Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 09-15

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Charlie Parker

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

First Session

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS:
LWD - WCB 2nd Quarter Rept., Hon. M. More 776
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 396, Boyle, Willard/Smith, George; Nobel Prize - Congrats.,
The Premier 776
Vote - Affirmative 777
Res. 397, Crosby, Sidney: Career - Congrats,
The Premier 777
Vote - Affirmative 777
Res. 398, Safe Communities Awareness Day (10/07/09) - Recognize,
Hon. Maureen MacDonald 778
Vote - Affirmative 779
Res. 399, Shelburne Long Boat Soc.: Ryl. Navy Dockyard - Recognize,
Hon. S. Belliveau 779
Vote - Affirmative 779
Res. 400, Mental Illness Awareness Wk. (10/04-10/10/09) - Recognize,
Hon. Maureen MacDonald 779
Vote - Affirmative 780
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 30, Public Trustee Act, Hon. R. Landry 780
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 401, HPP - United Way Workplace Campaign,
Hon. S. McNeil 781
Vote - Affirmative 781
Vote - Affirmative
Res. 402, Educ.: NSCC Strike - Contingency Plan,
Hon. K. Casey 782
Res. 403, Queens Co. Fair: Vols./Participants/Comm. - Recognize,
Ms. V. Conrad 782
Vote - Affirmative 783
Res. 404, Registered Nurses College (N.S.) -
Natl. Quality Instit. Award, Hon. S. McNeil 783
Vote - Affirmative 784
Res. 405, Shelley, Jody/Participants: Golf Fore Health Tournament -
Thank, Hon. R. Hurlburt 784
Vote - Affirmative 784
Res. 406, West. Kings Dist. HS: Envirothon Team - Congrats.,
Mr. L. Glavine 785
Vote - Affirmative 785
Res. 407, MacIsaac, Heather: World Teachers' Day Contest - Congrats.,
Hon. C. Clarke 785
Vote - Affirmative 786
Res. 408, Caisse Populaire de Clare - Commun. Dev. Award,
Hon. W. Gaudet 786
Vote - Affirmative 787
Res. 409, Gov't. (N.S.): Pub. Serv. - Equality Implement,
Mr. A. MacLeod 787
Res. 410, Colbourne, Rodney/Green, Steve/MacDougall, Steve -
Ernst & Young Award, Mr. A. Younger 788
Vote - Affirmative 789
Res. 411, Firefighters (N.S.): Efforts - Thank,
Mr. K. Bain 789
Vote - Affirmative 790
Res. 412, Riteman, Philip - Order of Nova Scotia,
Ms. K. Regan 790
Vote - Affirmative 790
Res. 413, Shinerama - Anniv. (45th),
Hon. C. d'Entremont 790
Vote - Affirmative 792
Res. 414, Wilson, Dave/Wilson Group - Ernst & Young Award,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 792
Vote - Affirmative 792
Res. 415, Windsor Farmers Market: Efforts - Applaud,
Mr. C. Porter 793
Vote - Affirmative 793
Res. 416, Prime Minister's Teaching excellence Award: Recipients -
Congrats., Ms. K. Regan 793
Vote - Affirmative 794
Res. 417, Prem./Dep. Prem./HPP Min.: Rink Revitalization Prog. -
Reinstate, Hon. K. Casey 794
Res. 418, HPP: Rink Revitalization Prog. - Reinstatement Support,
Hon. C. d'Entremont 795
Res. 419, Egyptian Cdn. Assoc./Pres. & Exec.: Annual Dinner -
Congrats., Ms. D. Whalen 796
Vote - Affirmative 796
Res. 420, Millville Commun. Ctr.: Pumpkin Contest - Congrats.,
Mr. K. Bain 797
Vote - Affirmative 797
Res. 421, Houston, Sandra - RCL Award,
Mr. C. Porter 797
Vote - Affirmative 798
Res. 422, N.S. Music Wk.: Yarmouth - Hosting Congrats.,
Hon. R. Hurlburt 798
Vote - Affirmative 799
Res. 423, Nat. Res.: C.B. Forest Land - Action Plan,
Mr. A. MacLeod 799
Res. 424, Pictou - Antigonish Reg. Library: ERD Min. - Invest,
Hon. C. Clarke 800
Res. 425, Ships' Co. Theatre - Commun. Serv. (25 Yrs.),
Hon. M. Scott 801
Vote - Affirmative 801
ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS:
No. 95, Prem: N.S. Fisheries Loan Bd. - Funding,
Mr. David Wilson (Glace Bay) 802
No. 96, Prem.: Cabinet Conflict - Confirm, Hon. K. Casey 803
No. 97, Prem.: Public Servants - Union/Non-Union Raises,
Hon. S. McNeil 804
No. 98, Prem. - NSCC: Educ. Min. - Parties Meet, Hon. S. McNeil 805
No. 99, Fin.: Audit - Clarification, Hon. C. Clarke 806
No. 100, Fin.: Audit - Advice, Mr. L. Glavine 807
No. 101, Prem. - NSCC: Prem. - Message, Hon. K. Casey 809
No. 102, Educ.: NSCC Strike Action - Min. Awareness, Ms. K. Regan 810
No. 103, Prem. - ERD Min./Environ. Min.: Conflict of Interest -
Position, Hon. R. Hurlburt 811
No. 104, Energy: EnerGuide Prog. - Status, Mr. A. Younger 812
No. 105, Educ. - Tobacco Companies: Litigation - Legislation,
Hon. M. Samson 814
No. 106, Justice: Antigonish Corr. Ctr. - Status, Mr. A. MacLeod 815
No. 107, Health: Physician Retirement List - Table,
Ms. D. Whalen 816
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ON MOTION FOR SUPPLY:
Mr. A. Younger 819
Hon. C. Clarke 823
Mr. B. Skabar 828
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON SUPPLY AT 4:36 P.M. 832
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 5:59 P.M.. 832
ADJOURNMENT:
MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5):
TCH: Dockside Ceilidh - Fund,
Hon. C. Clarke 832
Hon. Manning MacDonald 835
Hon. P. Paris 838
HOUSE RECESSED AT 6:30 P.M. 841
HOUSE RESOLVED INTO CWH ON SUPPLY AT 6:32 P.M. 841
HOUSE RECONVENED AT 9:14 P.M. 841
ADJOURNMENT, The House rose to meet again on Wed., Oct. 7th at 1:30 p.m. 842
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 426, Boyle, Willard S./Colleagues; Nobel Prize (2009) -
Congrats., Mr. A. Younger 843
Res. 427, Berwick Alpines Men's Fastball Team (1971):
Berwick Sports Hall of Fame - Induction, Mr. L. Glavine 843
Res. 428, Thomas, Mrs. Nola: East Preston Day Care Centre (35 Yrs.),
Hon. K. Colwell 844
Res. 429, Glasgow, Mrs. Alexa: East Preston Day Care Centre (35 Yrs.),
Hon. K. Colwell 844
Res. 430, Williams, Mr. George: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (24 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 845
Res. 431, Smith, Mrs. Juanita: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (23 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 845
Res. 432, Downie, Mrs. Birley: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (19 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 846
Res. 433, McMullin, Mrs. Kim: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (16 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 846
Res. 434, Colley, Mrs. Sandra: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (14 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 847
Res. 435, Dixon, Ms. Tammie: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (13 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 847
Res. 436, Brooks, Ms. Angela: East Preston Day Care Ctr. -
Work (10 Yrs.), Hon. K. Colwell 848
Res. 437, Babineau, Barbara: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 848
Res. 438, Callbeck, Nicola: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 849
Res. 439, Dorey, Cheryl: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 849
Res. 440, Gould, Darlene: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 850
Res. 441, Henry, Michelle: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 850
Res. 442, Maine, Diana: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 851
Res. 443, Reid, Tessa: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 851
Res. 444, Ripley, Jennifer: CCA Prog. - Graduation,
Hon. M. Scott 852
Res. 445, MacDonald, Sonya - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 852
Res. 446, Meekins, Lindsay - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 853
Res. 447, Moore, Brent - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 853
Res. 448, O'Brien, Felicia - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 854
Res. 449, Peddle, Stephen - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 854
Res. 450, Quinn, Alissa - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 855
Res. 451, Romero, Gabriela - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 855
Res. 452, Stone, Brandon - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 856
Res. 453, Surette, Jacob - Academic Achievement,
Hon. M. Scott 856
Res. 454, Boyle, Willard S.: Nobel Prize (2009) - Congrats.,
Hon. M. Scott 857

[Page 775]

HALIFAX, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2009

Sixty-first General Assembly

First Session

2:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Charlie Parker

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Gordon Gosse, Hon. Wayne Gaudet, Mr. Alfie MacLeod

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Before we start the daily routine, I want to announce the subject for this evening's late debate, which was submitted by the honourable member for Cape Breton West:

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage re-evaluate the request for $5,000 to enable the Dockside Ceilidh's Performing Arts Series to meet their obligations and prepare for the 24th season without this funding pressure.

This will be debated this evening at 6:00 p.m.

We will begin the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

[Page 776]

775

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Labour and Workforce Development.

HON. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table the Workers' Compensation Board Second Quarter Report, 2009.

MR. SPEAKER: The report is tabled.

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 396

HON. DARRELL DEXTER (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia-born scientist Willard Boyle along with his colleagues, George Smith and Charles Kao, have been awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in physics; and

Whereas Mr. Boyle and Mr. Smith won the Nobel Prize in physics for inventing the first successful imaging technology using a digital sensor; and

Whereas his lifelong work in physics helped create practical innovations for everyday life and new tools for scientific exploration;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Nova Scotia native Willard Boyle and his colleague, George Smith, for their dedication to scientific excellence and the recognition of that work by award of the 2009 Nobel Prize for physics.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 777]

The motion is carried.

The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 397

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas National Hockey League star and Cole Harbour native Sidney Crosby won the Stanley Cup and was introduced into the Order of Nova Scotia; and

Whereas Mr. Crosby is a true inspiration to young people here in Nova Scotia and across the world; and

Whereas he has had an exceptional year, winning the Cup and leading the NHL playoffs with 15 goals;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Sidney Crosby on his remarkable career, his hard work and dedication, and his commitment to his community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health Promotion and Protection.

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, with your permission, I would like to make an introduction before reading my resolution.

MR. SPEAKER: Certainly.

[Page 778]

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I draw the attention of members to the east gallery, where we are joined today by some guests. The heads of Canada's National Injury Prevention Organization, Canadian Red Cross, SMARTRISK, Safe Communities Canada, Think First Canada, and Safe Kids Canada are in Halifax this week to celebrate Safe Communities Canada Day. While these groups have always worked together, they have just formed a national alliance to help make Canada the safest country in the world.

I would like to draw the attention of members to the following people, and I would ask them to rise as I read your name and then we'll extend a warm welcome from the House: Paul Kells, president of Safe Communities Canada; Pamela Fuselli, executive director, Safe Kids Canada; Bob Baker, president and CEO of SMARTRISK; Sandy Wells, national program manager of Think First Canada; Conrad Sauvé, Secretary General and CEO of the Canadian Red Cross; and Ismael Aquino and Sheila Fougere, co-chairs of the Safe Communities Halifax Regional Municipality; as well as Julian Young, co-ordinator of Injury Prevention and Control, Health Promotion and Protection. So we welcome you all here today. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health Promotion and Protection.

RESOLUTION NO. 398

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas supporting healthy and safe communities is a priority of the Department of Health Promotion and Protection and tomorrow is National Safe Communities Day; and

Whereas this year's campaign is Be Visible, and Nova Scotians are asked to participate and businesses and safe organizations are encouraged to organize safety awareness events to increase understanding of the importance of injury prevention; and

Whereas an effective way to help reduce personal injury and contribute to the well-being of fellow citizens is to become certified in first aid and CPR;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize Safe Communities Day on October 7th, and I encourage everyone to participate and learn more about the importance of being safe every day.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 779]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 399

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Shelburne Longboat Society represented Shelburne at the 250th Anniversary of the founding of the Royal Navy Dockyard, in Halifax, on July 17-19, 2009; and

Whereas in 2008, two 20-foot, 18th Century longboats were built and displayed as part of the Loyalist Landing celebration; and

Whereas over one million visitors and 60 tall ships and 25 longboats participated in this event;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly recognize the Shelburne Longboat Society for representing Shelburne at the 250th Anniversary of the founding of the Royal Navy Dockyard in Halifax on July 17-19, 2009.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 400

[Page 780]

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas October 4th to October 10th is Mental Illness Awareness Week all across Canada, recognizing that one in five Canadians is affected by mental illness in their lifetime and most Nova Scotians will be indirectly affected by mental illness through relationships with family, friends, and co-workers; and

Whereas this year the Canadian Mental Health Association and the Schizophrenia Society provide support services to more than 100,000 Canadians through the combined efforts of more than 10,000 volunteers ,and staff, in locally run organizations in all provinces and territories and branches in more than 135 communities, to help de-stigmatize mental illness; and

Whereas mental health professionals in the province's nine district health authorities and the IWK provide treatment services in our hospitals and in our community mental health clinics to citizens of Nova Scotia living with a mental illness;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House recognize October 4th to October 10th as Mental Illness Awareness Week and acknowledge the work done by those individuals involved.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 30 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 379 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Trustee Act. (Hon. Ross Landry)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that this bill be read a second time on a future day.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

[Page 781]

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, do you mind if I do an introduction? It is not related to the resolution.

MR. SPEAKER: Sure.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I draw the attention of the House to the west gallery. Fin Armsworthy is here, and he is a councillor in Canso. I would ask him to stand and receive the warm welcome of the House. (Applause)

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 401

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas between September and December, each year, more than 5,000 volunteers support the workplace campaign to raise funds for the United Way; and

Whereas the Province of Nova Scotia, with the leadership from the Department of Health Promotion and Protection, launched its workplace campaign at the Halifax Metro Centre; and

Whereas donations raised through the Province of Nova Scotia workplace campaign will be used to fund programs which help young children and families thrive, reduce violence and build strong communities;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in extending appreciation to the Department of Health Promotion and Protection as the lead department for the Province of Nova Scotia United Way Workplace Campaign and in wishing them all the best as they embark on initiatives that will encourage the supporting of agencies that do so much to enhance our communities.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 782]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 402

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas some 25,000 full- and part-time students in the Nova Scotia Community College system are presently facing the prospect of their school year being thrown into turmoil; and

Whereas the Minister of Education has admitted she is hearing a lot about the anxiety facing Nova Scotia Community College students; and

Whereas the anxiety and turmoil concerns are the result of the Minister of Education's inability to get a new collective agreement signed between the government and the Nova Scotia Teachers Union, representing the community college faculty;

Therefore be it resolved that if the minister is unable to commit her government to a fair and reasonable settlement with the Nova Scotia Community College teachers, she should immediately announce the government's contingency plans, so that the school year for Nova Scotia Community College students will not be interrupted by a nasty and unnecessary labour dispute.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 403

[Page 783]

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Queens County Fair is held in Caledonia each year for all to enjoy; and

Whereas volunteers from all over Queens County provided support for this year's fair; and

Whereas this year saw almost double the number of people attending, with so many events being directed toward kids and more livestock events being held;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly recognize all the volunteers, participants and the Queens County Fair committee for all their hard work and wish them continued success in providing a wonderful September fair for community members and visitors to enjoy.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 404

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia has been offering educational sessions since 1999 to nurses in 45 health care facilities across the province through what is known to be one of the largest telehealth networks in the world; and

Whereas the college is a recipient of one of the National Quality Institute 2009 Canada Awards for Excellence; and

[Page 784]

Whereas this award is presented annually to organizations recognized for their outstanding achievements in the areas of quality, customer service and a healthy workplace;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly join me in congratulating the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia on this achievement and thank them for their dedication to our province.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Yarmouth.

RESOLUTION NO. 405

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Jody Shelley Golf Fore Health Tournament took place this past July at the West Pubnico Golf and Country Club, in support of the Yarmouth Regional Hospital; and

Whereas this is the fifth annual event hosted by the Yarmouth native and NHL enforcer, and over $33,000 was raised for new equipment; and

Whereas the fact that Jody continues to use his profile to make a difference for the people of his hometown is worthy of our recognition;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly thank Jody Shelley, as well as all participants in the Golf Fore Health Tournament, and their continued dedication to their community and work on behalf of the Yarmouth Regional Hospital.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 785]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 406

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas West Kings District High School Envirothon team took first place at the provincial championships; and

Whereas the West Kings team was tested on their knowledge of various issues, including soil and land use, forestry, aquatic ecology, wildlife, and biodiversity; and

Whereas their success at Acadia University allowed the West Kings students to represent Nova Scotia at the national championships and qualified them to compete in the North American Canon Envirothon at Ashville, North Carolina;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate the West Kings District High School Envirothon team and wish them continued success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

[Page 786]

RESOLUTION NO. 407

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas World Teachers' Day is an annual celebration organized by the Canadian Teachers' Federation, focusing on the valuable work of educators across the country; and

Whereas the theme of this year's celebration was Peace and involved a contest inviting Canadian teachers to design a poster concept on living and teaching peace in the classroom, with the winning submission receiving a trip to Montreal for a public presentation on peace by His Holiness the Dalai Lama; and

Whereas the winning concept was designed by Nova Scotia educator Heather MacIsaac, who currently teaches graphic design at the Nova Scotia Community College Marconi Campus in Sydney;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in congratulating Heather MacIsaac on winning the World Teachers' Day contest, and representing the Province of Nova Scotia through her dedication to teaching and outstanding creative ability.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 408

HON. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I would like to present this resolution in French, followed by the English translation, please.

[Page 787]

M. le président, à une date ultérieure, j'ai l'intention de proposer l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que la Caisse populaire de Clare s'est mérité le prix d'Excellence en développement communautaire 2009, qui lui a été décerné récemment lors d'une cérémonie à Truro; et

Attendu que la Caisse populaire de Clare démontre un bel exemple d'une entreprise locale qui contribue à l'amélioration de sa communauté par son leadership, son dévouement, et son appui; et

Attendu que la Caisse populaire de Clare a aidé à la réalisation de plus de soixante initiatives communautaires et projets d'infrastructures qui rapportent de vrais bénéfices aux communautés dans la grande municipalité de Clare;

Qu'il soit résolu que cette assemblée reconnaisse la Caisse populaire de Clare pour sa contribution au développement communautaire et félicite ses directeurs, ses employées et ses membres pour s'être mérité le prix d'Excellence en développement communautaire.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas La Caisse Populaire de Clare was recently awarded the Excellence in Community Development 2009 award in Truro; and

Whereas La Caisse Populaire de Clare is a great example of how local business can contribute to the betterment of their communities through leadership, dedication, and support; and

Whereas La Caisse Populaire de Clare has assisted more than 60 community initiatives and infrastructure projects that provide real benefits to communities across the municipality of Clare;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate staff, directors, and members of La Caisse Populaire de Clare on its 2009 Community Development Award.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 788]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

RESOLUTION NO. 409

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Public Service employees are the backbone to a strong Public Service who deliver services to all Nova Scotians; and

Whereas former governments always treated employees equally, regardless of their union affiliation or non-union status; and

Whereas this government has chosen to discriminate against non-union employees by giving a 2.9 per cent increase to unions and non-union employees are only receiving a 1 per cent increase;

Therefore be it resolved that this House demand that this government implement equality throughout the Public Service and quit patronizing unions.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

[2:30 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 410

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 789]

Whereas Offshore Technologies Services Ltd. is a growing energy services company based in Sydney that provides technical and professional services to companies across the country; and

Whereas Offshore Technologies Services was the winner of the 2009 Atlantic Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year awards ceremony in Halifax on Thursday, October 1st; and

Whereas Offshore Technologies Services president and general manager Rodney Colbourne, along with business partners Steve Green and Steve MacDougall, said the exposure of winning the award is the best form of marketing that you can have;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Rodney Colbourne, Steve Green, and Steve MacDougall for their success and recognize their incredible accomplishment as winners of the 2009 Atlantic Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 411

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas October 4th to October 10th has been designated as Fire Prevention Week; and

Whereas both career and volunteer firefighters will visit schools throughout the province to educate children on fire safety; and

[Page 790]

Whereas Nova Scotians are encouraged to make sure their carbon monoxide detectors and fire safety equipment are properly installed and working;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House thank all firefighters in the province for their tireless efforts and remind all residents of Nova Scotia to practise fire safety 365 days a year.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 412

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Order of Nova Scotia was established in 2001 to recognize Nova Scotians who have made outstanding contributions to our province; and

Whereas Bedford resident Philip Riteman is a Holocaust survivor who lost his immediate family in the genocide; and

Whereas Mr. Riteman's willingness to share his experiences, to educate a generation of Nova Scotia students about the horrors of the Holocaust and the sheer inhumanity of genocides, has prompted the awarding of the Order to him this year;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly recognize the contributions Mr. Philip Riteman has made to educating our province and congratulate him on being named to the Order.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 791]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Argyle.

RESOLUTION NO. 413

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: M. le Président, à une date ultérieure, je demanderai l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que la fibrose kystique est une maladie génétique qui touche les jeunes, principalement au niveau des poumons et du système digestif, avec environ un sur 3,600 enfants nés au Canada qui souffrent de la fibrose kystique; et

Attendu que Shinerama coordonne des levées de fonds pour la Fondation canadienne de la fibrose kystique depuis 1964, et que cette année soixante-deux écoles seront impliquées dans la campagne; et;

Attendu que l'Université Sainte-Anne a recueilli plus de 100,000 dollars depuis 1990 et qu'environ 90 étudiants ont participé à la collecte de fonds cette années dans divers endroits de la ville et du comté de Yarmouth en organisant des activités comme le cirage de chaussures, des lave-autos, un barbecue, entre autres activités;

Par consequent, qu'il soit résolu que tous les membres de cette assemblée se joignent à moi pour féliciter Shinerama à l'occasion de son 45e anniversaire et reconnaître l'immense contribution que cette association apporte à la Fondation canadienne de la fibrose kystique et tous les étudiants de l'Université Sainte-Anne pour leur participation soutenue dans la collecte de fonds et leur souhaiter beaucoup de succès.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease that affects young people, primarily their lungs and digestive system, with about one in every 3,600 children born in Canada having CF; and

Whereas Shinerama became a fundraiser for the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in 1964 and this year 62 schools will be involved in the campaign; and

[Page 792]

Whereas Université Sainte-Anne has raised over $100,000 since 1990 and about 90 students participated in the fundraising efforts this year at various locations in Yarmouth Town and County by holding a shoeshining event, car washes, a barbeque among other activities;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in congratulating Shinerama on its 45th Anniversary and on the tremendous contribution this association brings to the Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and also all the students from Université Sainte-Anne for their dedicated participation in the fundraising events and wish them continued success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

RESOLUTION NO. 414

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the chairman of the Wilson Group of companies is the winner of this year's Atlantic Ernst and Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award; and

Whereas the Truro-based Wilson Group employs more than 500 people and is one of Atlantic Canada's largest independent gas retailers;

Whereas the name of the chairman of this group is Dave Wilson, a common but popular name in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly, including the two Dave Wilsons in this House, congratulate Dave Wilson of the Wilson Group on this significant achievement and wish him all the best in future endeavours.

[Page 793]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 415

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, this motion is about Windsor but I'm fearful of saying Wilson too many times.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas buying foods that have been grown and cultivated right here in our own communities will not only stimulate the local economy, it will say to our farmers, we care about you; and

Whereas the Windsor Farmers Market is a developing market, interested in creating a vibrant and exciting destination for Windsor residents and visitors to experience; and

Whereas the Windsor Farmers Market is dedicated to creating a local venue for patrons to access fresh, local, quality, wholesome, delicious produce, baked goods and artisan crafts;

Therefore be it resolved that MLAs in this House of Assembly applaud the ongoing efforts of the Windsor Farmers Market and make it a point to drop in during your next Saturday visit to downtown Windsor.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 794]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 416

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Prime Minister's Award for Teaching Excellence is presented to teachers from across Canada in recognition of the outstanding commitment they have made to teaching; and

Whereas six Nova Scotia teachers have been selected to receive this honour; and

Whereas Steven Van Zoost of Avon View High School is being honoured with the Certificate of Excellence, and Certificates of Achievement will be presented to Kent Brewer of Memorial Composite High School, Michael Diabo of Prince Arthur Junior High School, Jason Fuller of Horton High School and Shelley MacDonald and Carla MacEachern both of Thorburn Consolidated School;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate these teachers on receipt of the Prime Minister's Award for Teaching Excellence and acknowledge their commitment to their students.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 795]

The honourable Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 417

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Wayne Otter, manager of the Trenton rink and Highland Region representative on the Recreation Facilities Association of Nova Scotia, describes the former government's $2 million rink revitalization fund as a "godsend for most rinks because they barely have enough money for operation"; and

Whereas the NDP Government has cut the rink revitalization program from its September 24th budget; and

Whereas Mr. Otter said this funding could have been very useful at the Trenton rink as the town's facility is aging and the hot water tank needs replacement;

Therefore be it resolved that the Premier, his Deputy Premier and Minister of Health Promotion and Protection seize the opportunity to reach out to rural communities across Nova Scotia such as Trenton and reinstate the rink revitalization program that was so greatly appreciated.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Argyle.

RESOLUTION NO. 418

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP Government has cut the $2 million rink revitalization program that 75 local community rinks depend on to upgrade their infrastructure; and

[Page 796]

Whereas the local community arenas are the lifeblood of many Nova Scotia communities served by dedicated selfless volunteers; and

Whereas the cut in funding for the rink revitalization will mean that ice time and amateur sports will become increasingly unaffordable for many families as the costs of maintenance will now be downloaded upon working families;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House support the reinstatement of the rink revitalization program for the benefit of local communities, amateur sports and recreation and that the NDP recognize that their better deal for families is a raw deal for Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 419

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Sunday, September 27, 2009 I was privileged to attend the 3rd Annual Dinner of the Egyptian Canadian Association of Nova Scotia at St. Mary's Boat Club in Halifax; and

Whereas the dinner was attended by members of all ages who enjoyed a wonderful evening of Egyptian food, music and dance; and

Whereas the organizers were delighted to welcome the Lieutenant Governor, Mayann Francis, to the event this year;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Assembly congratulate the president, El Sary Abdel Hameid, and the entire executive of the Egyptian Canadian Association on this successful community event.

[Page 797]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 420

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on Saturday, October 3rd, the Millville Community Centre hosted its 17th annual giant pumpkin contest; and

Whereas a large crowd was on hand to view the many pumpkins of all shapes and sizes; and

Whereas John MacKinnon of Strathlorne proved that bigger is better as his pumpkin, weighing 1,112 pounds, took top prize;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Legislature congratulate both the Millville Community Centre on another successful pumpkin contest and John MacKinnon on winning top prize.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 798]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 421

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Sandra Houston of Newport Station recently received the merit award at the Annual Honours and Awards Banquet at the Hants County Royal Canadian Legion Branch 9; and

Whereas Sandra's embrace of the Royal Canadian Legion and all it holds dear is a commitment deserving of great respect; and

Whereas a recognition provided by an organization which serves veterans is an accomplishment that should hold extra significance in light of their sacrifice and valour in defence of the country and freedoms we hold dear;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Sandra Houston on the award she received and express gratitude for all she has done for the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 9.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Yarmouth.

RESOLUTION NO. 422

[Page 799]

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotia Music Week takes place in Yarmouth from November 5th to November 8th, an event where top musicians from Atlantic Canada gather for performances, an awards show and educational seminars; and

Whereas this event, now in its 12th year, has continued to grow and is now attended by well over 500 delegates, which provides an excellent opportunity for up and coming artists to display their talents and receive the recognition they deserve; and

[2:45 p.m.]

Whereas this is the latest in a series of major events to take place in Yarmouth, which further cements it as a top destination in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Yarmouth on yet again hosting a premiere event, and encourage one and all to attend Nova Scotia Music Week.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

RESOLUTION NO. 423

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas one local forestry contractor is quoted in the Inverness Oran saying, "The woods are a mess!"; and

[Page 800]

Whereas the Department of Natural Resources staff responsible for Inverness have said that the spruce bark beetle will continue to create problems in the forests for the next several years; and

Whereas the majority of foresters are fearful that this pest will essentially destroy most of the mature white spruce population throughout Cape Breton in the next few years;

Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Natural Resources immediately outline in this House of Assembly his department's action plan to save Cape Breton's forest land.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Lunenburg on an introduction.

MS. PAM BIRDSALL: Mr. Speaker, I would like the members of the House of Assembly to welcome my brother Merlin. Merlin is a strong Party member and has worked on many elections and is my dearly loved brother and I would ask you to welcome him. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: We welcome him and any and all visitors here with us today.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 424

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas October is Canadian Library Month, the perfect time to honour the gift of literacy and recognize the support for reading and learning Nova Scotians receive from their libraries; and

Whereas local libraries help foster a love of reading and of learning in communities, offering thousands of different books and services on a wide variety of subjects for residents, operating on a minimal budget; and

[Page 801]

Whereas the Antigonish library already has $3.45 million committed to the People's Place Project but is having a difficult time securing the provincial portion of funding they need from the NDP Government to move forward on an important initiative for the region, the People's Place Project, in the amount of $1.8 million;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House join me in continued support for the Pictou-Antigonish Regional Library and ask the Minister of Economic and Rural Development to invest the $1.8 million needed to complete the People's Place Project, and thank the Government of Canada, the County and Town of Antigonish and public for their contributions.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear a No.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Cumberland South.

RESOLUTION NO. 425

HON. MURRAY SCOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Ship's Company Theatre, Parrsboro, N.S., is celebrating it's 25th year of operation; and

Whereas the Ship's Company Theatre continues to contribute both culturally and economically to the local community by providing first-class live performances as well as many other programs throughout the season; and

Whereas Pamela Halstead, the Artistic Producer, is leaving Ship's Company Theatre after six very successful years at the helm;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate the Ship's Company Theatre on 25 years of service to the community and wish them many more years of success and thank Pamela Halstead, Artistic Producer, for her six years of excellent service and wish her all the best in future endeavours.

[Page 802]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

ORAL QUESTIONS PUT BY MEMBERS

MR. SPEAKER: The time now is 2:50 p.m. and we will go to 3:50 p.m.

The honourable member for Glace Bay.

PREM.: N.S. FISHERIES LOAN BD. - FUNDING

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. As a member who represents a fishing community, one of the main concerns facing the industry is the ability of new entrants to access financing to purchase licences and vessels. To their credit, the former Progressive Conservative Government established a new fund through the Fisheries Loan Board to provide financing for new entrants. It's essential that we assist new entrants so that fishing licences can remain in our communities and sustain those rural communities. My question to the Premier is, is your government committed to maintaining the funding for new entrants through the Nova Scotia Fisheries Loan Board?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I'd like to thank the member opposite for the question. What he may remember, or maybe he doesn't, is that the program put forward by the former government was certainly done at the behest of the members on this side of the House at the time. We, of course, recognize the importance of ensuring there is adequate funding for new entrants into the fishery.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, as the Premier is well aware, new entrants are having a difficult time accessing funding for licences and vessels through

[Page 803]

traditional banks as many lack the necessary collateral to secure the loans. As with every other program, there is limited funding for new entrants through the Fisheries Loan Board. As the Premier is probably aware, a lobster or crab licence could cost anywhere from $250,000 to more than $1 million. My question to the Premier is, what criteria is your government using to determine who qualifies for assistance under this program?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the honourable member may understand that the matter is much more complex than that. For a long time, it was a question of whether or not the licences themselves actually were collateral. As he may know, there have been various decisions before the courts with respect to the question of whether or not they are collateral. I understand these matters are continuing to work their way through the courts or through the banking system itself, but we, of course, stand ready to assist young fishermen, particularly, who are trying to acquire new licences and we will continue to do so.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Glace Bay): Mr. Speaker, it has been brought to our attention that the Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture is selling, or has sold, his personal lobster licence and vessel. The issue that has been raised to us relates to the source of the funding for that purchase. My question to the Premier is, will the Premier confirm whether financing for the sale of your Fisheries Minister's lobster licence and vessel came through the Nova Scotia Fisheries Loan Board?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, no, I cannot confirm that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

PREM. CABINET CONFLICT - CONFIRM

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Premier. In this morning's edition of the ChronicleHerald, the Deputy Premier stated that unions with contracts expiring can judge for themselves that 1 per cent raises are what the province can afford, "I believe that would be a signal worth taking." But, the Premier, in the same article stated that the Deputy Premier's comment is not necessarily the case. My question for the Premier is, is there a breakdown in communication between the Premier and his deputy or is there truly a conflict within the Cabinet?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I can confirm there is no conflict in the Cabinet. I know she's very concerned about that, but there is none. The fact of the matter is that both the Deputy Premier and myself are obviously very concerned about the financial wherewithal of the province to be able to respond to all of the contractual obligations that the province has, including those that are contained in collective bargaining. What the Deputy Premier said is absolutely right - it's no secret at all. It's a signal to everyone; it's a signal to the province that, in fact, we know something that the former members of government apparently didn't know, and that is that there is a limit to the money of the government.

[Page 804]

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I think it's fairly clear that they were conflicting messages, so my question to the Premier is this, who should Nova Scotians believe after reading this morning's edition of The ChronicleHerald , the Premier or the Deputy Premier?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I think it's clear that the Deputy Premier and myself are both on the same page when it comes to the question of contract negotiations. We actually believe that this province has to live within its means. We make no secret of that; we've said that throughout the election campaign. At that time people were able to judge - did they believe in the approach that we took or did they believe in the approach taken by the former government? And we know how that turned out.

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, yes, the Premier is right about one thing, they're both on the same page - the front page of The ChronicleHerald.

So my final supplementary to the Premier is this, both union and non-union employees in this province provide a valuable service and both groups deserve the same respect, will the Premier advise his deputy of the government's position before the Deputy Premier once again misleads Nova Scotians with a statement that cannot be supported by the Premier?

THE PREMIER: The reality, Mr. Speaker, is that the Province of Nova Scotia has a serious problem with its provincial revenues, with its financing. The members opposite know, as it was contained in the Deloitte report, that that government put us on an unsustainable path when it came to the budgets of this province, and we are going to take the necessary measures in order to be able to correct that and make sure that debt and deficit will not become the legacy to the people of this province.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

PREM.: PUBLIC SERVANTS - UNION/NON-UNION RAISES

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Yesterday your government announced 1,800 non-unionized public servants would receive no raise, or perhaps a 1 per cent increase, not the 2.9 per cent increase given to unionized government employees. The Premier has repeatedly stated that he wants to be the Premier for all Nova Scotians. Does the Premier really mean for all unionized Nova Scotians? My question to the Premier is, why are you creating two different classes of public servants in this province, one that deserves a raise and one that doesn't?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, as the honourable member may know, the previous contracts were, of course, signed by the previous government. When this government came into power we had the unfortunate duty of having to hire an outside, independent

[Page 805]

accountancy firm in order to audit what had happened. We did that, we reviewed it and, unfortunately, it was not what we would have liked to have found. What we found was a massive deficit. We're taking the appropriate measures to deal with it.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, yesterday your Deputy Premier sent out what he said was a clear signal to unions with contracts set to expire - that 1 per cent was what is going to be on the table and no more. Later the Premier told reporters his Deputy Premier was wrong and that the collective bargaining process can't be predetermined.

However, the Minister of Education claims the government has been - and I'm quoting here - "quite up front with everyone in terms of knowing how much money is available."

Mr. Speaker, the Premier and his ministers seem to be having a little problem with staying on the same page, and you can't chalk this one up to growing pains. So my question

to the Premier is, is the 1 per cent a clear signal or not?

[3:00 p.m.]

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, there is no contradiction between what the members of government are saying. The only problem that the members opposite have is that they're not listening to what we're saying, and that is that there is not an unlimited amount of money in this province and we are here to make sure that collective bargaining is conducted in good faith and that the people of this province are not left with a legacy of debt and deficit. What about that doesn't he understand?

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, the Deputy Premier may have slipped up yesterday and told the truth, but the message was loud and clear, it is 1 per cent collective bargaining or not. When the Premier was in Opposition, he believed in the collective bargaining process. So my question for the Premier is, why are your ministers negotiating in the press and not allowing the collective bargaining process to run its course?

THE PREMIER: Well, Mr. Speaker, that's not the case. In fact, as we said, we are dedicated to ensuring that the collective bargaining process is respected, unlike the members opposite, who when they were in government rolled back wages and legislated contracts.

MR. SPEAKER: The Leader of the Official Opposition on a new question.

PREM. - NSCC: EDUC. MIN. - PARTIES MEET

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier. Yesterday we got another insight into how this government will deal with unionized workers. While in Opposition these members repeatedly insisted that government has a role to play in contract

[Page 806]

negotiations with government employees. They were quick to call the former government silent partners. However, the Minister of Education has refused to intervene in the impending strike at Nova Scotia Community College. So my question for the Premier is, will you now practice what you preached and direct your Minister of Education to meet with both sides of this dispute?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, the bargaining table is available to both parties. If they want to use it, they're welcome to do so. That is the whole point of respecting collective bargaining, to ensure that there is a forum in which those negotiations can take place.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, these words may be familiar to the Premier because he spoke them in Opposition. (Interruptions) He may have done that too, but I don't know. Speaking about CUPE's support workers in their dispute with the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional School Board, the Premier said: This strike is about fairness and it's about the respect that we give Cape Breton workers of CUPE 5050, the same wages and benefits enjoyed by their colleagues doing the same work on mainland Nova Scotia.

What the Premier is now doing is what he fought against in Opposition. What a difference an election will make. So my question to the Premier is, will he instruct his Minister of Education to give the faculty, staff, and support staff at NSCC the fairness and respect they deserve?

THE PREMIER: The answer to the Leader of the Official Opposition is, of course, we believe that all the members of that bargaining unit should get the same pay and benefits regardless of where they work in the province.

MR. MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Education seems more concerned with making a point to other Public Service sectors facing contract negotiations than the 25,000 students who are in limbo because of this government's position, and I remind him once again of what the Premier said in a similar situation when he was in Opposition: I am at a loss to explain why the government ignores their role in this situation.

Indeed, Mr. Speaker, why? So my question to the Premier is, why is your government ignoring the role they play in this impasse?

THE PREMIER: Well, Mr. Speaker, the answer is we're not. We understand very clearly. We're the funding vehicle for the Nova Scotia Community College. We understand that. It's up to the community college and their negotiating team to negotiate the contract with the unionized workers. It's that simple. We intend to allow collective bargaining to take place at the table.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

[Page 807]

FIN.: AUDIT - CLARIFICATION

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Minister of Finance. It's bad enough that the Premier and the Deputy Premier are at odds over who knows what, said what and understands what's going on with employee wage settlements. Now the Minister of Finance has joined the fray but this time it's over the NDP's independent audit. Either the Minister of Finance has amnesia or hasn't tweaked his boss's lingo yet. Yesterday in estimates the Minister of Finance's amnesia struck again. The NDP didn't conduct an audit, but now I would quote a financial review. He indicated any talk of independent audit was just the Premier and basically election talk. Well, the people of Nova Scotia clearly understood the Premier, the NDP and what the auditor's undertaking was to be. Will the minister inform this House who is correct and in charge, him or the Premier?

HON. GRAHAM STEELE: Mr. Speaker, I think Hansard will show that what the member has purported to have happened in estimates yesterday never happened. It's a complete misrepresentation of what was said yesterday. I will say this, the Deloitte report shows that the previous government put this province on an unsustainable path and the fact that that Party, the Third Party, would focus on the title on the cover rather than the contents shows us why it is that that government put us on that unsustainable path.

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I know that the member for Kings West was in the committee room, and members of his caucus, and thankfully this House has a Hansard, so does that committee room, and it reflects other than what that minister has just said here. The Minister of Finance must be trying to downplay the Premier's $100,000 independent audit that was to determine the state of the province's books. While the Minister of Finance is desperate to distance himself from the Premier on this matter, what is clear is that the auditors did report, did give advice and that the Minister of Finance decided to selectively ignore Deloitte. The auditors clearly said that prepaying should not be done on borrowed money, a move that in the Spring the now Minister of Finance would also be diametrically opposed to. Now the amnesia deepens as the minister introduced a measure which he was against and the now Premier and his NDP caucus were against.

Will the Minister of Finance come clean with this House and admit that his political posturing and his expensive advice was really an election ploy that he has abandoned and now disagrees on the position, words and actions of his own Premier?

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, what the Deloitte report shows is that the previous government put this province on an unsustainable path, that if we had continued down the road that they put us on, we would have had a deficit of $1.3 billion within three years, that our debt would have been $16.7 billion in three years. That was an unsustainable path and the people of Nova Scotia voted for a change and that is what we will deliver.

MR. CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotians - and it's evident here today - are now starting to see the pattern of bad decision-making, bad judgment and lack of ability within

[Page 808]

the Cabinet to even communicate their own policies and actions. The Minister of Finance and the Premier were quick to assail the previous government of being, and I quote, inept, dishonest and incompetent. They must have been looking at a mirror when they were practising those lines here today. The minister has his own words and actions to eat now. His flip-flops, double-talk and inability to effectively lead the finances of the province is painfully evident and getting costly, $100,000 at a time for each consultant. My question to the minister is, since this was just election talk, why did he spend over $100,000 on an unnecessary auditor through the deficit financing actions of his government?

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, during the recent election campaign we promised an independent review of the province's books and that is exactly what we delivered. That review shows that the previous government put us on an unsustainable path and we will not follow them down that path.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

FIN.: AUDIT - ADVICE

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I feel like my question has already been introduced today. One of the very first actions of this government was to commission a review of the state of the province's finances. I like "audit" better because it was used on 21 news stories during the election. This report cost Nova Scotians $100,000 and was released with great fanfare. In the report one of the first actions it recommended is, ". . . for recurring assistance payments . . . avoid one-time or pre-payments." One of the first actions this government took was to ignore the specific advice that Nova Scotians paid $100,000 for and move university assistance from next year's budget to this year's budget. My question to the minister is, why did the government choose to go against the very advice which they sought?

HON. GRAHAM STEELE: Mr. Speaker, we dealt with this question at length yesterday in the estimates process but the message doesn't seem to have gotten through, so let me repeat it one more time. The previous government shifted money around, using the university memorandum of understanding, putting the better part of two years' funding in a single year. That was a distortion of the province's financial situation and what the Liberal Party is advocating is substituting one distortion for another. Mr. Speaker, we have one year of university funding in one budget, what could be more accountable than that?

MR. GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, the MOU doesn't run out until the Spring of 2011, so the minister didn't end this agreement. It would be worthwhile to read the $100,000 piece of advice one more time from Deloitte: government should ". . . match grants to the year in which expenses are incurred by universities . . ." Mr. Speaker, because of this prepayment, grants to match the expenses in the 2010-11 fiscal year are now zero dollars, the real distortion. My question is, will the minister explain how this prepayment will help anyone in Nova Scotia who is not sitting across from me right now?

[Page 809]

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, we dealt with this question at some length in estimates yesterday, including that very same question, so let me answer the question again in the House. The previous government introduced a distortion into the province's finances by paying two years of university funding in a single year.

What we did when we walked into office is, looking at the situation, we chose to bring this complex and unnecessarily complicated situation to an end by unwinding the memorandum of understanding while keeping our promises to universities. It is clear, it is more accountable. What exactly is the Liberal Party complaining about?

MR. GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, this isn't simply a disagreement over semantics. The report was clear, ". . . for recurring assistance payments . . . avoid one-time or pre-payments." The ink was barely dry on this report, which Nova Scotians paid $100,000 for, when they chose to make a prepayment. The minister didn't put an end to prepayments. The minister chose to pay $341 million, inflate the deficit, even though Deloitte specifically advised him not to do this. He did exactly what he argued against when he was in Opposition. He did exactly what his $100,000 adviser told him not to do. Mr. Speaker, my final question to the minister is, why is the NDP Government paying hundreds of thousands of dollars for advice which they refuse to listen to?

[3:15 p.m.]

MR. STEELE: Mr. Speaker, the member asked the same question in estimates last night and we dealt with it at some length, but I'll repeat it for him again. The previous government introduced a distortion into the province's finances. We believe that the clearest, most transparent, and most accountable way of accounting for university spending is to have one year's payment in one year's budget, and that is exactly what we did.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party.

PREM. - NSCC: PREM. - MESSAGE

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, my question through you is to the Premier. An advertisement placed in this morning's edition of The ChronicleHerald by the Nova Scotia Teachers Union says the time to talk is over. I would table this, please. In the union's 114-year history, members have never engaged in a province-wide strike. Now 900 community college staff are on the brink of this being their first. Mr. Premier, the union believes that your Minister of Education has chosen to treat members of the NSCC faculty differently than the NSTU members in our public schools. What do you have to say to the faculty of NSCC?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, what I say is I hope that the members and the faculty at NSCC will be able to conclude an agreement with the NSCC so that there isn't a disruption in the education of the students in those facilities.

[Page 810]

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, through you again to the Premier, there are 25,000 full-and part-time students feeling considerable stress and anxiety, wanting to know whether their school year will continue. What does the Premier have to say to the students today about the potential disruption in their studies?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the Interim Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party for her question. I think the question does, in fact, adequately set out the very deep concern that the members of this government have with respect to the negotiations there at the community college. We are concerned about what may happen with respect to the education of those students. What we are doing, though, is we're ensuring that the collective bargaining process has the freedom to go forward, and we would encourage both parties to get back to the table and to find a reasonable conclusion.

MS. CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I haven't seen the concern. After the faculty and the professional support employees at the community college voted overwhelmingly on September 22nd in support of job action, the Minister of Education was asked about a contingency plan. She had no plan. We are now very close to strike action. The minister must have a plan by now. Will the Premier share that contingency plan so that students can have some reason to believe this government cares about them?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, as you know, this is a matter between the administration of the community college and their union. I'm confident that they have taken into account all of the variables that are necessary in this process. I'm confident that they have put in place their own contingency plan with respect to this matter, and what I would like to say to all members of the House is just simply that we would like to see this matter resolved. We would hope the parties would go back to the table and understand that, you know, what is at stake here is not just what's good for the province, not just what's good for the staff, but also what is good for the students.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

EDUC.: NSCC STRIKE ACTION - MIN. AWARENESS

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education. Yesterday the minister refused to address the issue of a looming Nova Scotia Community College strike, despite the fact the collective bargaining process is at a standstill. I would remind the minister that both the community college negotiators and the Nova Scotia Teachers' Union agree - community college faculty and support staff deserve the 2.9 per cent increase. Yesterday, the NSTU said that the minister was shirking her responsibilities and indicated a strike date would be set. My question to the minister is, does the minister realize that if she doesn't take action today, a strike date will be set tomorrow?

HON. MARILYN MORE: Mr. Speaker, I'm very aware of what's happening and I certainly share my government's concern with all the parties involved in the collective

[Page 811]

bargaining process. The best thing I can do as Minister of Education is to stay out of the negotiations, to allow it to go to its conclusion and to trust that reasonable people on all sides of the negotiating table will come to a reasonable conclusion and protect their best interests and also the best interests of the student population of the community college system. Thank you.

MS. REGAN: Mr. Speaker, again the minister is neglecting her responsibilities. By refusing to address this issue, the minister is putting the futures of thousands of students in jeopardy. A strike will cause a major disruption for students who need to get out into the workforce. In the past, the NSCC has had an enviable job placement rate of 92 per cent for its grads, but a strike may threaten this success. A StatsCan study released today said that young people are feeling the effects of the recession more than any other demographic. We need to help them, not hurt them. My question for the minister is, why is this minister making it harder for students to graduate and find work?

MS. MORE: Mr. Speaker, my government realizes that these negotiations are very tough on all parties. All I can say is that we are encouraging both sides to get back to negotiations so they can come to a reasonable conclusion.

The negotiating process in no way reflects on the value of the academic excellence that the college provides, nor the quality of teaching provided by the faculty and the professional staff. I just want to say that we understand the anxiety, apprehension and concern expressed by all involved in the negotiations, but staying out of it and allowing them to come to a natural conclusion is the best way to support the process. Thank you.

MS. REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I fail to understand how the Deputy Premier saying there's a 1 per cent deal out there - that everybody's going to get 1 per cent - is negotiating in good faith. Our economy needs college graduates and despite these tough economic times, NSCC graduates have the skills to get work and contribute to Nova Scotia's success. My question to the minister is, how are your government's actions helping more NSCC students graduate and enter the workforce?

MS. MORE: Mr. Speaker, I could stand on my feet for four straight hours and talk about the strengths of the community college system in Nova Scotia. As I said earlier, in no way does the collective bargaining process reflect the value of the college system, the professional staff, nor the students. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Yarmouth.

PREM. - ERD MIN./ENVIRON. MIN.: CONFLICT OF INTEREST

- POSITION

HON. RICHARD HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, through you my question is to the Premier. Our caucus and I would like to know what the Premier's position is regarding

[Page 812]

actions or comments by ministers when litigation is pending against a government, or a body funded by government.

THE PREMIER: Well, Mr. Speaker, ministers are free to meet with whomever they like to meet with.

MR. HURLBURT: Well, Mr. Speaker, we'll try to be a little bit clearer on my first supplementary. Through you, Mr. Speaker, to the Premier. Recently both the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and the Minister of Environment and of Fisheries and Aquaculture visited with an individual, at his private home, who has launched a $700,000 lawsuit against the South West Shore Development Authority - and the minister has yet to meet with the RDA board in southwestern Nova Scotia, or anywhere in the province. The authority consists of mayors, wardens and other elected officials, and local volunteer business people.

The Minister of Economic and Rural Development is aware that he is responsible for the operations of the regional development authority across Nova Scotia. So my question is, why would you, as a Premier, allow the two ministers to meet with the complainant involved in a six-figure lawsuit against the South West Shore Development Authority?

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I'm not sure that the member understands, there is no conflict.

MR. HURLBURT: Mr. Speaker, through you to the Premier, I can assure the Premier that this member understands, it is that Premier who doesn't understand. That's a Premier and a government that was going to be open and transparent. Their minister has the audacity to not meet with the RDAs or the association of RDAs, but yet he'll go and meet with a complainant for a $700,000 lawsuit against one of the RDAs.

Mr. Speaker, through you to the Premier - members of the community are aware of this visit and perceive that a conflict of interest situation exists. I want to know, today, if the Premier will look at the ministerial code of conduct and then commit to ask the Conflict of Interest Commissioner to investigate what transpired at this meeting, and whether the two ministers I mentioned should have even been at this gentleman's private home, something that doesn't sound right to the people of southwestern Nova Scotia? And the people of southwestern Nova Scotia deserve to have an answer, not a smile by the Premier.

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, you know I've been around the House for a while but I think that's one of the most bizarre questions I've heard. Last week, the members right there were berating me for not meeting with the mayor of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality, who is involved in a lawsuit against the province. Now which way do you want it - do you want us to meet with people or not meet with people? (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

[Page 813]

ENERGY: ENERGUIDE PROG. - STATUS

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister of Energy. On September 29, 2009, the Minister of Finance suggested, in the Halifax ChronicleHerald, to their editorial board that he is concerned about the cost of the EnerGuide program and that maybe that's a good place to start with cuts. My question to the Minister of Energy is, are you planning to cut - and I will table the article - are you planning to make cuts or cap the EnerGuide program?

HON. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for this important question. I want you to know that one of the great privileges I have as the Minister of Energy is working very closely with the people in Conserve Nova Scotia. For example, this weekend I had the opportunity to go to Exhibition Park and spend two and a half hours listening to requests and meeting with individual Nova Scotians about the popularity of programs like Conserve Nova Scotia. Person after person came forward and asked whether they could be involved in one program after another. In fact, I want the member to know they actually asked for personal members of Conserve Nova Scotia - Mr. Donald Dodge, in particular, you know, was asked, what can he possibly do for some of these programs.

[3:30 p.m.]

The good people at Conserve Nova Scotia have promoted these programs. These programs are extremely popular and let me assure you, we will make the right decision that these programs continue to serve Nova Scotians.

MR. YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Finance seems to think he didn't say that, well I'll quote him. He said: to be financially responsible you have to set an upper end to your funding envelope, and went on to complain that at the moment there is no end to the funding envelope, that is a cut. Like other issues we've heard about in Question Period today, the ministers can't seem to agree because during estimates, the Minister of Environment said, and I quote from Hansard, "Any time you have a tool that you can reduce energy it is good. The answer is yes. That is an obvious, to me it's a no-brainer. When you can assist people to cut down on household use and put dollars in their pockets to create less emissions overall in Nova Scotia, to me, and if you ask any Nova Scotian, you're going to get the answer yes.

My question to the minister is, why is his government, why is the Minister of Finance talking about capping a program that is very popular and helps low-income families reduce energy costs in their homes?

MR. ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, over 21,000 Nova Scotian families have been involved in the EnerGuide program since its inception in 2007 - over 21,000 people involved in that program. I want the member opposite and I want the members of my side of the House

[Page 814]

here also to know that person after person is very much assured by the fact that Conserve Nova Scotia is delivering important programs that we plan to continue.

Let's be clear on one particular thing, if there's something good for Nova Scotians when it comes to energy, this government is going to make sure that it's on the side of Nova Scotians.

MR. YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Energy is very good at giving speeches but he's not very good at giving answers and maybe if he spent less time trying to be the Minister of Community Services and the Minister of Finance spent less time trying to be the Minister of Energy, something would actually get done by that government. The fact of the matter is that this is a program which can help all Nova Scotians to contribute to reducing climate change gases and can help low-income families permanently reduce their energy costs. Mr. Speaker, I want to know why it is that the government is talking about cutting a program and have they now joined Stephen Harper and don't believe in climate change?

MR. ESTABROOKS: Thank you, Mr. Speaker and I thank the member opposite for the question and I thank the Minister of Community Services for giving me a little bit of advice. I want the Minister of Community Services to know that I just couldn't tell him that.

The staff at Conserve Nova Scotia is extremely pleased with the budget that we are going to debate in this House during estimates. They were very relieved with the fact that many, many Nova Scotians are continuing to reach the services which they so richly deserve because this government, this Minister of Finance and this Minister of Conserve Nova Scotia are going to continue to deliver those services.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

EDUC. - TOBACCO COMPANIES: LITIGATION - LEGISLATION

HON. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, last week Ontario exhibited leadership by joining New Brunswick and British Columbia in the initiation of a health care cost recovery lawsuit against tobacco companies. Yesterday the Province of Quebec signed on as well. Four years ago, Nova Scotia passed legislation that would enable us to also show leadership. However, all of us recognize that legislation was but a first step and much work needed to be done within government before we too were ready to join our provincial counterparts in this lawsuit. My question through you to the Minister of Justice is, could the minister please outline what he has done on this file in his 108 days in office to get his government to the point where our province can proclaim Bill No. 222 and file the statement of claim against the tobacco companies?

[Page 815]

HON. ROSS LANDRY: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for his question. I'll refer that over to the Minister of Health. It's more appropriate there that it be answered.

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the honourable member for the question; it is an important question. The Province of Nova Scotia has a very good tobacco-cessation strategy. The Act the member refers to indeed has yet to be proclaimed. We are very carefully watching the litigation as it proceeds in the provinces that the member referred to. That litigation is in the earliest stages. Thank you.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, so much for leadership. Apparently now we're going to watch other provinces do litigation and then follow their lead after that. Bill No. 222 was passed four years ago with the intention of allowing the Province of Nova Scotia to prepare its case against big tobacco. At the time, we were one of the first provinces to enact such legislation. Yet here we are, 108 days into this government and the Minister of Justice has no idea what I'm talking about when it comes enacting a lawsuit against big tobacco.

So my question to the Premier is, does your government even take the issue of fighting tobacco companies for what they have cost our health care systems seriously or is this just something to sit back and watch like a regular TV show?

THE PREMIER: I want to thank the member for Richmond for his question. It is a good question. I have reviewed the file, in fact, and I watched the coverage with respect to the entrance of the other provinces into this particular lawsuit. What I can tell him is that we are reviewing it very carefully. We know that it will cost the Province of Nova Scotia millions of dollars to get into this lawsuit, to share the cost. We're looking to determine whether or not, at this particular time, that's an investment that we can afford to make.

MR. SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I would suggest to the Premier that it's an investment that we can't afford not to make on behalf of the people of Nova Scotia. This province, and families throughout this entire province, have seen the devastating impact that tobacco use has had. As legislators, we know the devastating financial impact that it has had for us here in our province in health care costs which, regardless of the tobacco cessation program, continue to be a real issue for the people of Nova Scotia. Today what we're hearing is that this government doesn't seem to know who's on first when it comes to who is actually going to initiate this ligation.

So my final supplementary to the Premier, can you at least tell us which is the lead department on this file or do you plan on donning your robes and taking this case to court yourself? (Laughter)

THE PREMIER: Mr. Speaker, I thank the member opposite for his question. He could join me, he could sit second chair, I wouldn't mind that. (Interruption) He is right about this - it is a serious question. We've looked at it, we've looked at the file. It is actually

[Page 816]

a question of whether or not we put the investment into this file at this period of time. These are, as you know, budget questions. We have to balance off the fact that (Interruption) yes, you actually have to spend money - that's what it costs in order to enter lawsuits. We're going to continue to consider it, as we go forward, we'll look for what we consider to be the right time to enter the suit.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

JUSTICE: ANTIGONISH CORR. CTR. - STATUS

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Justice. It is disturbing for a member of this House - with a background of law enforcement - to become the Minister of Justice and Attorney General and then move away from a business case that supports a 200-bed facility to replace the Antigonish Correctional Centre. Now, the minister - of all who are in Cabinet - should know about the pressing public-safety need and be pushing this project forward. However, instead, the NDP have yanked the project after over $100 million was invested in planning for this and the North Nova Correctional Centre in Springhill. Will the minister come clean with this House on why the NDP have turned their back on the working families of Antigonish County currently employed and who were looking forward to be employed in a new facility? They were expecting a better deal, not a raw deal from this minister.

HON. ROSS LANDRY: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The question from the honourable member from the other side - I don't know if he reads the newspapers or follows the news but I have said consistently, time after time, that the issue of the correctional facility is under review and once the business case is completed, a decision will be made.

At no time has it been said anywhere that the building is being built or is not being built in Antigonish or whether it is being built in Springhill or not being built. I visited your colleague there - we had a good, lengthy discussion about the matter. Consultations have been carried out, and consultations have been carried out in Antigonish as well. So let's let the process go and follow the newspapers and you'll get your messages if you're not getting it here.

MR. MACLEOD: You know, Mr. Speaker, I do read the paper and I have got to tell you that this minister has been shirking his responsibilities for a long time. Those words ring hollow with the good people of Antigonish County. They are there wondering where the Minister of Justice's priorities are. The current facility is in need of replacement. The site selection was underway, design was underway. The minister's office, however, has said to Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, stop doing that work.

Here is a letter that I am going to table that shows the work that was underway and it is dated April 3rd of this year. Now, Mr. Speaker, will this minister confirm that he remains committed to the people of Antigonish County or is he playing politics with a very, very serious issue?

[Page 817]

MR. LANDRY: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you for the question. I repeat myself again, once the business case is completed, decisions will be made. It has been said in this House before, it's been said publicly on numerous occasions and I stand by my position. No decision has been made, and it would be inappropriate for me to comment otherwise.

MR. MACLEOD: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Minister of Justice knows better than to be playing crass politics with such an important subject. The people of Antigonish and Springhill both know the business case is solid for their facilities in their chosen communities. It is known that your office does not help to make this happen in a hurry. You refuse to come clean with the people of Antigonish and you refuse to come clean with the people of Springhill. Mr. Speaker, one more time, will the Minister of Justice honour the commitment to the people of Antigonish and do the right thing and commit the 200-bed facility? A yes or a no, Mr. Minister, yes or no?

MR. LANDRY: Mr. Speaker, I thank you for the question. It is interesting in the question as I heard it there. He says a 200-bed facility. Is he talking a 200-bed facility for Antigonish or is he talking about one for Springhill or is he talking . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: . . . never thought you would know what it was about.

MR. LANDRY: He said we're either building one or we're building two facilities. That's the general direction of the business case and when we have that, the decision will be made.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

HEALTH: PHYSICIAN RETIREMENT LIST - TABLE

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Health. Family doctors are the backbone of our health system and the first point of contact for any Nova Scotians with health issues. When people cannot find a family doctor, it causes personal distress and anxiety and increases the ill health of Nova Scotians and it puts a big strain on our emergency and acute care sectors, especially in rural Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, on the 24th of July of this year, in 2009, the President of Doctors Nova Scotia - in an article in The ChronicleHerald - said that in this report that 21 per cent of family doctors plan to retire within the next five years. So he signaled a looming crisis in the availability of family doctors in the province. My question to the Minister of Health is, will the minister table, before the end of the day here in the House, the list of communities where those 21 per cent of family doctors are expected to retire in the next five years?

[3:45 p.m.]

[Page 818]

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I thank the honourable member for bringing an important issue to the floor of the House. Family physicians are an integral and central part of our health care system and, indeed, in all of our health human resources we're looking at an age crunch, the demographic crunch. So the planning for replenishing our family physicians, as well as other health human resources, is very important.

We've increased the number of seats at Dalhousie Medical School, for example, in the last year or so. With respect to the statistics that the honourable member is looking for, if we have them in the department I would be happy to provide them to the honourable member, but perhaps they were statistics that Doctors Nova Scotia keep and I wouldn't have access to those immediately.

MS. WHALEN: I would like to suggest that it's important enough that the department should have a list of where the doctors are as they're planning to retire, because you can't plan adequately if you don't have that kind of information.

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the New Brunswick Government made the big announcement that they had five new family doctors coming to their province, and despite the fact that we know there are already communities facing a lot of shortages of doctors right now, we don't hear any announcements from the Nova Scotia Government. I know the minister may agree that DHAs take a lead in the recruitment of doctors, but New Brunswick is taking an active lead. Their government is stepping in and looking for doctors. So my question to the minister is, will the minister tell the members of this House whether or not Nova Scotia has a physician human resource strategy, as other provinces do - and that would be a plan that would lay out the recruitment of doctors?

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: First of all, Mr. Speaker, doctors are independent contractors, if you will, and they're under no obligation to provide their retirement plans to the Department of Health. Both the DHAs and the Department of Health have an active recruiter in terms of recruiting doctors to the various areas - family physicians as well as specialists - and the recruitment process has been in place for many, many years, with a variety of incentives that are available for under-serviced - particularly rural - parts of the province.

MS. WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, what I heard the minister say today is that there is no plan for the recruitment of physicians, that we have a couple of people assigned to that but no physician human resource plan for this province. In order to get a handle on where we're going to need doctors, we need to have the data, and I'm sure that any doctor would be happy to share that with the minister. We know, for example, in the Valley, that in the area just between Aylesford and Bridgetown there are 11 family doctors, and seven of them are over the age of 62. Seven of them - they go between the ages of 62 and 74. So it's likely to be an area where we're going to need more physicians. So I would like to ask the minister, when does she intend to order a physician recruitment or physician human resource strategy for our province so that we can get ahead of this wave of retirements?

[Page 819]

MS. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I do want to thank the honourable member for the question, because it is an important topic. The Province of Nova Scotia has more physicians per capita than any other province in the country. However, the distribution of physicians in the province may not necessarily match the patient requirements around the province - the population requirements - and the Department of Health is very aware of that, this minister is very aware of that, this government is very aware of that, and we are engaged in discussion.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. The time allotted for the Oral Question Period has expired.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East on an introduction.

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Thank you. In the Speaker's Gallery, I would like to introduce Tim Olive, executive director of the Downtown Dartmouth Business Commission and former MLA and Minister of Natural Resources. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: It's always great to have former members come to the House, so we welcome our guest here today.

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I move that you do now leave the Chair and that the House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole House on Supply unto Her Majesty.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, as we go into Supply today, one of the things when you're this far into the budget process , it struck me that it's a good time to look at some of the previous NDP promises and commitments, what they've said before and what they're saying today.

It's something that has frustrated me for some time, to the point where, after I was elected and we looked and we said, look, there's a majority NDP Government, the first in

[Page 820]

history, very clearly a first in Nova Scotia, truly a historic event, just as many members of the government said. A number of people asked me, what do you think it's going to be like? I said, I have a lot of faith in this and people working together and I still have faith in people working together.

But, what I am frustrated about is the fact that with many of the things that were made as commitments and so forth - both in the election campaign and in the days in Opposition - they're now saying the opposite. I'd like to spend some time to give some examples of that. I'd like to maybe start with one that the honourable member for Cape Breton North had referred to earlier - when is an audit an audit and when is it a review?

During the election campaign, the now-government was very clear that they were going to do an audit of the province's finances. Yesterday, in estimates, we learned that, well, we didn't really do an audit, we did a review instead. There was no determination of whether funds were misappropriated or sent in the wrong direction - none of that kind of work that in debates and in literature and in newspaper articles it was committed to. This was simply a review to see what past things were going on, assuming there were no changes. Which seemed to be a bit silly, but we accept that and say, okay, that's going to be the plan for the new government.

Then, lo and behold, as we heard a bit earlier today, what's the first thing the government does but throw out one of the major recommendations which is to not make any pre-payments. What's the first thing they do? They make a pre-payment to universities. The Minister of Finance, in Question Period, talked a lot about the idea that, no, no, that's okay because it's cleaning up the books a bit.

I'm a little bit confused as to how that's cleaning up the books. Cleaning up the books would have meant making that payment in the next fiscal year. I guess that would have made it difficult to balance the books next year and so the Minister of Finance chose not to do that. What I find frustrating is I think I could have accepted if the Minister of Finance came to the House and said, I know we said we wouldn't do this, I know the Deloitte report says we're not going to do this, but we're going to do it. It's going to help us balance the books next year and then we can go forward on a clean footing.

I probably could have accepted that because it would have been honest and it would have been transparent. Transparency, that's one that I've really struggled with because when we ask questions, we don't often get answers. Somebody joked to me the other day who's been around longer than I have, and said, it's not answer period, it's Question Period. All right. So we get the questions out and then one day, maybe down the road somebody will ask questions.

I know the members on the other side when they were in Opposition must have had the same frustrations and so I'd like to point out a few more. The member for Pictou West - when he was in Opposition said, in fact, he chastised the government for allowing any testing

[Page 821]

by Eastrock Resources Limited in the Chignecto Game Sanctuary. So, what was one of the very first actions of the Minister of Energy of this government? It was to allow testing by Eastrock in the Chignecto Game Sanctuary. That makes no sense. That is blatant - how can you say one thing and then turn around days after becoming government and change your mind. It makes no sense.

Feed-in tariffs were promoted heavily by the NDP and the official NDP policy statement says, a rate will be recommended to the URB in consultation with the renewable energy sector in Nova Scotia Power. Well that has now been changed again, yet something else. Now, instead of going to the URB with a recommendation from the government, they're going to consult widely with all stakeholders and all interested groups and that is a fundamental change in policy that the NDP government opposed when they were in opposition, yet now they're saying the complete opposite.

We look at how the NDP, when they were in opposition, critiqued the Tory government for their care of the mentally ill in government institutions and they supported a shift from larger institutions to smaller group homes and that was said over and over in the House. Yet when the minister has been asked about that - we look at Riverview - there has been no request for changes and the cases aren't being reviewed. Well, why not?

Then the Premier said earlier this year to Halifax Magazine - in fact September 1st of this year - he said there is an immediate priority in Halifax for Class A office space downtown. All right, we all agree on that, that's fine. But then when the municipality is sitting there expecting an announcement from the government that the Trade Center towers are going ahead, we hear that, well, we're going to review that for view planes and so forth, which isn't even a provincial role. In fact, the NDP said in opposition - or they criticized the Tory government for getting involved in the Waterside Centre and now they're saying, well we're going to look and make sure that it doesn't impinge view planes.

You know what? The view planes from Citadel Hill are very important, and I don't think anything should impinge on the view planes, but it's the guys up the street in City Hall and the women up in City Hill who get to make those decisions and they get to face the electors at the ballot box over those decisions. In fact, the only way for the government to make a decision on that basis is to change the Halifax Charter of the Municipal Government Act. So again, you can't say one thing in opposition and then say something within the first 108 days in government without at least getting up and giving a mea culpa. My goodness, it's just unbelievable.

Daycares - when the NDP were in Opposition and the Woodside Child Care Centre closed, there was outrage. There were going to be protests in the street. Why would the government let a child care centre close? Then the Waverley Road centre announces they're going to close and it's, well, we're doing all we can, it's a private centre. It is a private centre, and the government has done some things, but where are the protests in the street that the government promised when daycare centres close?

[Page 822]

We all remember the promise that no ERs would close once the NDP became government. My goodness, hasn't that one changed? The NDP announced an ER coordinator, a very highly qualified person, and it basically just tagged on to an ER plan that was already in place by the previous government, and maybe tweaked a little bit, but just following the same thing and, in fact, now it might take awhile to fix that problem.

What annoys me most about that is the member for Annapolis said during the election, you can't promise to have all the ERs closed the day you take government because you have to put together the solutions and it's going to take phasing in. Oh, no, no, said the NDP, that's not the case, we can stop that immediately. Guess what? You can't. So the question becomes, why do the people of Nova Scotia, when they look at this - they're going to look at this and they're going to say, we can't let that happen again. We're not going to let people say completely different things in opposition and then get into government and within the first 108 days, do completely the opposite in file after file.

Another one, this one came up in estimates the other day - environmental assessments on road projects. The now Minister of Finance put out a press release criticizing the former Tory Government for eliminating or reducing the requirement for environmental assessments on roadwork and suggested that they would change that immediately. So in estimates I said, what changes have you made to the environmental assessment process in your first 108 days? Well, there were changes - changes were made, mainly around wetlands, as I understand it. Not one change on roads. Oh, we haven't thought about that one. What do you mean, you haven't thought about that one? You talked about it in Opposition. It doesn't make any sense, Mr. Speaker, it doesn't make any sense to me at all.

[4:00 p.m.]

You know, perhaps the most obvious one is the Financial Measures Act. The thing about the Financial Measures Act is, I think we all knew that there would be a deficit, coming into this budget. There's nobody in this province who didn't think there would be a deficit in this budget.

The fact of the matter is, as much as the Minister of Finance would like to change what he said back in April, he was very clear that he was against the proposal that would have suspended the deficit rules and would have allowed the offshore offset to be moved around - very much against that. You know, Mr. Speaker, I would have a lot more respect if the Minister of Finance would just stand up and say listen, you know what, I did say that, I've now looked at the finances, things are different, I'm sorry, I've changed my mind. Instead, what we hear is, no, no, that's not really what I meant, it was the first motion of confidence for bringing down the government.

Why is it that the Minister of Finance can't just stand up and say listen, the situation has changed, the facts have changed, and I've changed my mind and maybe I shouldn't have said that in the first place. I actually think, Mr. Speaker, that the public of Nova Scotia would

[Page 823]

have a hell of a lot more respect for that than they do for what's going on at the moment - "heck of a lot" is what I said, yes. It's like that fuddle duddle thing. I'm sure I said that.

You know, my favourite one of the week is actually the caregiver allowance, and the reason this is my favourite one is because the Minister of Health now stands up in Question Period and says, well, you guys wanted it. Well, that's right, you know - the Liberals and the Tories wanted it, and so did the NDP. But, more importantly, the NDP put out a press release when it came on, celebrating how wonderful a program this would be, and my goodness, aren't we the saviors, we're bringing in the caregiver allowance, and a couple of NDP backbenchers have put out newsletters saying how easy it is to get into the Caregiver Allowance Program and how wonderful the Caregiver Allowance Program is, and shouldn't we all be involved.

The member for Dartmouth North is smiling because he is very happy. I don't think he said that in one of his, but the fact of the matter is that you can't put that out and then say, well, yes, but it really wasn't our program, it's not as good as you think.

Mr. Speaker, my honourable colleague, the member for Bedford-Birch Cove, said a couple of weeks ago, I think in estimates or somewhere like that, that when she was growing up her mom said that you took responsibility for things. Sometimes I think the public would have a lot - well, you should take responsibility all the time, but at least sometimes do it. I think the members of the public of Nova Scotia would have a lot more respect for the NDP Government if they would just say listen, we're going to take responsibility for it, it's our government now. It is our budget because we changed enough stuff to fundamentally change what that budget means to Nova Scotia's future.

The Financial Measures Act that they're introducing is fundamentally different from the one that the Tory Government introduced, so it is their budget, it is their government, it is their program. They didn't have to introduce any of these things - it's a choice, and you take responsibility for your choices in Nova Scotia. I don't know whether some of the members would go home and tell their children that they can get away with not telling them that.

You know, it's frustrating for me, Mr. Speaker, because I get asked by a lot of people how I find the transition from City Hall to Province House. One of the things I say is, well, it's more organized, but the difference is that at City Hall people at least take responsibility when they do things. At City Hall somebody does something or they change their mind, and they stand up and at least generally admit that they've changed their mind. That is what we have to have happen here. If we want people to trust politicians and start not thinking of us as the least-trusted occupations in Canada, then we'd better fundamentally change how we deal with things when we change our mind or we find new information. Just stand up and be like that, stand up and say you don't know the answer to the question, instead of giving a speech on a whole other subject, which we've heard from a few people.

[Page 824]

Mr. Speaker, I know my time has wrapped up and I hope you understand my frustrations. (Interruptions) I hear the talk about the chickens and the cats. I'm glad we're not talking about chickens and cats here but I guarantee you somebody over there is going to bring it up at some point. So the fact of the matter is we need to change the way politics are done in this province and part of that is about taking responsibility and wouldn't it be nice if we started with the government doing that.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I'm very pleased to rise for the debate going into Supply to build on a few of the comments that my honourable colleague has presented here this afternoon, really get to the core of what this whole process of estimates and the budget deliberations are all about, and that is to look at where we are. Especially after a change in government. A change that was precipitated on very, very specific pretenses and assumptions made by the New Democratic Party on which they stood before Nova Scotians and told them, with nothing short of outright indignation, that the government was wrong in how it was proceeding with the budget process in the Spring.

I will note, Mr. Speaker, yet another balanced budget and a balanced budget that understood at a time of an economic recession that would allow us to keep Nova Scotians working and to put other Nova Scotians to work. But the New Democrats saw fit that they wanted to have an election at all costs. What we know now and we're seeing the costs of their desperate attempts to get to government and they did make a case to Nova Scotians of which we respect, thus they're there with 31 members. In that process they said a lot of things that now they're trying to dodge from account for, that the spin doctors behind the scenes are trying to suggest that things are, no, not quite the same way.

Well, we know what we heard, we know what the conditions were. We now know, within almost 100 days of taking office, not only do we move from a balanced budget during an economic downturn and the worst recession we've seen in our generation, that they have actually come back to this House, Mr. Speaker, with measures that they again vehemently opposed themselves in the Spring and now herald as a way for them to provide continuity during a recession.

In the midst of all that, Mr. Speaker, they've also given Nova Scotians a gift that they ill can afford because they've given them a current day count of $592 million deficit. What's also interesting about that deficit, and I want to go back to where we were because I'm sure the auditors they engaged for $100,000 - that they said they didn't have but then they couldn't figure out their opinion there, they thought they would go outside for that. The Department of Health needed another $100,000 consultant. We see this government goes somewhere else and if it's gas pricing, well, we'll go to the URB, Utility and Review Board, and we'll give them that duty but the cost does not go down. In fact, we know the cost is going to go up to provide that service. So since taking office they've taken some actions but it's costing Nova Scotians.

[Page 825]

They presented a budget, Mr. Speaker, that comes forward and imposes a very significant deficit not only today but on the backs of future generations that will have to pay off the interest and the debt they're accumulating when they came in and said they wanted to have a balanced budget. I understand why they want to stack the deck this year with deficit. Even though their independent auditor that they try to walk away from, and I've got all kinds of paperwork here and the Minister of Finance was very much incorrect, his recollection from committee in estimates to this House is astonishing. I know that both my colleagues in the Liberal Party who were present to hear it, know that he is not talking consistently on where he was in that room or on the floor of this House. Which in itself is disturbing to know where the government is going. Again I go back, they took power and when a Party is willing to take power at any cost, it also means that they're willing to do anything with that power at the cost of Nova Scotians. We're seeing it through this massive deficit.

What we know, Mr. Speaker, is the Premier had committed that we will have a balanced budget, he'll find a way to do it. Well, we also know, anyone who has looked at it and Nova Scotians at the coffee shops are saying, well, it's easy how they want to balance the books for next year because they're going to borrow the money this year. Money they didn't need to borrow, money against the advice of their own independent auditor, Deloitte, and they're willing to put that budget pressure on Nova Scotians today.

We as a government, they criticized us for prepayments, but I can tell you I was part of a government that prepaid commitments in areas where, yes, we had a government-associated entity with a defined memorandum of understanding that talked about the framework. It wasn't just cash because we had it, there was a need out there. We agreed on a multi-year formula and we committed to doing those things as part of a balanced budget and with the surplus capacity to do it so Nova Scotians did not incur debt. It's kind of like anyone else who has their house and they have their mortgage and they're having a good year and they can pay their mortgage bills, but they can also double up on some payments to help mitigate that pressure in future years - a lot of people do that, whether it's their house or other personal household financial pressures.

It's very uncommon if you have a mortgage and you have to meet that payment and then you're going to go to accelerate your payment by borrowing money to add to your payments for your mortgage in the same year you do not have the money. So not only have you made that payment, you've taken the interest and accumulated it - and that's what the New Democrats are doing to Nova Scotians. What they haven't talked about are the interest calculations, and I know that across the street right now in estimates with the Department of Finance and the minister people are going to be wondering what is the other associated cost to this convenient deficit in one year by stacking the deck this year so that next year they can say we'll come in with a balanced budget.

[Page 826]

What we do know is there are a lot of Nova Scotians who have already done the math and continue to do the math about where the New Democratic Party is. They're also listening to the doublespeak and the double standards that have come forward, the hypocrisy that's been brought forward - the statements that they've made, they're on the record as making in the Hansard of this province and the media transcripts of this province - is very consistent. There are people all over this province and I know, and I feel bad for some of the new members who have to look and say, well, that wasn't what was in their little blue and orange plan, the Darrell Dexter plan for a better deal, for genuine leadership.

They wanted a better deal. We know it's a raw deal, we know the costs that are coming, and every time they can't stand up themselves to account for where they are, they're hiring a $100,000 accountant - it must be the $100,000 payday in Nova Scotia if you're a consultant and you know the New Democratic Party, because they're doing anything they can to try to get away from the fact that they own this budget, they own the choices, and they own the decisions to take strategic investments out.

We talk about - I know my colleague, the member for Cumberland South, and the issues within Springhill about a new jail, just take out $18 million. Well, we also knew, and know, that was all part of not just a building but spending in rural regions of this province, strategic infrastructure, key jobs that would grow and expand with partnership with the Government of Canada. The business case was there and the Minister of Finance was in committee in the House and he has amnesia about the facts and accounting for them; the Minister of Justice has amnesia about what it is he is or isn't doing, and it's going to be very interesting and I will say on the record today, there is another fact that we want to have the information on. (Interruption)

The Minister of Justice says, well, we're getting the business case. Well, he hasn't disclosed yet what $100,000 consultant he's gone out to to try to spin a new case so that he can come in and, like some of his other colleagues in the House, try to justify going in a different direction when Nova Scotians had a need and a right to public safety, to good correctional infrastructure. We know we had an infrastructure deficit; we know that's a challenge.

Members of this House, and I know of my caucus, wouldn't have an issue with regard to universities, because we all know that some of the things they have - what we had intended to do before, which they've dismissed about it was terrible dealing with universities, because those very universities could have accessed stimulus money through Ottawa to help them meet some of their infrastructure deficit, to help them provide for better program and service ability within their environments and on their campuses, yet they move away from that and people have lost opportunities that otherwise could have been realized.

Again, the inconsistency of the New Democrats to keep their focus on the true priorities of Nova Scotians and their ability to get the facts straight, to account for the numbers - and again we are having and we're part of a debate right now that will see that

[Page 827]

they have the numbers. At the end of the day, whenever this comes to a vote, we know that they have 31 members to 21 when a vote happens.

[4:15 p.m.]

But we're not going to go, we're not muzzled. They've muzzled their own, but they haven't muzzled us. We're not going to go into that process. Whenever that vote is held, we know how they're all going to stand and how they're going to vote to impose a $592 million deficit that will likely grow on Nova Scotians. We now know that Nova Scotians are waking up to the union-friendly Party that now has dismissed certain workers - 1,800 of them as a matter of fact, who aren't in a bargaining unit - and have set them adrift. Now we also see that union representatives have congregated throughout the hallowed halls of Province House because they're wondering where the other negotiations are going to go.

We know one of the things that will be flowing into this House before long - the workers who they made commitments and promises to. Those individuals who will be coming in and saying, where's the deal you promised us? We supported you financially and personally, we put up signs, we went to work for you because you had a better deal for Nova Scotians. Now they're saying, wait, we got a raw deal from the New Democrats.

Those people will be coming to this House, will be going to the constituency offices of the members on the government side and I can tell you with a very clear conscience, we will sit and stand as Progressive Conservatives and know we never dodged that responsibility. We never misled people with regard to where we were going and the clarity we were providing in the context that we led Nova Scotia and Nova Scotians through difficult times to prosperity, making sure we could utilize our resources effectively.

So for the very Party that wailed against, for instance, offshore revenues being used for other priorities for Nova Scotians. They said it awful, it's despicable, this is not possible. They stood in this House for a short period before they brought the axe down on the government, on a bill that was prevented to provide the flexibility for a balanced budget.

Mr. Speaker, in this House, they stood when they were on the Opposition side, they stood and voted it down, a balanced budget, a balanced budget for Nova Scotians. They went out and campaigned, and did all the warm and fuzzies, and they returned from 20 to 31 in this House. Now we have 31 people who have to stand on that side and vote for something and know the hypocrisy of the position they took and know that they have to face people for making promises they're not keeping or will honour to Nova Scotians.

I know as I go to Cape Breton North and I travel anywhere else in this province, I can hold my head up high knowing we had tough issues and we dealt with them forthrightly and honestly to Nova Scotians. It's disheartening when you have a Minister of Finance and a Premier who come in and will say a previous government was incompetent and inept and dishonest with Nova Scotians.

[Page 828]

Well, we put it clearly before them. We had a reasonable budget, a reasonable plan for Nova Scotians. They walked away from it and yet were willing to come back, once they seized the reins of power in this province, to come back and do the very same things and try to legitimate it as being necessary. But when we left this Chamber, I know that the day the Honourable James Muir stood up to deliver a budget they would never let bring forward for consideration - I know when that minister presented that budget, he presented a balanced budget.

They triggered an election, we went out, Nova Scotians made their decision, but they didn't think that 100 days later, after they took over power, that we'd be here today talking about a $592 million deficit, trying to get the grasp of what they're imposing on Nova Scotians, seeing issues come forward that they once had a very, very solid position on from what they spoke of passionately in this House and all of a sudden it's silent. As my honourable colleague for Yarmouth said, the muzzles are on. They won't say anything, they haven't said anything.

They can't say anything because they know they are fundamentally wrong. But they do have 21 members here in the Opposition to their 31. (Interruption) Well, it will be 21 again, let me tell you, don't you worry. In closing, I know my time is running out, they provide me, the honourable members, with a good segue into what's going on in Antigonish and in Inverness right now. I'll tell you, they're not seeing orange, they're seeing the truth of what's gone on. They're hearing the hypocrisy. They're seeing the double standards. They're hearing the double-speak that's gone on in here and they're recognizing the disappointment because they're letting down the people of Antigonish and they're letting down the people of Inverness.

Inverness and those people, I actually feel sorry for the candidates - the New Democratic candidates in those two by-elections because now they have two other candidates in those constituencies standing up and saying, ah, look what they did to get to power. Look at what they're doing with power and they're not doing anything in the true interests of Nova Scotians that they can hold themselves credibly up. All they're doing is adding debt, taking away programs, not honouring commitments that they said they would honour but now won't honour.

Mr. Speaker, Nova Scotians are hurting, loudly and clearly, and I'll tell you that in the coffee shops, there's a whole new spin on the NDP mantra that they presented to Nova Scotians. There is a whole new spin and I'll tell you, they don't buy what they're offering any more. They'll get, as you say, in a short time through another budget and we will stand in opposition of them and the recklessness of their actions and we'll always stand for Nova Scotians and why I'm pleased to stand in my place today. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. The honourable member for Cumberland North.

[Page 829]

MR. BRIAN SKABAR: Mr. Speaker, thank you so much for this opportunity to speak. I find the debate on the Supply motion interesting on so many fronts. Not in the least am I disappointed with the budget debate on Supply to date. As a matter of fact, I look forward to the issues coming up, particularly with reference to Community Services, Corrections and Service Nova Scotia because they do, in fact, represent the true priorities of Nova Scotians - those we talked about during the campaign and those that we continue or pursue as we speak now.

Mr. Speaker, I am so proud to be here today living my dream. The representative, the first New Democrat of the first New Democratic Government in Nova Scotia, a dream held dear by a relatively small core of people who kept the dream alive for so many years. It was very lonely being an NDP supporter in Amherst for so long, as it was in much of rural Nova Scotia during those years. I thank the steadfast supporters in Cumberland North for their encouragement and support of my candidacy. Thank you in particular to Carol Corney, Evie Coates and Wanda Pulsifer.

Amherst is my home, where I live with my other core of supporters: Joyce, my bride of 26 years and daughter of Betty and the late Alister Webster of McLennan's Mountain; my son, Thomas, in his fourth year at Mount Allison University; Margaret, age 16; and Lauren, 13 on October 17th - happy birthday, Lauren. Lindsay, my oldest daughter at 24, is off to seek her fortune and my other daughter, Jennifer, is off to Brazil, starting a business in the hospitality industry.

[4:30 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, my constituency, like many others in Nova Scotia, consists of a town, by local standards a metropolis of Amherst, a village and several more, smaller communities. It stretches from Wallace to the east, to Malagash, through Pugwash and up to Northport, then to Amherst and Maccan.

Amherst is the primary entrance by road to Nova Scotia, the first impression when you come to Nova Scotia from New Brunswick. The New Brunswick border is some three kilometres from my office in downtown Amherst. Amherst, the home to four of the Fathers of Confederation: R.B. Dickey, E.B. Chandler, Jonathan McCully and, of course, Sir Charles Tupper.

Sir Charles Tupper's seat is now entrusted by the people of Cumberland North to a member of the first NDP Government. I see him looking at me there, I see the portrait of Sir Charles across the room looking at me now and smiling. (Interruption) Oh they're both smiling, thanks. He was a great Canadian. Indeed, by definition one of the very first Canadians. The greatest Canadian, however, greets you as you step into my office in downtown Amherst. There T.C. Douglas reminds us all it is not too late to build a better world and that's what we intend to do. That's what we're doing right here in Nova Scotia.

[Page 830]

With a population of roughly 10,000 residents, Amherst is the hub of my constituency. Established in 1764, it's history is rich in the century-old buildings, the Victorian homes that line the streets from one end of the town to the other. Our downtown is a sea of brick and sandstone. The beautiful First Baptist Church just celebrated its 200th Anniversary last month.

Mr. Speaker, just next door to the Amherst Post Office home to the Tantramar Theatre, where many of my constituents enjoy dinner theatres and old-time musicals. The Buddy Holly Story is coming up next. Pugsley's Pharmacy is across the street in the Tupper Block. I could go on for a considerable time about downtown Amherst, but perhaps you saw it on the TSN live broadcast. (Interruption) Yes, during the competition there from the TSN effort, the Town of Amherst voted 168,000 times compared to the 45,000 votes from its competitors on that side, being Dartmouth. Out of the 20 competing communities across the country, Amherst received the most votes in the entire competition and, in turn, Amherst YMCA won $25,000 toward building upgrades. (Interruption) A couple hundred - well, that's for the whole family, a couple hundred.

We have many impressive employers in the Amherst area: C-Vision, a state of the art electronics manufacturing facility with customers all over the world. One of its many projects includes the development of the new LED roadway lighting. IMP Aerospace is another one of the world-renowned corporations located in our little town; employees there aided in many of the military aircraft components over the years. The company is a longtime supplier to Boeing and Bombardier Aircraft, along with many other internationally-based customers. As a matter of fact, Amherst Aerospace, although not the Amherst branch, did in fact have a part in building the Canadarm.

Poly-Cel is another one of the manufacturing companies in Amherst. Its flexible packaging products can be found in every grocery aisle of your store. Amherst also boasts an 18-hole golf course, which recently celebrated its 100th Anniversary. Amherst youth can take part in every sport imaginable, from gymnastics, martial arts, basketball, ballet; the Junior A Ramblers play every Saturday night all winter (Interruption) Baseball in particular. The Cumberland YMCA just hosted its first-ever cross-border 10-kilometre run from New Brunswick to Amherst. Participants turned out in the hundreds and it will be expected to be much larger next year.

Entering Nova Scotia from the other side, you'll come to Cumberland's northeastern-most border, the Village of Wallace. Wallace was founded over 225 years ago, in 1884, and all of us here are more familiar with the community of Wallace than we might think. As a matter of fact, this very building we're in was built with Wallace sandstone when it was constructed in 1811. The historic sandstone is found in the Peace Tower as well as the Parliament Buildings.

Wallace has been in the news more recently. Just today, as a matter of fact, Willard Boyle received the Nobel Prize for physics - Willard Boyle being a Wallace resident. Yes,

[Page 831]

Wallace is the home of other mental giants as well. Now, here's one - Simon Newcomb, a world-renowned mathematician and astronomer in the 19th Century, has had many important contributions - for one, the statistical principle known as Benford's Law. For those of you who are not aware of this phenomenon, it states that, "In any list of numbers taken from an arbitrary set of data, more numbers will tend to have the leading digit '1' than any other." Thank you for that, Simon Newcomb.

Wallace is also home to the Fox Harb'r Golf Resort. Fox Harb'r entertains many influential people. Aside from Tiger Woods, it has also hosted Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. Now, Ron Joyce, the former owner of Tim Hortons franchise, could have built his resort anywhere in the world. He chose Cumberland North as his place to build Fox Harb'r. Millard Charman, at the age of 93, graciously offered to and did take me for a tour of the whole of the Wallace area.

Just up the road from Wallace we find Malagash, a great spot. For any wine connoisseurs, Malagash is host to the Jost Wineries, a family-run, award-winning vineyard that has been making wine in the area since 1983. The winery has won over 200 national and international medals over the years, including the award for Canada's best wine, best wine of the year in 2000. I understand from the owner that the location on the Northumberland Strait is particularly favorable for growing grapes.

Mr. Speaker, the Northumberland Strait follows the coast up to Pugwash, up through God's country. Pugwash is home to about 800 full-time residents, but this increases by several thousand during the summer months because of the peace and tranquility of the area. The Northumberland Links golf course is where Anne Murray will be seen golfing on a regular basis these days and, of course there are the famously warm waters of the Northumberland Strait - I understand the warmest water this side of the Carolinas.

Pugwash is a village with a lot of gusto. The volunteer activity in this community is incredible and impressive. Pugwash HarbourFest, held in August, saw 25,000 visitors visit Pugwash in three days. The committee, led by Bill Kempt and Denis Brown, hosted the event and many volunteers helped make it a great a success.

Pugwash is much better known on a number of other fronts. One of its more famous sons, Cyrus Eaton, a rich industrialist apprenticed to John D. Rockefeller, was a prime mover for world peace in 1957. Inspired by the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, he hosted what would be known as the first Pugwash Peace Conference, which brought together scientists from across the world - no easy feat in the days of the Cold War and the Iron Curtain. As a consequence of these initiatives, Dr. Joseph Rotblat, the only person to ever walk away from the Manhattan Project, was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize. In 1995 he bequeathed this peace prize to the Pugwash Peace Exchange, the organization keeping Eaton's dream alive today.

Pugwash is one of two communities in Canada that has a Nobel Peace Prize. You can go to Ottawa and visit the prize of Lester Pearson - it's in a glass case surrounded by a velvet

[Page 832]

rope - or you can go to Pugwash and hold the Peace Prize in your hand (Interruption) You should go to Pugwash. Ottawa-Pugwash, take Pugwash. So, yes, you can go to Pugwash and join the Pugwash Peace Exchange, as a matter of fact, along with many other notable people.

Mr. Speaker, Pugwash has always warmly welcomed its visitors. As a matter of fact, on a trip to Moscow in 1961 Cyrus Eaton met Yuri Gagarin, the first man ever in outer space. Now, Cyrus Eaton offered to buy Yuri Gagarin a car, something he'd never be able to own in communist Russia at that time. But Yuri didn't take him up on his offer, instead he asked Cyrus Eaton to take him to the town where he grew up. So for his wish of anything in the world, he wanted to go to Pugwash, and Yuri Gagarin did go to Pugwash. As a matter of fact when you get to the Thinkers' Lodge, you'll see pictures of Yuri Gagarin along with everyone back from 40 or 50 years ago.

The beauty of our province is so vast and it is overwhelming to see, every part, but I encourage you and all members to drive the Sunrise Trail and see one of Cumberland North's most intriguing and active communities. While you're down on that route, you'll pass by Linden, agricultural country, at one time home to up 40,000 head of cattle on the marsh. When I decided to run, the very first place I went was Northport. They talked to me about the bridge then, the design is on the way, thank you, Minister Estabrooks, for that bridge.

That loops us back to Amherst and just about 10 minutes north of Amherst border you will come across the communities of Nappan and Maccan. Maccan is perhaps best known as the home for the Maccan Royals, one of the oldest baseball teams in Nova Scotia. The federally-funded Nappan Experimental Farm is one of five original experimental farms in Canada. It dates back to 1886. The facility and its scientists conduct research on beef production and nutrition in Canada, as well as research pertaining to botany and other agricultural matters. Research scientists are here regularly and have their trials and findings published in reputable scientific journals.

Mr. Speaker, The Pavilion plays host to community meetings, square dancing clubs, wedding receptions and the whole farm is open throughout the week for tours and educational sessions.

Though I mentioned many places and moments, it is the people in my constituency that I take pride in the most. I'm humbled by the trust that they placed in me to represent them in the government and I'm honoured to do so. I want to take this opportunity to thank the people of Cumberland North for their support. Thank you. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: That completes the time for the debate going into Supply for this afternoon.

The motion is carried.

[Page 833]

[4:36 p.m. The House resolved itself into a CWH on Supply with Deputy Speaker Mr. Gordon Gosse in the Chair.]

[5:59 p.m. CWH on Supply rose and the House reconvened with Deputy Speaker Mr. Gordon Gosse in the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: We have arrived at the moment of interruption. The adjournment motion was submitted by the honourable member for Cape Breton West:

"Therefore be it resolved that the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage re-evaluate the request for $5,000 to enable the Dockside Ceilidh's Performing Arts Series to meet their obligations and prepare for the 24th season without this funding pressure."

ADJOURNMENT

MOTION UNDER RULE 5(5)

[6:00 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

TCH: DOCKSIDE CEILIDH - FUND

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I'm very pleased to rise in response to the resolution that has been brought forward today. I regret the fact that this resolution has to hit the floor because, again, the minister and his colleagues voted against this resolution as part of support for the Dockside Ceilidh in North Sydney at Marine Atlantic, which we know is a signature event in the region.

Again, when you look at the resolution, I think we need to go to the core - asking the minister to re-evaluate the request, not to admonish the minister or criticize him, but ask him to re-evaluate a legitimate request with regard to funding for the Dockside Ceilidh and provide a little perspective for the minister and some other colleagues here.

This was started in 1987 at Marine Atlantic Incorporated. The then-terminal manager, now councillor, Gordon MacLeod of the CBRM, worked with the president of the Northside Highland Dancers Association, Kay Batherson, a very well-known volunteer in the community. Aside from this, she's very well-known as well for her volunteer efforts for the Terry Fox Run and other community initiatives - so a long history. Even though this was started in 1987, her tenure working in the cultural community went from 1961 to 2009.

This is not a passing interest in community involvement - it's been a long-standing one. I would say - thankfully to the terminal manager at the time - the next five terminal managers have continued to work with the community group through the partners of Marine

[Page 834]

Atlantic Incorporated; Tourism, Culture and Heritage; Enterprise Cape Breton Corporation; the dancing association; and the community.

What we also know, for the benefit of the members, is this is a program that operated three days and two nights a week - very good scheduling - from late June until the end of August. As we know, it involves music and the song and dance specific to the culture of Nova Scotia, and especially that of Cape Breton. For tourists and local people alike, this has been a focal centre point of attracting people, to the point where we see hundreds of people a day. On average, the statistics show that 250 to 300 go to each performance.

There are events around this province where a $5,000 investment would have gone into an event just for one performance, let alone something that stretches an entire tourist season. This has involved dozens of students gaining experience, showcasing their talent, and adding to the cultural vibrancy of their area and being able to highlight that to tourists, visitors, and locals alike, to show how good they are. To the point, there have been tourists throughout all of Canada, every province and territory, that have witnessed the performances there, from the United States, Europe, and beyond.

Another added attraction is, because the local RV parks have tourists coming and going, they list this as an area where the people coming can go. They go and enjoy the entertainment and go back again, thus extending a stay in Cape Breton and in Nova Scotia that otherwise they may have gone elsewhere.

I think this was a win-win effort on their part. You have the community, the corporation, and the culture of the area all coming together. In fact, to speak to understanding of culture, the coordinators for this program, who are students, had to be French-speaking to make sure they accommodated those tourists coming in from Quebec or any other French-speaking Canadian or travellers to the area. Again, we've had the participation of other non-students, like local artists, musicians, singers and dancers who have performed in helping these students to hone their talents and skills. Indeed, what we have is enabling them as well, people who have come and written their own music and performed for the first time there in a showcase that they otherwise wouldn't have had.

So, Mr. Speaker, when we're talking about this, we're talking about an investment. When you look at the significance of every week, five performances, week after week through the tourist season, a request to the minister and his department to support them is not unreasonable. When you consider that there is everything from fiddling to step dancing, to vocalists and guitarists, Cape Breton piano style - we know there's a Cape Breton piano style - that they get to showcase and highlight the culture of the area. It also allows people to help promote. But these students are ambassadors for the Province of Nova Scotia, building on the very mandate that the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage would have and therefore would be a very small investment, because we know that the cost of advertising is very high, but to actually support students, to support volunteers in the community to do this is a very important thing.

[Page 835]

Mr. Speaker, they have a guest book they've kept and that guest book is waiting with a spot open for the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage to come. He can personally come and experience that. They want him to sign that book and see the value, to see the power of the presence of what they're able to do on an outdoor stage at the parking lot at Marine Atlantic, to recognize that we had and have had millions, but every year hundreds of thousands of people who come through the port of North Sydney, the gateway to Newfoundland and Labrador, have been entertained, have been given an opportunity to experience and to reflect on the culture of our area, which is strong and diverse and something that is very important.

I can say, since it was started in 1987, 23 seasons have gone by, they now don't know if they can have a 24th season. They have had to borrow from another not-for-profit group to try to get through this year. Mr. Speaker, they wrote and I wrote to the minister and the minister said they should talk to the people in the region. Then they get a turndown from the program, and we know that they meet - everything I've said, I would think, meets the festivals and events criteria that would be out. If not that, the minister has the discretion, the minister has the ability and his colleagues can make a choice. Because I can tell you, since it started, over those 23 years, it wasn't just a Progressive Conservative Government that was in, there was a Liberal Government, and the member for Cape Breton South was the Economic Development Minister who also supported the Dockside Ceilidhs and chose to rise to the occasion and the need of the community and helped support them.

So it has transcended political boundaries and political administrations and it is very confusing why the minister, with $5,000 - and again to re-evaluate his decision to consider the impact. As I've said, since 1961 Kay Batherson has been a community activist, someone who has been involved, and anybody who knows Kay knows she's a person of substance and believes in the community. Mr. [Deputy] Speaker, I know you know her. So when she says she has a need and she's having trouble and doesn't think she can do next year, I'll tell you the impact is going to be more than $5,000, and the community will not stand by and watch her not supported by the provincial government. Again, we're asking the minister to re-evaluate the request. He has an opportunity, it's never the wrong time to do the right thing, to help support the Dockside Ceilidhs.

The former Minister of Economic Development and Tourism, the member for Cape Breton South, saw fit to do it, his colleagues saw fit to do it in government, we've seen fit to do it, and the discretion is there by the minister to do it. Then they'll say, well, program areas were cut back. But I want to reflect, Mr. Speaker - and quickly. I know time will run out, but let's look at it.

They had time and a lot of effort now to hire consultants at $100,000 a pop to try to justify what they're doing, no hesitation to fund $100,000, but they won't fund the Dockside Ceilidhs and the talent from the area. Mr. Speaker, no problem by the Minister of Finance to add $341 million to the debt this year by doing a prepay that his own auditors he hired, at

[Page 836]

a cost of $100,000, he ignored their advice. That $100,000 would have gone a long way throughout Nova Scotia to help groups like the Dockside Ceilidhs that are doing good work, getting a return on the money that's invested, supporting local communities, supporting our youth, giving them meaningful experience, supporting the very community and growing the ability for us to promote Nova Scotia, and in this case Cape Breton as well, as a gateway area.

We talk about Atlantic Gateway. We talk about energy gateways. Well, we have a people gateway and the people of the area deserve to be invested in and the people who volunteer don't deserve to be dismissed. The minister should have an opportunity to sit down with those individuals to help them out. Again, it's not the wrong time for the minister to do the right thing. There is a spot in the guest book there that he can sign and be seen as a supporter and an endorser of a great initiative in the community.

Mr. Speaker, if the minister wasn't fully aware of the significance and the magnitude of what's going on with Dockside Ceilidh, in these few moments I believe I've been able to help provide some of that scope. That's why people like myself and the Progressive Conservatives, that's why the member for Cape Breton South and his colleagues when they were in government, they supported them. You know the people involved. You know they're credible.

Mr. Speaker, you know, when I was a minister, we would have discretionary money and if there was a need in a community, we would go out and do it, whether it was a youth centre, whether it was a community group, we did it. I did it in your area not because you were in Opposition, because you were doing something good for your community and it was the right thing to do. Well, there's something good going on at the Marine Atlantic terminal area at the performance stage, Mr. Minister. It is the right thing to do and it's not too late to do the right thing for the community.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise to support my colleague, the member for Cape Breton North, in regard to the resolution before us this evening. Indeed, the Dockside Ceilidh has been part of our culture for the past 24 years, a very important part of it. While it doesn't get the kind of recognition it deserves, over the years it was very important for that event to happen and be able to continue to happen in the Cape Breton area.

You know one has to wonder, Mr. Speaker, whether or not decisions like this that were made to deny the princely sum of $5,000 to a group of volunteers in the area headed by Kay Batherson, you have to wonder why the decision was made. I would hope that that decision was not a punitive decision made because of the recent outcome of the election in Cape Breton North. I would hope that's not the case. I hope perhaps they could give a better

[Page 837]

reason than that for not giving the $5,000 but for the life of me I can't come up with a reason why they would not allow $5,000 for this very worthwhile event.

I can recall, and the member for Cape Breton North himself a former minister in the last government making reference to me being the Minister of Economic Development and Tourism back in the late 1990s. I can recall a number of these events that were happening in Cape Breton and wherever possible we certainly took the opportunity to go down to talk to the people who were putting these events on. To find out first-hand what was happening with these events, how valuable they were to the community. I would suggest to the minister opposite that he take the opportunity to go and sit down and have a cup of tea with Kay Batherson and her people and perhaps bring a cheque for $5,000 along with him. You know, he said that he was in the Cape Breton area before having tea with the people from the partnership. Well, maybe he can go back there again and while he's at it, the member for Cape Breton North suggested he sign the guest book. Well, you know, I suggest he do that as well.

Mr. Speaker, it always seems to be a struggle in Cape Breton when we're talking about advancing the cause culturally of our area and economically. The two of them are entwined, you know, like you can't have one without the other. In the case of an event like the Dockside Ceilidh and like the importance of Marine Atlantic to our area and to the gateway to Newfoundland and Labrador, as the member for Cape Breton North pointed out, to have the kind of decision that throws a pall over all of that, it doesn't make any sense.

It has come to the stage where the Destination Cape Breton people are suggesting that perhaps the time has come to take matters into their own hands. Maybe the Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage or the Department of Economic Development, whichever wants to handle it, could look at a block of funding to the partnership in Cape Breton. Have them look after these community events that are ongoing year in and year out and some of the larger ones that have to go cap in hand all the time to government.

I'm not convinced, Mr. Speaker, that the minister has done this decision or other decisions or taken this decision unilaterally. I believe that the problem we have in Cape Breton is one of - it could be systemic, that people in the department up here are saying, well, if you're going to cut anything, let's try to cut some of these fairs out that are in the Cape Breton area.

I go back, Mr. Speaker, to the Doers' & Dreamers' Travel Guide. That is not done by that minister, or it wasn't done when I was Minister of Tourism, or it wasn't done when the previous government was there. It is done basically by people in the Department of Tourism, aided by consultants and other people who put together a production like this to be distributed, and if you look from cover to cover in the Doers' & Dreamers' Travel Guide, you see very little reference to Cape Breton and its events overall.

[Page 838]

I would suggest to the minister that he take a few moments and go through the Doers' & Dreamers' Travel Guide cover to cover and make his own judgement as to whether or not he feels that Cape Breton is getting adequately portrayed as a destination point and a valuable cultural experience that it should be getting in this province. I suggest to you that the answer he will get will bear out my conviction that perhaps the people in Cape Breton have to move in another direction and not depend on the provincial Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage to get equal billing, as the rest of the province.

[6:15 p.m.]

Now I'm speaking as a member who comes from Cape Breton and I have a deep feeling for my area, as does the member for Cape Breton North - as do the other Cape Breton members who are sitting here in this House. I say again, Mr. Minister, that I would hope that you will take the opportunity in this particular instance, not only to evaluate whether or not you feel that the great icons, tourist icons and developmental icons, that are in Cape Breton are getting a fair play from this government or whether or not you feel there's room for improvement.

If you feel there's room for improvement, then I think you have a responsibility to speak to the people in your department about the word "fairness" in distributing tourist dollars throughout the province, and also economic development dollars - I say that because you do wear a dual hat here.

I believe, Mr. Speaker, that we had some things going in Cape Breton over the years that we latched onto and we started to improve upon and grow and, all of a sudden, somebody in the bureaucracies decide that Cape Breton may be getting a little bit too far ahead or may be moving in a forward direction too fast. It has been my experience that if you don't keep the vigil up all the time, we always seem to lose in Cape Breton - and this is another instance.

I would have never thought that this government would turn down a resolution put forth by the member for Cape Breton North, a former minister, to have the government agree that $5,000 was a good investment. That's all it said - a good investment for a dockside ceilidh in the Northside area. I'm sure that the people down there are still scratching their heads as to how punitive a government could be to deny a resolution with so little financial obligation when, indeed, the member for Cape Breton North outlined some of the ridiculous expenses this government has taken on to make themselves look good politically in the past couple of months.

I would say to you, Mr. Speaker, that it's time that Destination Cape Breton were given a fair shake by the Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage, that they be brought into these discussions, that they set their own priorities for tourism dollars that will be spent in our section of Nova Scotia, our great little area that we call home in Cape Breton. I would hope that the government would realize that for the amount of money that is being spent in

[Page 839]

Cape Breton, the volunteer sector down there is way and far above doing more to grow the tourism and cultural sector in our area than, indeed, the government is.

Thank heavens we have the people in our area like Kay Batherson, and like all the others who are involved with the various productions that go on throughout the years, including Celtic Colours and all the other events that happen throughout rural Cape Breton as well that make us a great place to visit and a great place to spend some time.

Now is a good time to be down there, by the way, Mr. Speaker, with the leaves turning and Celtic Colours coming this week, and all that kind of great stuff that is happening in Cape Breton. I would hope that the minister will take the time to get in his car and drive down there and have a look at the wonderful leaves turning and the events that are going on now with Celtic Colours and while he's down there to go in and see Kay Batherson and perhaps just maybe he can pick a cheque out of his pocket and say here, Kay, this is for all your work in the past and this is for all your dedication and this is something that we think you should have.

I think once the minister makes himself familiar with what's happening down there, he will agree with me and the member for Cape Breton North that this is a great investment. Imagine, $5,000 and the goodwill that brings with the volunteers down there and I would suggest that the minister would probably have the opportunity to sign the guest book and maybe even get his picture taken with that $5,000 and perhaps have it enshrined down there in a place of honour.

For that kind of money I would encourage the minister to drive down to Cape Breton, see what we're all about and have a cup of tea with Kay and the group down there. I thank you for your time.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage.

HON. PERCY PARIS: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to rise and speak to this matter this evening, and do you know what? I am going to Cape Breton on Friday and I hope to spend a few days there. Just as soon as the House rises on Friday I'm going to get in my car and I'm going to drive down.

The Department of Tourism, Culture and Heritage invests in Nova Scotia's arts and culture community in many ways. We are very supportive and we support the growth of our province's creative economy. Nova Scotia's art and cultural sector is estimated to contribute more than $1 billion to the provincial economy and generate 28,000 jobs. We recognize how important that contribution is to communities and that's why we are working, we are working hard to support creativity and artistic excellence throughout the province.

The department received a letter from Mayor John Morgan of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality on June 25, 2009, asking the minister to look into the status of the

[Page 840]

Northside Highland application. I personally inquired to staff about the application and informed Mayor Morgan in writing on August 6, 2009, that the association's application under the May 15th deadline was not successful. In my response, I explained the independent process used to review applications and recommend grant recipients. Mr. Speaker, if I may, I will read that letter and I will table it.

"Dear Mayor Morgan:

Thank you for your letter of June 25, 2009 and the copy of the letter and funding application from the Northside Highland Dancers' Association.

The Northside Highland Dancers' Association applied to the Cultural Activities Program which, like all funding programs in the Culture Division, is evaluated by external assessment panels or peer juries. These external panels make recommendations based on the relative merits of the applications received for a particular deadline. This is a highly competitive process and there is no guarantee that a previously funded activity will continue to receive support.

The Northside Highland Dancers' Association's application was not successful in the May 15th competition and they have been advised of the outcome.

Should you have any further questions about the application, please contact Mr. Peter Guilford, Director of Programs . . .".

I included his phone number.

This was cc'd to a number of MLAs including members who are here this evening and also to Kathleen Batherson, President and Director of the Northside Highland Dancers Association.

I wish to point out that the department's cultural division has provided funding support to the Northside Highland Dancers Association through the Cultural Activities Program three times since 2003. They received $5,000 each year in 2005 and again in 2006, and then in 2008, they received $3,250.

The department's cultural division makes available $7.7 million every year in grant funding support. This supports artists in arts and cultural organizations engaged in creative programming and activities. That funding includes grants through the Cultural Activities Program - CAP. The Cultural Activities Program helps build communities through support for arts and cultural activities. Communities can include geographic locations as well as communities of interest, such as those involved in visual arts, music, or craft.

[Page 841]

Applications to this program, along with the other cultural funding programs within the department, are reviewed by an external assessment panel made up of two individuals from the cultural sector and a divisional staff person. They in turn recommend projects for funding.

As with all funding programs in the department, the application for the Cultural Activities Program is very competitive. While the department would like to be able to position itself and respond positively to all applications it receives, demand for the program funding oftentimes exceeds available funds. The honourable members should be very well aware that external assessment panels made up of experts from the cultural sector were created for cultural programs to ensure that the merits of the projects were the determining factor in decisions by the department.

Mr. Speaker, I will repeat, to ensure that the merits of the projects were the determining factor in decisions by the department. To re-evaluate . . .

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, on a point of order for the honourable minister, he's talking about program criteria - he's failed to talk about his discretion as a minister to support those initiatives. You know as the member for Cape Breton Nova as well as the member for Cape Breton Centre, ministerial discretion was provided to your constituencies and he's failing to address the fact why he won't do it even though other ministers have spent hundreds of thousands on frivolous things in the past days.

MR. SPEAKER: I think that's not a point of order. It may be a good point, but it's not a point of order - it's a disagreement between two members.

The honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage has the floor.

MR. PARIS: Thank you. To re-evaluate a decision by an external assessment panel that followed the proper guidelines for the Cultural Activities Program would be counter to the transparency (Interruptions) Mr. Speaker, I was very polite when the other members of the House spoke. I didn't say two words. I would expect the same courtesy.

AN HON. MEMBER: The people of Cape Breton are expecting courtesy right now.

MR. SPEAKER: Order. Order. Order, please. The honourable Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage has the floor. Thank you.

MR. PARIS: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We have to rely upon transparency and accountability that a peer review assessment process is meant to foster. The government is committed to peer review processes. The unfortunate fact is that sometimes there are worthwhile projects that do not receive funding because not enough financial resources are available at that time. It's as simple as that. Not everyone can get funded.

[Page 842]

Mr. Speaker, while it's not possible to have the external assessment panel re-evaluate its recommendation in this instance, the Northside Highland Dancers Association is able to apply again under one of the other deadlines for the Cultural Activities Program.

There are four deadlines for the program every year: February 15th, May 15th, August 15th, and November 15th. Mr. Speaker, I will undertake to make sure the Northside Highland Dancers Association is made aware of the availability to reapply under a future deadline. The department is working hard to support the arts and culture sector.

As I just mentioned, the Culture Division provides more than $7.7 million in funding support to the arts and culture sector every year in Nova Scotia. That support reaches communities and individuals in every corner of the Province of Nova Scotia. In Cape Breton alone, over $900,000 - actually, $930,000 - was invested from the department's cultural funding during the 2008-09 fiscal year. A total of 58 projects received funding which benefits individual artists, cultural activities, and young people interested in arts and culture. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: Order. The time allotted for late debate has expired. We will now take a short break as we will return to Committee of the Whole House on Supply.

[6:30 p.m. The House recessed.]

[6:32 p.m. The House reconvened into a CWH on Supply.]

[9:14 p.m. CWH on Supply rose and the House reconvened with Deputy Speaker Mr. Gordon Gosse in the Chair.]

MR. SPEAKER: The Chairman of the Committee of the Whole House on Supply reports:

THE CLERK: That the committee has met and made progress and begs leave to sit again.

MR. SPEAKER: Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

The Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. DAVID WILSON (Sackville-Cobequid): Mr. Speaker, that concludes the government's business for today. I ask that you now recognize the House Leader from the Official Opposition to inform the House of the hours and the business for tomorrow on Opposition Day.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Deputy Opposition House Leader.

[Page 843]

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I rise to notify the House of business tomorrow on Opposition Day: Bill No. 26 and Resolution No. 208 will be the order of business. The House hours for tomorrow will be 1:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I move adjournment of the House.

MR. SPEAKER: Is the House ready for the question? Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The House stands adjourned until 1:30 p.m. tomorrow.

[The House rose at 9:15 p.m.]

[Page 844]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 426

By: Mr. Andrew Younger (Dartmouth East)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotian physicist Willard S. Boyle and two Americans have been awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics; and

Whereas the Nobel citation for Boyle and his colleague George E. Smith stated that they "invented the first successful imaging technology using a digital sensor, a CCD" which builds upon ideas for which Albert Einstein was awarded the 1921 Nobel Prize; and

Whereas the CCD has allowed such varied practical uses of science as getting images from Mars to the hand-held digital camera;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House of Assembly congratulate Willard S. Boyle and his colleagues on winning the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics.

RESOLUTION NO. 427

By: Mr. Leo Glavine (Kings West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the annual Berwick Sports Hall of Fame induction ceremony took place June 6, 2009 celebrating locals' accomplishments in sport; and

Whereas the 1971 Berwick Alpines Men's Fastball Team was inducted in this year's ceremony in recognition of their accomplishments on the field; and

Whereas Lawrence Hayden contributed to the success of the 1971 Berwick Alpines Men's Fastball Team as the manager;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House congratulate Lawrence Hayden of the 1971 Berwick Alpines Men's Fastball Team for his induction into the Berwick Sport Hall of Fame.

[Page 845]

RESOLUTION NO. 428

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mrs. Nola Thomas started work at the centre on this very day as head teacher; and

Whereas Mrs. Nola Thomas has stayed on at the centre for the past 35 years providing early childhood education to hundreds of children who have come to the centre over the years;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mrs. Nola Thomas for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 35 years.

RESOLUTION NO. 429

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mrs. Alexa Glasgow started work at the centre on this very day as executive assistant; and

Whereas Mrs. Alexa Glasgow has stayed on at the centre for the past 35 years providing numerous support services;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mrs. Alexa Glasgow for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 35 years.

[Page 846]

RESOLUTION NO. 430

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mr. George Williams started work at the centre in September 1985 as a van driver and caretaker; and

Whereas Mr. George Williams has stayed on at the centre for the past 24 years providing safe transportation and a clean environment for the children;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mr. George Williams for his hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 24 years.

RESOLUTION NO. 431

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mrs. Juanita Smith started work at the centre in September 1986 as an ECE teacher; and

Whereas Mrs. Juanita Smith has stayed on at the centre for the past 23 years providing early childhood education to hundreds of children who have come to the centre over the years;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mrs. Juanita Smith for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 23 years.

[Page 847]

RESOLUTION NO. 432

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mrs. Birley Downie started work at the centre in 1990 as a cook; and

Whereas Mrs. Birley Downie has stayed on at the centre for the past 19 years providing tasty nutritious meals for the children;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mrs. Birley Downie for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 19 years.

RESOLUTION NO. 433

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mrs. Kim McMullin started work at the centre in 1993 as a teacher and then became the Happy Beginnings' co-ordinator; and

Whereas Mrs. Kim McMullin has stayed on at the centre for almost 16 years providing early childhood education for the children and program co-ordination for the centre;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mrs. Kim McMullin for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the better part of the past 16 years.

[Page 848]

RESOLUTION NO. 434

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Mrs. Sandra Colley started work at the centre in April 1995 as an ECE teacher; and

Whereas Mrs. Sandra Colley has stayed on at the centre for the past 14 years providing early childhood education to hundreds of children who have come to the centre over the years;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Mrs. Sandra Colley for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 14 years.

RESOLUTION NO. 435

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Ms. Tammie Dixon started work at the centre in August 1996 as an ECE teacher; and

Whereas Ms. Tammie Dixon has stayed on at the centre for the past 13 years providing early childhood education to hundreds of children who have come to the centre over the years;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Ms. Tammie Dixon for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 13 years.

[Page 849]

RESOLUTION NO. 436

By: Hon. Keith Colwell (Preston)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the East Preston Day Care Centre is celebrating its 35th Anniversary on October 24, 2009; and

Whereas Ms. Angela Brooks started work at the centre in September 1999 as an ECE teacher; and

Whereas Ms. Angela Brooks has stayed on at the centre for the past 10 years providing early childhood education to hundreds of children who have come to the centre over the years;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly join me in acknowledging Ms. Angela Brooks for her hard work and dedication to the children and families of the East Preston Day Care Centre for the past 10 years.

RESOLUTION NO. 437

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Barbara Babineau was one of those graduating from the CCA program with honours;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Barbara Babineau on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

[Page 850]

RESOLUTION NO. 438

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High-Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Nicola Callbeck was one of those graduating from the CCA program in September;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Nicola Callbeck on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 439

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Cheryl Dorey was one of those graduating from the CCA program with honours;

[Page 851]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Cheryl Dorey on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 440

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High-Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Darlene Gould was one of those graduating from the CCA program in September;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Darlene Gould on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 441

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High-Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

[Page 852]

Whereas Michelle Henry was one of those graduating from the CCA program with honours;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Michelle Henry on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 442

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High-Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Diana Maine was one of those graduating from the CCA program with honours;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Diana Maine on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 443

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High-Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of

[Page 853]

their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Tessa Reid was one of those graduating from the CCA program in September;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Tessa Reid on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 444

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas while most students are preparing to go back to school, the High-Crest Springhill Nursing Home was graduating its inaugural class; and

Whereas witnessing a demand for continuing care assistants, High-Crest opted to refine its resources and create a classroom environment that allowed students to immerse themselves in their education and place of work in February 2009 when they started their CCA program and those qualifying for High-Crest's own bursary system had 70 per cent of their tuition knocked off in exchange for a one year long commitment to work at the nursing home following graduation; and

Whereas Jennifer Ripley was one of those graduating from the CCA program in September;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Jennifer Ripley on graduating from the CCA program and wish her all the best in the future.

RESOLUTION NO. 445

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

[Page 854]

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Sonya MacDonald received the Youth Health Centre Bursary, Laidlaw Transit Scholarship, the SHS staff Award and the Chamber of Commerce Bursary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Sonya MacDonald on this outstanding achievement and wish her continued success in all future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 446

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paiad off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Lindsay Meekins received the Nova Scotia Teachers' Union Bursary, SHS School Spirit Bursary, the Pit Player's Bursary and the Junction Road Elementary Home and School Association Bursary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Lindsay Meekins on this outstanding achievement and wish her continued success in all future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 447

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

[Page 855]

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Brent Moore received the Springhill High School Cafeteria Bursary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Brent Moore on this outstanding achievement and wish him continued success in all future endeavours.

[Page 856]

RESOLUTION NO. 448

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Felicia O'Brien received the SHS Student Council Bursary, the Ken Murphy Memorial Arts Award, the Annie G. Murray Memorial IODE Bursary, the Ropak Packaging Bursary, the Surette Battery Scholarship in memory of Lorne Smith and the SHS School; Advisory Council Bursary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Felicia O'Brien on this outstanding achievement and wish her continued success in all future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 449

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Stephen Peddle received the Catholic Women's League Bursary, the Jade Palace Restaurant Bursary, the Annie G. Memorial Scholarship and the Ross Anderson Pharmacy Bursary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Stephen Peddle on this outstanding achievement and wish him continued success in all future endeavours.

[Page 857]

RESOLUTION NO. 450

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Alissa Quinn received the West End Memorial Home and School Association Bursary, the Matthew Meekins Memorial Scholarship, the Pit Player's Bursary and the Laurie Lodge No. 70 Freemason's Scholarship;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Alissa Quinn on this outstanding achievement and wish her continued success in all future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 451

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Gabriela Romero received the Canada Post Award;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Gabriela Romero on this outstanding achievement and wish her continued success in all future endeavours.

[Page 858]

RESOLUTION NO. 452

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Brandon Stone received the Isabelle Simpson Bursary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Brandon Stone on this outstanding achievement and wish him continued success in all future endeavours.

RESOLUTION NO. 453

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas hard work and dedication of students paid off as they finished their final school year at Springhill Regional High School; and

Whereas friends, family, faculty and students gathered to watch the graduating class of 2009 take that final walk across the stage to receive their diploma and embark upon their future lives; and

Whereas Jacob Surette received the Charm Diamond Centre Scholarship and the Lamp Cabin Bursary in memory of Craig McSavaney;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Jacob Surette on this outstanding achievement and wish him continued success in all future endeavours.

[Page 859]

RESOLUTION NO. 454

By: Hon. Murray Scott (Cumberland South)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas since the very first Nobel Prize in Physics was presented in 1901, there have been only 183 individuals in the field that have been bestowed with the honour; and

Whereas yesterday, Amherst born physicist Willard S. Boyle was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in inventing an imaging semiconductor circuit, known as a CCD sensor; and

Whereas this sensor can be found in sensitive surgical equipment, but most of us would know it best for its use as the eye of a digital camera;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Willard S. Boyle on his receipt of the Nobel Prize in Physics, a truly amazing acknowledgement of his hard work.