Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

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21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 01/02-111

Commemorating the Golden Jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, 2002

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Murray Scott

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Annual subscriptions available from the Office of the Speaker.

Second Session

THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2002

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Nat. Res. - Innocent Lake: Hunting - Restrict, Mr. W. Gaudet 10491
Commun. Serv. - Transition Houses/Women's Ctrs.: Service Cuts -
Oppose, Mr. J. DeWolfe 10492
Commun. Serv. - Transition Houses/Women's Ctrs.: Service Cuts -
Oppose, Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10492
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
Civil Procedure Rules Amendments, Hon. M. Baker 10493
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4010, Partnership for Access Awareness (N.S.) - Thank,
Hon. P. Christie 10493
Vote - Affirmative 10494
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 4011, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed, Mr. D. Dexter 10494
Res. 4012, VON: Work/Dedication - Thank, Dr. J. Smith 10495
Vote - Affirmative 10495
Res. 4013, Connell Chrysler/Everett & Smith Chrysler: Purchase -
Congrats., Mr. F. Chipman 10496
Vote - Affirmative 10496
Res. 4014, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10496
Res. 4015, C.B.-Vic. Reg. Sch. Bd.: TIME Can. Award - Congrats.,
Mr. K. MacAskill 10497
Vote - Affirmative 10498
Res. 4016, Jodrey, Roy - Jr. Achievement N.S. Bus. Hall of Fame:
Induction (Posthumous) - Acknowledge, Mr. M. Parent 10498
Vote - Affirmative 10499
Res. 4017, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed, Mr. K. Deveaux 10499
Res. 4018, Strait Richmond Hosp.: ER Physician -
Compensation Enhance, Mr. M. Samson 10499
Res. 4019, Shaw, Allan - Jr. Achievement N.S. Bus. Hall of Fame:
Induction - Congrats., Ms. M. McGrath 10500
Vote - Agreement 10501
Res. 4020, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens Heed, Mr. F. Corbett 10501
Res. 4021, Mem. HS - Principal's List: Honorees - Congrats.,
Mr. B. Boudreau 10502
Vote - Affirmative 10503
Res. 4022, MacKay, Dan/Oulton, Anne/N. Col. Dist. Girl Guide Leaders:
Dedication - Recognize, Mr. W. Langille 10503
Vote - Affirmative 10503
Res. 4023, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed, Mr. H. Epstein 10504
Res. 4024, Miller, Dr. Robert/Wright, Dr. Bruce - Med. Soc. (N.S.):
Pres. (Incoming/Past) - Congrats., Dr. J. Smith 10504
Vote - Affirmative 10505
Res. 4025, Lt.-Gov's. Medal: HRM Recipients (2002) - Congrats.,
Ms. M. McGrath 10505
Vote - Affirmative 10506
Res. 4026, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed, Mr. W. Estabrooks 10506
Res. 4027, Aboriginal Affairs - Min.: Natives - Disinterest,
Mr. B. Boudreau 10507
Res. 4028, Paddy's Pub/Rosie's Rest.: Success - Congrats.,
Mr. F. Chipman 10507
Vote - Affirmative 10508
Res. 4029, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed,
Mr. Robert Chisholm 10508
Res. 4030, W. Pictou Dist. HS - Int'l. Free the Children Fdn.:
Fundraising - Congrats., Mr. M. Samson 10509
Vote - Affirmative 10510
Res. 4031, West End Mem. Sch. - Grade 3 Students: Letter-Writing
Campaign - Congrats., (by Mr. W. Langille), The Speaker 10510
Vote - Affirmative 10510
Res. 4032, Zurawski, Susan: Diff-Ability Fair - Congrats.,
Mr. J. MacDonell 10511
Vote - Affirmative 10511
Res. 4033, Savage, Dr. John: Contributions - Congrats., Mr. T. Olive 10512
Vote - Affirmative 10512
Res. 4034, PC Gov't. - Fee Levels: Citizens - Heed, Mr. G. Steele 10513
Res. 4035, Finlay, Elaine: Vol. Award - Congrats., Mr. D. Downe 10514
Vote - Affirmative 10514
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 1140, Sysco - PC Staffer: Contract - Defend, Mr. D. Dexter 10515
No. 1141, Environ. & Lbr. - Ammonia Nitrate Spill (Coldbrook,
Kings Co.): Investigation - Update, Mr. R. MacKinnon 10516
No. 1142, Econ. Dev. - Political Friends: Taxpayers' Money - Usage,
Mr. F. Corbett 10517
No. 1143, Educ. - Anti-Bullying Efforts: Success - Details,
Mr. M. Samson 10518
No. 1144, Commun. Serv. - Whitman Case: Delay - Explain, Mr. J. Pye 10520
No. 1145, Commun. Serv. - Special-Needs Funding: Guidelines -
Breach, Mr. D. Wilson 10521
No. 1146, Environ. & Lbr. - Anna. Valley Water System: Tests -
Provide, Mr. D. Dexter 10522
No. 1147, Econ. Dev. - Southwestern N.S.: Unemployment Crisis -
Plans, Mr. Manning MacDonald 10523
No. 1148, Environ. & Lbr. - Sysco Site: Coal Stockpiling -
Rules Adherence, Mr. F. Corbett 10525
No. 1149, Econ. Dev. - Trade Mission: Rural N.S./C.B. - Priorities,
Mr. W. Gaudet 10526
No. 1150, Educ. - Teaching: Graduates - Option Ensure,
Mr. K. Deveaux 10527
No. 1151, Health - Nurses: 2001-02 - Increases, Dr. J. Smith 10528
No. 1152, Environ. & Lbr. - Protected Areas: ATVs - Usage,
Mr. J. MacDonell 10530
No. 1153, Environ. & Lbr. - Insurance Premium Tax: Revenue - Amount,
Mr. B. Boudreau 10531
No. 1154, Health - Aricept: Approval - Delay Explain,
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10532
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 1:41 P.M. 10534
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 6:00 P.M. 10534
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5):
Gov't. (N.S.): Comprehensive Smoking Ban - Enact:
Mr. R. MacKinnon 10534
Hon. J. Muir 10537
Ms. Maureen MacDonald 10539
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON BILLS AT 6:30 P.M. 10541
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 7:58 P.M. 10541
CWH REPORTS 10541
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Fri., May 24th at 9:00 a.m. 10542
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 4036, Assoc. of Liberation Children - DeWolfe Reunion:
Efforts - Acknowledge, Mr. W. Dooks 10543
Res. 4037, Springhill Jr. & Sr. HS - Students: 30-Hour Famine -
Participants Recognize, The Speaker 10543
Res. 4038, Scott, Jan - B.Ed.: Completion - Congrats., The Speaker 10544

[Page 10491]

HALIFAX, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2002

Fifty-eighth General Assembly

Second Session

12:00 NOON

SPEAKER

Hon. Murray Scott

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Brooke Taylor, Mr. Jerry Pye, Mr. David Wilson

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Before we begin the daily routine, the subject for this evening's late debate was submitted by the honourable member for Cape Breton Nova:

Therefore be it resolved that the Government of Nova Scotia follow the lead of Kings County and enact a comprehensive smoking ban instead of the current half-hearted attempt to protect people from second-hand smoke.

This will be debated this evening at 6:00 p.m.

We will begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of 100 residents of Clare, I beg leave to table a petition that reads, ". . . we, the undersigned, call on the Government of Nova Scotia to ensure the personal safety and well being of the residents, before it's too late, by restricting hunting through a designation of the area around Innocent Lake as a 'No Hunting Zone.'" I have affixed my name to the petition.

10491

[Page 10492]

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. JAMES DEWOLFE: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition signed by 1,500 residents of Pictou County, to which I have attached my name. The operative clause is, "We as citizens insist that the government roll back these cuts and enter into a meaningful dialogue about responsible funding for our community-based services.". Those services are Tearmann House for Abused Women, Pictou County Women's Centre and New Leaf. I table that, please.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table a petition, the operative clause of which reads:

"Being safe is a right and not a privilege! We believe that every Nova Scotian woman should be able to count on shelter and support whenever and wherever it is required. By threatening to reduce or eliminate services provided by transition houses, women's centres and men's treatment programs, we put women and their children at further risk. We therefore urge the government to abandon its plan to limit access and to cut those essential programs and to begin a meaningful dialogue with communities about addressing true need. In our community, Chrysalis House, a valuable and essential resource, helps hundreds of women and children each year - by providing shelter, support, counselling, outreach, and advocacy. Chrysalis House helps the rest of us in the community to understand the complex problem of family violence and how we can all take part in 'breaking the cycle of violence'."

This petition has been signed by 147 Nova Scotians and I have affixed my signature to it.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

[Page 10493]

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. MICHAEL BAKER: Mr. Speaker, I am tabling two copies of changes to the rules pursuant to the Judicature Act. These amendments to the Civil Procedure Rules were made pursuant to the Judicature Act by the Judges of the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal on April 22, 2002.

MR. SPEAKER: The document is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Community Services.

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, before I make this resolution, with your permission, I would like to make an introduction. In the west gallery today we have Mr. Don Roper, Chairman of the Partnership for Access Awareness Nova Scotia, and with him is Elsie Chollete, board member of the Partnership for Public Awareness of Nova Scotia. I would ask them to rise and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 4010

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 15th annual Access Awareness Week in Nova Scotia begins May 25th; and

Whereas this year's theme is Until it Touches Your Life; and

Whereas this annual event has seen a positive change in attitude and access for Nova Scotians with disabilities;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in thanking the Partnership for Access Awareness Nova Scotia, a community-based organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life for all Nova Scotians with disabilities by promoting diversity and inclusion.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[Page 10494]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 4011

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Dartmouth-Cole Harbour calls for the Premier to stop eroding the financial well-being of those on fixed incomes by raising taxes through thinly disguised fees; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to stop raising taxes and bringing in fees that hurt those on fixed incomes.

Apparently the Government House Leader agrees, so I will ask for waiver and passage without debate. (Interruptions)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please.

[There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 10495]

Is it agreed?]

MR. SPEAKER: I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

I would like to see a copy of that resolution, please.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4012

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas May 20 to May 26, 2002, is Victorian Order of Nurses Week across Canada; and

Whereas the demand for home and community health care is increasing, the need for visiting nurses, home support workers and volunteers is becoming more and more important; and

Whereas VON Week offers the opportunity for all to show their appreciation for the VON staff and volunteers who go above and beyond the call of duty whenever they are called upon to provide care;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this Legislative Assembly thank the VON and all our nurses, home support workers, volunteers and staff for their continuing hard work and dedication in caring for their communities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Annapolis.

[Page 10496]

RESOLUTION NO. 4013

MR. FRANK CHIPMAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas last week Kim Connell and Bruce Woodworth of Connell Chrysler, Middleton, purchased the three-generation family business of Everett & Smith Chrysler; and

Whereas Connell Chrysler plans to renovate and expand the facility in Bridgetown and retain as many employees as possible; and

Whereas this move will consolidate the market and allow the Chrysler image to serve their clients better;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge the dedication of Everett & Smith Chrysler and extend their congratulations to Bruce Woodworth and Kim Connell of Connell Chrysler, and wish them luck in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

RESOLUTION NO. 4014

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

[Page 10497]

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Needham calls for the Premier to demonstrate respect for workers by improvements to our labour standards protections; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to improve our labour standards for the protection of all working people.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Victoria.

[12:15 p.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 4015

MR. KENNETH MACASKILL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board's Learning Through the Arts program recently received the TIME Canada Commitment Award at a ceremony in Ottawa; and

Whereas in 1999, the board was chosen as one of six school districts across Canada to participate in the elementary education initiative; and

Whereas the TIME award was presented to the board for its determination to complete the three-year pilot project despite many challenges;

Therefore be it resolved that the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board be commended for their commitment to art in the classroom and be congratulated on receiving the TIME award.

[Page 10498]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 4016

MR. MARK PARENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Junior Achievement Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame recognizes the achievements of Nova Scotia's prominent business leaders; and

Whereas in recognition of his success, leadership and entrepreneurial achievements, the late Roy Jodrey of the Annapolis Valley will be inducted posthumously to the Junior Achievement Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame; and

Whereas Mr. Jodrey, a self-educated man, was the founder of the Scotia Investments Group of Companies and is well-known throughout the province and across Canada as a thrifty farmer, an early entrepreneur in hydro power and a successful financier;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House acknowledge the contributions Roy Jodrey made to this province and recognize Junior Achievers as an important part of Nova Scotia's growing economy now and in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 10499]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 4017

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage calls for the Premier to get better benefits and royalties from offshore gas; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to reopen negotiations on an offshore gas deal to secure a better deal for Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 4018

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas yesterday I tabled a petition signed by 1,406 residents from Richmond County and other parts of the Strait area regarding the lack of emergency room coverage at the Strait Richmond Hospital; and

[Page 10500]

Whereas residents of the Strait area have once again fallen victim to this government's failure to implement a comprehensive plan for emergency health services; and

Whereas the minister only recently agreed to review the compensation package being offered at the Strait Richmond Hospital, finally recognizing that this was the major factor in the inability to keep physicians for the long term;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Health and this government make the health and safety of the residents of the Strait area a top priority by immediately enhancing the compensation package for the position of the emergency room physician at the Strait Richmond Hospital.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax-Bedford Basin.

RESOLUTION NO. 4019

MS. MARY ANN MCGRATH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Junior Achievement Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame was developed to raise funds for business education programs and to recognize the achievements of Nova Scotia business people who have made valuable contributions to business in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas this year, Allan C. Shaw, Chairman and CEO of the Shaw Group Ltd., one of Canada's 50 best-managed companies, will be inducted into the Junior Achievement Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame; and

Whereas Mr. Shaw has been selected because of his business successes, substantial community involvement and for his role in helping provincial industries compete in the global market;

[Page 10501]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Allan Shaw on being recognized by the Junior Achievement Nova Scotia Business Hall of Fame and commend Nova Scotia's Junior Achievers for their own role in promoting a healthy business climate in this province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Just before I recognize the next member, I would like to bring the attention of all the members to two individuals who are sitting in the Speaker's Gallery today. We have His Excellency J.A. van Hellenberg Hubar, who is the Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and his wife, Mrs. Liliana van Hellenberg Hubar-Schilling, spouse of the ambassador, and they're here in Nova Scotia meeting with several members of government and business people in Nova Scotia the next few days. I had the opportunity this morning to meet with these very fine people. I want to welcome them to the gallery today and ask the honourable members to give them their usual warm welcome, please. (Applause)

We hope you enjoy the proceedings today.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

RESOLUTION NO. 4020

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Progressive Conservative Government what positive steps people want this government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Cape Breton Centre calls for the Premier to revamp the Seniors' Pharmacare co-pay premium that causes such hardship for those on fixed incomes; and

[Page 10502]

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and Progressive Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to revisit and increase in the Seniors' Pharmacare premium.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4021

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 227 Northside students who attend Memorial High School were honoured at a banquet held on May 15, 2002; and

Whereas the students were honoured for making the principal's list for academic achievement; and

Whereas Memorial High School is the largest school on Cape Breton Island;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend their congratulations to the 227 students of Memorial High School who were honoured last week and that we wish them continued success in future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 10503]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 4022

MR. WILLIAM LANGILLE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the North Shore of Colchester County consists of caring people always wanting to help others and volunteering whenever and wherever necessary; and

Whereas no better examples exist than with the honouring of Dan MacKay, Anne Oulton and the 14 leaders of the North Colchester Girl Guides during National Volunteer Week by the Municipality of Colchester County; and

Whereas Dan is actively involved with the community hall committee at The Falls, Colchester County, where funding is raised for the upkeep of The Falls cemetery, Anne with everything from the North Shore Senior Citizens Committee to the Lillian Fraser Hospital Auxiliary, while the Girl Guide leaders have taught young children so many special things about life;

Therefore be it resolved that this Legislature recognize the dedication and excellent work put forward by Dan MacKay, Anne Oulton and the leaders of the North Colchester District Girl Guides, and wish them continued success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

[Page 10504]

RESOLUTION NO. 4023

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Chebucto calls for the Premier to implement the Kendrick report which emphasizes user, family and community participation in decisions impacting on the provision of community services; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to implement the Kendrick report recommendations to revamp the provision of community services.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 4024

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas doctors from across the province will gather in Digby from May 23rd to May 25th for the Medical Society of Nova Scotia's Annual Conference; and

Whereas during the conference, Halifax radiologist Dr. Robert M. Miller will be inducted as the society's president for the 2002-03 term, replacing outgoing President Dr. Bruce Wright; and

[Page 10505]

Whereas the Medical Society of Nova Scotia is the professional society representing all physicians in the Province of Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend their congratulations to Dr. Robert M. Miller as the incoming president of the Medical Society of Nova Scotia and that we acknowledge and extend thanks to Dr. Bruce Wright for his valuable health leadership contribution in his tenure as President of the Nova Scotia Medical Society.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Bedford Basin.

RESOLUTION NO. 4025

MS. MARY ANN MCGRATH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Lieutenant Governor's Education Medal was created in 1961 by Lieutenant Governor E.C. Plow and is awarded annually to one male and one female student per school in Grade 11 or in a first-year vocational school program, nominated by their school, who display commendable academic performance and who demonstrate leadership and service in their community; and

Whereas the Lieutenant Governor's Education Medal has been presented by the Lieutenant Governor in two areas each year since it was established and other recipients receive their medals in their respective schools during graduation ceremonies; and

Whereas 31 exceptional Grade 11 students from 16 schools in the Halifax Regional Municipality received the Lieutenant Governor's medal in a special ceremony Wednesday at Prince Andrew High School in Dartmouth;

[Page 10506]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House thank all 2002 Lieutenant Governor's Medal recipients from the Halifax Regional Municipality, as well as other medal recipients across the province, for displaying the personal qualities of leadership, school participation and community service which were recognized through the medal presentation ceremony on Wednesday.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Timberlea-Prospect.

RESOLUTION NO. 4026

MR. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want this government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Timberlea-Prospect calls for the Premier to ensure that our children have healthy schools in which to learn; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to protect our children from sick schools.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 10507]

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 4027

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Native people of Nova Scotia are not being represented properly by their minister; and

Whereas when I began to ask the minister of recreation with regard to Native health, the Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs thought he was off the hook and didn't bother to pay attention; and

Whereas my final supplementary went to the Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs but since he was more concerned with talking to the Deputy Premier than actually listening to my question, he was not able to provide an answer;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House acknowledge that the Minister responsible for Aboriginal Affairs has no interest in the problems of Natives, even when a question is put forth directly towards him.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 4028

MR. FRANK CHIPMAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 10508]

Whereas Middleton native Brian Fitzgerald opened Paddy's Pub in 1992 in Kentville and in May 2001 opened their doors in Wolfville; and

Whereas the pub's unique products, reasonable prices and comfortable surroundings and company has made it so successful; and

Whereas Paddy's will celebrate its 10th Anniversary in Kentville and 1st Anniversary in Wolfville during three special days, May 24th to May 26th;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Paddy's Pub and Rosie's Restaurant for their success and wish them luck in their future years.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Atlantic.

RESOLUTION NO. 4029

MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take, and if the Liberals want to sing along, they can; and

AN HON. MEMBER: Yeah, exactly. We got a tune.

MR. ROBERT CHISHOLM: Whereas one such suggestion from the constituency of Halifax Atlantic calls for the Premier to implement a fair tax system where companies such as Michelin Tire, Sobeys and Clearwater Fisheries pay their fair share; and

[Page 10509]

[12:30 p.m.]

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and the Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to implement a fair tax system for Nova Scotians. (Interruptions)

Mr. Speaker, I guess I won't seek waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 4030

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a group of West Pictou District High School students has begun an initiative to raise money to build a school in a Third World country; and

Whereas proceeds from school pizza days, dances and a benefit show featuring local talent will go to the international Free the Children Foundation; and

Whereas Grade 12 student Crystal Shaw is a forerunner in bringing the initiative to her high school after founding a group at the high school last year called Youth With a Mission;

Therefore be it resolved that the students of West Pictou District High School be commended for taking the leadership and initiative to provide education to the Third World, and be wished success in reaching their goal of raising between $1,500 and $3,000.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 10510]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 4031

MR. WILLIAM LANGILLE: Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the honourable member for Cumberland South, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Canadian military continues to do its part in fighting the war on terrorism in Afghanistan; and

Whereas many members of the military have been away from home and family for months to ensure that we continue to enjoy a peaceful world; and

Whereas Linda Scott's Grade 3 students at West End Memorial School in Springhill have been writing letters to one Canadian soldier in Afghanistan who they have never met, telling him how much they appreciate his efforts and keeping him informed of things happening in their lives at home;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this Legislature congratulate the Grade 3 students of West End Memorial School in Springhill for doing their part to encourage our very brave and respected members of the Canadian Armed Forces and letting them know how much they are thought of.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants East.

[Page 10511]

RESOLUTION NO. 4032

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas people with disabilities are often not understood by more fortunate people; and

Whereas education is needed to inform people, particularly children, of how difficult any ordinary task can be for others with a disability; and

Whereas Ms. Susan Zurawski, Learning Centre Coordinator at the Shubenacadie District School, on April 19th organized a Diff-Ability Fair where children could experience the challenges faced by children with a disability;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Ms. Susan Zurawski of Shubenacadie District School for holding the Diff-Ability Fair, where other children can experience and understand children facing special challenges.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

MR. TIMOTHY OLIVE: Mr. Speaker, prior to reading the resolution, if I could beg the indulgence of the House, most MLAs in the House respect the commitment that other MLAs make and the dedication and commitment they make to Nova Scotians. I think it's fair to say that when one reaches the pinnacle of being the Premier of the Province of Nova Scotia, it requires a great deal more dedication and work on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia. With that in mind, I would like to read this resolution.

[Page 10512]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth South.

RESOLUTION NO. 4033

MR. TIMOTHY OLIVE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dr. John Savage emigrated to Dartmouth in 1967 and, as a physician and community leader, served as Chairman of the Dartmouth School Board, formed the first mainland Nova Scotia detox centre in the Gottingen Street Salvation Army Hostel, and helped to found both the Halifax-Dartmouth Big Brothers/Big Sisters and the Development and Peace Committee; and

Whereas Dr. Savage served the people of Dartmouth faithfully as mayor in 1985 and was re-elected twice before winning the Leadership of the provincial Liberal Party in 1992, later becoming Premier and the member for Dartmouth South in 1993; and

Whereas this Friday, this Dartmouth resident will receive an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws from Saint Mary's University;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House thank Dr. John Savage for his extensive work in medicine here and abroad, his community involvement, especially in Dartmouth, and his public service which will be recognized by Saint Mary's University this Friday.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried. (Applause)

The honourable member for Glace Bay on an introduction.

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, I would like everyone to join me in welcoming in the west gallery today a group that has made the trip all the way from Glace Bay to visit Province House and see the procedures of the Legislature. They are 18 junior high Grade 9 students from Bridgeport Junior High School in Glace Bay. They are accompanied by Tanya

[Page 10513]

Royal, Jane Summerell, Laura MacPherson and Cathy MacDonald and, not to single anyone out, but among the group somewhere is my son, Daniel. I would like all the members of the House to please join me and welcome them to Province House. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: I certainly welcome our special guests to the gallery today. I thank the honourable member for Glace Bay for that. (Interruption) Pardon me? Order, please. The record will show the honourable member for Glace Bay said it was a nice looking boy on the left, just like his mother. (Laughter)

The honourable member for Halifax Fairview.

RESOLUTION NO. 4034

MR. GRAHAM STEELE: Maybe the member for Glace Bay will behave today for a change.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP caucus invited Nova Scotians to speak out and make a difference by telling Premier Hamm and the Conservative Government what positive steps people want the government to take; and

Whereas one such suggestion calls for the Premier to stop gouging seniors through increased Pharmacare premiums, rising property assessments and taxes, increased nursing home costs and allowing exorbitant auto insurance rates; and

Whereas the Premier has told this House that he can listen and learn from Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier and Conservative Government should listen to those who call upon them to treat seniors fairly through reducing Pharmacare premiums, implementing a fair property assessment and tax system, reducing nursing home costs and regulating auto insurance rates.

Mr. Speaker, I fear that I would not get the unanimous consent for this, but I'm going to ask for it anyway; I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

[Page 10514]

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg West.

RESOLUTION NO. 4035

MR. DONALD DOWNE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Elaine Finlay of Marriotts Cove was honoured for her outstanding volunteer contributions; and

Whereas at the Nova Scotia Hospice Palliative Association board meeting, Mrs. Finlay was presented with a medal in recognition of her volunteer work by Senator Sharon Carstairs, federal minister with special responsibilities for palliative care; and

Whereas created by the Royal Canadian Mint, the medal was minted in honour of the International Year of the Volunteer as declared by the United Nations General Assembly;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House extend their congratulations to Elaine Finlay on her award and recognize the invaluable contributions she has made to our health care system.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: Question Period will begin at 12:38 p.m. and end at 1:38 p.m.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

[Page 10515]

SYSCO - PC STAFFER: CONTRACT - DEFEND

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, I rise on a matter of considerable outrage and offence to Nova Scotians. The Minister of Economic Development laid off hundreds of steelworkers in Cape Breton, people with families to feed, in a high unemployment area, where decent jobs are scarce. Today we learned that this minister, through his agents at Ernst & Young, just handed a Tory political staffer, Alfie MacLeod, $195,000 for three years for Sysco community relations. The minister gave him the contract because he said Mr. MacLeod had good government connections. My question to the Minister of Economic Development is, how can you possibly defend a $195,000 contract for a Conservative political staffer?

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is correct. Ernst & Young, a private sector company acting on behalf of the province, hired Mr. MacLeod based on his knowledge of the community, of the issues related to Sysco and I believe he will do a good job in the service of Ernst & Young on behalf of the people of Cape Breton.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, this is the government that handed Roland Martin hundreds of thousands of dollars in untendered contracts. This is the minister who changed his policy on business loans so he could hand Valley Vista $1.35 million. However, in past cases the Premier admitted it was a mistake to give his own chief of staff a contract that would run well after the Tory term in office expires. So I want to give the Minister of Economic Development an opportunity to make amends to Nova Scotians. Will the Minister of Economic Development admit that he, too, has made a mistake and ensure that Mr. MacLeod's public employment ends at the same time as all the other political staff when this government is defeated?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, the decommissioning of Sysco will run well past the mandate of this government. It may take 18 months to 24 months. Mr. MacLeod is working through Ernst & Young to see that project to completion.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, these are the kinds of decisions that bankrupted this province, pork-barreling, blatant patronage, no protection of the public interest when contracts are handed out to a favourite few. Why can't the Minister of Economic Development see that this blatant abuse of the public trust will no longer be tolerated in Nova Scotia?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I would remind the members opposite that the province has not put additional money into the operation of Sysco. We, in fact, are the government that ended the operation's reliance on taxpayers' dollars.

[Page 10516]

MR. SPEAKER: Just for the record, Oral Question Period will end at 1:39 p.m.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - AMMONIA NITRATE SPILL

(COLDBROOK, KINGS CO.): INVESTIGATION - UPDATE

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Environment and Labour. Yesterday, when asked during Oral Question Period, the minister could not confirm if his department was investigating a spill of ammonia nitrate in Coldbrook, Kings County, and he stated that, "I have not been advised of that at this point in time." Yet later in the day, the minister downplayed to reporters the spill of ammonia nitrate at Scotia Fertilizer and still again, the minister also stated that he would certainly ask his department if this was the case. So my question to the minister is, can the minister please give an update today as to whether or not his department is indeed investigating the effects of an ammonia nitrate spill?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Yes, Mr. Speaker, there was a rather interesting question posed by the member opposite yesterday and, in fact, the way he posed it, it made it sound quite alarming. In actual fact what took place is that there was a report into the department. An inspector did go out, investigated it and discovered that there were some bags of sand that were used to hold down tarpaulins over fertilizer and some of them had opened up and spilt sand. I thank the member opposite also for allowing me to make that assurance to Nova Scotians.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, whether the minister likes to admit it or not, I spoke directly with an employee in his department who confirmed that there was indeed an ammonia nitrate spill on that site. In fact, I even raised the name of the employee and asked the minister to, in fact, speak to that employee and he said it would be improper to speak to that employee directly. I will table pictures of the effects of that spill on this site for the minister to view for himself since he doesn't want to go and do it.

My question to the minister, Mr. Speaker, given the fact that an employee in this department has confirmed there is a spill and the photographs show quite clearly there is a spill, my question is, why has the minister not spoken directly with the officer investigating this ammonia nitrate spill?

[12:45 p.m.]

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to bring up a couple of points, perhaps in the final supplementary for the last one. Actually, I have been advised that the member opposite did call an inspector, and that the inspector told him that the bags that were broken open were

[Page 10517]

25 kilogram bags of filler sand that were used to weigh down plastic tarps. So I would ask the member opposite to please set the record straight.

MR. MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, the minister is correct, but he also told me there was ammonia nitrate spilt on the site. I don't know why the minister only wants to deal in half-truths. It's just absolutely amazing to the people of the Valley. This media report, as a result of a study that was done by Barry Hennigar of AMEC Earth and Environmental Limited, and I have to quote this to make the point, show that most water consumed in the Valley comes from groundwater sources tapped by wells. My question to the minister is, will the minister commit today to initiating a complete, open and honest discussion about any health effects and safety issues on this issue with industry and local residents of the Valley, with a view to preventing further ammonia nitrate spills?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I think the member opposite's call for openness and honesty is commendable. With regard to that, I am kind of wondering why the new Leader of the Liberal Party would allow that member to get up yesterday, ask questions, making reference to this being in the newspapers over the weekend, when in fact the information that was in the newspapers over the weekend was about an ammonia leak in the Kentville Industrial Park, a completely different subject. The member very clearly indicated it was with reference to this, and to be specific, I am advised that there is no spill of ammonia nitrate at that site.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

ECON. DEV. - POLITICAL FRIENDS:

TAXPAYERS' MONEY - USAGE

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, the actions of this Minister of Economic Development would make his predecessor blush. He has handed out a $195,000 contract without an open competition. He has made it clear by doing that that his friends are more important than the economy of Cape Breton. He's given inadequate pensions to hundreds of steelworkers and thrown the rest of them out of work. I want to ask this minister, what is it that makes this minister think he has the right to use taxpayers' money to feather the nests of his political friends?

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I would remind the member opposite that this government has created more new jobs in Cape Breton than any predecessors. In fact, on Friday, Stream will be announcing their 1,000th job in Glace Bay. I think that's a good record in terms of using taxpayers' dollars wisely. I will put our record up against the previous government's record any day.

[Page 10518]

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, this minister's version of Lotto 6/49, making payoffs to people like Jamie Baillie and Roland Martin and Alfie MacLeod, speaks volumes. If you're a low-end wage earner in Cape Breton, $8 an hour can do you fine, but we're saving the big jobs for our buddies. That's what this is saying. Our good buddy, Matt Harris, we know what a great job he did on the Duferco file, don't we? He did a bang-up job. I want to ask you, Mr. Minister, to table today in this House the contract provided to Mr. MacLeod and a job description so we can see exactly what a community relations officer does in a shut-down steel mill?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, this government did not hire Mr. MacLeod. Mr. MacLeod was hired by Ernst & Young, who are operating on behalf of the province to deal with the decommissioning.

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, all they care about is looking after their friends. They had the infamous postcard, Close Sysco, Open Hospital Beds, and we know how accurate that was. Now they gloat about making $8 an hour jobs, maybe. Their involvement is tenuous at best, yet when it comes to looking after their own, $65,000 plus the perks isn't over the wall on these guys. I want to ask this minister, will he have the intestinal fortitude to stand in this House today and put his employment record contract on the table so we can see what his perks are and what it's costing the taxpayers of Nova Scotia to have a political hack in a job that needs to be done?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, again, that's a question better addressed to Ernst & Young. In terms of his remuneration, the dollar value has already been articulated by the members opposite. In terms of what Mr. Alfie MacLeod will be able to accomplish, he will help this government decommission Sysco, something that previous governments failed to do.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

EDUC. - ANTI-BULLYING EFFORTS: SUCCESS - DETAILS

MR. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, there have been recent reports of incidents of bullying in several Nova Scotia schools, including Pictou, Neils Harbour and Musquodoboit Valley. Bullying in schools is a worldwide problem that can have negative consequences for the general school climate and for the rights of students to learn in a safe environment without fear. Bullying can also have negative lifelong consequences. Comprehensive intervention plans that involve all students, parents and school staff are needed. My question to the Minister of Education is, will the minister, in light of these different incidents of bullying that continue to take place, now accept that her efforts to address this issue of bullying have not been successful?

[Page 10519]

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, there are literally hundreds of programs in schools and school boards across this province to combat bullying, administrators and teachers using different programs to suit their own school communities. I would say it is deeply insulting to the many teachers and principals who try so hard to stop bullying to say that their efforts are unsuccessful.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, the question clearly said that the minister's efforts have been unsuccessful because it was this minister who said she was going to address and take care of the issue and it's this minister's policies that have not been successful. For her to try to turn it as an attack on the teachers or administrators is lame, to say the least, from this minister. Bullying is an issue that must be taken seriously. One Halifax parent started the League of Peaceful Schools after her son was a victim of bullying. With 170 member schools in Nova Scotia and P.E.I., this organization is developing discipline policies with input from students, staff and parents. The founder has said that, it's "essential that the school respond to all incidents so that children and parents realize that the school really will do something."

My question to the minister is, parents like Donna Leslie in Musquodoboit don't believe that their concerns about bullying are being taken seriously by their schools. When will the government show leadership on this issue and ensure that all schools in Nova Scotia have plans in place to deal with bullying?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, all schools in this province do have programs to deal with bullying. Discussing an individual case between a parent and a principal is not really appropriate when you are trying to discuss programs in place for bullying. I have here a list of programs in place at all the school boards and there are dozens and dozens. I would like to table that list, if I could. There are very many success stories. The fact that there are incidents where children are hurt, perhaps even die, is certainly a tragedy, but it is not that there are not prevention programs in place.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, the whole point is not to say that there are not prevention programs in place. The fact is that we continue to hear of these incidents on a continual basis. Therefore, as a responsible government, a responsible minister, she should be looking for new ways and new means of enforcing this to make sure it doesn't continue. Research indicates that up to 14 per cent of students are initiators of bullying behaviour and 5 per cent of students are victims of bullying. We know that children who are involved in bullying are at risk of developing problems later in life.

My final supplementary to the minister, this issue is another example of the government's failure to plan for the future of our children. Will the minister hold a meeting with parents, schools and teachers to develop new plans that will respond to this important issue?

[Page 10520]

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, we are doing some work in that regard but the member opposite again degrades the efforts of teachers and students and people in my department and, as regrettable as some of these incidents are, the member opposite knows full well that the Department of Education and the school system in this province cannot change 100 per cent of human nature.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth North.

COMMUN. SERV. - WHITMAN CASE: DELAY - EXPLAIN

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Community Services. Ryan Whitman - and I might want to mention that Ryan's parents are in the east gallery here waiting for some responses to my particular question - suffers from multi-chemical sensitivity. He cannot leave his home without a filter mask and oxygen. The chemicals in regular food and cleaning products cause him to have tremors and even anaphylactic shock. Ryan's family received help from an in-home support program for his organic supplies, but he was cut off last April and his parents have fought for over a year to get answers and have Ryan's funding reinstated. Only late yesterday afternoon did they receive an offer, and only after our office sent several e-mails and phoned various staff members on his behalf. I ask the Minister of Community Services, why did his department allow this urgent case to drag on for over one year?

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, I certainly am not going to discuss individual cases. We have a lot of cases in this province that we work with and we work with a lot of cases to resolve their issues. That case has been brought to us by several people - the MLA for Eastern Shore and the member for Dartmouth North and we're working with that family, as we work with all families in Nova Scotia.

MR. PYE: Mr. Speaker, it's worth reminding that this has taken over a year in order to go through this entire process and that's unacceptable. I table a list of Ryan's monthly expenses. Ryan's organic food, medication, supplements and medical supplies total $1,150 a month. I will table the information from experts at Johns Hopkins stating that Ryan needs to follow this particular diet. The province has offered $539 a month - it isn't even enough to cover Ryan's needs. His father is disabled and has a modest pension. Even so, all the Whitmans are asking for is help with special supplies and they will cover the other costs.

MR. SPEAKER: Question, please.

MR. PYE: My question to the Minister of Community Services. Why won't your department cover the full amount of $1,150?

[Page 10521]

MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, as I indicated earlier, we work with all the families that have special needs and that will be something that the family and the department will work on, as they do. We attempt to meet all those needs. We have a lot of demands across the province and we attempt to meet those and we will continue to do that.

MR. PYE: Mr. Speaker, the department has ignored this family. Ryan has cut back on his eating, losing weight he can't afford to lose, because his family doesn't have the money for the food he requires. I ask the Minister of Community Services, will you review Ryan's monthly expenses, that's the $1,150, and fund all his dietary and medical supplies now?

MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, as the honourable member knows, all of the clients that we have across the province who need anything, they get reviewed on a periodic basis and we certainly will be doing that with this family, as we do with other families across the province.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

COMMUN. SERV. - SPECIAL-NEEDS FUNDING:

GUIDELINES - BREACH

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Community Services. Families with special needs face severe obstacles in life that are not made any easier when government makes life more difficult. A recent court ruling went in favour of the Department of Community Services and against the family with a special-needs child. The judge in the case however made the following observation - The Department of Community Services violated its own financial guidelines by using the family's gross income before taxes instead of their net income after taxes, as per the wording of the department's own policy guidelines. My question to the minister is, how many families have been denied funding for their children with special needs because the Department of Community Services failed to follow their own financial guidelines?

[1:00 p.m.]

HON. PETER CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, I don't know - the interpretation that the honourable member put on the court case is not the interpretation that I have seen. The interpretation from the judge indicated that the department policies were being followed, and that we were following the standard practice of using net income, so there are no families.

MR. WILSON: Mr. Speaker, it's not my interpretation, that was the judge's interpretation. Families in this province should not be forced to sue the Department of Community Services in order to obtain justice. It's reprehensible that the department is not following its own guidelines with respect to families with special needs. My question for the

[Page 10522]

minister is, how can the minister justify that his department is not following those departmental guidelines?

MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, as I just indicated, we are following those guidelines. We are following the net income guidelines. I would invite the member, if he has an instance of where we are not, to table it. The judge indicated that the department, in the ruling we had, was following the regulations.

MR. WILSON: Mr. Speaker, the minister is trying to pretend that he doesn't know what case I'm talking about. He does know what case I'm talking about, it's the case that went before the courts and he knows the decision of the courts. The minister has failed to realize that the misapplication of policy is affecting the lives of some real people here who have real challenges. My final question for the minister is, why won't the minister simply review this case and resolve it on a basis of compassion, if he has any, instead of misapplied policy?

MR. CHRISTIE: Mr. Speaker, I will take the member's suggestion and review that. I will also take the opportunity to send to the member the interpretation of the legal opinion that we have from the judge, indicating the department's position on the net income situation. I will also forward that on to him.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - ANNA. VALLEY WATER SYSTEM:

TESTS - PROVIDE

MR. DARRELL DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Environment and Labour. Yesterday, inside and outside the House, the minister dismissed his own government's test results about the levels of nitrates in drinking water in the Annapolis Valley, and he scorned his own government official's warning that pregnant women and infants should use an alternative source of drinking water. Today I would like to give the Minister of Environment and Labour another chance. When will he provide residents of the Annapolis Valley with the specific test results on drinking water that are in the government's hands?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, it must be my lucky day, because yesterday that honourable member and the honourable critic from the Liberals both got up and completely misconstrued two situations, and they've both gotten up and given me a chance to respond today. I would like to start by pointing out that the report that was referenced yesterday was from 1989, and this was widely distributed at that time. The people who did have the high nitrate levels were given that information. It was a report that was initiated by Health and Agriculture. I'm just delighted that the member got up and confessed today that he was misleading the people of the Annapolis Valley. Thank you.

[Page 10523]

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, that's outrageous. That is absolutely outrageous that a minister of that government should stand up when he knows that he has refused and failed to give the people of the Valley the information that they deserve in order to protect their own health. People cannot take measures to protect their health and that of their families if they don't have specific information. Industry can't change its practices to achieve lower and safer levels of nitrate in drinking water unless they have regular, reliable testing. The government has been monitoring the situation, but they keep their results private. Why won't the government recognize the need for public information and agree to regular public testing

of drinking water in the Annapolis Valley?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite is right. His statements were outrageous yesterday, they continue to be so today. There is a follow-up to this that has been done with selected wells that were tested in the 1989 study. I want to tell you for 16 months the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries went in and tested those wells and every month they were given the test results from their specific wells.

MR. DEXTER: Mr. Speaker, this is about public health and a cleaner environment, pure and simple. Health prevention means reducing the risks, like nitrates in drinking water. When can Nova Scotians expect to get complete test results and a plan to reduce nitrate levels? When?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I hope the member opposite continues on with this line of questioning because I think my colleague would like to also answer his question. I would start by pointing out that yesterday it was pointed out that anybody on a private well should regularly test their well water. It's an appropriate precaution and once again I thank the members opposite for agreeing with the government.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

ECON. DEV. - SOUTHWESTERN N.S.:

UNEMPLOYMENT CRISIS - PLANS

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Economic Development. This government owes its power to the good people of rural Nova Scotia. Without rural Nova Scotia, there would be no Hamm Government. Unfortunately, rural Nova Scotia has not prospered under this government. April unemployment stats show that southern Nova Scotia, including Liverpool, Yarmouth and Digby, have an unemployment rate of 14 per cent and that rate is fast approaching that of Cape Breton, which presently stands at 16.1 per cent, despite all the talk the minister outlines about the numbers of the jobs he's been creating. Going back to 1992, the rate has never been higher; even when the groundfishery collapsed, unemployment was still lower in 1992 than it is today. My question to the minister is, could the minister explain what, specifically, his government is doing to deal with the unemployment crisis in southwestern Nova Scotia?

[Page 10524]

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for his question. This government brought forward a comprehensive economic development strategy for the province, the first in over a decade. Just recently we participated in an announcement of 700 jobs created in Queens County and Digby-Annapolis County. There have been significant investments in Yarmouth, all of which are in southwestern Nova Scotia. It's a very difficult problem to address the concerns in rural Nova Scotia but we're working in that direction. Last year we had the second highest growth rate, provincially, compared only to that of Alberta. So we are doing a good job in difficult times.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, how can that minister stand in his place and say that he's doing a good job, when the unemployment rate is going up? They're not my figures, they're Stats Canada figures. The unemployment rate in southwestern Nova Scotia is going up, not down, because this government and this minister has no strategy at all for rural Nova Scotia. When we were in office the unemployment rate in the southwestern region was much lower than it is today. Our government created Team Southwest, led by my colleague from Clare. That took unemployment down 10 per cent in the southern region. This government's efforts are clearly not working. For example, Service Zone in Liverpool is being delayed by almost a year and few people are to be employed in the start up. My supplementary question to the minister is, why won't the minister demonstrate leadership and attack the unemployment situation in southwest Nova Scotia?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, the member opposite wishes we could wave a magic wand and correct the problem. The reality is that change takes time. We are moving in the right direction. There have been a significant number of jobs created. It is an issue, not just in southwestern Nova Scotia but in all parts of this province. What we have attempted to do is develop a balanced approach.

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, that minister makes it easy; he makes it real easy when he gets up and he says such ridiculous statements, that they're doing something, they're creating something when, in fact, the unemployment rate is going up that way, not down. The unemployment rate in southwestern Nova Scotia is going up. Do you get that? It's going up. My final supplementary to the minister, this government is crossing its fingers and hoping that divine intervention will create jobs in rural Nova Scotia, not government policies, because there are no government policies. My final supplementary to the minister, why won't the minister coordinate and lead an all-out effort to eliminate the growing economic crisis and unemployment crisis in southern Nova Scotia by creating a task force down there instead of doing nothing?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, I find it somewhat ironic that the member opposite, because of the weaknesses of his question, always reduces it to personalized attacks. This government is creating more employment than the previous government did. The issue in rural Nova Scotia is a very complex problem and there are no simple solutions.

[Page 10525]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - SYSCO SITE:

COAL STOCKPILING - RULES ADHERENCE

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, you know the residents of Whitney Pier for years have been the environmental guinea pigs of this province. Now the government with their partnership with Provincial Energy Ventures plans to stockpile two to four million tons of imported coal on the former Sysco site. We all know the environmental price that Whitney Pier area has paid for industrial jobs, industrial jobs that no longer exist. Stockpiling coal on top of an already possible toxic site doesn't make this situation any better.

So through you to the Minister of Environment and Labour, Mr. Speaker, I want to ask him why are you ignoring the rules and allowing this project to be fast-tracked without doing a proper environmental impact study? Is it because your government is a partner?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the member opposite for pointing out the good job that the member for Cape Breton Nova has done on two previous occasions in this House, asking those very questions. We dealt with it fairly extensively and I think that if you were to go back to Hansard, you would get your answers, but just to be specific, we did research this and the appropriate precautions are in place to protect the community.

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, hollow words from a hollow minister, they continued to stockpile huge amounts of coal even before the Sysco development report was approved. That minister knows that. If he doesn't, he should, but it wouldn't surprise me if he doesn't. The government's own report says an environmental impact study assessment, not just a baseline study, is the kind of activity that should be done, that should be the norm, but instead of allowing the public review, the Progressive Conservatives are steamrolling over the people of Whitney Pier. So, Mr. Minister, I want to ask you today, will you personally promise Whitney Pier residents and this House that a class two environmental assessment will be done before that coal is stockpiled?

MR. MORSE: As has already been provided actually to the member for the area, a very extensive list of all the people who came and spoke with the department's local office has been given to him and, in fact, Mr. Speaker, this is a matter of administration for the local regional office. It's not something that requires either a level one, or certainly not a level two environmental impact assessment, but the constituents were consulted on this and I would suggest that in this case they've certainly been well represented by their member, the member for Cape Breton Nova.

[Page 10526]

MR. CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, this minister knows full well that he has the authority to have a class two assessment done on that site, he just doesn't care. It's more important for that government to give Alfie MacLeod a job than to worry about the health and environmental risk of young children who go to Harbourside Elementary School. This minister just doesn't care. So I want to ask him, why does your government think so little of Cape Bretoners that you're willing to further risk the children and the elderly around that site rather than do what you're supposed to do and do a class two environmental assessment on that project? Is it, again, because your government is a partner?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I would like to point out to the member opposite, to assure him that, in fact, before this permit was considered, staff took a trip out to the West Coast to view similar operations, that the sprinkler systems are in place for dust suppression. We monitor the temperature, the wind speed. There are all kinds of precautions in place to protect the community and I must say I can see why the member for Cape Breton Nova left the socialists and moved on to another Party because that type of nonsense just doesn't make any sense.

[1:15 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader in the House of the Liberal Party.

ECON. DEV. - TRADE MISSION: RURAL N.S./C.B. - PRIORITIES

MR. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Economic Development. I was pleased to see Nova Scotia participating in the Team Canada Atlantic Trade Mission to New York this week, even though the Premier didn't have time to participate in the Atlantic Energy Summit in Saint John last week. I was somewhat alarmed to see that only three companies participating in the mission are from outside metro Halifax. The Premier once said "My government will enthusiastically reach out to every region of this province. We are the sum of all our parts. If one region suffers, we all suffer." My question to the minister is, could the minister explain how enthusiastically the Premier is reaching out to every region in the province by ignoring rural Nova Scotia and Cape Breton on this trade mission to New York?

HON. GORDON BALSER: Mr. Speaker, this government takes export, development and trade missions very seriously. A comprehensive program is put in place so the participants maximize their opportunities. Not every trade mission suits every company, and I assure the members opposite, all members of this House, that invitations were extended far and wide across the province for companies for whom New York was the right target market.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I wish to table a quote from the Premier from March 31, 2001, where he said in Sydney, "Cape Breton is being recognized more and more as a great place to do business. As Premier I am proud to do my part to bring that recognition to the

[Page 10527]

Island." The only Cape Breton company participating in the mission is WAPN Fisheries & Seafoods Ltd. of the Membertou Mi'kmaq community, a very good company but only one. My question to the minister is, could the minister explain why only one Cape Breton company is going on the trade mission and eight from metro Halifax?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, again, not every trade mission is suitable for every company. I will remind the member opposite that Cape Breton companies were represented on the Team Atlanta mission not that long ago, and they were successful. For some companies New York is the right market, for some companies Atlanta is the right market, and for other companies it may be the Asian market. We try to match the companies with the mission so they actually get some benefit, they aren't just a junket.

MR. GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, earlier today in Question Period the Minister of Economic Development talked about the government's economic development strategy. I wish to table a page from that economic development strategy, Opportunities for Prosperity, in which the government reflects the view that Cape Breton does not present a special circumstance. My question to the minister is, could the minister now explain why the New York market will not have a complete view of the Cape Breton economy?

MR. BALSER: Mr. Speaker, when we put together a trade mission, staff representatives go who are knowledgeable of all parts of the province. The reason the Premier participates is to raise the profile of this region in that market. Even though a company from a particular region may not be represented, their message is carried loud and forcefully - and successfully I might add.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

EDUC. - TEACHING: GRADUATES - OPTION ENSURE

MR. KEVIN DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education. I will table an article from the Truro Daily News which talks about a shortage of teachers in the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board. The board's director of corporate services specifically refers to the problem of the provincial budget not being set early enough in the calendar year to permit the board to recruit teachers. This allows for other provinces and other countries to recruit future Nova Scotian education graduates. My question to the Minister of Education is, what is her government doing to ensure that teaching in Nova Scotia is an option for our graduates?

HON. JANE PURVES: Mr. Speaker, that question has been answered and discussed many, many times in this House. We are doing several things to try to ensure that our graduates go to our schools first and other schools second. For the most part, to do that, we have to work in co-operation with the Teachers Union in order to effect early hiring. We are doing our best to do that, in fact, the Halifax board did a number of early hirings this year

[Page 10528]

which now a grievance has been filed against him for doing that. So, it's not an easy issue, but it is one we're working on. Most of the graduates of Nova Scotia's teachers' colleges end up in Nova Scotia schools.

MR. DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board, like all boards in Nova Scotia, will be facing a teacher shortage in the not too distant future and I will table documents that will show that in the Chignecto board by 2006, 22 per cent of its current teachers will have retired. That's actually lower than most boards. My question to the Minister of Education is, when will the minister provide multi-year funding to the school boards so they're able to go out and start recruiting sooner than they're able to now?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, we would love to provide multi-year funding to school boards; I'm sure the Minister of Health would like to provide multi-year funding to health boards too, it is not possible to do that at this time. The member opposite knows that. We are working on real solutions, not pie-in-the-sky solutions as proposed by the member opposite.

MR. DEVEAUX: Mr. Speaker, I would hope it wouldn't be pie in the sky to be able to guarantee certain core funding to our school boards on a two or three or four year basis so that they're able to plan ahead so they can recruit teachers and address the teacher shortage that is only going to become more critical. I will table documents from Brian Forbes, the President of the Teachers Union of Nova Scotia, where he talks about the issue of teacher supply and he notes that a lot of teachers are leaving the profession because of the high stress related to the work. One method of keeping teachers in this system is providing a mentoring program during the early part of their career for young teachers. So my question to the minister is, when will the Minister of Education recognize the urgent nature of this situation and the shortage and give recruiters a fighting chance at Nova Scotian graduates?

MISS PURVES: Mr. Speaker, as I said previously, most of the graduates from our education programs do end up in Nova Scotia schools - not all. We do have a problem with early recruitment. Multi-year funding, at this stage in our budget evolution in Nova Scotia, is simply not a possibility, so we have to work on real solutions (Interruptions) Core funding is guaranteed to the school boards, they already have core funding.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

HEALTH - NURSES: 2001-02 - INCREASES

DR. JAMES SMITH: Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of Health. On May 16th a nursing policy adviser at the Department of Health indicated that they have more nurses this year. This was reported in the media and the government was given the credit for this. However, she could not provide any numbers. My question to the minister is, could the minister please indicate how many more nurses are practising in Nova Scotia this year compared to last year?

[Page 10529]

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia keeps those statistics and the statistics on the new graduates aren't available yet.

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, the minister doesn't know, he waits for the figures from the registered nurses. If you review the registered nurses annual report that was just released - they had their annual meeting on, I think, it was May 16th - it indicates the number, and this was just posted on the Web site, of active, practising registered nurses has been declining ever since this government took office. We've seen a decline of 93 active practising nurses since 1999. My question is to the minister, how can the minister and his government claim success when there are fewer active practising nurses today in Nova Scotia than there were last year?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, I was at the annual dinner of the College of Registered Nurses a week ago - I guess it was a week ago today - and I would just like to inform the honourable member and the other members of this House that the representative from the national association, as well as representatives from the College of Registered Nurses here in Nova Scotia, spoke most glowingly of the recruitment strategy that this government has put forward. Indeed, I was very pleased with the reception that our recruitment efforts and our whole approach to the nursing strategy here in Nova Scotia received that evening.

DR. SMITH: Mr. Speaker, with all respect, I can only say that they must have been reading the media here in Halifax and not looking at the figures of that organization. I will table the annual report. The figures are all there. There is a decline in nursing graduates, Loss per Class - 39 per cent were lost in 1999. Now it's 49 per cent of the class, and those are the up-to-date figures as of the end of last year. The College of Registered Nurses' Annual Report also shows that this minister has been unsuccessful in retaining brand new graduates. In fact, last year, despite this nursing strategy, we lost almost 50 per cent of our new graduates, an increase of almost 10 per cent since this government took power. That is not success. My question to the minister, could the minister please indicate whether he plans to reallocate resources in the nursing strategy to try to retain our bright, new graduates and reverse the trend of the out-migration of our new nursing graduates?

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, we have targeted new graduates in our nursing strategy with co-op work terms and bursaries. The nursing strategy was introduced in April 2001. Sixty third-year nurses had paid co-op work terms that year and 90 more are doing that this summer; 25 fourth-year nursing students received bursaries and are now completing their return of service. Twice that number received bursaries this year and they are now starting to work in facilities throughout this province.

[Page 10530]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hants East.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - PROTECTED AREAS: ATVS - USAGE

MR. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I will table a letter by Jim Todd, vice-chairman of the Tobeatic Wilderness Committee. Mr. Todd raises concerns he has over the use of all-terrain vehicles in protected areas as designated by the Wilderness Areas Protection Act. Mr. Todd says that the Minister of Environment and Labour has approved the use of all-terrain vehicles in protected areas without public consultation. So I want to ask the minister, could the minister please clarify for this House whether all-terrain vehicles are now allowed in protected areas?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Yes, Mr. Speaker, a very appropriate question. The member opposite would know that there are very specific circumstances under which you can use motorized vehicle access in wilderness protected areas. It's clearly defined in the Act and, of course, I'm bound to uphold the provisions of the Act.

MR. MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I wish I could thank the minister for an answer, but he didn't give me one. Bill No. 24, An Act to Protect Wilderness Areas in Nova Scotia, calls for management plans to be in place for specific areas. These plans are to protect the limited amount of land our wilderness areas cover in this province. Management plans are to be undertaken with public consultation and I see the minister nodding, so he should know that. So can the minister promise this House that he will undertake fair and open public consultations before making any changes to the use of all-terrain vehicles in protected areas?

MR. MORSE: In fact, Mr. Speaker, the member opposite brings up a good point, and I appreciate the fact that he points out we're now going through that process with the Tobeatic Wilderness Area. In fact, I personally attended their opening session of the advisory committee. Those steps are also being taken in other areas and we look forward to eventually having 31 management plans for each of the protected areas within the confines that are allowed within the Wilderness Areas Protection Act.

[1:30 p.m.]

MR. MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, it's nice to know that the minister did attend the meeting, and if his account is correct, then Mr. Todd, the vice-chair of the Tobeatic Wilderness Committee, must have been absent for the meeting. So this government is once again trying to change policy without public input. When the Tobeatic Wilderness Committee approached the Department of Environment and Labour for a copy of the ATV provincial report presented in 2001 to the deputy minister, they were told to apply under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Our caucus offered to access the information on their behalf, and we were initially promised the report, however, the request

[Page 10531]

was later denied due to confidentiality issues. Why won't the Minister of Environment and Labour release the ATV report that has been in his hands since last year?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, this is an issue that evokes strong emotions because there are people from different segments of our province who have differing views on what should be done with those wilderness protected areas. This particular report, I'm not sure that I've seen the report, but I will ask to see it. At that time, I will be able to report back to this House.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton The Lakes.

ENVIRON. & LBR. - INSURANCE PREMIUM TAX:

REVENUE - AMOUNT

MR. BRIAN BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Environment and Labour. In the Insurance Premiums Tax Act, Section 3(1) it says the following, "In order to the raising of a revenue for provincial purposes, every insurance company shall pay to the Minister a tax equal to three per cent of gross premiums on life insurance, accident insurance and sickness insurance as defined in the Insurance Act . . ." and as well, "four per cent of gross premiums on other than life insurance, accident insurance and sickness insurance . . ." My question to the minister is, could the minister tell this House how much his department collects in premiums from this tax, and where does this money go?

HON. DAVID MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I would be very pleased to get that information for the member opposite. We're not in the estimates, I do not have those books in front of me. I have an approximation of what the amount would be, but he's asked a specific question. Really, if you're going to ask a question like that in Question Period, you might give notice in advance if you want to have an accurate answer.

AN HON. MEMBER: We would have to give you notice every time you stood up. (Interruptions)

MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, on the financial institutions Web site it states the following, "The division administers the collection and verification of $34 million in insurance premiums tax annually and administers the collection of a levy on all auto insurers of about $10 million for the Department of Health." My question is, could the minister explain to the House how much more money the government will receive as a result of higher insurance premiums in Nova Scotia?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, what I would like to point out to the member opposite is that we rely on the free market system in Nova Scotia and competition to drive insurance premiums. We feel that this provides better value to the consumers, and we are committed to continue to rely on the market to minimize insurance premiums.

[Page 10532]

MR. BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, my final supplementary is to the Minister of Environment and Labour. The bottom line is that this government is directly benefiting from the increase in insurance rates. This Finance Minister, perhaps, can use this money to balance his famous balanced budget. My question is, how can this minister claim he is concerned about high insurance rates when his government has a direct interest in the hike of insurance premiums across Nova Scotia?

MR. MORSE: Mr. Speaker, I think that when you look at the taxation of insurance products, one has to look at the big picture. Indeed, Mr. Speaker, as this House would be aware, I recently attended a conference with my Atlantic Canadian counterparts in St. John's, Newfoundland to discuss these matters. I guess the member opposite would perhaps like to move more towards the Newfoundland model. In Newfoundland, instead of a tax of 3 per cent or 4 per cent, they use the HST - 15 per cent. Is that the Liberal Party's position? Is that the Liberal Leader's position that he wants us to make insurance premiums subject to the HST?

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

HEALTH - ARICEPT: APPROVAL - DELAY EXPLAIN

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Health. Alzheimer's disease can be devastating to those who have the disease and to their family members who are often their caregivers. The drug Aricept has been shown to slow down the progression of this disease, allowing victims to remain independent and in their home for a longer period of time. However, the Pharmacare Program does not cover this drug which has been on the market for a number of years. I want to ask the Minister of Health, why is his department dragging its heels in approving Aricept for the Pharmacare Program?

HON. JAMES MUIR: Mr. Speaker, there is no question that Alzheimer's disease is a disabling ailment and one which we're going to see more of as more people live longer. The decisions about which drugs are placed on the Nova Scotia formulary is made by an expert management committee consisting of pharmacists, gerontologists and others who know about people, as well as about pharmaceuticals. In the opinion of that committee, the evidence up to this point is not strong enough so that Aricept - and there are two others now that fall into that category - can be included on that list.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, the evidence in other provinces where they have placed this drug on their Pharmacare plan certainly was good enough. I don't understand why it has not made the plan here in Nova Scotia. This drug can cost nearly $200 a month. Seniors are faced with the choice of cutting other items out of their budgets, like food, in order to treat a loved one who has Alzheimer's disease. That's a choice they

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shouldn't have to make. So I want to ask the Minister of Health will his department make the right choice and offer this ray of hope to Nova Scotians with Alzheimer's.

MR. MUIR: Mr. Speaker, there are a couple of things about the assessment of pharmaceuticals and I said that part of the role here in Nova Scotia is done by a committee of experts, not by politicians, although they do recommend to the department. I can tell you that they consider, among other things, cost-effectiveness. They continue to review periodically the evidence that the research comes in supporting the inclusion of drugs and they continue to do that for those that deal with dementia.

MR. SPEAKER: The time allotted for Oral Question Period has expired.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre on an introduction.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, in your gallery today I would like to introduce to the members of the House, Father Albert MacPherson, OSA. Father Albert is head of the Augustinian Healing Ministry from out of North Andover, Massachusetts. He will be having a healing ministry tonight at 8:00 p.m. at St. Thomas Aquinas Church in Halifax. I should declare that my problem here is that there's a conflict of interest because Father MacPherson is my brother-in-law, he's my wife's brother. So I would like to have the House give Father Albert a warm welcome and thank him for coming. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome our special guest to the gallery today.

The honourable member for Dartmouth North on an introduction.

MR. JERRY PYE: Mr. Speaker, earlier this afternoon during Question Period, I mentioned parents by the name of Lisa and Roger Whitman. I want you to know that Lisa and Roger Whitman are in the east gallery today. They're from a small community called Sober Island down the beautiful Eastern Shore. They were here to observe Question Period that was put forward today. I would hope the House would give them a warm welcome. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome our guests as well to the gallery today.

The honourable member for Cape Breton Centre on one more introduction.

MR. FRANK CORBETT: One more introduction, just one more. In the west gallery today, Mr. Speaker, I would like to introduce a long-time worker for the New Democrats, indeed a long-time worker on behalf of this province, Mr. Les Day, from the constituency of Cape Breton The Lakes. (Applause)

[Page 10534]

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome our guest today as well and hope he enjoys the proceedings.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and the House resolve itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[1:41 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Chariman Mr. Brooke Taylor in the Chair.]

[6:00 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We have reached the moment of interruption.

ADJOURNMENT

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

GOV'T. (N.S.): COMPREHENSIVE SMOKING BAN - ENACT

MR. RUSSELL MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to speak on this particular resolution.

"Therefore be it resolved that the Government of Nova Scotia follow the lead of Kings County and enact a comprehensive smoking ban instead of the current half-hearted attempt to protect people from second-hand smoke."

Mr. Speaker, it's becoming increasingly clear that the government and the Health Minister in particular have stopped listening to reason. There is virtually no difference between the current anti-smoking legislation and what currently exists in Nova Scotia. People who could smoke in bars yesterday will continue to smoke in bars when the government's bill is passed. The time of day may change, but the bottom line is that Nova Scotians will be forced to breathe in unwanted smoke.

[Page 10535]

In fact, what makes this bill worse is the fact that municipalities like those in Kings County have much stronger legislation. They have enacted bylaws that fully ban smoking. Unfortunately, the new law will mean municipal laws will be watered down. Instead of taking a leadership role, the province is abdicating its responsibility to provide the citizenry with the right to a healthy life.

French social philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville wrote in Democracy in America (1840), "A nation may establish a system of free government, but without the spirit of municipal institutions it cannot have the spirit of liberty."

Thankfully we still have local governments in this province that have maintained the spirit of liberty. The liberty I speak of is the liberty to work and live in an environment free of smoke. It is not only the right of children, but also the right of all Nova Scotians. The government legislation is a step backwards from what people are demanding. The people are ahead of the government on this issue, as they are on a host of other issues. In the year 2002, it is absolutely unconscionable that a government would accept anything less than a full 100 per cent ban on smoking when so many Nova Scotians are asking for that.

I want to take this opportunity to thank the municipalities like those in Kings and the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, who have embraced the spirit of liberty, the spirit of wellness and health. Municipalities like Wolfville and Kentville have demonstrated fortitude and leadership in public health.

One cannot help but think back to the last election when the Premier offered, "Strong Leadership . . . . a clear course". Obviously, Mr. Speaker, his moral compass would lead the way to a better tomorrow. Well what happened? It just didn't happen. The Premier's moral compass has been thrown off-kilter by the magnetic forces of lobby groups representing people who put profit ahead of the health and safety of Nova Scotians.

You know, one doesn't have to look back too far to see another time when profit was put before safety. The Westray mine disaster killed 26 men. It killed 26 men in their prime. It was sudden and it was tragic. There is seldom anything sudden about death from second-hand smoke. It is slow and painful and, yes, tragic. In fact, 200 men and women die each year in Nova Scotia from second-hand smoke; 26 Westrays that could be prevented by strong legislation. How could a government in good conscience allow seven Westrays a year to continue year after year?

Mr. Speaker, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fifth leading cause of death in Canada. It is a long, painful disease that slowly closes up the airways and starves the heart of oxygen. It is not sudden, but it is preventable. This legislation can prevent that slow, painful death for a large number of Nova Scotians. Accepting anything less than a total ban on smoking is immoral, and I believe that the Minister of Health fully knows this.

[Page 10536]

Speaking of morality, Mr. Speaker, I think it's rather ironic that an ordained minister who stands in his place representing one of the ridings in Kings County, effectively Kings North, could possibly support this legislation in its present form. I'm not professing that I or any member of this caucus is holier-than-thou, never have and I never will, but clearly, that member constantly lectures our previous government and our Party as being somehow less than deserving the respect of Nova Scotians. If that member accepts anything less than a full comprehensive ban then I would suggest that his lectures are nothing but shallow words. If he does, he will have cast his lot among the sinners. He will have engaged in the kind of cynical politics he claims to oppose.

I don't want to go on much more on that aspect, but I will certainly leave this one quote from Albert Einstein: "If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts." The Health Minister and his caucus are under the impression that somehow we had strong smoking legislation ready that would have been openly embraced by the Tories and the NDP. Like Albert Einstein said, "If the facts don't fit the theory, change the facts." The facts are that we were a minority government, nothing we could do would be supported by the Tories, and in many cases, the NDP. Think about that, Mr. Speaker. Even the present Premier said one of the biggest faults in the structure of government was having a minority government. The Health Minister who once voted against the removal of tobacco from pharmacies blames a minority government for not bringing in anti-smoking legislation. This is the same Party, when in Opposition, that couldn't even decide whether they wanted John Hamm to be their Leader. The Health Minister did and that's why he was rewarded. Perhaps, perhaps not. I will leave that for others to make that final conclusion.

The member for the beautiful Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley did not support the Leader and now he toils in the backbench. Let's hope the member for Sackville-Beaver Bank is not condemned to the same fate. In the end, however, we must not forget one fact: 200 Nova Scotians die as a result of second-hand smoke; stopping that requires leadership, something that is sadly lacking from this government. Those are the facts and I would ask the government to certainly reconsider its position.

In closing, I will leave this one quote from the honourable member for Kings North, in the Kentville Advertiser Friday, May 3, 2002. He says, "Our Nova Scotia government has promised free votes by members on non-confidence issues. Ideas abound, but consensus eludes." I will table that, Mr. Speaker, because clearly what's happened here is that all the government backbenchers or anyone who has any opposition to the legislation in its present form are being gagged. We will watch and we will see that the government will filibuster its own bill to prevent members from speaking out and voicing concerns. Yes, the Minister of Health with his Cabinet colleagues will lead the charge and make sure that the member for Sackville-Beaver Bank doesn't get a chance to introduce his amendment for a full smoking ban.

[Page 10537]

Mr. Speaker, why would the government go to great lengths to make sure that the Liberal or NDP Deputy Speakers not be allowed to sit in the Chair of Committee of the Whole House? The evidence speaks for itself. It's a gag order and it's forced legislation.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

HON. JAMES MUIR: I'm pleased to rise for a few minutes this evening to speak on the resolution that came from the member for Cape Breton Nova. I guess I'm going to begin by taking some issue with the remarks from the member for Cape Breton West. He does talk about the ill effects of second-hand smoke and I want to tell you, Mr. Speaker, as Health Minister, this government and the Progressive Conservative Party, we recognize that, but I think he's oversimplifying it. You know, like others, I am very much aware of the effects of second-hand smoke. Indeed, like other members of this caucus, I can name people who I believe have been killed by second-hand smoke.

Don't take this comment in any way to talk about second-hand smoke in places, but I can tell you that I don't think the people I know were ever in a bar. If they were, it was very infrequently. What I'm suggesting, Mr. Speaker, is that what we are doing is only part of the solution. If you live in a house as children, where there are smokers, you know, it's far more problematic to be exposed to second-hand smoke in an unventilated space for seven days a week and conceivably eight, nine or 10 hours a week. So in the smoking strategy, that's why we have to look at the bill we proposed as part of a smoking strategy. You know, it's part of a comprehensive strategy. We have to convince parents or people who do smoke that they should not smoke when they have others who don't smoke in their houses or homes or cars or whatever the dickens it is, and we can't legislate that, I don't think. So the strategy has to be comprehensive.

I had an e-mail after we proposed the amendments; I guess it was last Friday. It might have been before that. Somebody said, well, you should make it a law for anyone under the age of 18 to be exposed to second-hand smoke and they were talking about private homes, automobiles, and all of these things. Mr. Speaker, I can't disagree with it. It's not right that these young people should be exposed to smoke, but it's very difficult to legislate that. One of the things that I'm pleased to speak of is I know a number of people who have stopped smoking because of their children and other people who have stopped smoking because their grandchildren are coming to their homes, or they don't smoke in their homes anymore. They may go outside to smoke, but we've made progress. This is just another step in that road; I recognize that.

The issue of exposure to smoke, the bill is not perfect but it is going to virtually eliminate smoking in schools, which is a good thing, not only because it eliminates smoking in schools and school grounds. You know, when I was on my feet earlier, we were talking about smoking being cool. Maybe that's going to kill part of the coolness of smoking, when it is illegal for young people to smoke. It's going to be effectively eliminated in public

[Page 10538]

transport and that includes taxis. It will be buses, taxis, and if you are driving a vehicle from work and there's more than you in the car, then effectively you can't smoke.

Smoking in hospitals. Now, there's not a whole lot of smoking in hospitals, but some hospitals - and you and I, Mr. Speaker, have talked about this - there are facilities where they have a smoking room. People go in there and they smoke because they're addicted, but somebody has got to go in there and clean that room up. The issue of smoking in hospitals is basically addressed. At least after this legislation, if they are going to smoke, then it is going to be a separately ventilated room to standards and maybe it will not protect the smokers, but it will significantly reduce the risk to the non-smokers or the workers there.

You know, we have a lot of food courts in malls. I don't think there are too many food courts in the Province of Nova Scotia where you're going to see that they're going to stick in a smoking booth. They would have the right to do that, but I think this legislation is going to effectively eliminate smoking in public spaces in malls.

[6:15 p.m.]

One of the interesting things, Mr. Speaker, and I don't know whether the Liberal Party, when they did up their amendments, they did it simply because they wanted to draw amendments, or they just made an error in this, I don't think it was deliberate. One of the amendments that they proposed would eliminate smoking in restaurants where customers were, but it wouldn't eliminate smoking for the employees. If you worked in the kitchen, or you worked in the office, or wherever it was, that business, you know the proposed amendment and, as I say, it may not have been by intent, but it certainly was written that way that they didn't protect workers from that second-hand smoke, the customers but not the workers. I don't think it was intended that way, but that's the way it came.

Mr. Speaker, the issue of second-hand smoke is going to be significantly reduced in taxis, restaurants and those things. So the legislation is going to work and that's the important thing. I mean, we could have, like everybody else, devised legislation that nobody paid any attention to and wasn't going to work. We had 62 interveners, I think it was 62 interveners, at the Law Amendments Committee process. Most of those people made very articulate presentations. We didn't get too much there necessarily on emotion. They did try to present evidence and we who have sat at the Law Amendments Committee process recognize that that isn't always the case and as a result of the Law Amendments Committee process there were a number of changes proposed through the Law Amendments Committee that have been incorporated into the bill as it has now been circulated. We believe that those are going to make the bill even stronger.

One of the things that was introduced, and it came from I believe one of the other caucuses, was to set up a buffer zone between an entrance or an exit, or a window in a building or something, or a fresh air intake, and the ability to smoke. This made sense. It's

[Page 10539]

something that is desirable, but that's going to be a matter of education and that's why our whole smoking strategy, part of it is education. It's not just the legislation. There is the legislative part, there is the price part, there is the school part. I believe that smoking is on the way out. It's just going to take a little bit of time. The number of people who are smoking, at least it seems to me to be less. The price impact has been significant.

One of the things that would give another indication of this is where the tobacco companies are concentrating their sales efforts now. They aren't concentrating their sales efforts in Canada and the United States because they know that the attitude of people towards smoking is changing. They're doing their major campaigns over in the European countries and in the Asian countries. If you want to see smoking and what it's all about, how far advanced we are here, and the tobacco companies have kind of had their fangs pulled by the federal government when it comes to advertising.

People have talked in here about the lobby that we received from the tobacco industry. Mr. Speaker, I can tell you that I did not speak to a representative of the tobacco industry on a matter of tobacco. I have done it one time since I've been Minister of Health in just about three years and that had to do with the school ID program that's out there that's being sponsored. I have never been lobbied by a person from a tobacco company about this issue of tobacco. I'm just stating that as a matter of fact, but I can tell you I was lobbied by the drugstores on that thing. (Interruption) No, I was Minister of Health. That was after the vote. After the vote they came to see me and they said we are going to do this and we're going to do that and I want to tell you, you know, that bill did create a very seasonal bulge in construction for people like Lawton's, or for Sobey's I guess, the Sobey's group, the Pharmasave group, a number of those things, the Atlantic Wholesalers group, Loblaws, Zellers, all of these places, they had ways to get around that. Anyway, I will sit down with those few comments.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Needham.

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I can't believe what I heard the minister start to say although he got out of it pretty quickly, saying he had never been lobbied by the tobacco companies except for the school ID Program. I wonder what in the world he thinks the school ID program was. Was this a campaign to altruistically improve education in Nova Scotia on the part of the tobacco companies? I don't think so. This is precisely the point that I've been trying to make about how smart the tobacco companies actually are. And you know what? They're so smart that the Minster of Health was lobbied by the tobacco companies and didn't even realize they were doing it. It's time for a little education, I suggest, for the minister.

Before we talk about the tobacco companies, I want to speak more directly to the resolution, which is really about why we need a 100 per cent smoke-free ban in Nova Scotia, to follow the leadership essentially of municipalities in the Kings County area. Mr. Speaker,

[Page 10540]

because we've had an opportunity to talk about this in the last few days, you know that at the Law Amendments Committee we had representations from four of the Annapolis Valley towns: Mayors of Wolfville, Kentville, Windsor and on behalf of the Mayor of Berwick, who was not able to attend in person but was in full support and endorsed the representations we had from the Mayors of Kentville, Wolfville and the deputy mayor.

As we all know, the Town of Wolfville has gone 100 per cent smoke-free. They introduced a bylaw; it came into effect, I believe, in April, and there are a number of things about this particular action that I think are worth noting. One of the things that nobody has really talked about is that Wolfville is the home of Acadia University. Acadia, obviously, is a place where there are a lot of young people and student activities. The student union building there has pubs and dances and food courts and what have you. One of the things that I found quite interesting and very exciting and encouraging about the Wolfville bylaw was the way that they were able to get buy-in from the university and the student union in the Town of Wolfville. The student union is 100 per cent smoke-free and fully in support of this by-law. I think that is an excellent expression of leadership at the level of young people.

I want to say that I want this legislation to work. When the minister outlines all of the places that will be smoke-free as a result of this legislation, I don't know if there's anybody who wants that any more than I want that. I want this legislation to work. I want hospitals to be 100 per cent smoke-free and child care centres and bowling alleys and pool halls and all of these places that are listed in one part of the bill. Universities and university clubs and places where young kids, especially university students, are - I think that's very important. But, Mr. Speaker, my fear is that because we haven't gone the full course of introducing a 100 per cent smoke-free ban, that will contribute to an undermining of this legislation. I am sort of anxious thinking about what's going to happen in the Province of Nova Scotia come January 1, 2003, when some groups and organizations that don't agree with this legislation and have made their concerns pretty clear that they don't agree about this legislation, are feeling tremendously aggrieved because others do not have to conform to this legislation, such as the casino. We've talked about this before. When you have those kinds of exemptions, you make people feel that it's such an unfair situation to put them in that they're going to act out and they're not going to abide by the provisions in the legislation.

Mr. Speaker, we will have a very serious situation on our hands. I think we really needed to learn the lessons from other jurisdictions that have introduced legislation that has been weak and not taking on the issue in a clear and forceful way. The municipalities who came before us, Berwick, Kentville, Wolfville, Windsor, asked for a 100 per cent smoke-free ban. They asked not to be put into a situation where their bylaws would be stronger than the provincial legislation, putting a huge amount of pressure on them to either re-open their bylaws and weaken them, or try to maintain the position they had developed.

[Page 10541]

Certainly, we had a business from the Wolfville area - the owner and operator of Joe's Emporium and the Anvil - come before us and tell us how he, in fact, is losing his clientele to the New Minas area, to bars there that did not have a smoking ban. It was very clear. He produced financial information to the committee saying, this is the situation I've been placed in. Please give me a level playing field. Don't allow this to happen.

Mr. Speaker, I support the resolution that's before us here today. I think a 100 per cent ban would give the level playing field. It would allow those municipalities that have really taken the initiative and shown a tremendous amount of leadership with respect to this issue to maintain their position, which took them some time to work out and to plan for and to now implement. I think the other thing that was disturbing but not surprising was the lack of consultation that had occurred with respect to this legislation and the municipal units that came to speak with us. The relations sometimes between the provincial government and our municipalities are not what they should be.

I think if there's any lesson to have been learned with respect to the municipal units, it's the importance of sitting down and speaking with them. They're a very sensible group of people. The cliché, which I think is very true, is that municipal government is closer to the people. I think the municipal government experience of the honourable member for Sackville-Beaver Bank, no doubt, is a very central contributor to the role he's played in terms of raising concerns about the inadequacy and the weakness of this legislation.

Mr. Speaker, I wanted to make those points as I contribute to this debate.

MR. SPEAKER: The time allotted for the late debate has expired. I would like to thank all honourable members for bringing this debate before the House this evening.

The House will now revert to the Committee of the Whole House on Bills.

[6:30 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Bills with Deputy Chairman Mr. William Dooks in the Chair.]

[7:58 p.m. CWH on Bills rose and the House reconvened. Mr. Speaker, Hon. Murray Scott, resumed the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Bills reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met, made progress and begs leave to sit again.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 10542]

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. RONALD RUSSELL: Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now rise to meet again on the morrow at the hour of 9:00 a.m. The House will sit until such time as we have three more hours in the Committee of the Whole House on this bill. I move that the House do now rise.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is that the House do adjourn now until 9:00 a.m. tomorrow morning.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House is adjourned until 9:00 a.m.

[The House rose at 7:59 p.m.]

[Page 10543]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 4036

By: Mr. William Dooks (Eastern Shore)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Mr. Allison DeWolfe, a resident of the Lower Ship Harbour Road, Halifax County, along the Eastern Shore, had an especially proud moment on Friday, April 12th,when he met his 56-year-old son for the first time; and

Whereas this joyous occasion arose through the hard work of the Association of Liberation Children and Mr. DeWolfe's daughter Mary; and

Whereas Mr. DeWolfe and his daughter flew to Holland and were invited by a Dutch television network to meet Edward in the studio;

Therefore be it resolved that Members of the Legislative Assembly acknowledge the efforts of the Association of Liberation Children and Mr. DeWolfe's daughter Mary, enabling Mr. DeWolfe to have a such a joyous reunion with his son.

RESOLUTION NO. 4037

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 30-hour famine is an international youth movement which allows youth to make a significant impact on the problem of world hunger; and

Whereas 60 junior and senior high school students and teachers Derrick Eason, Phil Scott, Bernadine Conron, Karla Mitchell-Smith, Allen Stubbert, Audrey Morris, Jamie Arsenault and Baptist youth pastor Scott Balser, along with Mike Morris and Nancy Morris from Springhill undertook the 30-hour famine on April 27th; and

Whereas the event raised over $3,000 in order to aid underprivileged children and families;

[Page 10544]

Therefore be it resolved that this House recognize the Springhill students and teacher Derrick Eason who participated in this 30-hour famine and took an active role in helping to alleviate human suffering around the world.

RESOLUTION NO. 4038

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Speaker)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Monday, May 13, 2002, Acadia University graduated its Bachelor of Education class of 2002; and

Whereas Jan Scott, the daughter of the Speaker and Linda Scott, graduated with her Bachelor of Education Degree, with a major in junior high French; and

Whereas since her graduation, Jan has left for Europe where she will travel, then will take up summer employment in Italy as a camp instructor;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Jan Scott on her successful completion of a Bachelor of Education Degree and wish her success in her chosen field of teaching our children.