokers. But some are going to spend thousands of dollars, probably a lot of them. Some will spend more thousands than others and then in five years, or whatever time period, they're going to find the government will bring in legislation that will ban smoking in public places completely and they will have made this investment for nothing. I can't really understand why the business community didn't say level the playing field, don't impose these costs on us, no one would have to leave my establishment to go to another establishment that is smoke-free if mine is smoke-free. They will come to my establishment for the goods and services that I provide. If they like the service I provide or the goods I provide, they will come back, but they're certainly not going to leave my establishment to go to one that may have a less smoking environment simply because another entrepreneur has more money.

So, Mr. Speaker, I have to say to the government that I'm not supportive of this piece of legislation. I think that they're imposing an unnecessary burden on the business community. I think they're still imposing the risk of smoke to the citizens of Nova Scotia and I want to know, in the case of keeping smoke away from youth, well, that's certainly a laudable message, but I think even the Minister of Education could handle that, certainly if this is what they wanted to do, I mean to still allow smoking in schools, which this bill is supposed to take care of, I wonder who's going to police that? How much authority are principals or teachers going to have in this regard? We're talking about breaking the law here. Are we going to leave that in the hands of people who are already overburdened with the responsibilities that they have in doing their jobs as teachers or administrators and they're going to become policemen, or police people?

It's an unfair burden to place on them. I can see it leading to confrontation and, Mr. Speaker, I was a teacher for 15 years, I know what they're going to be up against and I was amazed - I was going to say surprised, but I was amazed. Now, it has been four years really since I've spent much time in school, in the classroom, and I certainly knew that students went out to the smoking pole at recess or lunch hour, whenever they had enough time. As a matter of fact, some of them snuck around the school to try to smoke in places they weren't supposed to.

[Page 10798]

A couple of weeks ago, I drove my son to school, not a usual occurrence, but he missed the bus so I took him there. I didn't count the students who were out smoking, but I want to say it looked like it had to be at least 50 people and I shouldn't have been surprised really - I mean I spent 15 years in that school - but I was. It made me stop and think. I want to say that I listened to the Minister of Finance when he spoke about his family and the fact that he had smoked and that he had given up smoking and the process around that and the difficulty. We do know that it's the youth that are the market. They are the future market for the tobacco industry.

[1:15 p.m.]

I was no different than, I think, the rest of the youth in this province. I remember being about 12 years old and asking my father for a drag off his cigarette and he complied. He said, sure, here. It was my brother and I, actually, at the same time. He said, there, now you've smoked, don't do it. I never did. It seemed pretty straightforward. But definitely we have to have a mechanism that targets the youth, that protects the youth, that prevents them from entering into the smoking habit. Now if it's true that we spend $170 million on smoking-related health issues, sicknesses, then that certainly is significant. I don't have a figure. Maybe when the minister gets up to close, he can tell us what we take in on taxes on cigarettes, but I would say if it's a $170 million, I would be surprised.

So this is an issue. It's a big issue; it's an issue that's much bigger than this province; it's much bigger than this country. If we are actually going to try to attack the health concerns around smoking, the availability of tobacco and the whole tobacco industry, and what that means to rural communities and the farmers who grow tobacco, it's a very big issue, but it's one, I think, that jurisdictions all over the planet are going to have to unite to address and come up with mechanisms that actually stop tobacco at its source. In other words, farmers who grow it are going to need to make a living doing something else, growing something else. The industry itself, we know if you couldn't grow tobacco in Canada or in the United States, they're certainly going to try to get people to grow it in other parts of the globe. They're not going to give up those billions of dollars in a rush.

So I want the government to know that if they want to bring a bill forward that actually addressed this issue in a comprehensive way right across the board, that I would be supportive of it and that would be a 100 per cent ban in public places across the province. You still have time to do it and I would like to see that happen. With those comments, I will take my seat.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the honourable Minister of Health it will be to close the debate on Bill No. 125.

The honourable Minister of Health.

[Page 10799]

HON. JAMES MUIR: I am pleased to rise and make a few remarks to close the debate on Bill No. 125. Mr. Speaker, this bill does three things: it encourages young people not to start smoking; it encourages people to smoke less and to stop; and it also protects people from second-hand smoke. This is very progressive legislation. It is, in essence, with some strengthening modifications, the same piece of legislation that I introduced on April 26th. The reason that there were a few modifications is because it is solid and good legislation. With the changes, it is even better legislation.

With this legislation, Mr. Speaker, smoking will be banned in a long list of public places such as schools and school grounds, shopping malls, theatres and recreational facilities and most workplaces in the province will be smoke-free. Smoking won't be permitted in a number of licensed establishments and restaurants when children are present or if they are present, then it has to be in a separately-vented, enclosed room, in which the ventilation standards will be very, very high.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, media coverage and public debate on this bill illustrates just how important it is to Nova Scotians. Unlike many pieces of legislation which pass, this is one on which most everyone had a stake or an opinion. Developing this legislation was not easy, and that's obviously a good point to make because regardless of what you hear with the political rhetoric on the other side of the House, if it was easy, it would have been done a long time ago. Both Parties had the option or the opportunity to introduce smoke-free legislation during the past two and a half years before this bill was introduced. Their little things have been mainly (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Order.

MR. JOHN HOLM: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. I am sure the minister just misspoke, but he should know or would know that on the order paper there is a bill introduced by the member for Halifax Needham that does in fact introduce a complete ban.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Obviously, that's not a point of order but it's certainly a clarification of the facts and a point for the House.

The honourable Minister of Health has the floor.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I just want to make this statement and make a couple of other closing remarks. Just in rebuttal, perhaps, to the member for Dartmouth East who spoke and the member for Cape Breton West and the member for Hants East and the member for Halifax Needham and the member for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour, the Medical Society of Nova Scotia commends the Honourable John Hamm and the Honourable Jamie Muir,

[Page 10800]

Minister of Health for the introduction of the Smoke-free Places Bill. This legislation moves us closer to eliminating exposure to second-hand smoke. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, just on a point of order.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. I haven't recognized anyone. If the honourable members would give the honourable members on their feet an opportunity to speak without so much input from both sides of the House (Interruptions)

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order. Number one, could I have that tabled with the date of when the Medical Society said that? I had some association with past presidents and there is one very active Tory past president, who says he's spending his time speaking to agencies and groups that had previously endorsed the legislation and is trying to get them to see the light, not to support this Tory legislation that is flawed.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

The honourable Minister of Health in response.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, for the honourable member's edification, I would be pleased to table it. It was a letter to the editor in The Chronicle-Herald, May 5, 2002. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health has the floor.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, every step we take in the fight against tobacco raises awareness of the issues and takes Nova Scotians closer to a healthier future. This legislation is more than just a step, it's a giant leap forward. Before I close, there's one last statistic that I ask all members here today to remember, and it's that there are seven other provinces and three territories that do not have extensive smoke-free places legislation. This bill is among the very strongest in the country, and I'm proud that Nova Scotia is one of the three provinces leading the way. I would ask all members of this House to join the members of the government bench and vote in favour of Bill No. 125. It's good legislation. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 125.

There has been a request for a recorded vote.

The bells will ring until the Whips are so satisfied.

[Page 10801]

[1:24 p.m.]

[The Division bells were rung.]

[1:40 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Just before I check with the Whips, I noticed we had some students come in during the last few minutes. I'm sure they're wondering what's going on on the floor of the Legislature. I could put myself in that same situation as well, I guess. But anyway, for the benefit of the visitors in the gallery who have just arrived, the House is about take a vote in regard to the bill that's before the House at this time. A recorded vote has been called for, so the bells will ring until all three Parties are satisfied that they have the number of members in the House they want to take part in the vote. So that's why the members are up, moving about and have been in and out of the Chamber at this time. Just so you are aware, that's why there is a little bit of confusion on the floor of the House at this time. Normally it's not like this.

Order, please. I do understand that there is someone who is going to do an introduction. With the agreement of the House, we will allow for that introduction now before we call for the vote.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure to introduce to the House 47 members of the Grade 6 class at Joseph Giles Elementary School in my riding. With them are Alan MacDonald and Phil Boyle, who are acting as the chaperones. They're going to witness, of course, a vote on a very important piece of legislation. So they're here at a very appropriate time and I would just ask the House to welcome them here today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Are the Whips satisfied?

[The Clerk calls the roll.]

[1:42 p.m.]

YEAS NAYS

Mr. Rodney MacDonald Mr. Corbett

Mr. Baker Mr. Deveaux

[Page 10802]

Mr. Russell Ms. Maureen MacDonald

Dr. Hamm Mr. Dexter

Mr. LeBlanc Mr. Holm

Mr. Muir Mr. Manning MacDonald

Mr. Fage Mr. Downe

Mr. Balser Mr. Gaudet

Mr. Parent Dr. Smith

Ms. McGrath Mr. MacAskill

Mr. Ronald Chisholm Mr. Wilson

Mr. Olive Mr. Boudreau

Mr. Morse Mr. Samson

Mr. MacIsaac Mr. MacKinnon

Mr. DeWolfe Mr. MacEwan

Mr. Taylor Mr. Steele

Mr. Dooks Mr. MacDonell

Mr. Langille Mr. Robert Chisholm

Mr. Chataway Mr. Estabrooks

Mr. Clarke Mr. Epstein

Mr. Hendsbee Mr. Pye

Mrs. Baillie

Mr. Carey

Mr. Morash

Mr. Chipman

Mr. Barnet

Mr. O'Donnell

Mr. Hurlburt

THE CLERK: For, 28. Against, 21.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is carried. (Applause)

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

[1:45 p.m.]

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 129.

[Page 10803]

Bill No. 129 - Assessment Act/Municipal Grants Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I move that this bill be now read for a third time.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, our Party intends to vote against Bill No. 129, and for the same reasons for which we voted against the previous bill just dealt with. The problem is that this bill does not help the situation. That's the difficulty with Bill No. 129, exactly as it was with respect to Bill No. 125. There is a problem; the problem has been identified, but the problem has not been dealt with.

The problem with which Bill No. 129 purports to deal is, on the face of it, one that looks as if it has minor effects, but I assure you that it is of extreme importance to many municipalities around this province. It has to do with what is included or excluded for purposes of assessment leading up to real property taxation. Real property taxation is, of course, virtually the only source of revenue for local governments around this province.

What this bill focuses on is the manufacturing sector of the economy. This bill looks prompted by the arrival here of the oil and gas industry at questions associated with manufacturing, because here is the basic scheme of the bill - that is, of the Act that exists right now, the Assessment Act. The Assessment Act says that when it comes to municipal taxation, you can tax land, buildings, and structures, but what you're not supposed to tax is machinery and equipment. The question then becomes how do you tell the difference between machinery and equipment and structures or fixtures? This becomes of great importance and has already become of great dollar importance to a number of municipalities around the province.

Here's why. Prior to the arrival of the oil and gas industry, we had fairly limited numbers of major manufacturing entities in our province. We, of course, had Michelin and Imperial Oil and the pulp and paper plants, but now we have a gas plant and a gas fractionation plant. Of course, there was the pipeline itself. There was some arguing about the value of the pipeline, but it was always clear that the main pipeline that crosses various municipalities was assessable and therefore subject to taxation for property tax purposes. There have been disputes about that; they were fought over; they were ultimately resolved through extended negotiation.

[Page 10804]

But at the same time as that question arose about the valuation of the pipeline, there arose a dispute with the oil and gas industry about the status for municipal tax purposes of the gas plant in Goldboro and the fractionation plant in Richmond County. As I understand the position of the companies, they take the view that essentially both of those entities are purely concerned with manufacturing. That is to say, they're saying there should be no municipal taxation on them. That's an extreme position, and to the extent that they have a fallback position, they're saying that essentially the bulk of those plants are machinery and equipment and are therefore, because they primarily consist of pipes and stacks and flaring equipment and burning equipment, machinery and equipment and should be exempt from taxation.

Now, this is a serious question. The government thinks that it is helping the municipalities by bringing in Bill No. 129. Well, I have to tell you that the government is not helping anyone by bringing in Bill No. 129 to the extent that the municipalities think and the government says that Bill No. 129 will clarify the situation and help sort out this crucial distinction between what is a building or a structure, and what is machinery and equipment and therefore exempt, it won't do it. In fact, what is going to happen is that the waters will continue to be very muddy. This problem will not be solved by Bill No. 129. It is easy to predict that even under Bill No. 129, if the government chooses to proceed with it and adopt it, what will happen is that the municipalities will end up at the Utility and Review Board under appeals, and probably in the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal under further appeals. What the government is doing is they are buying a lawsuit for the municipalities around this province; that's what Bill No. 129 does.

I will go further. I will suggest, on the basis of the cases that have been decided in the past at the Utility and Review Board and at the Court of Appeal, that probably the municipalities will lose. So to the extent that the government is saying to the municipalities, you had a problem and we've solved it, they're not doing that; they have failed to do that. To the extent that the government has been posturing by saying that they have taken on "big oil" through Bill No. 129, they haven't. So far as I can see, all they're doing with Bill No. 129 is making it slightly clear that of course the plants and some portion of the plant and of the fractionation plant will be subject to taxation, but that is far from dealing effectively with big oil, and it is far from dealing effectively with the problem that was pre-existing in the Assessment Act and which the government should have been aware of previously.

Now this is not an area of law within which I normally practice, so I hadn't paid a huge amount of attention to these sections and definition sections of the Assessment Act prior to Bill No. 129 being introduced, but it's been very interesting to have a look at this. Here's the basic scheme: The basic scheme is that machinery and equipment is not supposed to be subject to taxation, but the problem always, before Bill No. 129, was how do you tell what is machinery and equipment that it's exempt? Well the Act has never been completely clear about this, and the Assessment Act has led to various appeals over the years, and it's led to a couple of court rulings and yet the problem has never been entirely sorted out.

[Page 10805]

The difficulty, at its core, so far as I can see after reading the various decisions, is that the bill is not clear as to where the presumption lies. When the assessors are looking at a manufacturing enterprise and they're trying to decide whether those portions of it that they're looking at - be they pipes, be they other things - that are involved in the manufacturing process, and they're trying to decide if they are exempt or are so integral to the building, they are not given by the existing Assessment Act clear guidance; the existing Act just doesn't sort it out for them in clear terms.

Now, that's a problem that has been around for a long time and, in fact, so far as I can see, to the extent that the Assessment Act has taken a position, as interpreted from time to time in those few rare cases by the Utility and Review Board and the Court of Appeal, there has been no great favour done to the people of Nova Scotia or the local municipalities. They've tended the courts and the Utility and Review Board to accept, in the past, the arguments put forward by these very large manufacturing companies, and those arguments have been that when something is part of the building and affixed to it but at the same time, is used in the manufacturing process, then it's exempt.

It's not clear whether that's the correct tax policy and what we see here is the government stepping in, as it should have done when it was alerted to a problem, but stepping in to no good effect. It's been the policy of our Party with respect to tax matters that tinkering with one part of the tax system is a very bad idea. We have said year in, year out, that the tax system in Nova Scotia is beset by problems and that includes that portion of it that relates to municipal taxation, because that's what the Assessment Act is all about. Our position has been that a commission to look at a fair system of taxation from one part of the tax system to all the others is the only thing that's likely to fix the tax system here and this bill illustrates the problem with tinkering. The government is not able, apparently, to offer a principled analysis of where they think the line ought to be drawn in this case, between building and a structure, or machinery and equipment that is used for manufacturing.

Even if we accept the view of the government that it wishes to exempt from municipal taxation machinery and equipment, we're still left with the question of where you draw the line. I'm saying that we have to have a solid look at the extent to which machinery and equipment should be so exempt. That's a question for a fair tax commission. We're not at that point yet and that is something that we would rather see.

Mr. Speaker, I understand another member wishes to make an introduction. I will pause for a moment.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, to the honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

The honourable member for Annapolis on an introduction.

[Page 10806]

MR. FRANK CHIPMAN: Mr. Speaker, in the Speaker's Gallery this afternoon we have a young gentleman, Edward MacArthur, who just so happens to be the son of the Clerk, Rod MacArthur. I would like to have him stand and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Yes, I understand he's also a grandson of a former honourable member with the same name, Edward. Welcome to the Legislature. Welcome to all our guests in the Legislature this afternoon.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

MR. EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, it's nice to see my former law school classmate and his son together in your gallery.

This was a subject that my former law school colleague and I didn't study in any detail when we were going through, but it turns out to be a fascinating subject. Lawyers will be very familiar in other contexts with the whole question of what's a fixture inside a building. This question arises for purposes of definition of what's land; it comes up in questions of sales; it comes up in questions of mortgages, question of mortgages, and if things are generally so affixed to the main building that they are seen as becoming integral to it, then they're seen as being part of that building.

[2:00 p.m.]

Now there's never been any moving away from that when it comes to the law of mortgages, or the law of real estate and real estate sales. Where there does appear to be some moving away from it is in the law of assessment. The problem arises when it comes to focusing on this question of what is machinery and equipment. What the Utility and Review Board, and its predecessors boards, and the court of appeal has said is that when you have machinery and equipment that isn't fixed to the building, that's mobile, that's it's own entity, that could be easily picked up and taken somewhere else, that isn't bolted in place, that isn't cemented in place, that's machinery and equipment. No one disagrees with that; that question hasn't really been problematic.

The question becomes a different one. The question is, what do you do when there is machinery and equipment that's involved in the manufacturing process, but which at the same time is somehow integral and part of the building itself, of the building and the structure. What do you say it is? Is it machinery and equipment and therefore exempt, or is it part of the structure? That is a key question, and I want to illustrate the very significant ramifications of that.

[Page 10807]

Think for a moment about the StoraEnso plant in Port Hawkesbury. Apparently the value for assessment and therefore municipal tax purposes of that building is about $150 million. Now, that's a considerable amount, but do you know what, Mr. Speaker? They have installed inside that building $850 million worth of manufacturing equipment. Now some of that is no doubt attached in some way to the building, and yet the view of Stora is that none of it is assessable for municipal tax purposes and they seem to have prevailed in that view. Yet I'm puzzled by this because it's not clear when we listen to the director of the Assessment Division of the Department of Municipal Affairs that those are the principles on which he believes his assessors are operating. He seems to think that the presumption is in favour of seeing something as part of the building or structure, and that if an owner wants to make out the case that it's exempt machinery and equipment, the burden of proof is on them.

Now I have to say that's not in the Act, but it's a good point to focus on because it's probably the point that the minister should have focused on when he was coming to redraft the Assessment Act and bring forward his bill that became Bill No. 129. He should have looked at this question of who has the burden of proof. At the moment there's nothing in the Act that says who has the burden of proof, there's nothing about a presumption, there's nothing that helps weigh up the balance when there's an argument.

What the courts have said about this question of something being fixed or mobile is yes, if it's mobile then it's machinery and equipment. But they've added to that what they call a function test. They've said if you're trying to decide if something is machinery and equipment, look at what it does. Well you know what? That isn't entirely helpful. Something can be both machinery and equipment involved in the manufacturing process and attached to the building, or so integral to the building it's hard to imagine the building without it. There have been a few cases, I don't think I have to name them all, there have been a few in which the courts have engaged on this issue. The authoritative one seems to be the decision of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal in Riverport Seafoods Limited versus the Director of Assessment. This was a 1981 decision. It was further endorsed by the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal in 1985 in the case of the Director of Assessment versus Nabisco Brands Canada Limited which had to do with the Moirs chocolate factory on the other side of the harbour in Woodside.

The result of these cases seems to be that the position of companies that wish to assert that when something is machinery and equipment, it is to be preferred. The courts seem to have come down on the side of the companies. So when I said earlier that Bill No. 129 is buying a lawsuit for the municipalities, I think we can go further and predict that the odds are that the municipalities under Bill No. 129 are going to lose that dispute. This does nothing to enhance the tax position of those municipalities that the minister seems to think he's acting on behalf of. So when we look at what it is that the government thinks it has accomplished here, we have to conclude that it hasn't been very successful. It was faced with an opportunity to clarify something that has been a problem before the Utility and Review

[Page 10808]

Board, a problem in the Court of Appeal and, most importantly, a problem for municipal taxpayers all over Nova Scotia for years.

I mentioned that this was an area of the law that really hadn't come to my attention before and I would be surprised if a lot of people, except for corporate lawyers and a few people who work in the Assessment Division, have focused on and yet here is a very serious tax question that affects municipalities all over Nova Scotia. I have mentioned some of the large manufacturing enterprises, the Michelins, Imperial Oil and the pulp and paper plants and now, of course, the oil and gas companies and yet we also heard at the Law Amendments Committee from people who came on behalf of grocery stores, large grocery stores. They had a concern about protecting their tax exemption for their equipment. Now, this wasn't manufacturing equipment, but it was apparently shelving and a variety of other things and I'm surprised to hear that all of that seems to be exempt, but if their shelving and their cooling apparatus is exempt, as they seem to imply, that's a very interesting point. Is that the tax policy that we want to prevail in Nova Scotia?

My point is that large grocery stores are all over this province. It's every municipality that has an interest. It's not just a few that might have big manufacturing plants, oil and gas, pulp and paper, or tires. It's in every municipality that there are decent-sized grocery stores and this could make a considerable difference to their tax revenues. Is that the policy that the minister says he's content to live with, that interpretation? It's not clear and nothing helps sort it out. We had filed in front of us a document which was the guidelines that the assessment division says it uses in making this distinction and I have to tell you that those guidelines left me as a reader no wiser when I went through them, no wiser as to where the exact division line ought to be with respect to exempt machinery and equipment and taxable buildings and structures.

That's the key point. Because of the inept way in which the government went about its stated objective of bringing the oil and gas companies into line, what we saw at the Law Amendments Committee was every large manufacturing company in this province come to the Law Amendments Committee now with their knickers in a twist. They have all been alerted to this question.

I assure you, Mr. Speaker, that if there were any large manufacturing, probably any medium- or small-sized manufacturing plants anywhere in Nova Scotia that hadn't turned their minds to this aspect of the Assessment Act before, they're going to turn their minds to it now. I'm worried that we're going to lose tax revenue, never mind failing to make some fair gains. So what I'm pointing out is that this bill doesn't do the job. There was a mess to start with and there's a mess after Bill No. 129 if that government adopts it. They're not solving the problem and so far as I can tell, they're going to make the problem worse in two respects. They're going to make it worse because they are going to allow the municipalities to end up in a fight at the Utility and Review Board and probably in the courts and that will be expensive and they may lose and they've made the problem worse because they've

[Page 10809]

probably alerted every entity in the province that could possibly maximize their claim for exemption under those sections of the Assessment Act, amended or not amended, to come forward and argue their case with the local assessors.

I said at the beginning that our Party would not be supporting this bill and we would not be supporting it for exactly the same reason that we saw as being the fundamental failure in Bill No. 125. There's a problem, a real problem. It's been identified, but the bill fails to deal with it. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I rise in my place to speak on Bill No. 129 and I, too, will be speaking against Bill No. 129 and voting against Bill No. 129. Bill No. 129, when it was first tabled in the House just a few short weeks ago, we made it clear to the minister at that time that this bill sends a signal to the business community throughout the province and, clearly, around the world, that Nova Scotia, by this regressive piece of legislation, poorly crafted piece of legislation, that in fact what they are doing is telling the members around the board tables that Nova Scotia is not open for business. Nova Scotia is not a province to come and invest your money in because capital will start drying up.

The minister has tried on a number of occasions to put amendments forward to deal with the issue of the bill. But no matter how he's tried to put band-aids on a bill that is DOA, he cannot keep it alive because it's wrong. Maybe there's not a lot of people in the government of the day that have a background in business, but you don't have to be in business to understand that if there's an ability in a piece of legislation to go after a regressive tax on machinery and equipment, then it's going to say to businesses, no matter what your business is, it is another form of taxation and people will be very reluctant to make the investments in the Province of Nova Scotia.

Although the minister has, over the last period of time, tried to deal with some of the concerns that were brought forward, he has still failed.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. My gosh, there is far too much chatter in here. I wonder if I could ask an honourable member or a Page perhaps to close the door, please. There is far too much chatter in the Chamber this afternoon.

MR. DOWNE: Yes, and I think that should be written up in one of the newspapers. There should be an article about loose chatter in the House when a member is up speaking on an important piece of legislation.

AN HON. MEMBER: It's rude.

[Page 10810]

MR. DOWNE: That's right. It is rude. I'm surprised at some of the people that are doing it. I'm here speaking on this bill, this Bill No. 129 that is wrong for the investment aura or the investment opportunities in the Province of Nova Scotia. We brought up three points to the minister of why this bill is wrong. The first one was the issue of retroactivity. The minister in the bill wanted to go back two years to be able to impose taxes on industry in the Province of Nova Scotia. So he finally came to the realization that retroactivity in regard to going back and clawing out dollars of taxation two years past is wrong. So he finally eliminated that, which is a positive step, but still this bill called DOA is still wrong.

[2:15 p.m.]

Then we went after him on the issue of franchise and said, how can you start taxing franchise? In the bill, under the definition of structure, it states categorically that they have the ability to tax on the value of franchise. So then we brought it to the attention of the minister. Under this bill, does that mean you can go after Tim Hortons franchises or Kentucky Fried Chicken franchises or any other franchises, General Motors? Anybody that has a franchise, they could theoretically, by that bill, be able to charge for the value of the franchise. Another absolute ridiculous position in a bill. It took a long time to convince the minister of what he had done.

It's clear that the minister realized that that was wrong, so what the minister did is scratch off the issue of franchise because it would have impacted on every single company in the Province of Nova Scotia that either had a car dealership, a food distributorship, anybody who had a franchise in any area at all could be taxed. Finally the minister woke up to the realization that this side of the House was right on that matter as well. So he rescinded that particular aspect of the bill. He was moving in the right direction, but all of a sudden he stopped dead on the biggest single issue that the bill is so regressive about, and that is the issue of taxing machinery and equipment.

They tried in all their wisdom to try to find a solution to the issue, but he never found a simple solution. He said on one hand he's not going to tax machinery and equipment, but then again he goes back to the circular aspect of this bill by stating, well, just a minute, it refers back to definition of structure and definition of structure talks about machinery and equipment affixed inside that shelter.

We're talking about the ability of the Municipal Affairs Minister to be able to say to the assessors around the province - which, by the way, are going to be under the control of towns and municipalities throughout Nova Scotia - there's no wink-wink, nod-nod here. The legislation allows for those individuals to assess a value on machinery and equipment inside those structures. Because of that, companies, whether they manufacture tires in this province, or process fish or food products, manufacture chairs or forestry products, whatever they are doing in their facilities, large or small, they could very well be taxed. We have said to this minister time and time again he's wrong.

[Page 10811]

He doesn't have to believe this side of the House. He doesn't have to believe the arguments that we, as Liberals, have made on this issue. All he has to do is start listening to the number of presenters who presented their petitions and concerns to the minister. The Canadian Property Tax Association sent in a submission to the minister pointing out very clearly their displeasure with this bill. This was done before the last amendment. In contacting them, they have indicated that they still feel strongly about this issue, they do not like this bill.

When you start having companies like that, I know that the Premier must listen to people. He must have had people - out of the thousands of people at the big supper last night, I'm sure some business people - who might have mentioned to them their concern, or maybe they've done it prior to this date. I know he has gotten letters in his office and I know he's gotten them today and he had them last week and the week before. Business communities in this province are saying to them, this is a regressive piece of legislation, it's wrong. The legislation is simply wrong. If they want to go after a court case, deal with it in court or bring in something else relative to the outcome of that court case, but why bring in a piece of legislation that can be determined or interpreted to allow assessment of machinery and equipment within the definition of structures.

We've asked the minister to go back to the drawing board on this issue. The bill is wrong. It's poorly conceived. It's miserable legislation at best.

Why don't you go back to the drawing board in the Fall and come back with some legislation that makes sense to the business community of the Province of Nova Scotia? The minister can say, we've changed this; we've changed that. Well, he can say all he wants; the reality is that the business community in this province is worried that the ability of this bill in its literal translation could mean that there can be taxation on machinery and equipment that is affixed to the structure, whatever that structure might be. Because of that, that's what we're talking about.

They can say, well, you've got regulations and everything else. The reality is the legislation is interpreted by the words that are written in that legislation. When we heard that the minister and his senior staff say, well, that's not what we meant by that; our intent is this and our intent is that. Quite frankly, that minister is not going to be here forever and he's certainly not going to be in that portfolio forever, nor is the senior staff going to be there forever, because it doesn't matter what their intent is. It's what the bill says and how people can interpret that. Like any other piece of legislation, it's not until it goes to the court that we really understand whether or not that legislation has the ground to stand on.

Although the Premier says that we want to have a province that's open for business, by bringing this bill in, he's sending signals to whoever is looking at investments in the Province of Nova Scotia that this province is not open for business. That is what this bill is all about. They are sending a signal to the communities across the way, around the province,

[Page 10812]

around the region, within Canada, the United States and the world, that this province is not open for business and we will find a way to get you whether you like it or not.

As I said the last time, the biggest coward in the world is capital. When it gets scared, it runs and hides. The boardrooms around the world and this nation and this province that are making decisions on future investment in the Province of Nova Scotia - you have now, by this bill, sent up a red flag to those companies that are looking at investment. The government can shake its head all it wants. It doesn't matter what's being said in here; it matters what the boardrooms are saying across this province.

I wonder about the Sobeys of this world. How do they feel about this? Somebody might have said to them, don't worry, my friend, we weren't going to do anything to you. That might be fine and dandy to some people, but if you interpret the law and the bill as they are and follow the circle of logic that's in that bill, which just puts you in a spiral if you follow it long enough, they have the ability under the definition of structure to say that they can tax you for machinery and equipment.

The government doesn't have to listen and say that we are right; all they have to do is listen to the number of presenters who repeatedly came to the Red Chamber and spoke against this bill. They spoke against it for no other reason than they're saying the legislation is poorly drafted. There are members in this House who have been around this House for a long time, members on the front bench who have been in the House for a long time, and they know bad legislation when they see it. Why they allow bad legislation to come forward in this House is unbelievable.

If a minister knows, if a minister realizes that they made a mistake in trying to deal with the issue on this bill, the honourable thing to do for this minister, is to simply admit that there's a mistake and go back to the drawing board. Why wouldn't the minister simply go back (Interruptions) Here we go with this chatter again, Mr. Speaker. Why wouldn't this minister go back and start involving himself with the communities that are being affected? Yes, go back to the municipalities; yes, go back to the business communities across this province and come up with some legislation that makes sense to everybody.

People are worried about this bill. It can have an impact on virtually every level of industry in the Province of Nova Scotia, and it crosses all boundaries in the Province of Nova Scotia. This bill by its reputation alone is already sending signals to boardrooms around the world that they're saying this is not the way to do business for us. This legislation is circular in its interpretation and is entirely unclear as to what the outcome will be. Nova Scotians and Nova Scotian businesses are worried about this legislation and the minister talks about they brought in an amendment that says we're not going to tax machinery and equipment, but at the same time it goes back to the issue of definition of structure. If you go to definition of structure it says in there very clearly that machinery and equipment within that structure that's affixed to that structure can be taxed.

[Page 10813]

So that is why we feel that this legislation is wrong and it should be changed. We would ask the government to do the honourable thing and take this legislation back to the drawing board. You know the Fall is only a few months away and we're all going to be here and we can talk to the minister then. Why doesn't he go back and involve the communities that are affected, to bring legislation in that will be beneficial to the words that the Premier is always saying in this House, that Nova Scotia is a province that is open for business, bring it in, we want to grow the economy. The Minister of Finance talks about the economy in the Province of Nova Scotia, how important it is. Well this legislation is regressive to that statement, this legislation is opposing that statement, this legislation affects small business, medium-sized businesses and large businesses. It doesn't matter what size business you are, this bill will get you and that is what the problem is with this bill. It's wrong.

So with those few words, I will be soon taking my place. I know there are other speakers wanting to speak on this bill, but I want the government to understand clearly that what they've got before us, although the intention might be fine, and although the minister has tried to find some solutions to the issue of retroactivity, and I appreciate that, and he tried to deal with the issue of franchises, and I appreciate that, the bill is still wrong. I ask the minister to go back to the drawing board to find a piece of legislation that he can bring in here that we can all agree with, that is fair to the business community, but it also sends a signal to the business communities throughout the Province of Nova Scotia that they and we will have a province that wants to create jobs and wealth.

They talk about self-reliance, and the Premier talks about going with his tin cup to Ottawa and trying to get equalization changes and everything else, well you know the bottom line about having self-reliance - and I remember their statements about self-reliance - you can't build self-reliance in this province if you don't have industry, if you don't have jobs, if you don't have an environment that is open for development - if you don't create the environment to grow the economy, then you're going to have a problem. So what do they have here? They've got an environment that says to the business community in this country and in this province and globally that we are not open for business and if we don't like what you do we're going to get you one way or the other. That's a poor way for our Progressive Conservative Party to be.

You know they just heard one of their former Leaders of their national Party speak last night about the importance of trade and how much growth we're having in the economy because of trade. Well how can you have trade when the industries are concerned about even making further investment in Nova Scotia, because it makes them uncompetitive, because the investment in Nova Scotia is taxation by this government. What impact will it have on the $80 million expansion to the Esso refinery? What impact will it have on Stora Forest Industries in Richmond County? What impact will it have on the future investments by Michelin Tire Corporation, or anybody else in the Province of Nova Scotia? What impact will it have on small business?

[Page 10814]

We ask this government to do what is honourable, to go back to the drawing board. It's not just the Liberals that are making these arguments, or the New Democratic Party making those arguments, it's businesses around the province that are coming in and saying that this bill is wrong. With all the amendments, it's still wrong. So if the business community is making a mistake here, then I think that the minister and his government are saying to the business community, we don't believe you, we don't want you and as far as we're concerned, this legislation is the way we're going to go.

[2:30 p.m.]

Mark my words, mark our words, if the business community, no matter what sector they're in, feels that this government is going to go after them on taxation any further than they already are on the issue of machinery and equipment within the definition of structures, then they will be closing down businesses in Nova Scotia or they will be stopping the pipeline of new capital investment in the Province of Nova Scotia. That's what we're talking about. That's what this bill is all about and that's why we have been so opposed to this legislation, because it's fundamentally wrong for growing the economy of the Province of Nova Scotia.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, I'm going to be somewhat brief because I think my colleague, the member for Halifax Chebucto and the member for Lunenburg West have spoken quite passionately about this piece of legislation, particularly this bill. But what I want to say is when this bill was first introduced to the House a few weeks ago, in fact I was rather cautious about this bill because I had some concerns of the complexity of this bill. I had some concerns with respect to the overall assessment and with respect to the municipal grants amendments to the Municipal Grants Act as well.

So I'm very pleased now that I did not make the kind of comments that I might have made off the cuff until it had gone through the Law Amendments Committee, Mr. Speaker, and that in fact I have heard some 15 presenters making presentations before the Law Amendments Committee on this particular bill. I also want to say that I'm pleased to have the wisdom of my learned legal colleague, again from Halifax Chebucto, with respect to the legal language around this Assessment Act/Municipal Grants Act and the significant impact that legislation does have when in fact it's introduced.

Mr. Speaker, I think most importantly what I want to say is that this minister, as a matter of fact, what I will say is that if there is a Cabinet shuffle between now and the next sitting of the Legislature, which will happen in the fall, the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations has to be first on the list. The reason I say that is simply this. It is because this minister tried to deal with the equalization formula and how did he deal with the equalization formula after getting no co-operation from the UNSM and the

[Page 10815]

municipalities? He did it by taxing Nova Scotia Power. That was an easy, simple method of doing it and taxing Nova Scotia Power and throwing that money through to municipalities by way of an equalization formula.

Then along comes a non-resident property ownership issue. It never did come before the House. The minister commissioned a group of individuals to go across the province. He never did bring any recommendations forward to this House. Again, there was Bill No. 128, the coastal properties bill, which won't even see the light of day before this House closes. Bill No. 128 now, the minister is saying he is going out there consulting with the communities that are directly affected. Mr. Speaker, now we have Bill No. 129 which in fact this minister has not consulted with those people in the industry with respect to the assessment and the devastation that this might have on future proposed development. Now I'm not going to talk about the possible expansion of Imperial Oil because I do know my colleague, the member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage, represents the constituency in which Imperial Oil is located and he will certainly speak.

Mr. Speaker, if we look at the track record of this minister, surely this minister ought to be considered as one of the persons on the top list to be shuffled. Obviously, this minister is also a former minister in a former Cabinet some time ago. Every piece of legislation or every recommendation that this minister has brought forward has yet to go through this House and it has consistently been called back. So, Mr. Premier, I would say to you or whoever is responsible for a Cabinet shuffle, come the fall of this year of 2002, let's have a new replacement for the Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations. You will certainly be doing Nova Scotians a justice. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I take my place today, but I'm not very pleased to have the opportunity to stand here and speak on this topic. I'm sure the minister - I don't know. I'm baffled over this whole process. In fact, I strongly believe that the staff in the minister's office could do much better than this. I know that from my own personal experience in dealings with that department in the past. Why this minister - this is obviously a political agenda because his staff in that department are very capable of putting together a better bill than this.

Mr. Speaker, it's obvious to me, at least, through my knowledge of that department and the staff, that that staff is being interfered with, I would suggest. It's going to be interesting how the member for Cape Breton North votes on this bill. It affects his constituency. I don't know if he has woken up yet and smelled the coffee. However, within Cape Breton North there's a major industrial park. This bill will affect every industrial park across the Province of Nova Scotia. All you honourable members over there who have industrial parks located in your constituencies, well, hello. It's time you looked at this legislation very carefully.

[Page 10816]

Mr. Speaker, business invests in jurisdictions where it knows the ground rules. This will increase the cost of business and put Nova Scotia at a competitive disadvantage to provinces that have an exemption on machinery and equipment. Municipalities, particularly are left just hanging again. As my colleague, the member for Lunenburg West, indicated, the municipalities are attempting at least to put a system in place in which they would take over the responsibility for delivering assessment services in the Province of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, if the rules keep changing, as in this case, that drives investment away from this province it will have a very negative effect on many of the municipalities, in fact, I believe on all the municipal units throughout the Province of Nova Scotia. This bill will undoubtedly chase jobs away from Nova Scotia. What surprises me more than anything is the Premier's commitment in his blue book. I will read what it says, if I may. In the blue book, the Premier indicates very clearly and this is what he says:

"During its first mandate, a PC government will ensure that Nova Scotia regains its position as the most business friendly environment in Atlantic Canada - the best place to do business. We will do this by: making Nova Scotia the most attractive place to do business in Atlantic Canada by guaranteeing that costs imposed by government are the lowest in the region."

It continues, Mr. Speaker, into the next paragraph,

"Guaranteeing we have the most attractive tax structure in the region. Nova Scotia will have the lowest overall business and personal taxes in Atlantic Canada. No other province in Atlantic Canada will more aggressively pursue new opportunities for growing our economy than Nova Scotia through tax structure, ease of start-up or through aggressive marketing."

Mr. Speaker, not only does this bill position Nova Scotia as the most expensive place to do business in Atlantic Canada, it could very well make us the most expensive place in North America. All the gains that the business community gained in this province in the past eight years will be eliminated as a result of this bill. My former colleagues, just to give you some sort of example on how they were able, with their abilities, to attract business, a KPMG study praised Nova Scotia as a low-cost place to do business, and this bill eliminates that. This bill destroys what many business leaders, community leaders, members of this House and the government have contributed to the success over the last eight years and this bill now eliminates this. It eliminates it. Businesses throughout Nova Scotia, from small to large, will be affected by this bill.

One thing that concerns me a great deal about the bill, Mr. Speaker, is the part of the bill that will drive poor municipalities to tax business at a higher rate, thereby creating a downward free fall, and particularly jobs will likely be the first thing that will be at the expense of this bill, the elimination of jobs. Businesses, like the plastic manufacturing plant

[Page 10817]

Copol in Cape Breton, I would remind the Speaker, as well as all members of the House, continues to struggle because of the issue with the railroad. Copol will be hit harder with higher costs as a result of this bill, costs made worse, as I indicated, by the rail service abandoning Cape Breton. Companies like Trenton Works, does anybody care about Trenton Works? Trenton Works today is struggling to stay in existence. This bill will negatively impact their efforts. Businesses like ECI in Bridgewater will have to find ways to make up for increased costs.

Mr. Speaker, family farms will be affected. Many of the smaller farms will be in jeopardy as a result of this bill. Many small businesses will be forced into extinction because of this bill. As I indicated, and I'm not standing on my feet here to try to embarrass the minister because to my knowledge the minister is a very honourable member and, you know, I don't want to leave that impression, but I would have to question his abilities and his intentions with this bill. The day he presented it, it was obvious that there was no consultation whatsoever with either the municipalities or small business in this province, none, no consultation.

Mr. Speaker, if I recall correctly, the NDP were on their feet in here supporting this bill until they sat back and listened to my colleague, the member for Lunenburg West, who spoke first on this issue for my caucus and then the lights came on over there. If we recall, the House Leader of the NDP came rushing in - he must have been watching on the monitor outside - here and he started asking questions almost immediately as my colleague took his place in this great Chamber. The next speaker the NDP had on its feet seemed kind of confused and they really didn't know in what direction they were going to go forth in, until of course my turn came and the lights obviously came on full tilt at that point.

I'm not questioning the minister, as I indicated, I believe the minister to be an honourable gentleman. I say that in all fairness. I've seen him inside and outside this House, he's always polite, courteous and very professional. I would have to question his ability to run this department, sincerely. Because to my personal knowledge I know full well that staff in that department can do better than this. They can do better than this, but they are obviously not being allowed and are being directed to come forth with this piece; I don't know what to call it. The minister himself even attempted to amend the bill but, of course, even an amendment can't do anything with this bill. This bill, it's just time for the garbage can with the bill and back to the drawing board.

If the minister allows his staff to sit down and construct this bill, then they will have a bill that will do the things that the Premier promised in his blue book. Again, in the blue book, in the blue book, Mr. Speaker, this Tory Government guarantee - these are not my words, these are the words of the Premier of the Province of Nova Scotia during the election campaign in 1999. Of course, pick up the blue book, if any Nova Scotian doesn't have one, if you need a copy of one, obtain one and look at the book yourself. Look at it yourself. This

[Page 10818]

bill will clearly drive business from Nova Scotia. It will increase the cost of business to such an amount that jobs will be lost. Nova Scotians will be directly affected by this bill.

In closing, all I can do, because as all Nova Scotians know, there's more noses over on that side of the table and when the votes come down, they will win the vote. They will win the vote, Mr. Speaker, that's obvious. It will be interesting for me, at least, to sit here in my place and see how many of the members, such as the member for Cape Breton North - who has an industrial park in his area, in his constituency, which also affects my constituency because many of my residents work in those manufacturing plants in that industrial park - I will be very interested to see how this vote will take place.

We've pleaded with the minister, we've pleaded with the Premier. It's just one-sided. It's like the previous bill, the smoking bill. As the statistics indicated, 1,900 people die every year in Nova Scotia from cigarette smoking. The statistics show that 200 of those people are non-smokers who die from second-hand smoke. Those individuals over there had an opportunity here today in this Chamber to help those 200 lives; to help save 200 lives in this province. They failed to recognize that and they toed their Party line.

Mr. Speaker, in closing, I'm just hopeful that the Premier will live up to his commitment he made to Nova Scotians in 1999. Please, Premier, look at your promises, look at your guarantees and ask yourself, is this what you promised Nova Scotians? Increased assessments on businesses, job losses and new businesses that will not be attracted to this province. Premier, please come to your senses and direct your minister to remove this bill from the floor of this House. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I'm glad to be able to stand for a few moments with regard to Bill No. 129. We've heard a lot of debate on this piece of legislation with regard to specifically how it would impact future development or investment in this province. But I do want to say that, particularly around my riding, it will have a direct impact on the Imperial Oil refinery in my riding that's been around for 84 years. Long before anyone ever discovered gas or oil off the coast of Nova Scotia, there was a refinery in my riding that has been a major employer in the metro area and has had a major impact on the ability to develop oil and gas and produce gas products in this province.

At one time, there were two refineries in my riding. Ultramar closed 10 years ago for a lot of reasons, but let's be clear; on the North American market, maybe on a global level, there's been a reduction in the capacity of refineries and the need to have as many refineries in North America. There has been a consolidation. You see larger refineries being built. Even in Saint John, New Brunswick, I think it's 200,000 or 300,000 barrels a day, their building capacity there. This refinery in Dartmouth has a capacity of, I think, around 85,000 to 100,000 a day. But what's important is they are also planning on expanding that refinery, not

[Page 10819]

necessarily capacity, but what is done. There is $80 million being invested right now, and if anyone drove by the refinery, they would see $80 million being invested in that refinery right now to remove sulphur from gasoline, to reduce the sulphur levels.

There is discussion right now at Imperial Oil as to whether they will invest another $100 million to put in a plant that will reduce sulphur in diesel fuel in that plant. These are decisions that are made in a corporate boardroom, Mr. Speaker, but those decisions are made tougher and tougher by bills like Bill No. 129. Let us be clear; this creates nothing but confusion as to whether machinery and equipment will also be considered assessable property. In particular, at a refinery, we are looking at machinery and equipment that is bolted to the ground and is part of a structure that creates the process that develops gas and diesel products. Well, at the same time, under Bill No. 129, the debate will rage as to whether that equipment could also be taxed as assessable property.

That may not be the intention of this government, but let us be clear that when this bill passes, the intention of this government is irrelevant. What is said in this House is irrelevant. A court or a tribunal will be making decisions based on what is written in this legislation, and it is so confusing, so obfuscating, Mr. Speaker, that it will only result in more litigation and potentially decisions being made, whether it be the refinery, gas distribution, or whether it be other major industries in this province, they will be making decisions based on what Bill No. 129 says.

I will not be voting for this legislation. My caucus will not be voting for this legislation, not because of anything that was said by the member for Cape Breton The Lakes or his colleagues, let me note for the record, Mr. Speaker, but because we know this legislation is bad for Nova Scotia. It only creates more confusion, and in the case of my riding, where we have a major employer in the Imperial Oil refinery, which has a long and distinguished history of 84 years of processing fuel and producing gas and diesel products in this province. It is the only refinery left in Nova Scotia and the only Imperial Oil refinery, I believe, left east of Nanticoke on the Niagara Peninsula. This is important, and the future of that refinery and the future of developments at that refinery will be drastically impacted by Bill No. 129. That is why I cannot vote for it.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. If I recognize the honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations it will be to close debate on Bill No. 129.

The honourable Minister of Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations.

HON. ANGUS MACISAAC: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank members opposite for their comments. I want to first of all remind members of the House why this bill was necessary. It was necessary to bring clarity to the practices that we have been following in this province with respect to the assessment of property. The reason that we had to bring that clarity is because the ability and right of the province to assess the property of SOEI and of Maritimes

[Page 10820]

& Northeast, in the first instance, was challenged in the courts, through an appeal which would wind up in the courts. That appeal said that we did not have the right to assess this property. Indeed, the appeal challenged our authority and ownership of the Strait of Canso. That is something that was felt necessary for us to respond to in order to ensure that the assessment, as practised in this province, would carry on in the future, so that properties, for instance, such as the Imperial refinery, would not be stricken from the assessment roles or reduced to a minimal amount of money compared to what is there now.

Those were the issues that were at stake when we brought forward the original Bill No. 80 in the fall of 2000. That was over 18 months ago, Mr. Speaker. What has happened in that intervening period is the original Bill No. 80 was amended. It was amended so that the parties involved, that is the two companies, the municipalities and the province would have an opportunity to sit down and work through the issues that were separating the parties with respect to coming to an agreement, so that the appeal would not be necessary. That effort did not bring about an agreement.

Mr. Speaker, we then sought the assistance of retired Justice Clarke to try to mediate the settlement among the parties involved in this particular dispute. Mr. Justice Clarke's report indicated that an agreement did not appear possible in the environment in which the discussions were taking place. So there was a breakdown from that period with respect to the discussions. The two companies sort of unlocked their attitude, and Maritimes & Northeast came forward and sat down with the province, sat down with the municipalities, through the efforts of the province, and we were able to come to an agreement with Maritimes & Northeast, an agreement which will result in $220 million going into municipal revenues over the period of the next 20 years.

That agreement was made possible by the leadership of Maritimes & Northeast, through the efforts of people in my department and through the efforts of the municipal units which were effected by the pipeline property. We were able to achieve an agreement, entirely within the terms of the Assessment Act of this province. That agreement is now in place. As a matter of fact, a part of this legislation is intended to ensure the security of that agreement as we move forward. We've been able to move on when it comes to the issue of Maritimes & Northeast. That has been a very constructive effort on the part of that company to deal with what was a very difficult problem.

At this juncture, I might just point out that the problem was made difficult because there was a lack of proper preparation with respect to this industry in terms of issues such as assessment. I don't say that in an accusatory manner, I simply say that it was a fact of life that the legislation did not adequately deal with issues relative to this industry. The legislation failed to define structure as it was applied and has been applied throughout the history of the province.

[Page 10821]

There is nothing in this legislation that is going to alter the way in which property is assessed. I want to emphasize that. There is also nothing in the legislation that is going to start assessing machinery and equipment. That is going to be phased out and that will continue.

[3:00 p.m.]

But I want to go back to the effort that we had in terms of trying to achieve an agreement. As I indicated, we achieved one with Maritimes & Northeast, but with SOEI we were unable to achieve an agreement. We spent considerable effort, Mr. Speaker. We even went outside our department in order to provide a fresh face with respect to those discussions and yet an agreement was not possible. It was not achieved. We, therefore, made the decision that because an agreement was not achieved, we were going to come forward with the legislation.

As a result of presentations, we did make amendments to the legislation in order to accommodate some of the views that we heard, but I want to underline for the House, Mr. Speaker, that there is nothing in this legislation that is going to alter current assessment practices within this province. The legislation is intended to affirm the practices that have gone on in the past and will continue into the future.

Mr. Speaker, I don't want to get into a chirping war with the Opposition with respect to many of the points that they've made. The advice that I've received from my department I consider to be good advice. I consider the people in that department to be very professional. They've had a tremendous amount of experience and the legislation reflects that particular experience.

In closing, I simply want to say that we were subjected to a very severe campaign in an attempt to stop this legislation and that campaign suggested that many things were in the legislation that, in fact, are not there, were never intended to be there and never will be there. The legislation will affirm previous practices within this province and will allow us to carry forward and go forward based on the practices that we've had.

So, Mr. Speaker, I'm very pleased to conclude the debate on this legislation and I just want to say that this has been a very interesting process. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The motion is for third reading of Bill No. 129. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill do pass. Ordered that the title be as read by the Clerk. Ordered that the bill be engrossed.

[Page 10822]

ACTING SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: Her Honour the Lieutenant-Governor is without.

MR. SPEAKER: Let Her Honour the Lieutenant-Governor be admitted.

[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]

[The Lieutenant-Governor, the Honourable Myra Freeman, preceded by her escort, and by Mr. Peter Theriault, Acting Sergeant-at-Arms, bearing the Mace, entered the House of Assembly Chamber. The Lieutenant-Governor then took her seat on the Throne.

The Acting Sergeant-at-Arms then departed and re-entered the Chamber followed by the Speaker, the Honourable Murray Scott; Chief Clerk of the House, Roderick MacArthur, Q.C.; and Assistant Clerks, Neil Ferguson and Arthur Fordham, Q.C. They took up their positions at the foot of the Speaker's Table.]

ACTING SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: It is the wish of Her Honour that the ladies and gentlemen be seated.

MR. SPEAKER: May it please Your Honour, the General Assembly of the Province has, in its present session, passed certain bills to which, in the name and on behalf of the General Assembly, I respectfully request Your Honour's Assent.

THE CLERK:

Bill No. 9 - Pension Benefits Act.

Bill No. 72 - Electronic Evidence Act.

Bill No. 87 - Cosmetology Act.

Bill No. 98 - Volunteer Protection Act.

Bill No. 101 - Fire Safety Act.

Bill No. 105 - Elevators and Lifts Act.

Bill No. 106 - Guardianship Act.

Bill No. 107 - Land Registration Act.

Bill No. 108 - Interjurisdictional Support Orders Act.

Bill No. 109 - Financial Measures (2002) Act.

[Page 10823]

Bill No. 110 - Provincial Fossil Act.

Bill No. 111 - Motor Vehicle Act.

Bill No. 112 - Gas Distribution Act.

Bill No. 113 - Agriculture Administration Amendment (2002) Act.

Bill No. 115 - Justice Administration Amendment (2002) Act.

Bill No. 117 - Geoscience Profession Act.

Bill No. 118 - Municipality of Inverness Supplementary Pension Contribution Act.

Bill No. 119 - Canadian Information Processing Society of Nova Scotia Act.

Bill No. 120 - Anglican Church Act.

Bill No. 121 - An Act to Incorporate The Mic-Mac Amateur Aquatic Club.

Bill No. 123 - Halifax Regional Municipality Harbour Solutions Financing Act.

Bill No. 125 - Smoke-free Places Act.

Bill No. 129 - Assessment Act/Municipal Grants Act.

Bill No. 130 - Lunenburg Common Lands Act.

Bill No. 131 - Gray Grant Act.

Bill No. 132 - Atlantic Blue Cross Care Inc. Act.

Bill No. 133 - Antiochian Maronite Catholic Church Act.

Bill No. 134 - Volunteer Fire Services Act.

THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR:

In Her Majesty's name, I Assent to these Bills.

[Page 10824]

MR. SPEAKER: Your Honour, having been graciously pleased to give your Assent to the Bills passed during the present Session, it becomes my agreeable duty on behalf of Her Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, Her faithful Commons of Nova Scotia in General Assembly assembled, to present to Your Honour a bill for the Appropriation of Supply granted in the present Session for the support of the Public Service and to request Your Honour's Assent thereto.

THE CLERK:

Bill No. 124 - An Act to Provide for Defraying Certain Charges and Expenses of the Public Service of the Province.

THE LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR:

In Her Majesty's name, I thank Her loyal subjects, I accept their benevolence and I Assent to this Bill.

[The Speaker and the Clerks left the Chamber.]

[The Lieutenant-Governor left the Chamber.]

ACTING SERGEANT-AT-ARMS: His Honour, the Speaker.

[The Speaker took the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: I would ask all the honourable members to join me in the singing of the national anthem.

[The national anthem was sung by the members.]

MR. SPEAKER: Please be seated.

The honourable Premier.

HON. JOHN HAMM (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, and Members of the General Assembly, I hereby move that this General Assembly be now adjourned to meet again at the call of the Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 10825]

We stand adjourned.

[The House rose at 3:13 p.m.]

[Page 10826]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 4204

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Ross sisters of Fraserville have been dominating long-distance track and field events this year and recently competed at regionals in Truro; and

Whereas the love of track and field began four years ago when the oldest sibling, Lesley Ross, decided to give long-distance running a try and won all events she competed in; and

Whereas the four girls, Lesley, Jessie, Mallory and Helen compete against one another in some events, but are there for each other to help and offer tips to improve their running times;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the achievements of Lesley, Jessie, Mallory and Helen Ross and wish them success in their bid for positions on the Nova Scotia Canada Games 2005 team.

RESOLUTION NO. 4205

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas St. Thomas University has hosted the Model United Nations Mock Assembly for the past three years; and

Whereas first timers, Springhill High School students, were joined by nearly 200 other students from 40 schools in all three Maritime Provinces, Ontario, Quebec, the United Kingdom and Ecuador; and

Whereas the students were divided into three major committees that discussed globalization, interdependence, humanitarian intervention and UN reform;

[Page 10827]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Springhill High School participants including: Cody MacDonald, Lacey McDermott, Philip Carter, Scott MacDonald, Leanne Fraser and Alisha Choinet, for taking a proactive role in international relations and wish them luck in their future studies.

RESOLUTION NO. 4206

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Knights of Columbus have recently held their annual free throw competition at Springhill High School; and

Whereas the winners in the girls' group were Teesha Symes, Samantha Welsh and Sara Laurie; and

Whereas the winners in the boys' group were Nick Zoller, Jarrod Rolfe and Nathan Mattix;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the six girls and boys that placed in the free throw competition.

RESOLUTION NO. 4207

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Vonetta Chouinard, a Millvale resident, recently published her first book titled Vonetta's Memoirs of Beautiful Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the book is a collection of memoirs, poems, traditional recipes, local legends and photos from her childhood; and

Whereas she signed copies of her new book on May 24th in Parrsboro;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Vonetta on her recent publication and recognize the historical significance of her book.

[Page 10828]

RESOLUTION NO. 4208

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas singing is a talent that is appreciated and admired by many; and

Whereas 11-year old Danica Deveaux of Oxford recently won her first singing contest; and

Whereas as well as receiving the Junior Musical Theatre Award, she won two first and second gold medals;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Danica Deveaux for her accomplishments and wish her luck in her future competitions.

RESOLUTION NO. 4209

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Atlantic School of Theology is an outstanding and long-standing academic and teaching institution requiring tireless commitment and dedication from its students; and

Whereas many graduates who receive their Masters of Divinity are called to service as ministers with the United Church of Canada; and

Whereas Rob McArthur of St. Matthew Wesley United Church in North Sydney was recently ordained in Truro, along with colleagues who will soon begin active ministry;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge and congratulate Rob McArthur on his ordination and wish him every success as a minister serving God and community within the United Church of Canada.

[Page 10829]

RESOLUTION NO. 4210

By: Mr. David Hendsbee (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas volunteers are the lifeblood of many community service clubs and organizations across this province and country; and

Whereas Lions Clubs International is the largest community service organization in the world with 1.4 million members strong; and

Whereas the Lake Echo Lions are about to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of its club's charter which was granted on June 30, 1978;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge and commend the Lake Echo Lions Club for its unwavering spirit for advancing the needs and well-being of their community.

RESOLUTION NO. 4211

By: Mr. John MacDonell (Hants East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Hants East calls for the Premier and his government to stop increasing property tax assessments; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to stop increasing property taxes.

[Page 10830]

RESOLUTION NO. 4212

By: Mr. Kevin Deveaux (Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this House of Assembly has a long and distinguished history and the staff who serve the members are part of that heritage; and

Whereas Sara Knezevic is a page who came here from Beanja Luka, Bosnia-Herzegovina, as a refugee from that war-torn country in September 1996, and became a Canadian citizen in October 2001; and

Whereas Sara Knezevic served admirably as staff in the House from the Spring of 2000, but will be taking her leave of us today;

Therefore be it resolved that this House thank Sara Knezevic for her stellar service to the members, wish her well in her future endeavours and hope she leaves with wonderful memories of this historic institution.

RESOLUTION NO. 4213

By: Mr. Robert Chisholm (Halifax Atlantic)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Atlantic calls for the Premier to focus on cleaning up the environment; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to invest in a cleaner environment for us all.

[Page 10831]

RESOLUTION NO. 4214

By: Mr. John Holm (Sackville-Cobequid)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Sackville-Cobequid calls for the Premier and his government to stop gouging seniors with increased Pharmacare costs and car insurance premiums; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them and make sure seniors are able to afford to live.

RESOLUTION NO. 4215

By: Mr. Darrell Dexter (Leader of the Opposition)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Dartmouth-Cole Harbour calls for the Premier and his government to alleviate child poverty; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to help parents adequately feed, clothe and shelter their children.

[Page 10832]

RESOLUTION NO. 4216

By: Mr. Graham Steele (Halifax Fairview)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Fairview calls for the Premier and his government to work towards eliminating child poverty; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government spend more time devising ways to ensure that no Nova Scotian child ever has to know poverty.

RESOLUTION NO. 4217

By: Mr. Graham Steele (Halifax Fairview)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Fairview calls for the Premier and his government to ensure that roads are improved; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to improve the state of our province's highways.

[Page 10833]

RESOLUTION NO. 4218

By: Mr. Jerry Pye (Dartmouth North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Dartmouth North calls for the Premier and his government to create more jobs with better pay; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to create new higher-paying jobs.

RESOLUTION NO. 4219

By: Hon. Michael Baker (Justice)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia held their annual Banquet and Awards Ceremony this month recognizing several nurses for their extraordinary contributions to the nursing profession; and

Whereas the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia Honorary Life Memberships are granted to those leaving their professional careers who have rendered distinguished service or valuable assistance to the nursing profession; and

Whereas Jean Anderson of Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, retired from the Hillside Pines Home for Special Care after a distinguished 39-year career in nursing, served as staff nurse and nursing supervisor, has been very supportive in the former Registered Nurses Association of Nova Scotia Lunenburg/Queens Chapter and is described as a positive role model and a quiet leader with an ongoing dedication to the practice of nursing;

[Page 10834]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank Jean Anderson, honorary life member of the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia, for her steadfast dedication and compassion throughout her career.

RESOLUTION NO. 4220

By: Mr. Donald Downe (Lunenburg West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas as early as 1918 Bridgewater had a veteran's organization, which promoted the development of government legislation to recognize, protect, and support veterans; and

Whereas from the foundation of strong comradeship of the Great War Veterans Association, Branch 24 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Bridgewater, remains dedicated to caring for and protecting the welfare of veterans; and

Whereas the main objectives remain today, focus is also on playing a role in the community and especially in educating youth on the sacrifice and bravery of the men and women who fought for our freedom;

Therefore be it resolved that Branch 24 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Bridgewater be recognized for maintaining the objectives of the charter members, and may they continue to promote unity and the spirit of comradeship within the community.

RESOLUTION NO. 4221

By: Hon. James Muir (Health)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Pictou County Health Authority is holding its first employee and physician service recognition and retirement event today; and

Whereas 225 employees of the Aberdeen Hospital in New Glasgow, Sutherland-Harris Memorial Hospital in Pictou, Addiction Services, and Public Health Services are being recognized for their commitment and contribution to delivering quality health care services to the residents of Pictou County and beyond; and

Whereas the total number of years of those being recognized for 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 45, and 55 years of service is 4145 years;

[Page 10835]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate those employees of the Pictou County Health Authority on achieving these career milestones and thank them for their dedication and commitment.

RESOLUTION NO. 4222

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the recent annual Regional Heritage Fair attracted more than 750 students this year, with local students taking home eight of the awards; and

Whereas Katie Henwood received national recognition for her artwork, depicting four women representing different nationalities and ages symbolizing Canada's multiculturalism; and

Whereas Ms. Henwood's prize-winning entry was one of over 4,000 from across the country, and she is amazed and excited to be singled out;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Katie Henwood on her national honour and wish her success in all her future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4223

By: Hon. Murray Scott ( Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Springhill elementary school students are giving peace a chance; and

Whereas in conjunction with the "Peaceful Schools, Peaceful Playground" program, the "Principal's Peace Awards" were established; and

Whereas two students from each Primary to Grade 6 class at Junction Road and West End Elementary Schools were selected as award recipients, based on their role as "peacemakers";

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate all the Principal's Peace Award recipients including from Junction Road: Matthew Casey, Kyle Merrit, Robin Spence, Brayden Smith, Rachel Berry, Sonya MacDonald, Mary Jean Colwell, Leah Crowe,

[Page 10836]

Justus MacPhee, Channing Gogan, Ashley Perry, Lydia Hatfield, Brandon Oulton, Brandon White, Daniel Legere, Brandon Stone, Brayley Barton, Tiffany Hunter, Stacey Spence, Matthew Ward, and Kristen Welsh; and from West End elementary school: Mairi Demings, Tim Angers, Nick MacDonald, Sydney Peck, Larissa Crowe, Amanda Casey, Asia Shay, Bronson Beaton, Kenneth Cox, Jeremy Misken, Alex Chapman, Jessica Munro, Tara Maddison, Christopher Millard, Brendon Grimes, and Stephanie Clarke.

RESOLUTION NO. 4224

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas three teams from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick competed Saturday, May 25th, in the New Brunswick/Nova Scotia Mine Rescue Competition at the K.C. Irving Regional Centre in Bathurst; and

Whereas the Canadian Salt Company from Pugwash will be Nova Scotia's representative at this year's competition, along with Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. - N.B. Division, from Sussex, New Brunswick, and the host team from Bathurst, Noranda Inc. - Brunswick Mine; and

Whereas the three teams will be required to carry out a simulated emergency rescue situation in a mock mine, as well as a firefighting task and a first-aid event;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House offer our best wishes to all participants, especially those from Nova Scotia, as they test their abilities in an atmosphere of healthy competition.

RESOLUTION NO. 4225

By: Mr. David Hendsbee (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sometimes called Lou Gehrig's disease and first discovered in France over 100 years ago by Dr. Jean Martin Charcot, is a fatal, rapid progressive neuromuscular disease that affects motor neurons, eventually leading to complete paralysis; and

[Page 10837]

Whereas the ALS Society of Canada, founded in 1977 as a national non-profit, charitable organization dedicated to providing services to people with ALS and their families, estimates that there are approximately 1,500 to 2,000 Canadians living with ALS, making it as common as multiple sclerosis; and

Whereas June is declared ALS Awareness Month by Health Canada, and every dollar donated during ALS Awareness Month goes directly to research;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House help to promote a greater public awareness of ALS, especially during the month of June, and encourage those in their communities to continue to offer their time and financial support to help fund future ALS research.

RESOLUTION NO. 4226

By: Hon. Angus MacIsaac (Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas last night over 1,000 people filled the World Trade and Convention Centre to be a part of the largest political fundraising event this region has ever seen; and

Whereas its guest speaker, former Prime Minster the Right Honourable Brian Mulroney, wowed the audience with both his self-deprecating humour and assessment of politics then and now; and

Whereas Prime Minister between 1984 and 1993, Mr. Mulroney introduced such groundbreaking policies as Free Trade and NAFTA;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House join me in commending organizers and volunteers, and especially the former Prime Minister, for making last night's event such a huge success, and also thank Mr. Mulroney for presenting to St. F.X. University, during this trip to Nova Scotia, two $5,000 scholarships in his father's name.

RESOLUTION NO. 4227

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10838]

Whereas Russian educators were in Nova Scotian in February to learn from the Annapolis East Elementary School and to attend the orientation exercise of the Peaceful Schools International, an association aimed at reducing violence in the school systems; and

Whereas they spent a day learning about the peaceful education initiatives of Annapolis East, a member of the League of Peaceful Schools and first to be recognized under the PSI banner; and

Whereas there was a half-hour showing of a documentary focusing on Annapolis East and its anti-violence efforts, produced by the National Film Board of Canada;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House applaud the efforts of the students of the Annapolis East Elementary School in making their environment a peaceful one to be in, and thank them for their assistance in helping to guide the Russian school system to make similar advances.

RESOLUTION NO. 4228

By: Hon. Rodney MacDonald (Tourism and Culture)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas seniors are an important part of all communities throughout the province; and

Whereas the annual Senior Games which will be held in Inverness on June 1, 2002; and

Whereas there will be special activities and games of competition for seniors;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend their thanks to the organizers of the annual Senior Games, and wish all seniors from Inverness County a healthy and happy 2002.

RESOLUTION NO. 4229

By: Mr. David Hendsbee (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 2002 is a big year for Saint Mary's University, as it is celebrating its 200th Anniversary; and

[Page 10839]

Whereas to honour 200 years of excellence in education, a postage stamp was designed to acknowledge to the world the institution's tremendous achievements - Monday being the first day of cover for the stamp; and

Whereas this honour is fitting for a university which, although it had humble beginnings, has achieved international recognition, something the stamp will promote even further;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House acknowledge the achievements of Saint Mary's, a school which was founded in 1802 by Reverend Edmund Burke who determined that "an educational institution of higher learning was one of the most pressing needs of his people" - a goal still so true today.

RESOLUTION NO. 4230

By: Mr. Cecil O'Donnell (Shelburne)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas with deed in hand, the Town of Shelburne anxiously awaits the official signing of the transfer of the Shelburne Port Authority into the town's hands; and

Whereas after a long and difficult process the town and its mayor, P.G. Comeau, have worked and planned for this day with a full appreciation of the port's potential and a strong desire to develop it to its fullest; and

Whereas a year-round, deep harbour, Shelburne's port is well-used by fishermen and cargo vessels and is looking forward to welcoming cruise ships and offshore supply vessels servicing the expanding oil and gas industry;

Therefore be it resolved that all members acknowledge the importance of this occasion and applaud the efforts of Mayor Comeau and his dedicated team who, through perseverance and determination, have unlocked the door to great opportunities for the Town and County of Shelburne.

RESOLUTION NO. 4231

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10840]

Whereas rural fire departments often face a greater danger than urban departments, mainly because of a lack of water hydrants, and that increased risk leads to higher insurance rates for many rural homeowners; and

Whereas the Insurance Advisory Organization has organized a test, the superior water shuttle, to determine a department's response time and will grade each department accordingly; and

Whereas volunteer firefighters from four departments on the Northside - South Side Boularderie, Ross Ferry, George's River and Big Bras d'Or - have proven their capacity to fight major fires and passed the test with flying colors;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House commend the volunteer fire departments for their hard work and determination to provide South Side Boularderie, Ross Ferry, George's River and Big Bras d'Or top-notch firefighting service and for helping to keep insurance rates lower for homeowners in their communities.

RESOLUTION NO. 4232

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas since February, members of the Cape Breastoners Dragon Boat team have been training in anticipation of the launch of their new dragon boat; and

Whereas the team is comprised of breast cancer survivors from all over Cape Breton ranging in age from 40 to 70; and

Whereas training will finally pay off when the new dragon boat meets the waters of the Mira River on June 1st;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate the Cape Breastoners Dragon Boat team for their inspirational efforts and wish them luck with their dragon boat races.

RESOLUTION NO. 4233

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10841]

Whereas Sydney is hosting the annual Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists convention for the first time ever this June, boasting over 400 attendees; and

Whereas the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists includes fields such as radiology, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy; and

Whereas the five-day-long convention is expected to put approximately $500,000 into the local economy;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House welcome the Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists to Cape Breton and wish them a successful convention.

RESOLUTION NO. 4234

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Obbie Mitchell has served his community, province and country through both tremendous political and community involvement; and

Whereas Obbie Mitchell has enjoyed a long, successful career within his beloved Cape Breton, always striving to improve his area; and

Whereas friends, family, colleagues and officials are gathering to honour Obbie Mitchell for his outstanding and countless contributions, which have made him a great Nova Scotian;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge and congratulate Obbie Mitchell on his well-deserved honour and extend best wishes to Obbie's lovely wife, Mary.

RESOLUTION NO. 4235

By: Hon. Ronald Russell (Transportation and Public Works)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce has been operating in the Town of Windsor since 1882, four years after Windsor became a town; and

[Page 10842]

Whereas the Windsor branch of the CIBC has been of helpful assistance to residents of Windsor-West Hants for the past 120 years; and

Whereas a birthday celebration recently took place at the CIBC branch in Windsor celebrating the bank's 120 years of operation in the town;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs recognize the efforts of current Branch Manager Ruby Redden and staff and wish them another 120 years of successful operation in Windsor-West Hants.

RESOLUTION NO. 4236

By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas members of the Canadian Armed Forces serving in or near Afghanistan have found a new friend in 32 army veteran Ken Wilson of Greenwood; and

Whereas Mr. Wilson started sending care food packages to his son who is serving on the HMCS Charlottetown, the food being the kind sailors were unable to get through navy supply channels; and

Whereas the shipments became so popular in such a short period of time that Mr. Wilson soon got assistance from the local Foodland Grocery Store in Greenwood, which also enlisted support from General Mills, Dare Foods and Hershey Canada, and also local food wholesaler TRA Foods, resulting in 178 cases of food being donated;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs acknowledge the tremendous effort undertaken by Ken Wilson, Foodland Grocery in Greenwood and national and local food suppliers for making the tour of duty for our Armed Forces members a more comfortable existence.

RESOLUTION NO. 4237

By: Mr. Kerry Morash (Queens)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the position of assistant to MLAs is not an easy job, as any MLA here in the Legislature knows; and

[Page 10843]

Whereas Donna Wefer has served in that role for over 24 years for the people in Queens and therefore is one of the longest-serving MLA assistants in the province; and

Whereas she started in 1978 at the request of the then newly-elected John Leefe and remained until his retirement more than 20 years later and planned to retire herself but agreed to continue with me as my assistant;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge the dedication and hard work of Donna Wefer and applaud the role of all constituency assistants, who serve us loyally throughout the province.

RESOLUTION NO. 4238

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Pictou County Tourist Association recently celebrated 25 years of providing hospitality, while also handing out awards for 2002; and

Whereas the Mingo Group Maritime Inns and Resorts captured the North Star Award, presented annually to a Pictou County tourism sector individual, business or attraction that has been a stalwart in the Pictou County Tourism Industry for a number of years; and

Whereas Don Mingo has always been a strong proponent of the Pictou County tourism industry;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs congratulate Don Mingo of the Mingo Group Maritime Inns and Resorts for their winning of the 2002 North Star Award and wish both the Pictou County Tourist Association and Don Mingo many more years of continued success.

RESOLUTION NO. 4239

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Grade 5 students at Thorburn Consolidated School recently took part in a unique social studies class; and

[Page 10844]

Whereas the students dressed in various outfits recognizing the dress of many countries worldwide; and

Whereas projects such as these enhance the learning process of our older elementary school students as they begin learning about many facets of our world's make-up;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate teachers and Grade 5 students at Thorburn Consolidated School for their unique approach to both teaching and learning about the countries of this world.

RESOLUTION NO. 4240

By: Hon. Rodney MacDonald (Tourism and Culture)

I hereby give notice that on a future day, I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 70th Annapolis Valley Apple Blossom Festival officially opens tonight in Windsor with the festival theme this year being "Our Neighbours - Near and Far"; and

Whereas no better example of this theme exists than with the recent naming of the German airline's new A-340 Airbus as the Gander/Halifax, for the great hospitality shown by all Nova Scotians following last September's terrorist bombings in New York and Washington; and

Whereas the Halifax International Airport was just one of the stopping points for airliners from across the world last September 11th, but Nova Scotians from across the province put forth tremendous hospitality and welcomed the grounded passengers with open arms;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this Legislature recognize the unique theme of this year's Apple Blossom Festival, one of the world's top tourist attractions, while also thanking Nova Scotians once again for their hard work following that fateful September 11th morning, and to the German Airline, Lufthansa, for recognizing the warm hospitality shown and co-naming their new A-340 Airbus after Nova Scotia's provincial capital.

RESOLUTION NO. 4241

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10845]

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Allan Saunders of Sydney is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with his Bachelor of Arts, Community Studies;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Allan Saunders and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4242

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Caryn Smith of Sydney River is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with her Bachelor of Science with concentration in Biology;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Caryn Smith and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4243

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

[Page 10846]

Whereas Carl Getto of New Waterford is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with his Master of Business Administration in Community Economic Development;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Carl Getto and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4244

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Samantha Hill of Hampton, New Brunswick, is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with her Bachelor of Business Administration with a concentration in Marketing;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Samantha Hill and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4245

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Susan Knight of Grande Cache, Alberta, is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with her Bachelor of Business Administration specializing in Organizational Behaviour and Industrial Relations;

[Page 10847]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Susan Knight and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4246

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Mabel MacEachern of Sydney is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with her Bachelor of Arts with a concentration in Communications;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Mabel MacEachern and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4247

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Chris Francis of North Sydney is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with his Pre-Employment Trades Program, Automotive Repair;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Chris Francis and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

[Page 10848]

RESOLUTION NO. 4248

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offer a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Quentin MacDonald of Sydney is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with his Bachelor of Arts in Community Studies;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Quentin MacDonald and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 4249

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the University College of Cape Breton has been granting university degrees since the early 1980s and offers a wide range of programs; and

Whereas the Class of 2002 convocation took place earlier this month, increasing the number of names to the growing list of alumni, already 10,000 strong; and

Whereas Calvin Stevens of Eskasoni is one of the new UCCB alumni, graduating with his Bachelor of Arts with concentration in Mi'kmaq Studies;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Calvin Stevens and all other UCCB 2002 grads and wish them success in all their future endeavours.

[Page 10849]

RESOLUTION NO. 4250

By: Hon. Rodney MacDonald (Tourism and Culture)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Television Bureau of Canada recently selected the Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation's, Colourful Messages, television commercial, as the best in Canada in the Public Service category of the Retail Competition Awards; and

Whereas the television commercial was produced by Global Television and is part of the Liquor Corporation's campaign which promotes the message, Drinking and Driving Kills; and

Whereas this national award is the second one to have been awarded to the corporation in their promotion of the safe use of beverage alcohol products, and is an award judged by consumers rather than advertising experts;

Therefore be it resolved that the MLAs applaud the work of the Nova Scotia Liquor Commission and Global Television in winning this prestigious national award.

RESOLUTION NO. 4251

By: Mr. Barry Barnet (Sackville-Beaver Bank)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Glenn P. Connors of Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia, from Millwood High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

[Page 10850]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Glenn P. Connors, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4252

By: Mr. Barry Barnet (Sackville-Beaver Bank)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Emily M. Archibald of Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia, from Millwood High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Emily M. Archibald, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4253

By: Mr. Barry Barnet (Sackville-Beaver Bank)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

[Page 10851]

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Johnathan Andrew Fletcher of Beaver Bank, Nova Scotia, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Johnathan Andrew Fletcher, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4254

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Amy Anna MacDonald of Ecum Secum, Nova Scotia, from Duncan MacMillan High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Amy Anna MacDonald, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4255

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10852]

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Theresa Jahn of Musquodoboit Harbour, Nova Scotia, from Eastern Shore District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Theresa Jahn, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4256

By: Mr. William Langille (Colchester North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Brittany Fielding Brown of Truro, Nova Scotia, from Cobequid Educational Centre, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Brittany Fielding Brown, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10853]

RESOLUTION NO. 4257

By: Mr. William Langille (Colchester North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Gillian Lee Martin of Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia, from North Colchester High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Gillian Lee Martin, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4258

By: Mr. William Langille (Colchester North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10854]

Whereas Justin Carl Mattatall of Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia, from North Colchester High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Justin Carl Mattatall, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4259

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Darrell Christopher Dean of Middle Musquodoboit, Nova Scotia, from Musquodoboit Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Darrell Christopher Dean, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4260

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10855]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Gregory Tyler Barr of Stewiacke, Nova Scotia, from South Colchester High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Gregory Tyler Barr, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4261

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Katherine Diana Benison of Upper Musquodoboit, Nova Scotia, from Musquodoboit Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Katherine Diana Benison, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10856]

RESOLUTION NO. 4262

By: Mr. Brooke Taylor (Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Lilla Marjorie Cogswell Roy of Stewiacke, Nova Scotia, from South Colchester High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Lilla Marjorie Cogswell Roy, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4263

By: Mr. David Hendsbee (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10857]

Whereas Mark Baker of Lake Echo, Nova Scotia, from Auburn Drive High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Mark Baker, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4264

By: Mr. David Hendsbee (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Mark Neily of Porters Lake, Nova Scotia, from Eastern Shore District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Mark Neily, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4265

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10858]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Alicia May Frances Batson of Bridgetown, Nova Scotia, from Bridgetown Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Alicia May Frances Batson, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4266

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Brandea Balcomb of Granville Centre, Nova Scotia, from Annapolis West Education Centre, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Brandea Balcomb, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10859]

RESOLUTION NO. 4267

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Joshua Amos Baker of Middleton, Nova Scotia, from Middleton Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Joshua Amos Baker, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4268

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10860]

Whereas Meghan Alvaria Sheehy of Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia, from Middleton Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Meghan Alvaria Sheehy, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4269

By: Mr. Frank Chipman (Annapolis)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Nikolas Steenken of Upper Clements, Nova Scotia, from Annapolis West Education Centre, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Nikolas Steenken, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4270

By: Hon. David Morse (Environment and Labour)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10861]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Alexander Lugar of Coldbrook, N.S., from Central Kings Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Alexander Lugar, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4271

By: Hon. David Morse (Environment and Labour)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Fraser John Stephen Ash of Wolfville, N.S., from Horton High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Fraser John Stephen Ash, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10862]

RESOLUTION NO. 4272

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Danielle Amaris Hillary Dorn of Wallace, N.S., from Pugwash District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Danielle Amaris Hillary Dorn, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4273

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10863]

Whereas Laura Ashley Smith of Amerhst, N.S., from Amherst Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Laura Ashley Smith, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4274

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Mark Gordon Jackson of Amherst, N.S., from Amherst Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Mark Gordon Jackson, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4275

By: Hon. Ernest Fage (Natural Resources)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10864]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Maximilian Jordan Blades of Pugwash Junction, N.S., from Pugwash District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Maximilian Jordan Blades, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4276

By: Hon. James Muir (Health)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Samuel Duncan Searle of Truro, N.S., from Cobequid Educational Centre, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Samuel Duncan Searle, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10865]

RESOLUTION NO. 4277

By: Hon. Jane Purves (Education)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Devin Gordon of Halifax, N.S., from Queen Elizabeth High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Devin Gordon, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4278

By: Hon. Jane Purves (Education)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10866]

Whereas Sapna Jha of Halifax, N.S., from Queen Elizabeth High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Sapna Jha, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4279

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas John Alexander Forbes of New Glasgow, N.S., from Stellarton High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate John Alexander Forbes, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4280

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10867]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Margaret Rachel MacKay of Stellarton, N.S., from Stellarton High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Margaret Rachel MacKay, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4281

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Nicole Aileen Proudfoot of New Glasgow, N.S., from New Glasgow High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Nicole Aileen Proudfoot, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10868]

RESOLUTION NO. 4282

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Peter Gordon O'Brien Fraser of New Glasgow, N.S., from New Glasgow High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Peter Gordon O'Brien Fraser, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4283

By: Hon. John Hamm (The Premier)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10869]

Whereas Sean Alexander Dickie of Trenton, N.S., from Trenton High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Sean Alexander Dickie, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4284

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Andrew William Joseph Rector of Parrsboro, N.S., from Parrsboro Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Andrew William Joseph Rector, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4285

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10870]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Ashley Dawn McCabe of Oxford, N.S., from Oxford Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Ashley Dawn McCabe, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4286

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Crystal Dawn Roberts of Parrsboro, N.S., from Parrsboro Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Crystal Dawn Roberts, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10871]

RESOLUTION NO. 4287

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Derek Lloyd Allen of Parrsboro, N.S., from Advocate District School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Derek Lloyd Allen, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4288

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10872]

Whereas James Alexander Hoffman of Oxford, N.S., from Oxford Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate James Alexander Hoffman, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4289

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Kathleen Marie Spicer of Parrsboro, N.S., from Advocate District School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Kathleen Marie Spicer, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4290

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10873]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Lacey Ann McDermott of Southampton, Nova Scotia, from Springhill Junior-Senior High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Lacey Ann McDermott, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4291

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Megan Dawn Scopie of River Hebert, Nova Scotia, from River Hebert District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Megan Dawn Scopie, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10874]

RESOLUTION NO. 4292

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Michael Joshua Quinn of River Hebert East, Nova Scotia, from River Hebert District High, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Michael Joshua Quinn, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4293

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10875]

Whereas Scott Alexander MacDonald of Springhill, Nova Scotia, from Springhill Junior-Senior High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Scott Alexander MacDonald, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4294

By: Hon. Peter Christie (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Chelsey Ann Ricketts of Waverley, Nova Scotia, from Lockview High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Chelsey Ann Ricketts, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4295

By: Hon. Peter Christie (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10876]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas David Langille of Bedford, Nova Scotia, from C.P. Allen High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate David Langille, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4296

By: Hon. Peter Christie (Community Services)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Mee-Yeon Jang of Bedford, Nova Scotia, from C.P. Allen High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Mee-Yeon Jang, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10877]

RESOLUTION NO. 4297

By: Hon. Ronald Russell (Transportation and Public Works)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Alice-Dawn Charlotte Brison of Newport, Nova Scotia, from Hants West Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Alice-Dawn Charlotte Brison, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4298

By: Hon. Ronald Russell (Transportation and Public Works)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10878]

Whereas Jeffrey Wade Sanford of Newport, Nova Scotia, from Hants West Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Jeffrey Wade Sanford, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4299

By: Hon. Ronald Russell (Transportation and Public Works)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Robert William Hines of Falmouth, Nova Scotia, from Windsor Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Robert William Hines, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4300

By: Hon. Ronald Russell (Transportation and Public Works)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a 1st year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10879]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Sarah Nicole Drake of Falmouth, N.S., from Windsor Regional High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Sarah Nicole Drake, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4301

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Alan William MacGregor of Merigomish, N.S., from East Pictou Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Alan William MacGregor, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10880]

RESOLUTION NO. 4302

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Ashley Mildred Sharpe of Eureka, N.S., from East Pictou Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Ashley Mildred Sharpe, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4303

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10881]

Whereas Julia Dawn Anderson of Pictou County, N.S., from Trenton High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Julia Dawn Anderson, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4304

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Matthew Jeremy Yorke of Stellarton, N.S., from Westville High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Matthew Jeremy Yorke, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4305

By: Mr. James DeWolfe (Pictou East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10882]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Stacia Marie Findlay of Westville, N.S., from Westville High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Stacia Marie Findlay, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4306

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Erika Candice Bateman of Stillwater Lake, N.S., from Sir John A. Macdonald High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Erika Candice Bateman, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10883]

RESOLUTION NO. 4307

By: Mr. John Chataway (Chester-St. Margaret's)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Patrick Alexander Burke of East Dover, N.S., from Sir John A. Macdonald High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Patrick Alexander Burke, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4308

By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10884]

Whereas Constance Tweedie of Waterville, N.S., from Central Kings Rural High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Constance Tweedie, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4309

By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas David Nicholas Langelaan of Aylesford, N.S., from West Kings District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate David Nicholas Langelaan, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4310

By: Mr. Jon Carey (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10885]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Leann Michel Grosvold of Berwick, Nova Scotia, from West Kings District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Leann Michel Grosvold, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4311

By: Mr. Mark Parent (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Colin Neil Robar of Kentville, Nova Scotia, from Northeast Kings Education Centre, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Colin Neil Robar, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10886]

RESOLUTION NO. 4312

By: Mr. Mark Parent (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Lindsay Marie Best of Port Williams, Nova Scotia, from Horton High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Lindsay Marie Best, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4313

By: Mr. Mark Parent (Kings North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10887]

Whereas Nicole Candace Hill of Kentville, Nova Scotia, from Northeast Kings Education Centre, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Nicole Candace Hill, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4314

By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Christopher Boland of Halifax, Nova Scotia, from St. Patrick's High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Christopher Boland, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4315

By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10888]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Dimitri George Athanasiou of Halifax, Nova Scotia, from Halifax West High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Dimitri George Athanasiou, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4316

By: Ms. Mary Ann McGrath (Halifax Bedford Basin)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Natalie Elizabeth Parks of Halifax, Nova Scotia, from Halifax West High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Natalie Elizabeth Parks, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10889]

RESOLUTION NO. 4317

By: Mrs. Muriel Baillie (Pictou West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Adam Frazer Bate of Pictou, Nova Scotia, from West Pictou District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Adam Frazer Bate, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4318

By: Mrs. Muriel Baillie (Pictou West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10890]

Whereas Jeff Allan Hilchey of Pictou, Nova Scotia, from Pictou Academy, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Jeff Allan Hilchey, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4319

By: Mrs. Muriel Baillie (Pictou West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Megan Kathleen DeYoung of Scotsburn, Nova Scotia, from West Pictou District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Megan Kathleen DeYoung, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4320

By: Mrs. Muriel Baillie (Pictou West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10891]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Sophie Reich-Burrill of Pictou, Nova Scotia, from Pictou Academy, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Sophie Reich-Burrill, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4321

By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Jeanette Marie Patterson of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, from Dartmouth High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Jeanette Marie Patterson, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

[Page 10892]

RESOLUTION NO. 4322

By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Kathleen Claire Fraser of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, from Prince Andrew High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Kathleen Claire Fraser, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4323

By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

[Page 10893]

Whereas Neal Alexander Peacocke of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, from Dartmouth High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Neal Alexander Peacocke, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4324

By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Robert Gerard Marsh of Dartmouth Nova Scotia, from Prince Andrew High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Robert Gerard Marsh, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4325

By: Mr. Timothy Olive (Dartmouth South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant-Governor E. C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or a first year vocational school program, nominated by their school,

[Page 10894]

who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant-Governor's Education Medal is presented by the Lieutenant-Governor in two areas each year since it was established, and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools, usually during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas Sarah Moore of Eastern Passage, Nova Scotia, from Cole Harbour District High School, recently received the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Sarah Moore, as well as all other 2002 Lieutenant-Governor's Medal recipients in the province, for displaying the exceptional personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service recognized by the Lieutenant-Governor's Medal.

RESOLUTION NO. 4326

By: Mr. Cecil Clarke (Cape Breton North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 23 teams of skiers comprising 125 individuals hit the slopes of Ski Ben Eoin for a fun-filled ski event on behalf of the Canadian Cancer Society; and

Whereas organized by the Sydney Unit and with help from society members from across Cape Breton, the volunteer teams, with strong public support, raised $23,100; and

Whereas with the society's hard work and help from a range of volunteers like the junior and senior high students who joined the ski event, the society can continue to fund research, health promotion and supportive care and services for cancer patients;

Therefore be it resolved that this House applaud the fundraising success of Ski Mount Everest and commend the Canadian Cancer Society for fighting, on all our behalf, against the infliction of cancer.