Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 10-34

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Charlie Parker

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Second Session

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
TIR: TCH Rte. 104 (Exits 27 and 27A) - Changes,
Mr. C. MacKinnon 2669
Gov't. (N.S.): Scots - Recognize, Mr. C. MacKinnon 2670
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1747, Mi'Kmaq History Mo. (10/10): Significance - Recognize,
The Premier 2670
Vote - Affirmative 2671
Res. 1748, Johnson, Josephine: MSVU - Hon. Degree,
Hon. P. Paris 2671
Vote - Affirmative 2672
Res. 1749, Capital Health: Top 100 Best Places to Work
- Honour Congrats., Hon. Maureen MacDonald 2672
Vote - Affirmative 2672
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 73, Forests Act, Mr. L. Glavine 2673
No. 74, Land Titles Clarification Act, Mr. J. MacDonell 2673
No. 75, Merchandise Inspection Act, Mr. J. MacDonell 2673
NOTICES OF MOTION:^
Res. 1750, Cardiovascular Health/Heart & Stroke Fdn. (N.S.):
Public Awareness Campaign - Congrats.,
Ms. D. Whalen 2673
Vote - Affirmative 2674
Res. 1751, Shalom Commun. Home: Opening - Congrats.,
Mr. A. MacMaster 2674
Vote - Affirmative 2674
Res. 1752, Reyner, Al - Sir John A. Macdonald HS: Principal
- Appt. Hon. W. Estabrooks 2674
Vote - Affirmative 2675
Res. 1753, Forgeron, Michael: N.S. Sport Hall of Fame - Induction,
Mr. A. MacLeod 2675
Vote - Affirmative 2676
Res. 1754, Pictou Train Derailment (06/10): Emergency Providers
- Congrats., Mr. C. MacKinnon 2676
Vote - Affirmative 2677
Res. 1755, Musée des Acadiens des Pubnico: Accomplishments
- Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont 2677
Vote - Affirmative 2678
Res. 1756, Goodick, Capt. Aaron - Air Cadet Wing 545: Commander
- Appt., Ms. V. Conrad 2678
Vote - Affirmative 2679
Res. 1757, Riteman, Philip - Millions of Souls: Release - Congrats.,
Hon. C. Clarke 2679
Vote - Affirmative 2680
Res. 1758, Canstruction N.S.: Participants - Congrats.,
Mr. L. Preyra 2680
Vote - Affirmative 2680
Res. 1759, Blair, Caroline: Girl Guides - Anniv. (100th),
Hon. K. Casey 2681
Vote - Affirmative 2681
Res. 1760, Springfield Lake Rec. Assoc./Weir Rockin' Concert
- Congrats., Mr. M. Whynott 2681
Vote - Affirmative 2682
Res. 1761, MacLellan, Robert: Death of - Tribute,
Mr. K. Bain 2682
Vote - Affirmative 2683
Res. 1762, Meagher, Robyn: N.S. Sport Hall of Fame - Induction,
Mr. J. Boudreau 2683
Vote - Affirmative 2684
Res. 1763, Davis, Jim: Retirement - Congrats.,
Mr. A. MacMaster 2684
Vote - Affirmative 2684
Res. 1764, Duckworth, Muriel: Life - Celebrate,
Mr. L. Preyra 2685
Vote - Affirmative 2685
Res. 1765, Buchanan, Dr. Carl (Bucky) - Tribute,
Mr. A. MacLeod 2685
Vote - Affirmative 2686
Res. 1766, Hartlin, Roy - Hfx. Co. Ex.: Fair Person of Yr. - Congrats.,
Mr. G. Burrill 2686
Vote - Affirmative 2687
Res. 1767, Murphy, Luke: IWK Fundraising - Congrats.,
Hon. C. d'Entremont 2687
Vote - Affirmative 2688
Res. 1768, Queens Fitness Centre: Programs - Recognize,
Ms. V. Conrad 2688
Vote - Affirmative 2688
Res. 1769, Igoe, Dr. Michael: Efforts - Applaud,
Hon. C. Clarke 2688
Vote - Affirmative 2689
Res. 1770, Parker, Christina/Hammonds Plains Hist. Soc.: Formation
- Congrats., Mr. M. Whynott 2689
Vote - Affirmative 2690
Res. 1771, Morash, Comrade Neil: RCL Long-Serv. Award (65 Yrs.)
- Congrats., Hon. K. Casey 2690
Vote - Affirmative 2691
Res. 1772, Nicholson, Alex: Baddeck Terry Fox Run - Fundraising,
Mr. K. Bain 2691
Vote - Affirmative 2692
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
No. 72, Police Act,
Hon. R. Landry 2692
Hon. M. Samson 2694
Hon. C. Clarke 2697
Hon. R. Landry 2699
Vote - Affirmative 2700
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
Hon. C. Clarke 2700
Mr. G. MacLellan 2704
Mr. Z. Churchill 2713
Mr. L. Preyra 2718
Adjourned debate 2728
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Mon., Nov. 1st at 7 p.m. 2728^^
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 1773, Lloy, Jacob: Golfing Skills - Applaud,
Mr. C. Porter 2729

[Page 2669]

HALIFAX, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2010

Sixty-first General Assembly

Second Session

9:00 A.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Charlie Parker

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Gordon Gosse, Mr. Leo Glavine, Mr. Alfie MacLeod

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We'll start today's proceedings. As usual, we'll start with the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to table two petitions, the first is involving the twinning of the Trans-Canada Highway and changes to the on and off ramps in the areas of Exit 27 and Exit 27A. The operative clause is:

"The Department of Transportation, Infrastructure and Renewal [sic] and the Tourism Department need to work together to provide accurate, clear signage well before and at the new exits to advise motorists of alternate scenic Route 245."

It is signed by 182 residents and I, too, have affixed my signature.

[Page 2670]

2669

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: The second petition could have been signed by thousands of Nova Scotians. It has a sample of signatures of 94. The operative clause is:

"This petition . . . requests that the Nova Scotia Provincial Government remove the Scots from the British Subjects status and Recognize. 'Scots, and people of Scottish descent, in the province of Nova Sc9otia [sic] (New Scotland) as an Ethnic Group within the province.'"

I, too, have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 1747

HON. DARRELL DEXTER (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Mi'kmaq are the founding people of Nova Scotia, with evidence of their settlement in the province dating back nearly 12,000 years; and

Whereas October is Mi'kmaq history month, an observance of which is a priority for this government; and

Whereas 2010 was an outstanding year for the recognition of this important part of our province's history due to the 400th Anniversary of the baptism of Grand Chief Membertou, and the tour of the Halifax anniversary site by Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness, the Duke of Edinburgh;

[Page 2671]

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the House of Assembly recognize the significance of this Mi'kmaq history month and congratulate those involved in the organization of this year's historic celebrations.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of African Nova Scotian Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 1748

HON. PERCY PARIS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Josephine E. Johnson has dedicated her life to working for social and educational reform; and

Whereas Ms. Johnson started the Head Start program in North Preston, which provides essential education to children of low-income families, and later became the director of the North Preston Day Care Centre and Medical Child Care Clinic; and

Whereas through her professional career and many volunteer affiliations Ms. Johnson has enhanced the development of children and helped adult learners return to the workforce;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Josephine Johnson for being the recipient of an honorary degree from Mount Saint Vincent University and commend her for her long, ongoing dedication to her community and to Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 2672]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 1749

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Capital Health is the largest health authority in the province, overseeing hospitals, health care centres and community-based programs throughout Halifax Regional Municipality and western Hants County; and

Whereas Capital Health has 12,000 employees who provide quality health services to over 400,000 district residents, and specialty services to the rest of Nova Scotia and Atlantic Canada; and

Whereas Capital Health was recently named one of the top 100 best places to work in Canada by The Globe and Mail and Maclean's magazine;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Capital Health on this prestigious honour, and commend their ongoing dedication to providing better health care for Nova Scotians.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[9:15 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 2673]

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 73 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 179 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Forests Act. (Mr. Leo Glavine)

Bill No. 74 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 250 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Land Titles Clarification Act. (Hon. John MacDonell)

Bill No. 75 - Entitled an Act to Repeal Chapter 283 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Merchandise Inspection Act. (Hon. John MacDonell)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Clayton Park.

RESOLUTION NO. 1750

MS. DIANA WHALEN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas today, Friday, October 29th, is World Stroke Day; and

Whereas 50,000 people across Canada are hospitalized for stroke every year - representing one stroke every 10 minutes; and

Whereas Cardiovascular Health Nova Scotia and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia are supporting a public awareness campaign to help Nova Scotians learn the warning signs of stroke;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House congratulate Cardiovascular Health Nova Scotia and the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Nova Scotia for this campaign and, more importantly, acknowledge their efforts in educating Nova Scotians about steps we can all take to reduce the risk of stroke.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 2674]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 1751

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the new Shalom Community Home has its grand opening today in Port Hawkesbury; and

Whereas the Regional Occupational Centre and the Port Hawkesbury Community Home Committee have joined efforts to bring this project to fruition; and

Whereas Shalom Community Home offers people with disabilities a safe, happy, and beautiful place to live;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate the people who have made this new home a reality, and wish the executive director, Diana Poirier, staff and residents many years of health and good fortune.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

RESOLUTION NO. 1752

[Page 2675]

HON. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Al Reyner became the principal of Sir John A. Macdonald High School this September 2010; and

Whereas Al Reyner, a graduate of Sir John A. Macdonald, a student of this MLA, a star history student and an athlete from the past, appreciates the tradition of this great high school; and

Whereas Al Reyner's talents as an educational leader are welcomed at Sir John A. and in our community;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Al Reyner on his appointment as the principal of Sir John A. Macdonald, with best wishes in his future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1753

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Main-à-Dieu native Mike Forgeron put Nova Scotia on the world stage by achieving two gold medals in the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain; and

Whereas Mr. Forgeron is a role model for all young Nova Scotians who aspire to do their absolute best in their sport; and

[Page 2676]

Whereas Mr. Forgeron has been named to this year's class of inductees to the Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate and applaud Mr. Michael Forgeron for being recognized with this induction and thank him for his many contributions to our province's sporting legacy.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 1754

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the emergency services providers of Pictou East and Pictou Centre including fire departments, paramedics and police responded to a major train derailment and subsequent evacuation of residents lasting more than a week in June of this year; and

Whereas these same emergency providers were on the scene of a spontaneous combustion fire at a construction and demolition landfill site in Broadway, Pictou County for several days; and

Whereas these same responders managed a number of fatal accidents along the Trans-Canada, including one which resulted in a fire and oil spill at Barney's River where the cleanup continues to this date;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly congratulate and thank the hundreds of firefighters, paramedics, police, environment officials and community volunteers who responded and continue to be there for the people of Pictou East.

[Page 2677]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 1755

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: M. le Président, à une date ultérieure, je demanderai l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que le Musée des Acadiens des Pubnico qui appartient à la Société historique acadienne de Pubnico-Ouest a officiellement ouvert ses portes en 1979, a de nombreux éléments historiques sur place ainsi que des documents et de la littérature datant des années 1700; et

Attendu que le 28 Juillet 2010, le Musée a tenu l'ouverture officielle de leur expansion qui a maintenant une voûte climatisée et la rénovation d'une ancienne grange qui est devenu un espace de programmation sur la propriété; et

Attendu que la grange a été donnée au Musée par Pauline et Viat d'Entremont et dédiée La Salle Pauline et Viat d'Entremont, en reconnaissance du travail et le dévouement du couple vers le projet de rénovation;

Par conséquent, qu'il soit résolu que tous les membres de la l'Assemblée se joignent à moi pour féliciter le Musée des Acadiens des Pubnico sur leurs nombreuses réalisations de leurs projets et les remercier pour leur dévouement inlassable à la préservation de la culture et le patrimoine du peuple acadien.

Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Musée des Acadiens des Pubnico is operated by the Société Historique Acadienne de Pubnico-Ouest, which officially opened its doors in 1979, has many historical items on display along with documents and literature dating back to the 1700s; and

[Page 2678]

Whereas on July 28, 2010, the Musée held the official opening of their expansion that has a climatically controlled vault and the renovation of an old barn that has now become a new programming space for the property; and

Whereas the barn was donated to the Musée by Pauline and Viat d'Entremont and dedicated as La Salle Pauline and Viat d'Entremont in recognition of the work and dedication of the couple towards the renovation project;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating the Musée des Acadiens des Pubnico on their many accomplishments and thank them for their untiring devotion to the preservation of the culture and heritage of the Acadian people.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 1756

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Air Cadet Wing 545 of Queens County allows youth aged 12 to 19 years to get involved with trips and summer camps, learn about the theory of flight, and have a chance to earn their pilot's wings, as well as many other skills; and

Whereas Air Cadet Wing 545 has been in existence in Queens County for 60 years and now has a new Cadet Commander, Captain Aaron Goodick; and

Whereas Captain Goodick will be working to ensure that everyone involved with Air Cadet Wing 545 has a job to do, has a role to play in the squadron, and will be visible in their community at events throughout the year;

[Page 2679]

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly of Nova Scotia recognize and congratulate Captain Aaron Goodick on becoming the new Cadet Commander of Air Cadet Wing 545 of Queens County and wish him great success with the cadets.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1757

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Holocaust survivor and Nova Scotian Philip Riteman has bravely committed his life to educating today's youth about the atrocities committed against millions by Hitler's Nazi regime during World War II and spreading the message that "Hate destroys people, communities, and countries. Love binds us all together and makes a better world"; and

Whereas Mr. Riteman recently unveiled his new book, entitled Millions of Souls: The Philip Riteman Story; and

Whereas Millions of Souls is a firsthand account of Mr. Riteman's life in his Polish hometown, his struggle for survival as a teenager and lone survivor of his family in five concentration camps, his move to Newfoundland after the war, and his commitment to teaching people the lessons he learned along the way;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Philip Riteman on his new book and send him our heartfelt gratitude for sharing his story and his wisdom.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 2680]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

RESOLUTION NO. 1758

MR. LEONARD PREYRA: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Canstruction Nova Scotia is part of an annual international design competition held throughout North America and Australia; and

Whereas Canstruction Nova Scotia is a dynamic food and fundraising event in support of Feed Nova Scotia, where teams come together and build structures entirely out of canned food and are displayed at a public exhibition; and

Whereas this evening, October 29th, an award ceremony will be held to announce the best sculptures and when the event is all over this food is donated to Feed Nova Scotia to help stock the shelves of food banks and meal programs across the province;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the organizers, partners, participants, and judges of Canstruction Nova Scotia for their work to help support Feed Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[9:30 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 2681]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1759

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 2010 is the 100th Anniversary of the Girl Guides in Canada; and

Whereas the Guiding program, founded on personal skills and communication, stays relevant by keeping current with general survival and hands-on skills; and

Whereas Caroline Blair is a 30-year North River Brownie leader and a commissioner for the Colchester district;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Caroline Blair and all Girl Guides and their leaders on their 100th Anniversary of this organization.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville.

RESOLUTION NO. 1760

MR. MAT WHYNOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 2682]

Whereas on August 21, 2010, the Springfield Lake Recreation Association, in conjunction with Weir Rockin' hosted their fourth annual rock concert at Weir Field, with this year's headliners, popular 80s band Lover Boy; and

Whereas this continues to be a sought-after event for the Upper Sackville community and brought a sold-out crowd for an evening of rock music; and

Whereas this event would not have happened without the hard work and dedication from organizers, volunteers, sponsors, and supporters;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly congratulates all involved in this year's annual Weir Rockin' concert on a successful sold-out event in Upper Sackville and grant best wishes to the event organizers in future years.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 1761

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 18 years of hard work, dedication, commitment and love for one's community was the makeup of a special Victorian County councillor for the rural North of Smokey area; and

Whereas the late Robert MacLellan, councillor for District 8, understood the needs and aspirations of his constituents and advocated with hard, honest words from the heart to achieve his goals; and

[Page 2683]

Whereas Robert was a hard-working fisherman, a member of the Bay St. Lawrence Fire Department for 23 years with 21 of those as fire chief, a member of the board at Highland Manor and of the Bay St. Lawrence Credit Union, and was respected and admired by the residents, even though he had a passion for the Montreal Canadiens;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly extend their deepest sympathy to the MacLellan family and the community of District 8, on the passing of such a wonderful individual and community leader on August 30, 2010.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Guysborough-Sheet Harbour.

RESOLUTION NO. 1762

MR. JIM BOUDREAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Robyn Meagher, celebrated daughter of Mulgrave, who still holds the Nova Scotia Senior Girls 500 metre record set in 1984, will be inducted into Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame on October 30, 2010, in recognition of her 20-year career as one of Nova Scotia's most decorated track and field athletes; and

Whereas Robyn Meagher, a multiple Canadian Junior Champion and three-time All-Canadian, represented Canada in the 1992 and 1996 Olympic Games, in the 1994 Commonwealth Games, all the while demonstrating her no-quit attitude, her humility and her ability to rise to the occasion; and

Whereas Robyn Meagher has always maintained a great level of gratitude for her passionate and supportive parents, her family and her hometown of Mulgrave, which celebrates her accomplishments by holding an annual competitive run bearing her name;

[Page 2684]

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Robyn Meagher of Mulgrave on her athletic achievements, her personal strength of character, her pride of community and her 2010 induction into the Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 1763

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Jim Davis of Port Hawkesbury is retiring from the position of Chief Administrative Officer for the Town of Port Hawkesbury, on November 2nd; and

Whereas Jim has given 30 years of dedicated service to the people of the Town of Port Hawkesbury as finance director for 28 years; and

Whereas Jim's value to the town resulted in his dual role of finance director and CAO for a period of time;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly thank Mr. Davis for the work he has done for the people of Port Hawkesbury and wish him an enjoyable retirement.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 2685]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

RESOLUTION NO. 1764

MR. LEONARD PREYRA: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Muriel Duckworth was a pacifist, feminist and community activist; and

Whereas Muriel Duckworth was a founding member of the Nova Scotia branch of the Voice of Women for Peace, the first woman in Halifax to run for a seat in the Legislature, and the recipient of numerous awards and honorary degrees, including the Order of Canada, the Governor General's Award in commemoration of the Persons Case and the Pearson Medal of Peace; and

Whereas on October 30, 2010, Muriel Duckworth's life will be celebrated with the launch of Marion Kerans' book A Legacy of Love, Remembering Muriel Duckworth, Her Later Years, 1996-2009;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly acknowledge and celebrate the life of one of Nova Scotia's great citizens, Muriel Duckworth, and congratulate Marion Kerans on the publication of her new book.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 2686]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1765

MR. ALFIE MACLEOD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Dr. Carl (Bucky) Buchanan is well known in Cape Breton for his abilities and talents in the sports of hockey, soccer and gymnastics; and

Whereas he is also known for his ability as a coach, administrator, builder and supporter for over 40 years; and

Whereas Dr. Buchanan is being inducted into the Nova Scotia Hall of Fame on October 30, 2010;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly acknowledge and thank Dr. Carl (Bucky) Buchanan for his years of dedication and hard work on behalf of sports and athletes and congratulate him on his recent induction.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 1766

MR. GARY BURRILL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 2687]

Whereas Roy Hartlin, a member of the Middle Musquodoboit Agricultural Society and a past member of its board of directors has, since retiring in 1997, become a faithful volunteer every summer for the Halifax County Exhibition in Middle Musquodoboit; and

Whereas Roy can be found helping out in his quiet way with 4-H, looking after the poultry barn, weighing in draft horses for the horse pull or assisting with other chores to make sure the exhibition runs smoothly; and

Whereas in recognition of his years of commitment and hard work, Roy was named the 2010 Halifax County Exhibition Fair Person of the Year on August 18, 2010;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Roy Hartlin for having been recognized as Fair Person of the Year and mark with esteem his years of dedication to the exhibition and the communities of the Musquodoboit Valley.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 1767

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Luke Murphy, a native of Yarmouth County now residing in the HRM, was only two weeks old when he suddenly stopped breathing and had to be airlifted to the IWK, is sure that without the care he received there he might not be the healthy, active teenager he is today; and

Whereas on May 27th, Luke Murphy and a team of cyclists held a four-day bike-a-thon to raise funds called the IW300K, to promote awareness and the work of the IWK, active living and youth inventiveness; and

[Page 2688]

Whereas with partners, including the students of l'Ecole du Carrefour, the Nova Scotia Department of Health Promotion and Protection and others who chose to join him along the way completed a 300 kilometre route from Yarmouth to Halifax, on May 30th, finishing at the IWK;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating Luke Murphy for his determination in completing this initiative and wish him much success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 1768

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas exercise and a healthy lifestyle are important to the residents of Queens County and as our population ages; and

Whereas family doctors, first-line health providers and the Queens Fitness Centre have entered into a new phase of the Queens Fit Pro initiative; and

Whereas funding through the Department of Health Promotion and Protection in the amount of $4,000 will provide a 50 per cent discount on a three-month membership at the Queens Fitness Centre;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly recognize the Queens Fitness Centre for their exercise and healthy lifestyle program for residents of Queens County.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 2689]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1769

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Doctors Nova Scotia annually honours physicians who make exemplary contributions to the medical field and to their communities, including an honorary membership award to the Canadian Medical Association; and

Whereas receiving that award this year was Northside doctor Dr. Michael Igoe, who has been an internist at the Northside General Hospital in North Sydney for over 23 years and is currently the only practising internist in the community; and

Whereas Dr. Igoe goes above and beyond the call of duty, often making himself available outside of his regular office hours to ensure that his patients receive the best care he can provide;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly applaud the unwavering efforts of physicians like Dr. Michael Igoe, who constantly meet and exceed the expectations of their community, and thank Doctors Nova Scotia for providing the opportunity for Dr. Igoe to be adequately recognized for his hard work.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 2690]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville.

RESOLUTION NO. 1770

MR. MAT WHYNOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a group of residents in Hammonds Plains, including director Christina Parker, have recently founded the Hammonds Plains Historical Society in an effort to recapture and record the community's rich history; and

Whereas the group is currently exploring possible properties to use as a permanent museum for their historical artifacts and ensure that buildings of historical significance in the area are preserved; and

Whereas this is the first of its kind in the community and came about due to high interest from residents and the rich history of the area;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly congratulate Christina Parker and her fellow members of the Hammonds Plains Historical Society on their formation, and grant best wishes to them and their mandate in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

[9:45 a.m.]

RESOLUTION NO. 1771

[Page 2691]

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Comrade Neil Morash enlisted in the military at age 19 and saw service in Canada, England, France and Germany; and

Whereas he was decorated with the 1939-45 Star, Defence of Britain, the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal and Clasp, the French Star and the German Star; and

Whereas he joined the Cobequid Branch 72 of the Royal Canadian Legion in Great Village, Colchester North, on January 11, 1946 while he was still in the military;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Comrade Neil Morash for receiving a 65-year long service award from Cobequid Branch 72, and thank him for the work he has done and continues to do in the service of others.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 1772

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas 30 years ago Terry Fox set off to run across Canada to raise cancer awareness and with his strength, courage, and determination embarked on a rally of support across the nation and in his memory, the run, the famous Marathon of Hope continues; and

Whereas a small rural group, the Baddeck Lions Club, has been organizing a run event for the past 29 years to keep Terry's dream alive; and

[Page 2692]

Whereas Alex Nicholson has been a dedicated volunteer and run participant for 28 of those 29 years and has recently been presented with a Plaque of Appreciation from the Terry Fox Foundation;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House congratulate Alex Nicholson and all organizing volunteers, athletes, students, and residents who participated in the Baddeck Terry Fox Run on September 19th in their fundraising efforts in the nation's fight against cancer.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 72.

Bill No. 72 - Police Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. ROSS LANDRY: It's a good morning. Mr. Speaker, it's an honour to be here today to rise and give second reading to the amendments to the Police Act. As a former

[Page 2693]

police officer, this issue is very important to me and I have had much exposure to the background on these types of matters, so I have some passion and interest in this piece of legislation.

The amendments will allow the creation of an investigative team which will operate independent of law enforcement agencies. This team will investigate serious matters such as death, serious injury, sexual assault, or public interest concerns which have either resulted from or allegedly resulted from police actions.

These amendments will eliminate the current practice of police leading investigations into serious incidents that involve police. These changes to the Police Act will result in more transparency, impartiality, and integrity of each investigation and its outcome.

I believe it is important to note that the creation of the independent team in no way indicates that the police, in their investigations of such matters to date, have been anything but professional and objective. The creation of this arm's-length investigative team is about maintaining public confidence in the system. It is this need to maintain public confidence that spurred the Chiefs of Police to bring to the provincial table their concerns over the process and to indicate that a more arm's-length, independent process was needed. In fact, at yesterday's media briefing relating to the bill, representatives from the RCMP, municipal police service agencies, the Nova Scotia Chiefs of Police Association, and the Nova Scotia Association of Police Boards all voiced their support for these changes. There were also other police members attending the briefing and by their very presence showed their support for this bill.

Mr. Speaker, the proposed investigative team will also address concerns voiced by Nova Scotians over the practice of police investigating serious incidents involving other police. It was concern about public confidence in the system that prompted me last November, as the new Justice Minister, to direct staff to develop a more accountable, transparent, and independent model to investigate serious criminal matters against police. At that time staff began the process of collaborating with key policing partners, Public Prosecution Service, and academics to develop a proposed model to meet this need. That model was then brought to a broader group of policing stakeholders across the province to gather their feedback, which was considered in the drafting of the amendments to the Police Act.

The independent model of investigation that is being proposed is the Serious Incident Response Team. It is a civilian-led model of investigation, which includes using civilian and police investigators.

The proposed model follows the national and international trend of having civilians involved in these types of investigation. The team will consist of a civilian director, civilian provincial investigators and seconded police officers as required. The provincial investigators

[Page 2694]

will oversee the investigating and the director will have sole decision-making authority on the laying of charges or other actions if warranted. This combination of civilian and seconded police officers is required to achieve a balance between independence and operational effectiveness and this team will operate independent of law enforcement agencies.

The unit will consist of up to seven team members and is budgeted to cost about $800,000. This will cover the salary of the director, two civilian provincial investigators, an administrative assistant and administrative and overhead costs. I would like to note that there will not be an immediate hiring of seven people. We'll be hiring the director and three others to start, leaving room in the budget to hire more as needed.

There will be three ways that cases may be referred for investigation to this team. Firstly, incidents will be referred by the police themselves, which we believe will account for the majority of investigations. Incidents may be referred by the Minister of Justice, where a matter is deemed to be of public interest to have the matter investigated by an independent body. Lastly, the director of the team may initiate an investigation where he or she becomes aware of an incident that falls within the mandate of the team. I want to point out, in the case of the minister requesting an investigation, the decision to investigate still stands with the civilian team director. We expect that once these amendments receive the approval of the Legislature, the team will be in operation by the latter part of 2011.

Before I close, I want to thank our policing partners for their support in the creation of the Serious Incident Response Team. I also want to take the opportunity to thank the staff at the Justice Department for their efforts in leading this consultative process. Finally, I want to thank all those who participated in the consultative process and sessions that were held across the province. I'd like to take note that there continues to be some collaboration with targeted stakeholders on this bill. If revisions are required as a result, they may be incorporated into the bill in the Law Amendments Committee process. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Richmond.

HON. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, as Justice Critic for the Official Opposition, it is my pleasure to say a few words on Bill No. 72, an Act to Amend Chapter 31 of the Acts of 2004, the Police Act. As has been mentioned by the Minister of Justice, in effect this will create a new Serious Incident Response Team.

From the outset allow me to say that our caucus is certainly in support of the creation of this new team. We want to commend the police chiefs, and all police officers around this province, who were the impetus behind the creation of this new unit.

Unfortunately, we live in times where the people we represent tend to be fairly suspicious, of an especially suspicious nature, and there's always great concern in any organization when the public sees that it is members of the same organization who are

[Page 2695]

investigating themselves. As the minister said, none of us here in this House, I'm sure, would want to cast aspersions on the work that has been done by the police in Nova Scotia to investigate matters relating to other officers but the fact that it is the police officers themselves who have come forward and said, we want to give the public every assurance possible that when there is a matter that involves a police officer, that the investigation itself is being done in the most impartial manner possible. Certainly that is something.

It's unfortunate that there is that level of suspicion amongst Nova Scotians but I think it's important that the police themselves are the ones who are coming forward and saying, we don't want there to be any suspicion, we want Nova Scotians to be very confident in the fact that any reviews and investigations being done are being done by an independent team.

We've seen the case, for example, the Simon case, the unfortunate shooting of a member of the Wagmatcook reserve by a member of the RCMP and the investigation was led by members of the Halifax Regional Police. Now, with the creation of Bill No. 72, that will no longer be the case. We'll actually now have a civilian unit that will be undertaking this type of investigation, which should remove any suspicion that there is a lack of impartiality in these types of investigations.

As I attended the press conference yesterday by the Minister of Justice, immediately my first reaction was, what criteria will be used for the appointing of the director? I was suspicious, I'll admit at first, that the director would be a retired police officer or a retired Mountie, but Bill No. 72, without getting into too much of the specifics, does clearly indicate that the civilian director cannot be someone who has ever served in any kind of police force. Clearly, it will have to be someone who has not been involved, which I think will give Nova Scotians that sense of confidence.

I can tell you that our caucus will be watching very closely to see who exactly the Minister of Justice does appoint to this position because, for all intents and purposes, I would submit to you that this position is almost like appointing a judge. It clearly needs to be someone that Nova Scotians will see as being impartial, who will carry out their duties without any sense of political bias, any sort of gender bias or any police officer bias that is really going to be seen as someone that Nova Scotians will look to with a sense of confidence, as we do with the judges that we have here in our province. I do hope that the minister will take that type of approach in selecting who will be the director of this new team.

As well, who will be the civilian investigators? Clearly they will have to be individuals with a certain level of training and an ability to basically carry out, for all intents and purposes, what has traditionally been police work. It will be very important that those people who are hired are able to carry out that duty in the best fashion possible.

[Page 2696]

[10:00 a.m.]

Mr. Speaker, one of the concerns that we do have, that I can say as Justice Critic - and I have had a number of issues with this minister - is the timing. The minister initially, I believe, announced his intent to create such a team in 2009. It was reiterated, I believe, in January of this year only to have the announcement being made at the end of October 2010 and being told that this unit will only be up and running, he hopes, by the end of 2011.

I was a bit disappointed yesterday when the minister was questioned on that timeline, that he shrugged it off and said that it was basically the fault of the Civil Service, that he had been a bit naive as a minister in thinking the Civil Service could move as quickly as he initially had thought. I would submit to you, I don't really think it's the Civil Service that's to blame for this. I think the fact that the minister has indicated the $800,000 price tag that will come with this team is the real reason this will not be up and running before 2011.

I don't think the minister has been able to convince his Minister of Finance of the importance of this team and so thus the delay. I would hope that maybe Joan Jessome would find some time in her busy schedule, as president of the Nova Scotia Government & General Employees Union, to possibly speak with the Minister of Justice and remind him of the hard-working men and women that we have in our Civil Service in Nova Scotia and that the minister should not be blaming them for any delays which are really politically driven, rather than laying it at the feet of the hard-working men and women in our Department of Justice. I'll leave it to the minister to point out to us in the budget where the $800,000 line item is, to clearly dispel that this delay is really due to budget reasons, not due to any specific problem with the Department of Justice being able to implement these changes.

Mr. Speaker, as you know with any Justice bill, there is so much I could speak about on the issue of justice, but unfortunately this morning we are a bit pressed for time so I will not take the opportunity now to speak about the alarming rate of deaths by crime here in the Halifax Regional Municipality, the issue of temporary absences that the minister blindly was allowing to be issued by his department, or so many of the other issues, such as Boots on the Street and the cuts to that funding. Those are all issues which I believe I will probably have an opportunity, either at Committee of the Whole House or on third reading, to be able to address more fully.

With that, Mr. Speaker, as far as Bill No. 72, as I've mentioned, the concept is certainly something that we support. Yesterday the media was asking, should this unit be able to look back retroactively at other matters that have taken place? My response to that was that we'd like to see, and maybe the Minister of Justice can indicate in his remarks - I believe he said this legislation more closely mirrors Alberta. Has Alberta allowed their unit to be able to look back on old cases and to render a decision on that?

[Page 2697]

When it was asked, should it be able to look back, should it be able to look at the Simon case, at the Howard Hyde case, we certainly reserve judgment. My concern clearly would be that the passage of time would make it very difficult for this team to be able to investigate this, especially if it is only up and running at the end of 2011. I guess, with all due respect to the minister, if his prediction of this date is as accurate as the prediction of finding a site for the new jail, I guess we're not really looking at 2011 at all, it could be 2012, if not later. We're still being told - previously his decision was going to be soon on the jail; last week he added very soon; maybe today he'll add very, very soon. If this team is coming as soon as the site for the new jail, then I fear it might be quite some time.

With those remarks, Mr. Speaker, we do look forward to Bill No. 72 moving forward and I do hope the minister may ask his staff to address the issue of retroactivity and what is being done in other jurisdictions, to give us a better sense of whether that should be an amendment to this legislation or whether it is best to simply move forward with any cases that might arise in the future.

With that, Mr. Speaker, I look forward to the bill going to the Law Amendments Committee and to hearing the debate from my colleagues on this bill. Merci.

MR. SPEAKER: The honorable member for Cape Breton North.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker. I, too, am very pleased to speak to Bill No. 72 and the amendments to the Police Act, indeed, something that I believe is an important next step in the process of providing transparency and clarity, as has been referenced by the minister and by my honourable colleague, the Liberal Justice Critic.

This has evolved as part of a process and a reality of where we find ourselves in a modern-day context of justice delivery. However, there are some components of this that I think we need to reflect on and look at the best course forward in dealing with these matters. I do know from my own personal experience, previously as Attorney General and as Minister of Justice, when the Howard Hyde case came forward, and that was the Taser incident, it is very difficult to call upon a chief of police and inform him that you have to undertake an investigation into the policing conduct and actions related to a case because it does mean you are involving and engaging other police officers to go in and do that investigation. It is not a comfortable position for anyone to find themselves in, as is the case with the Simon matter in Wagmatcook that has been subject of great discussion and dialogue and emotions that flow from that and people wanting to have transparency and clarity.

I do commend, Mr. Speaker, officials within the Department of Justice because back during those matters it was officials working with their counterparts at the front line of policing, the chiefs of police and the officers doing the investigation. That indeed there was a sincere desire and intent to make sure that we could move to something that would be out

[Page 2698]

of the hands of, and third party from, police officers investigating police officers and providing that clarity - and I know there was some discussion at that time by the officials of what was the best process to be in place.

As we go forward with this bill, and the Progressive Conservative caucus is supportive of this bill moving forward and supportive of it being implemented, and implemented at the earliest opportunity rather than into late 2011, however it is important to note that the minister yesterday did say the budget is in place and I would hope that officials and the process for selecting the head of the new unit will be done and that person is undertaking their work sooner rather than later.

We all understand that people have to come in place, they have to collaborate to make sure the policies and procedures are clearly understood and if there are any regulations that the minister requires for Cabinet to deal with. Those are all things that we recognize. However, adding this budget at the same time when the government is cancelling policing positions sometimes can be counterproductive to what has been a good law and order agenda that we've seen here in Nova Scotia.

Making safer streets and communities has been something that we, as the former Progressive Conservative Government, take as a great accomplishment and we are concerned about the moving away from the front-line support and the strategic investment of policing positions. Whether they are on the street, whether they are investigative, whether they are special units, whether it's a joint task force, whether it's dealing with child pornography and exploitation - any number of things like port security or First Nations policing. You name it, those are all positive things and we're seeing budget cutbacks and people being told positions are being cancelled and attrition will be used to claw that back in a more quiet way, and we know that police departments and municipal units are concerned about speaking out because of any retribution or further cancelling of those positions.

We've also seen the political reality of a government that was prepared to say they would honour commitments, and then break those commitments and walk away from promises that would ensure that our infrastructure for justice delivery in this province would be enhanced. But instead we've taken a step back with this government. This government has walked away from a commitment they said they would honour, they have devastated an entire community here in the Province of Nova Scotia, but that community has now elected our Leader to represent Cumberland South because they know that they wanted something better, something clearer, and someone who will deliver for the people of that area. I look forward to our Leader taking his rightful place in the House as soon as possible and he will speak on behalf of the people of Cumberland South and the devastation that the NDP Government, walking away from its commitments, has done.

More importantly, Mr. Speaker, aside from the politics of breaking a commitment, there's the practicality of harming justice delivery in this province - and that has been done.

[Page 2699]

While I support the concept and indeed the implementation of this new unit, one has to wonder what this government will actually do - and that has been referenced by the Liberal Justice Critic about how this government will go about it. The brochures always look nice and they're shiny and colourful but the reality can be somewhat dim when this government puts their words into action.

This minister knows that we need to build on this and we need to work, and I do believe this is an important next step for the policing community for the investigative process to be successful. I believe that if we look at our justice partners from the RCMP, municipal, and Department of Justice, and all those individuals that commit their lives and work day in and day out, who are looking for the resources to do their jobs better, who are looking for a government to provide them with greater clarity and working tools. I would hope that not just the minister is taking credit for directing this, that he would acknowledge that it was the officials and the policing community - not the minister - that brought this forward. When I was minister, they came to me and we agreed.

We also agreed that they should look at a model within Atlantic Canada, and I have not heard the minister talk about the consultations that were underway with other Atlantic and Maritime officials to look at could there be a better way for cost efficiency and the independence and autonomy so that, if necessary, an investigation in Nova Scotia may not have even Nova Scotians involved to make sure it was truly independent and transparent. I have not heard the minister reference those things that officials were working on and officials did have those discussions.

I do want to acknowledge and compliment the policing community and the Chiefs of Police who came forward, and their representatives, to call for themselves being removed from that process because they wanted to ensure that the public has the utmost confidence in their work.

I know there's been some reference from the media about going back and reviewing previous cases. I've indicated that may be necessary and if there's an amendment - I would only say, in fairness, an amendment to that process for going back should only be reviewed if there is new, compelling evidence or information, not just to go back to relive the emotions around a case where an investigation was required. I think if there's new evidence or information, the Act could possibly be amended to account for that, but not to go back just because people didn't like the outcomes of a review, to have a new unit go back and do that all over again. It needs to be a go-forward process.

I would say that I applaud the minister for bringing this forward, the Progressive Conservative Caucus will support it. We do want to have more discussion and debate associated with this. We do want to make sure that it meets all of the requirements and that we can get some more clarity about the overall agenda of the government to step up to the plate and actually deliver on all aspects of the justice model for Nova Scotia; that they will

[Page 2700]

actually take an interest in honouring commitments, not just to new things and set other things aside as we're seeing; that they will be inclusive in recognizing that safer streets and communities are only a result of a government that has the integrity of honouring commitments, ensuring staff are properly resourced and that resources go, when needed, to issues that arise.

We see that within our correctional facilities at this time and we have also seen a government that's walked away from those challenges and just deferred it and blamed others and have hurt communities and have hurt job opportunities and, indeed, have hurt the integrity of the justice delivery model of this province.

However, I believe the minister will be co-operative in looking at potential amendments. I believe the minister will work, as he has to this point, with officials to make sure we have a good model for Nova Scotia, a model that works for the clarity and the transparency and the integrity of a strengthened system. With that, I thank the House for their time.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Justice.

HON. ROSS LANDRY: Mr. Speaker, before I do close debate, I wish to thank the speakers from the Opposition for their comments and their contribution. I do want to make a couple of quick points on what I heard.

First off, I want to give clarity that at no time did I criticize any civil servant. I support them 100 per cent. Also, this government is looking forward. If there's no change, there's no future. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Do you wish to move the motion?

MR. LANDRY: Mr. Speaker, I would move second reading of Bill No. 72.

[10:15 a.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 72. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

[Page 2701]

Before I go to the Government House Leader, I mentioned earlier about the poppies and the Legion. I got word since then that because of the lateness and the timing of our session here this year, they'll not be doing that. They're hoping to do it next year. So poppies will be available downstairs and we'll have a presentation next year.

The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, would you call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Deputy Government House Leader.

MR. DAVID WILSON: Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton North. I believe you have 23 minutes left.

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I do recognize that two of our new colleagues who have just entered the House for the Liberal caucus will be doing their addresses today, so maybe I'll do a bit of a shorter version, but if the government wants to continue to encourage me, I'll go the mile for them. Since they won't go the mile for Nova Scotians, someone has to stand up for them and that's why we're in this House, to hold them accountable.

If I call a précis of yesterday, I did in my reply talk about my disappointment in this House firing the Chief Clerk, walking away from the traditions of this Parliamentary democracy we have here, not standing up for an institution - the oldest one in this country, and one that was upheld within the Commonwealth - and now to destroy those things, that's what this government in their majority has decided to do, and you could not say in wisdom, because there is no wisdom in those actions.

The next time a general election comes around, the people will show the government how they feel about how they have been dealing with this institution and treating the people within this institution. That will be a reality. As I said, it's a sad day to see our institution harmed in the manner in which this government has chosen to harm it and use it as a political pawn, to throw it aside because the partisan interests of the seventh floor of the Premier's Office and the Cabinet saying, damn all, if we don't like it. No respect for this institution, that's what we have seen. I have been very disappointed, as a former Speaker of this House, to see the parliamentary traditions of this House thrown to the curb and under the Dexter bus once again.

[Page 2702]

I'm going to try to limit my comments because I know my colleagues have good things to say about their areas and they're very proud of their constituencies and the people who have helped them get to this House. I look across the way and, as I said, there are a lot of people disappointed in the government and the people who sit on the government side, because they thought they were going to do something when they got to that side of the House. They thought they were going to honour the commitments that were in their shiny campaign brochures. We now find out that that was just a big ruse - what the heck, what's that, that's only words on paper, just like keeping ERs open or honouring commitments like the Springhill correctional facility, like keeping the Yarmouth ferry going, keeping communities whole in this province. Instead they pit one community - urban against rural, one region against another region. That is the NDP legacy in less than two short years.

Gosh only knows what could come in the future, because they haven't been able to show it and they were willing for crass, political reasons to throw debt onto the children of this province - hundreds of millions, now over $1 billion or more debt on the children - to try to meet their crass political commitments and make a few stakeholders happy. That is what the NDP represents. That's what they're all about. What they're all about is saying one thing and doing another.

Yesterday we heard in this House about a concern about Holy Angels High School. The only all-girls public school east of Montreal since 1885, and this government and this Minister of Education directed that they will not support them - sent that directive. In Question Period yesterday she said it was a $10 million issue. Well, later in the day we found out it's a $750,000 issue. I'll tell you, there are 299 young women enrolled in Holy Angels High School in Sydney today - 299. I can tell you that if Dartmouth South-Portland Valley had an all-girls school with almost 300 young women in it, the minister might have a different take on the response that she would give to the school board. The minister knows that.

This government doesn't care enough to maintain what has been a great tradition in this province since 1885, but as I've said, they don't care about this institution - the oldest one in this country, 250 years of parliamentary democracy. That's all thrown amok, so the young women of Holy Angels High School are thrown under the Dexter bus as well, thrown to the curb. That is what those young women are experiencing down there.

Do you know what? I would think that they would want to hold that model up and say, we've got something good. As I know, I'm very proud of Memorial Composite High School, the only composite high school in Nova Scotia, and thank heavens, when there was a Progressive Conservative Government we would reinvest in that high school so that other students from other schools could go to that school and get trades training and academic training in that facility - a great model, but this government doesn't see fit to reinvest in it. This government doesn't see fit to recognize that model as being one to hold up and support.

[Page 2703]

I know there is one young woman from North Sydney who does three different bus transfers to get to Holy Angels every single day, going and coming back. If that school doesn't mean something to this government, it means something to that young woman who is now being deprived by the NDP of an opportunity to get the best education in a model since 1885. That's what the NDP and the Minister of Education think of 299 young women in Cape Breton and of that board.

I have the transcript and the chronology from the Cape Breton board -of dialogue -and I would ask the Pages to table, that to see where the board's interactions with this NDP Government have been. This minister's office and her officials who are throwing those young women to the curb, that's despicable but this is what this government will do. We've heard it about the Department of Justice, we've talked about the impacts of the Department of Justice, we've talked about the integrity of communities that were relying on the ferry service for Yarmouth. The government didn't care because it was all about the politics and retribution and retaliation by the NDP for individual members or communities that didn't curry their favour.

I can tell you, things have shifted in this province . I'll tell you, Nova Scotians will have a choice in the next election and the Liberals and the Tories may be at it to do it but at the end of the day, the people are always right. They were right in Cumberland South, they were right in Yarmouth, they were right in Glace Bay, they were right in Inverness and they're now second-guessing Antigonish, let me tell you. They're questioning what they thought was an NDP Government that was sincere. But you know what? In Antigonish, they threw $3 million at a library only to take away a new correctional facility. It would be kind of nice if the Minister of Justice would deal with the mould problems and the fire marshal's report down in the Antigonish facility, but they don't care about that because we're going to shut it down and what do the workers matter? Because we have a political agenda.

Somewhere in Pictou County, if you throw a dart, someone might get a new jail but at what cost to the province? At what cost to the integrity of the system? That is what the NDP Government - and from your very Chair, Her Honour, the Lieutenant-Governor, on behalf of Her Majesty, said a lot of good and noble things that are not coming to fruition in this House and are not benefiting Nova Scotians. To talk about a Party that would talk about working families and supporting them and creating good jobs, what good jobs? They're all going. The Dexter bus must be giving tickets to take them out of the province now because there are no opportunities here in Nova Scotia. If you're not under the Dexter bus, you're going to have to get on it because you have to go somewhere else for an opportunity. That's what the reality of the NDP has been.

I know there are some people sincere about wanting to represent their constituents. I don't think there is an insincere member in wanting to represent their constituents but there is an insincere political agenda and it's wrong-minded, ill-founded and it's ill-headed for that government to suggest that they think they have enough time to turn the Dexter bus around.

[Page 2704]

Well, it's a rollin' and it has gone in the wrong direction- and Nova Scotians know it- from this very institution, which we've harmed and we've been prepared to walk away from and from the very people we see in our communities, instead of having a government that will stand up.

As I've said, if this government who spent over $120 million now on dirt that no one wanted but you know, some green Nazis decided that's what they wanted. (Interruption) Let's get the land and appease some special interests

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. That term is not acceptable in this House.

MR. CLARKE: I'll retract that, Mr. Speaker, and I apologize.

MR. SPEAKER: You'll retract that? Thank you.

MR. CLARKE: People with another agenda went out there and the government was prepared to spend over $120 million and counting now for those things, yet the Minister of Education will not invest $750,000 or whatever it takes to maintain almost 300 young women getting the best education they can get in the only public girls school east of Montreal. That's the discussion. They can say what they want and they can talk about process, but that's what the NDP represents. It's a sad day in Nova Scotia and unfortunately, Nova Scotians will have to endure many more sad days. But we will be here as the Progressive Conservative caucus, we will speak up and we will hold this government to account and we will never back away from representing Nova Scotians the way this lot over there has done, thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Glace Bay.

MR. GEOFF MACLELLAN: Mr. Speaker, I want to thank my provincial colleagues, the House Leaders and your time today for this opportunity. I'd also like to thank the member for Cape Breton North for his generosity with his time.

Today I'm realizing a childhood dream. This very moment is a special one for me as I rise in the House of the historic Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly to talk about my hometown. I'm glowing with pride as I stand here as MLA for the riding of Glace Bay. Being the elected representative for our town, I often reflect on what Glace Bay is to me and I would like to paint you a picture of what Glace Bay is to all of us. It is a proud community with a storied coal mining and fishing history dating back to our official incorporation date of 1901.

It is 16,000 people who believe, as I do, that there is truly no better place to be brought up and raise a family. Glace Bay has largely avoided the trend of outward migration because our people simply want to stay home. Those who are forced to leave always do their

[Page 2705]

best to return. It is a place where respect is earned and we stand up and fight for what is right. We support those who are less fortunate and make sure that we protect those who make us who we are.

In 1902 Glace Bay became the birthplace of Marconi's transatlantic radio messages, which was a starting point for today's wireless technologies. Glace Bay is the Miners' Museum, the Savoy Theatre, the old Town Hall and the Marconi Museum. We are Renwick Brook, the Queen Elizabeth Park, the Glace Bay Harbour, the dam, the Hub Track and Table Head Beach. We are John Bernard Croak, we are J.B. McLaughlin, Matt Minglewood, Hugh MacLennan, Dave Amadio, Henry Poole MacKeen, Aselin Debision and Sergeant Jimmy MacNeil.

We are the Colliery Baseball and Hockey leagues, Caledonia Rugby, the Oland's Bay Byes, the Cinderella Miners, the Alpines, the Antonians and the Glace Bay Colonels. We are the Miners Forum in the BAYplex, the Cameron Bowl, South Street Field, the Robbie MacDonald Field and we are Ring 73. We are a community of communities with the proud people of Table Head, the Sterling, the Hub, Number 2, Number 11, Bridgeport, Chapel Hill, MacKay's Corner, Dominion Street, Steele's Hill, Caledonia and South Street coming together as one.

We are strong and proud seniors, we are fearless Canadian Forces veterans and we are loving families whose children will carry our legacy and direct our future.

Mr. Speaker, Glace Bay is my home and always will be. I am a product of our town and its people and I can tell you that there's no better feeling in this world than being given an opportunity to fight for your home. (Applause) I offered to represent our community because I want to help and we certainly need it in the proud Bay. I am worried about Glace Bay. If I wasn't, Mr. Speaker, I wouldn't be standing before you.

The challenges facing Glace Bay are complicated, without question. However, that doesn't mean we can sit idly by and let inactivity erode our population and our spirits. For every problem there is a solution and there is no time like the present to begin chipping away at major issues affecting our quality of life. Glace Bay needs jobs. Sure, it's not the hub of economic activity in this province, but that doesn't mean that we don't have strategic opportunities to create those jobs and keep our people at home, or at least bring them back from Alberta, British Columbia and Ontario.

[10:30 a.m.]

Supporting the Donkin Mine will provide a link to our historic economic drivers of the past. This development will create high-tech, well-paying jobs and will be the boost our economy is certainly looking for. In addition, we have to find a way to get the Sydney Harbour dredged as this development will have significant impact on the local workforce.

[Page 2706]

Employment relating to the dredging project, as well as the potential of a container port development, may serve as a future economic pillar for our island, which greatly impacts my home and riding of Glace Bay.

We have to work with private and public partners to ensure that the federal government is getting our message. The time for politics on this issue is over, the time to help Cape Breton move forward is now.

It is hard to envision a better community suited for potential developments in the all-important new area of the global economy and that is renewable energies. The province has set renewable energy targets for the next 10 years and there are few areas of our great province that are better equipped than us with ideal wind conditions, extensive tidal power, geothermal options through our legacy of coal mining and a tremendous opportunity being explored known as underground coal gasification.

While we look at the aforementioned future options, we must be sure to support those businesses and entrepreneurs who are carrying our private sector currently. We have to continue to spread the "buy local" message, Mr. Speaker, whether it's for the retail, food, or entertainment sectors. Small businesses are the drivers of our economy and need our support now more than ever. Whether we develop a plan for attracting more investment dollars or we establish a better tax system, we have to pitch in and help out and we have to make the link between family and small businesses. I know this would help the business owners in Glace Bay. The ultimate goal of economic development is to keep our families here and keep our families together.

I'm also worried about our future generations. Our youth truly are at risk. In Glace Bay our young people face challenges with broken and unhappy families, access to drugs, lack of recreation options, lack of educational support during their developmental stages - all-important developmental stages - and even financial support for the basic necessities of life. Our future is in jeopardy unless we find a way to ensure our children are safe, warm, dry, nourished, active, and educated. Politicians can't solve this problem alone. We have to engage our teachers, doctors, social workers, police force, guidance counsellors, parents, and the youth to get a real sense for the different perspectives in play. By understanding the specific needs of our at-risk youth, we can tailor programs and offer services that will get our kids on the right track and keep them there.

We should not suggest that our children are inactive if they don't have a myriad of options to get them off the couch or away from their computers. What we have to do is get back to basics: finding out what our youth enjoy and then developing, nurturing, coaching, and guiding these kids as they develop their interests and skills. Sport and recreation and arts and culture are two key areas for youth activity and development, of course. However, we do have the duty to support organizations from a financial perspective, supporting volunteerism and establishing a strategic plan for improving or at least maintaining our

[Page 2707]

eroding recreational facilities. Every community needs rec centres and recreation, including Glace Bay.

Mr. Speaker, Glace Bay is rich with seniors who remember the glory days of our town, and it's our absolute duty to support and protect those who laid the foundations for our community. The problems related to ER closures, drug coverage, and timely access to medical procedures are certainly extremely complex. That's why we should work together on these issues in Nova Scotia. The health of our seniors should never be political. Bringing in and retaining doctors in our province is a real problem that requires a measured strategy. This is not just about the health care system. It's also about making our communities more attractive and our business environment more competitive so that medical professionals want to come, live, and stay in Nova Scotia.

In addition to medical support, we need a detailed plan for seniors' recreation. Falls are the leading cause of hospital admissions and ER visits for seniors. Half of the nursing home admissions and 90 per cent of hip fractures can be attributed to falls. How do we help seniors combat falls? By delivering recreation options that combat the effects of muscle weakness, loss of balance, fatigue, and arthritis. In addition, we can help our seniors avoid falls by continuing and strengthening environmental modification programs that provide risk assessments and financial support to pay for those home modifications.

Mr. Speaker, I am also fearful of the mindset of Nova Scotians with respect to their representatives and the political system that governs the land. Many people have simply lost confidence in who they vote for. Nova Scotians are disenfranchised with Party politics and want people to be straight up with them and just tell the truth, whether it's good, bad, or otherwise. We have to work to rebuild the broken trust and get Nova Scotia to a place where our citizens can look to the Legislature and know that their best interests are being addressed or at the very least considered. We have to support our vital social programs, enhance economic development, and show Nova Scotians that we can manage their tax dollars. We need our people to trust us and know that we are doing everything we can to increase their quality of life in this province.

I just want to take a few moments to talk about some of the great things that are happening in my area as we speak. There are many problems and challenges, but there are also some great signs and good things happening on the ground in Glace Bay. What many people talk about is the youth centre and why we need a youth centre in places like Glace Bay, and it is to direct kids away from the challenges, the problems and the dangers that are out there and get them to somewhere where they're safe, where they can explore their options and they can explore their interests.

We have the Undercurrent Youth Centre which is about 80 per cent finished and it has been done entirely from community people, with some government funding, but at the end of the day it is the people who are empowered. They've come together to build this centre that is much needed in the Bay, so I think that's our start. As government

[Page 2708]

representatives we can do so much and as political representatives we can do so much, but without the people we just can't get to where we want to be. I think this is a great example of people who come together in a community and really see a problem, recognize it and help out. I'm very proud that the Undercurrent Youth Centre is coming along.

We've also turned a corner with respect to education in Glace Bay, where we're about to open the new junior high school in Glace Bay, Oceanview Education Centre, which replaced St. Michael's Junior High and Morrison Junior High; a tremendous facility that is built and it's going to serve our junior high-aged kids well. It's another step in the right direction and we're very happy about that. Again, it's mixing the junior high-aged kids from all over the community into one facility, so I think it's good for our culture, it's good for our people and it's certainly good for the teachers and educators in Glace Bay, so that's a good thing for sure.

I'm very happy to say one of those key resources and pillars of our community had somewhat of a rebound year and that would be the fisheries in Glace Bay. Early on in the summer I took the opportunity to go down to the wharf at 4:00 a.m. and talk to some of the fishers before they went out and it wasn't a phenomenal year, but they had a good year and I think that's a good sign. Again, many families and the economy in Glace Bay are connected to the fisheries, so that's important and that was certainly a good thing.

The Devco legacy projects are ongoing, that's to remediate and improve some of the lands that were owned by Devco, the mining corporation in Glace Bay and in Cape Breton. These projects are moving along nicely with soccer fields, green spaces, rugby fields, so that's certainly a welcome improvement in Glace Bay and we're happy to see those for sure.

The celebration of Marcus Garvey Days this past summer, the UNIA Culture Museum in the Sterling in Glace Bay, a phenomenal group of people, fantastic organizers and the event was very well done. The UNIA hall itself was founded in 1918 and restored in 2004, very beautiful and it looks after some of those issues that are affecting African Nova Scotians in Glace Bay and in Cape Breton. It was a great celebration and we congratulate the board of directors and Theresa Brewster in particular, who was a major force there.

The Table Head Development Society is one of those examples when you talk about empowering people. The Table Head Development Society is my former neighbourhood and what they did was looked around their streets and figured they needed change, needed things better, and needed things improved. They took it upon themselves to form a society and do some things - now they have an annual festival, they've raised a significant amount of money for major infrastructure investments . They provide an opportunity for the kids, the adults and the seniors of the area and of Glace Bay to get together and celebrate our history, our culture and our future, we're happy about that.

[Page 2709]

Next I want to mention the local radio, the Coast radio, a great community radio station, local content, fantastic job that they do and they are locally owned and they do an exceptional job in Glace Bay, representing those things that are all-important to us.

I'm going to end this positive segment by talking about the thing I'm most comfortable with and that would be sports. We've got some tremendous things, it doesn't matter what's happening in Glace Bay, our culture is always defined by and our fabric is always supported by sport, so we've got a few exceptional things happening.

One thing that has really revived the recreation facilities in Glace Bay and revived sports for not just a certain group of the population, but for everybody, was the formation of a women's baseball league in Glace Bay. It is a fantastic league, it currently has over 14 teams with females age 15 and up, and it's an incredible thing because when the games are played the stands are full, the place is packed, there are kids, there are seniors, people come out to watch these events and cheer on their team. It's an incredible thing and it has really, really reinvigorated and re-energized sport in Glace Bay. So that's a fantastic thing and we're happy to have them, for sure.

The Glace Bay Minor Hockey program is going strong once again. Many, many kids benefit from their coaching development and the opportunity to spend their time and their recreation opportunities at the rink. So Glace Bay Minor Hockey, they do an exceptional job.

We've just announced the return to Junior B hockey in Glace Bay. The Junior B Miners are back in the Nova Scotia Junior B Hockey League. (Applause) We're happy to have them back at the BAYplex in Glace Bay. It's been an incredible few games so far - there haven't been any fights yet so people are a little bit disappointed, but I'm sure we'll get there eventually. Welcome back to the Junior B hockey team. A good friend of mine, Ryan Joe MacKenzie is the coach there and he's doing a great job, along with Kent Verbeski.

The Vince Ryan Hockey Tournament in March will celebrate the 22nd annual edition of the tournament. That probably, you have to say, is an incredible economic development driver for Glace Bay. It's a four-day tournament, brings in over $5 million and 3,000 players alone. That's not families, that's not children, that's not spectators, just players alone - 3,000 people, so that's a pretty incredible event. We congratulate Rich Warren for the great work he does there.

Finally, in December there is the 14th Annual Panther Classic, which is a great institution and hockey tournament within the Nova Scotia Sport Federation. Many of the teams from metro Halifax, the high school hockey teams, come to the Panther Classic, the 14th edition this year. I'm looking forward to being there and dropping the puck and it will be a great event. Again, you don't find an empty seat in the house at the BAYplex for any of these games - and not just when the local teams are playing, when anybody's in town. It's

[Page 2710]

an exceptional event and I congratulate Ryan Boutilier, the head coach and a great guy who put together a good program there.

I just briefly want to mention some places to visit in Glace Bay, if any of my colleagues are coming down any time soon. My wife and I have some room in the house, so if you ever need a place to stay come on down. First of all, I think many of these pillars and institutions in Glace Bay you've heard of before. To start with, the historic Savoy Theatre in Glace Bay, built in the 1920s and it's home to the Summertime Revue. We've had incredible acts over the years: The Rankins, Matt Minglewood, The Barra MacNeils, Aselin Debison, Stompin' Tom, Blue Rodeo, and the White Stripes, just to name a few - and that's only in the last couple of years. So they do an incredible job. And I'd just like to send my get well wishes to the manager of the Savoy, Pam Leader, who is not feeling very well, so we want to make sure she has a speedy recovery and gets back to her great management style at the Savoy.

I'd also like to mention the Miners' Museum, which is an incredible place in Glace Bay. Opened in 1967, it obviously recognizes our very rich mining history and legacy in Glace Bay, and it provides an opportunity for visitors to actually go down and see a real, live mine site and how they work and what kinds of things are there, the infrastructure and the working conditions that are experienced in a mine, so an incredible thing. The Miners' Museum is a great place to be and it's also very important because it's home to the legendary choir, the Men of the Deeps. (Applause) So that's a great place.

[10:45 a.m.]

Next would be the Marconi Museum and, as I mentioned early, December 1902, from a transmission station in a neighbourhood called Table Head, inventor Guglielmo Marconi sent what was the first two-way transatlantic radio message. It's obviously a very proud part of our history that we celebrate and I think what's interesting - for Marconi, he had several places he could have located during the early 1900s and he chose Glace Bay because of the potential it had at the time, and I think that's a very significant point to make because I think we're all here and we're representing our communities because of the potential they have. I like to think of those days and I like to think that we're going to get back there someday. It's a great place to see and, again, an important part of our legacy, to say the least.

Finally, I just want to mention the Old Town Hall Museum, which was established in 1901. This again speaks to the empowerment of the people in Glace Bay. Back in the day it was home to all the civic services: the mayor and council, police and fire, the courthouse and even the jail. As you can imagine it was a pretty big building and it was pretty hectic at times, I'm sure. It was set for destruction back a few years ago and a group of very concerned people in Glace Bay formed a society to protect that very important building in our community.

[Page 2711]

Now it's home to the Glace Bay Museum, which has an incredible amount of artifacts and things that represent who we are, who we were and who we will be. They just opened the second floor this summer and that's all sports history and heritage, so an incredible place to visit as well.

I do want to mention one more, I don't want to miss this one because it's about boxers and they're the one people I don't want to miss. Ring 73 is a boxing facility in Glace Bay. It's a very small place in the neighbourhood known as the Hub in Glace Bay. It's made famous by people like Greg Martin, Blair Boone, Harry Reid, sole olympian Marty O'Donnell, John Vincent Gouthro, John John McCarthy, Keegan and Kyle Clarke, and that's just to name a few. I hope I didn't miss any important ones because I'll have to hide out for a few days. That's a very valuable and integral part of our history, both with sports and just as a community. We're pretty tough in the Bay and Ring 73 has a lot to do with it.

Basically, I can't really pick a favourite here. Every nook and cranny of Glace Bay is tied for my favourite, so I just want to mention some of those and get them on the record. I know my time is running a little short and my good friend from Yarmouth is getting ready to speak (Interruption) okay, I'll keep going then, how about that? Thank you, Mr. House Leader.

I want to mention the reasons why I did run. We all have our reasons and it's all part of who we are, where we come from, the timing and those types of things, but there are probably five key ones that I believe and I've touched on some of them. People really have lost faith in politics and the political system. It's not a Party to blame, it's not individual people to blame, it's just the way it is. That's a very sad thing for our democracy and it's a very tough thing for our province. I saw that in Glace Bay. It's difficult when you talk to people in the Bay and they're not picking one person or one Party over the other, they've just decided, I'm not going to vote at all. That's a very scary thing for us and a very scary thing for our country. I don't think we're alone there, but that's something we really have to worry about.

I truly believe that I can be the person for Glace Bay, as you all do for your own respective ridings, that you can make those changes and change the mindset and let people know that we are looking after their best interests and we're doing our best to help them all as much as we can, and getting people excited about government, about our system, about politics and elections because that's what we need. It's surely lacking with the youth, but it's almost contagious and there's a very small level of interest and level of trust out there. I think we have to get back to that. (Applause)

The second reason I ran is what I fear and what I see with the youth. They're turning to their computers, turning to themselves, they're turning to drugs. I don't think we do a good enough job to make them realize what's out there and what opportunities they have. When I was a kid, a couple of years ago, when Zach was a kid last month, you weren't allowed to

[Page 2712]

stay in the house, you had to get out there and do something. It didn't matter what it was, it was just get out. Now, that culture and mindset and philosophy has changed and I think when you provide youth centres, when you help support volunteerism in communities, when you provide new recreation and sport options, when you provide arts and culture, funding programs and ideas, I think that changes the mindset.

I think it starts with Glace Bay, it started for me in June and it'll continue now and I think that's an important thing. We can't lose track and we can't lose sight of our youth. That's a big thing for me and that's what I want to do to the best of my abilities in Glace Bay and I just think it's time and we can do that together. That's an important thing that we have to accomplish as representatives. (Applause)

The third reason I offered my name and ran in Glace Bay is to basically try to stop that trend of outward migration that I mentioned. In Glace Bay, relatively, it's not as bad as maybe it could be, but the bottom line in Glace Bay now - and again, this is connected to the youth and to the present and the adults who are in the working category now. When you are in Glace Bay and you go to high school, most people - more than half of the graduates every year - assume that they're going to get an education, training of some sort, some kind of added skill set, and they're leaving. The mindset is, I'm going to be in Alberta or I'm going to be in Ontario or I'm going to be somewhere. That is now entrenched in our culture, and that's just wrong.

What people realize - at a young age you might think that, but when you get to the point where you're in your 20s and 30 and beyond, every year it gets more prevalent: home is the best place in the world to be and nothing will ever take its place - not money, not options, and not things to do on the weekend. My goal and my mission and my hope is that I can do my best and keep people home who want to be there, and most people in Glace Bay do. I want to see a day where people graduate, go to school in Cape Breton if not Nova Scotia, and then are home and stay home and raise their kids at home and live there, and that's what I see in Glace Bay.

Fourthly, I truly believe that we do have to empower people, and that is the word I use because that is what creates partnerships with government, with our political system, and with the people of our community. We must empower the people. We must empower the youth, empower seniors to become more active and healthy, empower our working population to obtain the training and jobs that will pay the bills and allow them to live in comfort. Empowerment of our citizens and our residents is one of the reasons and the fourth reason why I'm here.

The final reason is that I truly believe in Glace Bay. I know we can do better. I know we can be better. We've got the people - we've got great quality people - and I just think that we need the community stakeholders to come together even more and push more and get involved and become volunteers and get entrenched in the community and find out what is

[Page 2713]

missing and where we can help. Everybody can help a little bit, given their expertise and their background and their knowledge of Glace Bay. That is what I am hoping for, and I truly do hope that I'm given and I'm blessed with the tools and the skills to be that champion and help people bring Glace Bay up to where we know it can be and allow it to rise and be the great community and great former town that we all believe it will be some day. That's why I'm here.

Finally, I want to take this moment to recognize some of the very key people who allowed me to realize this dream and represent the good people of Glace Bay. I hope you are comfortable.

First of all, I'd like to thank my lovely, beautiful wife, Leah. She knew I had the political bug from a very young age and she supported me through the whole thing, so I appreciate her support. She is with me all the way and she knows I'll do the right things, and I appreciate that. She's not here today, but she's with me on the Blackberry, so she is keeping tabs. Anyway, I appreciate her love and support and I certainly won't let her down. (Applause)

My father, Dan, who is a former Devco coal miner, had a few simple words for me this morning: just do your best and don't screw it up. Thanks for that, Dad. Also, my mother, Donna MacLellan, who makes just about the best tea biscuits in the province. Everyone at the election headquarters enjoyed those, so I challenge you to try those and not agree with me. Mom was a tremendous help in the election and through my whole life. She's not part of Ring 73, either.

Very quickly, the rest of my list: my sister, Laurie Mortimer; Earl, Tanya, and their new baby, Nadara Gracie; Jamie and Wendy Pollock - brother Jamie; Trisha MacDonald; Yvonne O'Neill; Al Chenel; Mike and Donna Catoul; Garret Pollock, my nephew, and Vanessa Davidson; John John McCarthy, my boxing buddy; Shaun O'Neill; Katherine MacDonald; Bill Taylor; Jeff Clements; Junior MacKeigan; Brett Hopkins; Steven Moore; Jenn Burke; Kay Cuzner and Dolly Milbury; Rodger and Lynn Cuzner; Darlene Cuzner and Jim MacLean; Kim Bedecki; Julie Tomado; Mike Kelloway; Mason Fraser; Star MacDonald; Donnie Campbell; Darryl MacAulay; Donald Headley; Sean Burke; Barry and Marguerite Verbeski; Cecil MacQueen; Rudy MacDougall; Reggie Lambert; Nick Sinclair; Matt Lever; Gregory MacNeil; Chris Burke; Grant MacEachern; Derrick Hayes; Ashley MacDonald; Arlene McVarish; Mitch, Scott and Brad Cuzner; Brett, Wayne and Jerry Bedecki . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Have you got the phone book over there?

MR. MACLELLAN: . . . Sis and Gerald Murrin - now I'm on the d's - Jim Dwyer; Josephine Kennedy; Kim MacIntyre; Arlene Billard; Cathy Donovan; Pat Donovan; Ian O'Neill and Kelly England; Joe Gobbler, Barb, Joey, Cindy, Eeker, Angela and Kelly MacDonald; Dale and Boo Bert; Nicole and Terry Wilcox; Dorothy Smith; Bubby O'handley; Ernie Pyke; Jason Samson and Crystal Miller; Charlie Bella Warren - I know this

[Page 2714]

is long but this is my only shot at this - and finally Russell Barrett; Derek MacInnis; Kenny MacDonald; Allen Farrell; Aubrey Cameron; Dave Donovan; Brian Kelloway; Katie, Courtney and Tyler Mortimer; Linda Sheppard; Naish and Olga Burke; Emma Adlaka; Mick Kelloway; Betty Oliver; Robin Clarke; Belinda Gracie; John Lawrence MacLeod; Kathleen and Hailey Budden; Emily Neville; Kenzie Wadden; and The Four Corners Band. (Applause)

AN HON. MEMBER: Who's in the band?

MR. MACLELLAN: To those people and to all the people of my community, I promise to give it all that I can to make sure that your best interests are protected and your voices are heard. You have put your faith in me and I promise I will not let you down.

I thank my Legislature colleagues for listening to my maiden speech and I thank you for your time, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, honourable member, well done and you're off to a good start.

[11:00 a.m.]

The honourable member for Yarmouth.

MR. ZACH CHURCHILL: Mr. Speaker, it's an honour and a privilege to be here today representing the proud constituency of Yarmouth in the Legislative Assembly of the great Province of Nova Scotia. Yarmouth is my home, it's the home of my family and the home of many proud and resilient people, and it is an absolute honour and privilege to represent them here. In the previous positions I've held representing students or working in the Public Service, I've actually watched the business of Province House from the outside, so I do know I'm in for a real treat being on the inside with all these distinguished members.

I, of course, wouldn't be here without the help of a driven, dedicated and hard-working campaign team. I would not be here without the donors who generously contributed to our campaign or the many volunteers who gave their time and energy to see that our campaign was a success. Now, Geoff had to go and list all of his people, I won't be doing that today, but to all those who were involved in our campaign, whether they were making calls, asking for money, canvassing with me, giving money or anything else, I want to thank them and recognize them here in the Legislative Assembly. (Applause)

I'd like to extend a special thank you to my family, the Churchills and the Bisharas, for their enduring support and love, which has long been a pillar of strength for me and I'm sure will continue to be. I would like to particularly recognize and thank my parents, Joanne Bishara and Jack Churchill, for being great parents and for their support during the campaign. In fact, I believe one of the biggest reasons I was elected, Mr. Speaker, was because of the

[Page 2715]

respect my mother and father have in our community due to the strength of character they both have as individuals. Door-to-door I would hear, I played hockey with your father - that wasn't always a good thing - or I worked for your father, or your mother taught me; they're good people. This is what I heard at the doorstep and it made me so proud to be their son.

At one door in particular, an elderly woman proceeded to tell me she wasn't voting at all for anyone because all politicians were the same, they don't care about people, they only care about themselves. I wasn't able to get one word in before she turned my brochure around and said, oh you're Joanne's boy, I'm sorry, you have my vote. You see, I'm lucky to have the parents I do.

It was a very enlightening experience canvassing door-to-door throughout the district of Yarmouth. Everywhere, whether I was in South End, Sandford, Port Maitland, Brenton, Carleton, Kemptville, Deerfield, Hebron, Pembrook, Cheboge, Rockville, Ohio - maybe I should have listed all the names of my supporters - Arcadia, Pinkneys Point or any of the other beautiful and unique communities of our district, I did hear a constant refrain - a refrain that has continued throughout Yarmouth since the day of that by-election and I am saddened that I do have to share that refrain today. We are being ignored, I heard, we have been forgotten and we have become isolated. This has been followed by a simple but compelling and very sincere question, why is this happening to us? Unfortunately, I neither had nor have an answer.

These feelings are mostly due to this government's decision in 2009 to cut the Yarmouth ferry link to New England, a decision which has had a devastating impact on our economy and on the surrounding area and on the lives of many business owners and families in our district.

I have met with unemployed ferry workers, some of whom had worked on a ferry in Yarmouth for the entirety of their adult lives, who are now without work and are deeply concerned about their future and the future of their families. I have talked to tourism operators and business owners whose livelihood is dependent on a ferry service between Yarmouth and New England.

Just this past Monday, members of the Liberal caucus hosted a round table in Yarmouth with local tourism operators and business owners to discuss the impact that the ferry loss has had on them. They provided us with their numbers and I'll tell you, the numbers were stark. (Interruption) We did have a special guest at that meeting, Chris d'Entremont, a member of the Progressive Conservative caucus.

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. Honourable member, I'll just remind you that for the House you're not to use Christian names or first names of members. I've noticed both the past two speakers have done that. Just for your information, that's a Rule of the House not to use Christian names.

[Page 2716]

The honourable member for Yarmouth has the floor.

MR. CHURCHILL: The numbers were stark, Mr. Speaker. Neil Hisgen of the MacKinnon Can Inn reported an 80 per cent drop in American visitors and he has had to lay off all of his staff. David Darby, director of the Yarmouth Fire Fighters Museum reported that American visitations were down 86.7 per cent. Bruce Bishop, director of the Yarmouth County Museum and Archives reported that archival visits in 2010 were down over 40 per cent since 2009. Bill Curry, the fifth-generation owner and operator of Tight Line Guides reported that after the government's announcement on the cut to the ferry, he lost every single one of his bookings for the 2010 season.

Brenda Doucette of Canada Glass Art reported that her business is down 67 per cent since 2009. She had to lay off all five of her full-time staff. Brian Rodney, a tourism operator, is in the process of converting his hotel and restaurant businesses into housing units and has been forced to lay off 20 of his staff, five of whom had been with him for over 20 years. Nancy Nowls of the Yarmouth Light - Yarmouth's famous, beautiful and historic lighthouse - reported that there has been a 79 per cent drop in American visitors to the Yarmouth Light.

Sharon Lloyd of the Yarmouth Wool Shop reported a 40 per cent drop in business between 2009 and 2010. Carlene MacDonald, owner and operator of Water Wood Bed and Breakfast, reported a 20 per cent drop in occupancy attributed directly to the loss of the ferry. Rose Madden of Yarmouth and Acadian Shores reported that visitors to their information centre decreased by 63 per cent this year. They had 3,000 American visitors in 2009 and 500 in 2010.

Just this week I spoke with Mark Rodd, President and CEO of Rodd Hotels and Resorts, owner of the Colony Harbour Inn and the Rodd Grand Hotel, the two largest hotels in Yarmouth. He informed me that between 2009 and 2010 the Colony is down 600 room nights. They have suffered a loss of $120,000 in room revenues and $175,000 in food and beverage revenues. The Grand Hotel, which has also suffered a loss, is down 2,500 rooms and has suffered financial losses of $300,000 in room revenues and $150,000 in food and beverage revenues.

The grand total of Mark Rodd's loss on these two businesses in Yarmouth, a staggering $745,000. The only reason he has stayed open is because of his commitment to the people of Yarmouth and his hope that the community will secure a ferry service for 2011. (Applause) If there is no ferry service, I wonder how he will be able to keep his doors open and what will happen to the 150 people who are employed by the Rodd company in Yarmouth.

[Page 2717]

I've spoken with Canada Border Service Agency's officers at the Port of Yarmouth who could lose their jobs if there is no international ferry service next year. These are good paying jobs and have become staple jobs in our community.

Unfortunately, these disheartening stories do not end with the impact of the ferry loss. I've also spoken to seniors and individuals of all ages who are without a family doctor and who are forced to wait sometimes more than 12 hours just to get their prescriptions filled. Estimates of individuals without a family doctor in Yarmouth range from 3,500 to over 8,000. Unfortunately, we don't know what the number is for sure.

I've talked to fishermen bringing their catch ashore to prices that are lower than ever, proud fishermen who break their backs day in and day out to bring us fish, worried about the future of their precious livelihood. I've heard from concerned community members along the Tusket water system, faced with blooms of blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, which can have long term chronic effects on human health. To date there has been nothing done to clean these toxins up or to even warn local residents and summer visitors of the dangers in the water.

I've met with youth who are homeless and fearful of the coming winter months, farmers who are worried about the future of the local agriculture industry and their ability to sell their nutritious and delicious produce. I've met with herring workers, struggling to find work and secure the hours they need to qualify for employment insurance. I have spoken with single parents struggling to find money for their children's medication, let alone for university or college. I have talked to countless young people - like many of the friends and children of the members of this House - doubting if they will be able to make a future in Yarmouth with their family or even in Nova Scotia, close to home.

These are the stories of my community. Stories of neighbours, friends, fathers, mothers, sons and daughters. This has become our story, Yarmouth's story, and I'm energized to represent the people of Yarmouth in this House because I believe that story can change.

Is government to blame for all these things? Can government fix all these things? Perhaps not. The challenges that Yarmouth and the province face are in part due to global trends and events that few people have control over. Many parts of North America are faced with an aging population so there are less young people and a higher demand on our health care services and many regions in our country are facing a doctor shortage.

The world is dealing with the phenomenon of urbanization with more and more people moving into cities. There is a global downturn in American tourism and the world just went through a massive recession. Locally, the price of our fish has gone down, the Canadian dollar has gone up and herring are staying at the bottom of the ocean where they can't be caught.

[Page 2718]

This government's decisions have impacted and will continue to impact the outcomes in this province and the lives of people in our communities. Government can partner with businesses, industry and communities like ours in Yarmouth to help to create the conditions for success in certain areas. In Yarmouth that means treating our ferry as an economic investment and helping the area secure a ferry service for next year. That's what it is - it's an economic investment. As Spencer Consulting has just recently reported, an annual $6 million investment in the Yarmouth-New England ferry service would yield over $22 million in profits for the Province of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, it is also important to note that the data used in this report is from the provincial and federal tourism statistics compiled during the recession. Just imagine what those numbers would be based on good tourism seasons. I was asked yesterday by the Minister of Economic and Rural Development to table that report and I'd like to table that today, Mr. Speaker.

I just read today that this government will be extending a subsidy to the C.B. Rail. I did read a quote from the Minister of Economic and Rural Development that said this shouldn't be compared . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: How short is that memory . . .

MR. CHURCHILL: Until September of next year - this shouldn't be compared to a ferry service in Yarmouth because when rails are gone, they can never come back. I just want to assure the minister and this House, with infrastructure changing in Yarmouth, with tourism operators changing their business models from bed and breakfasts, motels, hotels, to housing units, with restaurants closing and with our port status in jeopardy - if we don't have a ferry service next year, Mr. Speaker, ours might be gone forever as well.

Mr. Speaker, a partner in government means supporting our entrepreneurs and small businesses and not burdening them with high business tax. Reviewing our current incentive programs to recruit and retain doctors in rural areas, identifying the areas where we're not competing and development new, creative solutions to addressing our current doctor shortage. It means promoting local farmers and producers, helping our farmers develop local markets to sell their produce and creating province-wide regulations to promote our high quality local products. It means providing financial support to community groups like the Tri-County Women's Centre and the SHYFT Initiative who are trying to address the issue of homelessness in youth in our communities. It means working with our municipal governments to get a regional development agency back in southwestern Nova Scotia to help recruit industry, create jobs and grow the economy.

I'll be very clear, Mr. Speaker. The people of Yarmouth don't want a handout, the people of Yarmouth just want to work. They want to partner in this government, they want to be productive, they want an economic success story where tourism is strengthened, where

[Page 2719]

the fishery is thriving, where industry is growing. Where small businesses are flourishing, where entrepreneurs are able to pursue their dreams. Where young people are able to find jobs at home so they can be with their families and where all people are able to live happy and healthy lives. These are the hopes of my community and these are the hopes I'll be championing on its behalf in this House.

Through me, Mr. Speaker, you will hear the anger, frustration and confusion of my constituents. Constituents who do feel abandoned, who feel forgotten and who feel that their hopes aren't fully being reached. In me, you will find someone always willing to extend a hand across partisan lines, to work for the good of my community, the good of the Province of Nova Scotia if a hand is extended back.

[11:15 a.m.]

Mr. Speaker, one of my professors at Saint Mary's, Magi Abdul-Masih, who is an inspiration to her students - much like the member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island is - asked our class a question during one of our weekly sessions. She asked, do you know what builds bridges? Do you know what breaks down misconceptions? Do you know what fosters understanding, what brings people together and, in so doing, what changes the world? We, in our infinite wisdom, replied with what we thought was a brilliant answer, we said love. She said nice try, it comes before love. She said friendship changes the world.

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to developing friendships with all the distinguished members of this House, to develop friendships that are forged in our common desire and mission to improve our communities and make Nova Scotia a better place to live for all of our citizens. If we work together we can address the challenges that my community faces in Yarmouth, the challenges that communities face across this province and the challenges that our province faces as a whole. Because by working together, all is possible. Thank you so much. (Sustained Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, honourable member. You too are off to a good start. The honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

MR. LEONARD PREYRA: Mr. Speaker, it's a real pleasure to rise here and to follow my student Zach Churchill, and . . . (Interruptions) Oh, sorry, let me take that back.

MR. SPEAKER: The rule in the House is that we don't use surnames or Christian names. Just a reminder, honourable member, not to use first names.

MR. PREYRA: Earlier on I heard you caution him on this very point and obviously we both missed that lecture, Mr. Speaker. Let me start again.

I would like to congratulate the honourable member for Yarmouth and the member for Glace Bay on a great start to their first two days in this House. I heard them yesterday in

[Page 2720]

Question Period and I know they will carry that spirit of co-operation and constructive engagement that they showed today in this House.

Both of the honourable members talked about the great honour and privilege it is to serve in this House. They both talked in the same way that I feel, that as representatives here we carry not only the hopes and aspirations and dreams of the constituencies we represent, but also the hopes and dreams of our families, our parents, our friends, and all of us who have gone before. We represent, in many ways, the collective efforts of those people to get us to where we are. I want to congratulate the honourable members for Glace Bay and Yarmouth in particular for reminding us of that great heritage, of reminding us of our obligations to our constituencies, to our communities, to our families, and to each other.

I know that the honourable member for Glace Bay talked about some of the things that he heard on the doorsteps in Glace Bay. I was in Glace Bay for the campaign as well and I heard much the same thing. I heard that there is a lack of faith in politics and politicians, that we do need to restore hope, that we do need to earn the trust of our constituents, to convince them that we are there to serve the people.

In the four years that I have been in this House, I honestly believe that all my colleagues on both sides of the House believe that - they are here to serve the people. They believe they can make a difference, they would like to make a difference, and they would like to leave their constituencies and the province a better place at the end of it. I'm delighted to say that when I was in Glace Bay, we still had that sense of faith and hope on the doorsteps. Although people may be disillusioned, they're not so disillusioned that they would not pick good MLAs and would not vote and would not talk about their hopes and aspirations.

It's the same in my constituency in Halifax Citadel-Sable Island. I must say, when I was first asked to run for office I didn't like the idea of going door to door and knocking on doors. I shared the sense that many people had that politicians were intruding on people's spaces, that they were bothering people when they were interested in other things. My constituents are happy to see me at the door and I now try and spend as much time as I can on the doorstep.

Yes, they do tell me that they're fed up with the system, that there are things about the system they would like to change, but I'm happy to say that they like their individual MLAs. They like their politicians. They believe that any time they come into contact with the office, they're happy with the response they get and they're happy with the follow-up. I think that's something to keep in mind. As MLAs, we have an obligation to our communities and to our constituencies. People honestly believe that we are doing the best job that we can for them.

I agree with the member for Glace Bay when he talks about the need for engagement, for more inclusive politics, for more empowering politics. I too heard that. When I was in

[Page 2721]

Glace Bay I was surprised at the number of people who said that they had four or five people registered in their homes, yet only one or two or three of them were there. They had spouses or their brothers or sisters or children who were away and that those children wanted to come back.

We have the same issues here in Halifax Citadel-Sable Island, Mr. Speaker, and we too would like to bring back many of the people who have left. We would like to keep many of the young people who want to work here. We too would like to empower people and that's why we are engaging in a program to do that very thing. People on the doorstep in Halifax Citadel-Sable Island also told me that they would like us to make life better for Nova Scotian families. They told us that they would like better health care, that they would like to reduce wait times. I'm happy to say that the Minister of Health and Minister of Health Promotion and Protection has embarked on that very thing, that we are responding to that need that we've heard on the doorstep. They want better jobs. They want more meaningful jobs. They want jobs that are innovative. They want jobs that are challenging them and that's something that we are also embarking on.

But above all, Mr. Speaker, they would like us to live within our means. They would like all of those things but they would also understand that we have to do what we can to make sure that our revenues match our expenses, that we have to generate ways of raising more revenues or we have to find ways of cutting costs, or we have to find ways of reallocating costs and using our monies in the most efficient way.

Mr. Speaker, while I share with the member for Glace Bay, the member for Yarmouth, that our constituents want us to do a number of things, they would also like us to do more direct things to help make Nova Scotia a better place, put Nova Scotia in a better position down the road to do many of the things that we want to do to meet many of the hopes and aspirations and dreams that they have. So I want to commend the members for Glace Bay and Yarmouth on reminding us of that and bringing those things forward.

Now, I have a special fondness for the member for Yarmouth. He and I have been together for many years and maybe it was my familiarity that made me refer to him by name, his first name. He started out as a student of mine but we are friends and over the years I have watched his career blossom. He was a very active, productive and effective student on campus and I know that he brought to the campus a certain energy and sense of enterprise. I spent a lot of time with faculty, staff and students and he was a great bridge builder and I look forward to him playing a similar role in his constituency and also building a bridge with government and with his colleagues in the House. I know that he and I have talked before about this, that although the public, generally, has the impression that we spend a lot of time arguing with each other, the fact of the matter is that politics and the future belong to those who build bridges and those who are constructive and those who come forward with good ideas.

[Page 2722]

I know that when I was on the other side of the House, there were ministers we worked with that engaged in that process and it was a constructive process and we were able to accomplish a great deal because we did have our eye on our constituencies and we did have an eye on the greater good of Nova Scotia. I believe, as I said earlier, that the members of this House share that commitment to this larger purpose. I'm delighted at the tone and the direction that both members have taken, and that's not to say you couldn't (Applause) that's not to say that you cannot advocate. That's not to say you can't embark on an aggressive pattern and defence of your constituencies, but it has to be respectful and it has to be constructive and I appreciate their initial contribution to the House.

I want to say something, Mr. Speaker, about my constituency of Halifax Citadel-Sable Island. I was hoping to say more - the member for Halifax Atlantic is sitting beside me so maybe I'll say less. She and I share a common waterway called the Northwest Arm and I wanted to start there because we both, I believe, began our political careers or were drawn to politics from activities that revolved around the Northwest Arm itself. She has written a great history about the Northwest Arm itself. She has written a great history about the Northwest Arm so I don't want to recount that history here.

Let me begin by saying that the history of my constituency goes back to its founding by the Mi'kmaq people on the Northwest Arm. It was a gathering place and later on came to be called the Northwest Arm, but the Mi'kmaq called it Salt Water All the Way Up and they called it a gathering place, so I want to pay tribute to those original founding settlers on the Northwest Arm that eventually became part of Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

I should say, Mr. Speaker, that on the Northwest Arm we had some very famous residents. Joe Howe lived on the Northwest Arm; Samuel Cunard, the builder of those great ships that made Nova Scotia so famous; Sir Charles Tupper; Sir Sanford Fleming lived on the Northwest Arm, the charterer of the Intercolonial Railway, a great surveyor, the person who conceived of Standard Time. Lots of famous people lived along the Northwest Arm and those people helped build Nova Scotia. They helped build this province and they helped build this country and I am proud to represent a constituency with that history.

Mr. Speaker, we also have a number of places on the Northwest Arm that help define who we are. Georges Island was the site of many fortifications at the beginning of the setting up of a defence of Halifax Harbour. The Town of Halifax was later founded in 1749. I always find it ironic, especially on Canada Day, when I am asked to speak at Pier 21 and Citadel Hill. Pier 21 is one of those places where we have welcomed people from all over the world, millions of people from all over the world. We have set off ships and veterans to fight in a variety of wars. We have set up fortifications to keep people out and yet about half an hour later I have to race up Citadel Hill and we have this other Halifax, this Halifax of fortifications.

[Page 2723]

My constituency in many ways represents that dual history of Nova Scotia, Mr. Speaker. We have been in the forefront of the struggle to promote peace and democracy and preserve our security all over the world but we have also been a welcoming place for people all over the world.

I want to say something, Mr. Speaker, about the larger role of the City of Halifax and Halifax Citadel in Nova Scotian politics. In my constituency there are a number of universities. In fact, I have six universities in Halifax Citadel-Sable Island. It is very much a centre of learning, a centre of innovation with great faculty, staff, students, a place for leading research.

[11:30 a.m.]

Dalhousie University, a large institution - I live in the neighbourhood - is the centre of a number of things that we, as a government, have identified as important to our program. In the last several months there have been research studies reporting on the centre for the study of immuno-vaccines, a university that is in the centre of the fight against the spread of disease.

The Brain Research Centre, Mr. Speaker, MRIs that map the human brain and identify very early some genetic flaws, genetic predispositions, of trying to prevent and anticipate health-related events.

The Centre for Ocean Research, quite an extraordinary project, I believe a $168 million project that looks at the oceans, maps the oceans, the movement of living things in the ocean, the temperature. Research will tell us a lot about global warming, about the state of the universe - a huge international project that says a great deal about our capacity to do work on the front end of research and innovation.

I'm still a faculty member on leave at Saint Mary's University, so I would be remiss in not saying more about Saint Mary's. As you know, Saint Mary's was founded on the Jesuit tradition. The Jesuits focused on excellence in academics and athletics and Saint Mary's still embodies that spirit of the Jesuits. In fact, I had an office that was the residence of a Jesuit priest. It had a sink and it had items on the wall and every day it reminded me of the Jesuit tradition at Saint Mary's.

One day I was sitting in my office and a Jesuit priest came in and said to me, this is a great office and a great institution. We formed this institution as a public service. We formed this institution to deal with questions of inequality, poverty, and injustice. We believed education was an important tool in developing people. Saint Mary's still carries on that tradition. I daresay that Saint Mary's gets more students from all over Nova Scotia, students from all socioeconomic classes, and the added value of a Saint Mary's education is

[Page 2724]

clear. Saint Mary's has remained true to that tradition of playing a role both in academics and athletics, but also playing a role in the improvement of our province and our citizens.

My two children are - well, my daughter Kate is about to graduate, but my two children are both at Saint Mary's and I'm delighted that they have thrived in those conditions at Saint Mary's.

Last week it was my pleasure to welcome a delegation from the city of Xiamen in China. They were looking into the possibility of twinning with Halifax and it was a real pleasure to listen to those senior administrators and civic officials from Xiamen talk about the City of Halifax, talk about my constituency and how beautiful and diverse it was and how lively it was with the student population. They were very excited about the possibility of twinning with our City of Halifax. In fact, thousands of students have started to come from China to Saint Mary's University and to Dalhousie and the other universities in my constituency, and they've added a whole new level of variety, of innovation, and of creativity to my constituency.

The Atlantic School of Theology is in my constituency. The Atlantic School of Theology is one of those great ecumenical interfaith universities now. It has attracted scholars from all over the world to look at the larger spiritual and ethical issues that challenge us. I want to congratulate Reverend Canon Eric Beresford for his leadership at the Atlantic School of Theology.

Last week I was at an event where Mark Tewksbury, Canada's Olympic swimmer and member of the International Olympic Committee, was talking about corruption at the International Olympic Committee and how disgusted he was at the way in which decisions are made and what he witnessed there. His commitment to trying to change the Olympic Committee, of trying to remind us of what sport was all about and what sport means and what the limits of competition are and what the boundaries are in any kind of competition - What Mark Tewksbury had to say about ethics applies very much to other endeavours in life, to business and to politics.

I want to thank the Atlantic School of Theology in particular for its partnership with Saint Mary's University on its work in raising ethical issues and reminding us of the philosophical bases and principles that govern, or ought to govern, the conduct of politics and business and sport.

My constituency also includes the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. I've had the pleasure of being on the campus many times over the last several months and I was at an art competition over the summer and it's quite extraordinary, the work that's being done there. I had always associated art with pure art, but the students at NSCAD have been able to marry art and business and tourism and a whole variety of things. They brought this together and they're using their art to make political statements, they're using their art to

[Page 2725]

define our province, they're using their art to promote innovation and competitiveness and entrepreneurship, and it's wonderful to see the difference that they have made in my constituency. Everywhere you go you see students from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and there isn't a protest out here in Halifax Citadel-Sable Island that doesn't include some of the work of the students from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. They're using their art in very productive and innovative ways and it's great to have them in my constituency.

Just down the road from me is the Université Sainte-Anne, which is in the forefront of reminding us of our Acadian heritage, of connecting us to the fact of bilingualism in Canada. Many of us in the House here have taken French language courses - and thanks very much to the Office of the Speaker for making those things possible. The Université Sainte-Anne has played a great role in building this province and building our founding peoples, both in an Acadian context and also from the larger French-English definition that has made this country what it is.

So, Mr. Speaker, as I began to say, I'm delighted that the universities are at the centre of the life in my constituency. They contribute to the economic well-being of our province, they contribute to innovation, to productivity, they bring large numbers of students and that adds to the diversity and vitality of my constituency. As a government, we're very much looking forward to the universities playing a leading role in delivering some of those things that we talked about earlier - better health care, better jobs and playing a role in getting us back to balance with our fiscal crisis that we face.

I wanted to say something about the economy of Halifax Citadel-Sable Island. Many people refer to Halifax and HRM as the hub of the Maritime economy, as the hub of Nova Scotia, and my constituency lies at the heart of that hub and I'm delighted at the role that it plays and continues to play in Nova Scotia.

It is the centre of the banking and financial services and it's a growing sector. Before I talk about specific elements of that economy, I want to talk about the two business associations in my constituency, and I must say, when I started out in politics, I wasn't that sure that I could work with the business community because there was this public impression of what the business community was about.

I remember very early in my political career, which doesn't go back very far, but in 2006 I had heard that there were panhandlers on Spring Garden Road who were being so-called hassled by a certain Mr. Bernie Smith from the Spring Garden Area Business Association. I called Mr. Smith up and said I wanted to talk to him about what was going on on Spring Garden Road. He said, you know, Leonard, I see kids everyday on Spring Garden Road and they're sitting there and I want to know where they're coming from, what brought them here, or what it would take to get them off the streets, and he said I do go talk to them and, yes, I do try to find a way to get them off the street and I do get them off the street, not

[Page 2726]

necessarily because it's good for business but because it's good for those young people as well.

So, Mr. Speaker, I too got into the habit of talking to the young people on Spring Garden Road and I did learn an awful lot about where they come from.

AN HON. MEMBER: You're not that old.

MR. PREYRA: I'm not that old, Mr. Speaker, but I do talk to those young people on Spring Garden Road. Many of those young people are out there because things have failed in their communities where they come from - they're not all residents of Halifax Citadel-Sable Island, they are residents of all across the province. Some of them, many of them I would say, are amazingly creative, very bright young people who were just not able to work with others in their community or their schools - or I should say their schools and their communities and their families were not able to handle their creativity. Many of them are there because their systems have broken down, that they didn't, or couldn't, get the support they needed.

I want to say, Mr. Speaker, that I was delighted that I did speak with Mr. Smith that day and the Spring Garden Area Merchants Association. It has led to a very long and productive friendship. Last week Mr. Smith resigned or retired from the Spring Garden Area Business Association and I would like to use this occasion to thank Mr. Smith for the great work he is doing on the Spring Garden Area Business Association. (Applause)

I also want to say something about the downtown Halifax Business Commission, Mr. Speaker. I've met with them regularly, particularly Paul MacKinnon, and Mr. MacKinnon and I first came into contact with each other when we both wanted to do something about the Barrington Street Heritage District. Over the years that we have worked together, the last three or four years, he has fought very hard to bring the downtown Halifax business district plan, Barrington Street district plan, to fruition. Just in the last year we've seen some of those incentives brought forward, and more people are taking that up, but we do share a commitment to the Barrington Street Heritage District.

We may not agree on everything relating to development in downtown Halifax, Mr. Speaker, but we do share a commitment to preserving our heritage, to making heritage an important part of our development and also to bring more residents downtown to make Halifax a livable city. Mr. Smith and Mr. MacKinnon were in the forefront of creating a program that we initiated four or five years ago. Out of those conversations with people on Spring Garden Road came a recognition that we needed better navigation in the capital district, that we needed to find a way to get those young people off the streets, to get those young people to the services that they need. So out of that was born the Navigator Project, a very successful pilot program that in many ways embodies what Bernie Smith was talking about earlier - that we can deal with the problems on Spring Garden area by getting tough

[Page 2727]

and criminalizing people and forcing them off the streets, but we can also deal with problems by finding out those issues, by identifying those issues and navigating people to the services that are out there.

[11:45 a.m.]

One of the things that we found, Mr. Speaker, for those of us who have followed the Nunn Inquiry, Mr. Justice Nunn was saying that the city and the province failed many times to intervene and many times to divert and navigate people away from it and that's the philosophy behind the Navigator Project. We know that in many cases the services are there and that we have to find a way to get people to those services. I want to thank Bernie Smith, Paul MacKinnon, and Tim Olive on the Dartmouth side, for their work in getting the Navigator Project. I will be talking more in a little bit with my colleagues on both sides of the House about trying to find more resources for the Navigator Project, so we can build it some more.

I want to begin by complimenting the ministers on this side of the House, and I should say the former ministers as well on the other side of the House, for providing some of the seed money that created that pilot project. I'm hoping that what the Spring Garden Area Merchants Association did and what the Downtown Halifax Business Commission did in the Navigator Project could be a model we could build on in other towns and in other applications.

I wanted to say that the economy of Halifax itself is in great shape, and I think one of the things we need to do - in particular I need to do - is remember that Halifax might be the hub here, but the City of Halifax can play a larger role in supporting the economy of the rest of Nova Scotia. I'm particularly proud of one development that has opened in the last month and that's the Halifax Seaport Farmers Market. The Halifax Seaport Farmers Market represents everything that's great and good about the City of Halifax and also about rural Nova Scotia and rural farmers.

It is an extraordinary partnership where members of my constituency are saying that we want to buy local, we want to support our local farmers, and we want to make sure that we eat healthy food that hasn't travelled long distances. The residents of my constituency have supported this alliance with farmers and every week on Saturday morning you will find them there, along with the member for Halifax Chebucto and myself - we're still waiting for the bench that's going to be put in for both of us. We've spent many years there - it's not there but we hope it will be there.

It is a great place to meet our constituents and also people from rural Nova Scotia for whom the farmers market is a lifesaver, for whom the farmers market is their last chance to sell their product. I know that when the new Seaport Farmers Market was first being created, people thought that it was just going to be a fad, a beautiful bells and whistles green building,

[Page 2728]

but it has already outgrown itself. The market is full and soon it will be open seven days a week, and there will be regular stores there with producers from all across the province - and they're also opening an international market, which I believe is opening next week.

The international market is doing something that we, in the Government of Nova Scotia, are trying to do - we're trying to diversify our products, we're trying to get more variety, and we're trying to get more diversity in our communities. The Seaport Farmers Market's international market day is going to showcase what new products and what our newcomers and immigrants are doing for this province, and I'm very much looking forward to sampling that and to looking at this innovation in action.

But the farmers market, as I said earlier, embodies what politics is really all about. We do need to build alliances across this province between urban consumers largely, and producers - and I'll talk about that in a minute - we do need to buy local, we do need to keep our rural communities alive, and the best way to do that is to make sure we support them. (Applause)

I also want to say something about the seaport farmers market. Along the waterfront as well we have the Port of Halifax. The Port of Halifax was there at the creation it seems - it may not have been there in its present form, but it was there. The Port of Halifax was there when the Cunard ships were being launched. And I know the Bluenose came from Lunenburg, but it spends a lot of time on the waterfront. The waterfront itself is a great centre of economic activity. In recent years, the Port of Halifax has made great investments in deepening the harbour and rebuilding the piers. I am delighted to say that this year, in these last few months, the Port of Halifax has set records in terms of people coming here on cruise ships, containers coming in.

I know that two years ago there was a great deal of gloom and doom about the future of the Port of Halifax but I'm happy to say that the Port of Halifax is rebounding and, in particular, the markets from Asia and beyond.

I was reading a Vietnamese magazine about the shipping trade two weeks ago at a conference that I was at. In that magazine was a story about the Premier's visit to Vietnam. The mayor of that city - I forgotten that name - was saying that they met with the Nova Scotia delegation and they met with the Premier. At that time they had not realized that the Port of Halifax was closer to them and closer to Europe and closer to North American markets. That conversation led to the introduction of a new shipping line that began to call on Halifax this summer. I was delighted to see reference to that and to know that those kinds of missions, those types of initiatives, that type of entrepreneurship produces millions of dollars in revenue, it helps our economy and it helps build bridges with people in other parts of the world and facilitates trade that we haven't really explored before. I'm not sure how much time I have, Mr. Speaker.

[Page 2729]

MR. SPEAKER: Well perhaps around 11:55 a.m. would be a good time to wrap it up.

MR. PREYRA: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I don't want to close completely but for the moment I'd like to say a little bit more about the seaport. Like places all over the world, the waterfront was in serious decay less than a decade ago, but if you go to the Halifax seaport now, along Marginal Road, you will see Pier 21, Canada's national museum, just declared Canada's national museum within the last couple of months. It's the only national museum outside of Ottawa.

In particular I want to commend the board at Pier 21 and Ruth Goldbloom whose great energy and great passion and great vision has brought us to this moment. Not a day goes by when you go to Pier 21 and see a number of busloads of people there wanting to talk about or to inquire into Nova Scotia's immigration history. There's also the opportunity there to find out about one's own family history. I see people squealing with delight at seeing the names of their family members who have come there and what baggage they carry with them. Pier 21 is a great asset and has just been developed as part of a reclaimed waterfront.

I see I'm getting the nod there, Mr. Speaker, and I would like to adjourn now and continue at a future date. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you. The motion is to adjourn debate.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Deputy Government House Leader for Monday's business.

MR. DAVID WILSON: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That adjourns government business for today and we'd like to meet again on Monday, November 1st, between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. After daily routines, we'll call Government Motions, Address in Reply and Public Bills for Second Reading, Bill No. 74 and Bill No. 75.

Mr. Speaker, I move that we do now rise.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is that we adjourn until 7:00 p.m. on Monday.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 2730]

The motion is carried.

[The House rose at 11:56 a.m.]

[Page 2731]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 1773

By: Mr. Chuck Porter (Hants West)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the origin of the game golf is unclear, the most widely accepted account is that the modern game originated in Scotland around the 12th Century with shepherds knocking stones into rabbit holes on the current site of the Old Course at St. Andrews; and

Whereas Jake Lloy of Windsor was certainly not knocking stones into rabbit holes this summer as he was awarded the 2010 Midget Golf Championship at the Avon Valley Golf and Country Junior Awards night held in late August; and

Whereas Jake was team captain for the Hants West Middle School golf team and enjoyed a tremendous summer participating in tournaments all over Nova Scotia including the Burger King Restaurant Junior Invitational in New Minas, the Paragon-Pepsi Junior Invitational in Kingston and one at the Links at Penn-Hills in Shubenacadie, but a brief illness forced him to withdraw from the Nova Scotia Junior Open Golf Championship Tournament in Dartmouth in July;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly applaud Jacob Lloy of Windsor on his exceptional golfing skills and wish him every success with all future pursuits in life.