Assemblée Législative de la Nouvelle-Écosse

Les travaux de la Chambre ont repris le
21 septembre 2017

HANSARD 10-35

DEBATES AND PROCEEDINGS

Speaker: Honourable Charlie Parker

Published by Order of the Legislature by Hansard Reporting Services and printed by the Queen's Printer.

Available on INTERNET at http://nslegislature.ca/index.php/proceedings/hansard/

Second Session

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2010

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS:
Prem.: Commons - Concerts Halt, Mr. H. Epstein 2732
GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1774, Diabetes Awareness Mo. (11/10) - Recognize,
Hon. Maureen MacDonald 2733
Vote - Affirmative 2733
Res. 1775, Strickland, John: Death of - Tribute,
Hon. P. Paris 2733
Vote - Affirmative 2734
Res. 1776, Uniacke Heritage Soc. - Anniv. (15th),
Hon. J. MacDonell 2734
Vote - Affirmative 2735
INTRODUCTION OF BILLS:
No. 76, Credit Union Act, Hon. G. Steele 2735
No. 77, Tax Review (2010-11) Act, Hon. S. McNeil 2735
No. 78, Public Utilities Act, Hon. G. Steele 2735
No. 79, Securities Act, Hon. G. Steele 2735
NOTICES OF MOTION:
Res. 1777, Stevens, Carolyn - Pengrowth-N.S. Energy Scholarship,
The Premier 2735
Vote - Affirmative 2736
Res. 1778, Mitchell, George: Death of - Tribute,
Hon. S. McNeil 2736
Vote - Affirmative 2737
Res. 1779, Lamond, Mary Jane - Portia White Prize,
Mr. K. Bain 2737
Vote - Affirmative 2737
Res. 1780, Movember: Campaign - Join,
Mr. M. Whynott 2738
Vote - Affirmative 2738
Res. 1781, Agric.: Farmers/Producers - Support,
Mr. L. Glavine 2738
Vote - Affirmative 2739
Res. 1782, Instrument Concepts -
Truro & Dist. C of C Exporter of Yr. Award, Hon. K. Casey 2739
Vote - Affirmative 2740
Res. 1783, Allaway, Simone - Running Accomplishments,
Hon. W. Estabrooks 2740
Vote - Affirmative 2740
Res. 1784, Marchand, Barry: Richmond Amateur Baseball Assoc.
- Contribution, Hon. M. Samson 2741
Vote - Affirmative 2741
Res. 1785, Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame: Sydney Mines
- Dedication, Hon. C. Clarke 2741
Vote - Affirmative 2742
Res. 1786, Haven TV Show: Producers/Crew/Actors - Congrats.,
Hon. D. Peterson-Rafuse 2742
Vote - Affirmative 2743
Res. 1787, Jody Shelley Golf Tournament: Hosts - Congrats.,
Hon. W. Gaudet 2743
Vote - Affirmative 2744
Res. 1788, Holocaust Educ. Wk. (11/01-11/09/10) - Participate,
Hon. C. d'Entremont 2744
Vote - Affirmative 2744
Res. 1789, Evelyn Richardson Mem. Elem. Sch.:
WOW Reading Challenge - Congrats., Hon. S. Belliveau 2745
Vote - Affirmative 2745
Res. 1790, MacArthur, Roderick: Contributions - Congrats.,
Mr. A. Younger 2745
Vote - Affirmative 2746
Res. 1791, Patterson's Gen. Store - Anniv. (35th),
Mr. A. MacMaster 2746
Vote - Affirmative 2747
Res. 1792, Truro Rotary Club: Fundraising - Thank,
Ms. L. Zann 2747
Vote - Affirmative 2747
Res. 1793, MacNeil, Dr. David - Fam. Physician of Yr. Award,
Ms. K. Regan 2748
Vote - Affirmative 2748
Res. 1794, Spencer, Margie - Helliwell Award,
Mr. C. Porter 2748
Vote - Affirmative 2749
Res. 1795, Fin.: Taxpayer Savings - Fiscal Prudence,
Mr. C. MacKinnon 2749
Res. 1796, Annapolis Parish: 1st Cdn. Anglican Worship Serv. -
Anniv. (300th), Hon. S. McNeil 2750^^
Vote - Affirmative 2751
Res. 1797, Morrison, Warden Bruce/Patterson, Dep. Warden Fraser:
Appts. - Congrats., Mr. K. Bain 2751
Vote - Affirmative 2751
Res. 1798, Bowers, Ron: Fundraising - Congrats.,
Ms. V. Conrad 2752
Vote - Affirmative 2752
Res. 1799, PC Caucus/Hal-Con Convention Goers:
Storytelling Efforts - Support, Mr. A. Younger 2752
Res. 1800, Sugar Moon Farm: Fodor's Selection - Congrats.,
Hon. K. Casey 2753
Vote - Affirmative 2754
Res. 1801, Friends of McNabs Island Soc.: Cleanup - Congrats.,
Ms. B. Kent 2754
Vote - Affirmative 2755
Res. 1802, Annapolis Highland Vineyards: Medals - Congrats.,
Mr. H. Theriault 2755
Vote - Affirmative 2755
Res. 1803, Nicholson, Gary: Commun. Serv. - Congrats.,
Hon. C. Clarke 2755
Vote - Affirmative 2756
Res. 1804, Highlander Curling Club: HPP Funding - Congrats.,
Mr. M. Smith 2756
Vote - Affirmative 2757
Res. 1805, Johnson, Major Bob - CIC Officer of Yr.,
Mr. L. Glavine 2757
Vote - Affirmative 2758
Res. 1806, Village Historique Acadien: Cultural Preservation
- Congrats., Hon. C. d'Entremont 2758
Vote - Affirmative 2759
Res. 1807, McKay, Ralph: Korean War Serv. - Thank,
Mr. B. Skabar 2759
Vote - Affirmative 2760
Res. 1808, MacGillivray, Logan -
Red Cross Young Humanitarian Award,^Ms. K. Regan 2760
Vote - Affirmative 2760
Res. 1809, MacNeil, Danette/Shining Waters Bakery & Eatery
- Congrats., Mr. A. MacMaster 2761
Vote - Affirmative 2761
Res. 1810, Chrysalis House/Exec. Dir. Fraser - Anniv. (25th),
Mr. J. Morton 2761
Vote - Affirmative 2762
Res. 1811, MacDonald, Cherie: Haiti Assistance - Commitment,
Mr. C. Porter 2762
Vote - Affirmative 2763
Res. 1812, Stoodley, Laura: Natal Day Parade Can. Games Torch Bearer
- Congrats., Ms. P. Birdsall 2763
Vote - Affirmative 2764
Res. 1813, Boudreau, Val: Brookfield Elem. Sch. - Commitment,
Mr. G. Burrill 2764
Vote - Affirmative 2764
Res. 1814, Kirkpatrick, Joanne - Brookside Jr. HS: Principal
- Appt., Hon. W. Estabrooks 2765
Vote - Affirmative 2765
Res. 1815, Queens Reg. Mun. - Septage Facility,
Ms. V. Conrad 2765
Vote - Affirmative 2766
Res. 1816, St. James Church Boys League (Mahone Bay)
- Anniv. (50th), Ms. P. Birdsall 2766
Vote - Affirmative 2767
Res. 1817, Mills, Todd: Cobequid Dist./Greater Truro - Contributions,
Mr. G. Burrill 2767
Vote - Affirmative 2767
GOVERNMENT BUSINESS:
PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING:
Bill No. 74, Land Titles Clarification Act,
Hon. J. MacDonell 2768
Mr. L. Glavine 2770
Hon. C. d'Entremont 2771
Hon. J. MacDonell 2773
Vote - Affirmative 2773
Bill No. 75, Merchandise Inspection Act,
Hon. J. MacDonell 2773
Mr. A. Younger 2774
Mr. A. MacMaster 2774
Hon. J. MacDonell 2775
Vote - Affirmative 2775
GOVERNMENT MOTIONS:
ADDRESS IN REPLY:
Mr. L. Preyra 2776
Mr. G. Gosse 2781
Adjourned debate 2797
ADJOURNMENT, House rose to meet again on Tue., Nov. 2nd at 2 p.m. 2798
NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3):
Res. 1818, Learning Disabilities Awareness Mo. (10/10) - Recognize,
Ms. K. Regan 2799
Res. 1819, Island & Barrington Passage FD Extrication Team Comp.
- Congrats., Hon. S. Belliveau 2799
Res. 1820, Movember: Campaign - Join,
Mr. B. Skabar 2800

[Page 2731]

HALIFAX, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2010

Sixty-first General Assembly

Second Session

7:00 P.M.

SPEAKER

Hon. Charlie Parker

DEPUTY SPEAKERS

Mr. Gordon Gosse, Mr. Leo Glavine, Mr. Alfie MacLeod

MR. SPEAKER: Order, please. We'll start tonight's proceedings.

The honourable member for Cape Breton South.

HON. MANNING MACDONALD: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise on a point of order relating to comments made by the Minister of Education during Oral Question Period on October 28th. In responding to a question from the honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove, the minister gave inaccurate information in an attempt to mislead the House. This was in response to a question on the pending sale of Holy Angels High in Sydney. The minister suggested that the province does not have the authority to buy a private building.

The minister could have suggested many things - that she did not wish to buy the building, that the province did not wish to buy the building - but she said the province does not ". . . have the authority to buy a private building . . .".

As any member of the House can attest, the province has the authority to purchase whatever it chooses. The minister no doubt has had time to reflect on those comments and I am sure she would wish to withdraw them.

[Page 2732]

2731

Mr. Speaker, I would ask you to peruse Hansard on this matter and give the honourable member a chance to withdraw those remarks or rule them out of order.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, there was no breach of any privilege done here. It was in the context of the answer. She was answering a question as related to buying schools and that's simply how she answered it. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: I think the honourable member said it was a point of order . . .

MR. MANNING MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, it was not a point of privilege, it was a point of order. If the Government House Leader had been listening he would have heard that.

MR. SPEAKER: It is a point of order that has been raised. I will take this under advisement and give my decision on a future date.

We'll start the daily routine.

PRESENTING AND READING PETITIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Chebucto.

MR. HOWARD EPSTEIN: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have here a petition that I wish to table, signed by 2,150 persons. It is jointly addressed to the HRM Council and to the provincial government. The operative clause reads:

"---- no more publicly-subsidized . . . concerts preventing our use of the Halifax Commons, public green space designated for the free access of ALL citizens."

Mr. Speaker, I have affixed my signature.

MR. SPEAKER: The petition is tabled.

PRESENTING REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

TABLING REPORTS, REGULATIONS AND OTHER PAPERS

STATEMENTS BY MINISTERS

[Page 2733]

GOVERNMENT NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Health.

RESOLUTION NO. 1774

HON. MAUREEN MACDONALD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas November is Diabetes Awareness Month and November 14th World Diabetes Day; and

Whereas diabetes affects more than 75,000 adult Nova Scotians and 750 children in the province, and recognizing that the total number affected will grow by 20 per cent in the next five years; and

Whereas the province has invested directly to keep Nova Scotians with diabetes healthier through the Diabetes Assistance Program, Family Pharmacare, and our provincial Diabetes Care Program;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House recognize November as Diabetes Awareness Month, show leadership by modelling healthy lifestyle practices, and support organizations such as the Canadian Diabetes Association that help Nova Scotians with diabetes.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of African Nova Scotian Affairs.

RESOLUTION NO. 1775

[Page 2734]

HON. PERCY PARIS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas John Strickland was a friend, an entertainer, and a role model for youth; and

Whereas Mr. Strickland was also a much-loved fan-favourite basketball player during his two-year tenure as a power forward with the Halifax Rainmen; and

Whereas Mr. Strickland, or "Strick," passed away quietly in his sleep on October 4th at his home in New York City;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House take a moment to honour the life and legacy of John Strickland and the influential role he played on the court for the Halifax Rainmen and in the community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Agriculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 1776

HON. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Nova Scotians cherish their shared heritage; and

Whereas heritage societies contribute greatly to their communities' social fabric by working to preserve their respective heritages; and

Whereas on October 20, 2010, Uniacke Heritage Society celebrated the 15th Anniversary of its founding;

[Page 2735]

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the members of the Uniacke Heritage Society on their 15th Anniversary and wish them well for the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[7:15 p.m.]

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

Bill No. 76 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 4 of the Acts of 1994. The Credit Union Act. (Hon. Graham Steele)

Bill No. 77 - Entitled an Act to Review the Provincial Tax Regime. (Hon. Stephen McNeil)

Bill No. 78 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 380 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Public Utilities Act. (Hon. Graham Steele)

Bill No. 79 - Entitled an Act to Amend Chapter 418 of the Revised Statutes of 1989. The Securities Act. (Hon. Graham Steele)

MR. SPEAKER: Ordered that these bills be read a second time on a future day.

NOTICES OF MOTION

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Premier.

RESOLUTION NO. 1777

HON. DARRELL DEXTER (The Premier): Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 2736]

Whereas Carolyn Stevens, a resident of Cole Harbour, was one of 19 university and community college students in the province to be awarded a Pengrowth-Nova Scotia Energy Scholarship earlier this month; and

Whereas recipients are chosen based on their academic achievement, community involvement and extracurricular activities, as well as their demonstrated interest in pursuing a career in the energy sector; and

Whereas Nova Scotia has a strong and growing energy industry that is made even stronger by scholarships like these that help educate students and prepare them for the workplace and encourage them to take active roles in their communities;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Carolyn Stevens and all the scholarship recipients on this great achievement, and wish them the best in their studies and subsequent careers in the energy sector.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 1778

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on August 5, 2010, the residents of Halifax lost a steadfast and dedicated servant when George Mitchell passed away; and

Whereas Mr. Mitchell's service to our province included serving as Minister of Education, Attorney General, Development Minister and Speaker of the Legislature, in addition to being MLA for Halifax Cornwallis from 1970 to 1979; and

Whereas his personal conduct and calm demeanor earned him the respect of all Parties in the Legislature;

[Page 2737]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the Legislature extend their sympathies to the family of the late George Mitchell and honour his memory by ensuring that our actions respect the best interest of the public at large.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 1779

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas well-known and celebrated Gaelic singer Mary Jane Lamond had recently been awarded the prestigious Portia White Prize, which promotes excellence, innovation and expression in the arts; and

Whereas this year's winner, Lamond, has chosen arts organization Communn Féis an Eilein of Christmas Island to receive the $7,000 protege prize; and

Whereas the Féis is an organization promoting and preserving the Gaelic language and culture;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Mary Jane Lamond on receiving this prestigious award, thank her for recognizing the Communn Féis an Eilein as a strong organization to preserve the Gaelic language and culture, and wish both Mary Jane and the Féis continued success in the future.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 2738]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Hammonds Plains-Upper Sackville.

RESOLUTION NO. 1780

MR. MAT WHYNOTT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Movember movement challenges men across the world to change their appearance and the face of men's health by growing a moustache for the entire month of November; and

Whereas the movement raises funds for Prostate Cancer Canada, enabling them to fund vital research that will lead to better screening tests and treatment options and to run support services for men surviving prostate cancer; and

Whereas the success of Movember is directly attributed to more than 627,000 people who have supported the cause since 2003 with different variations of moustaches;

Therefore be it resolved that other members of the House of Assembly join me in participating in Movember - believe it or not - an important and valuable international campaign for prostate cancer occurring throughout the month of November.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 2739]

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1781

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas farming has been a way of life and means of economic development in our province for generations; and

Whereas producers and farmers alike are facing difficult times, burdened by debt and the economic downturn; and

Whereas government can be a crucial part of revitalizing our industries and providing support and assistance to our agricultural community;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly work together to provide the necessary tools to support our farmers and producers, encourage Nova Scotians to buy local, and strive to maintain a sustainable agricultural community for generations to come.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1782

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Instrument Concepts, located in Great Village, Colchester North, designs and manufactures subsea technology used for offshore engineering, ocean observation and environmental monitoring; and

[Page 2740]

Whereas Instrument Concepts exports to a number of countries including Algeria, Brazil, Japan, and the United States; and

Whereas the company is proud of its newest product, icListen, which records sounds in the ocean;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Instrument Concepts for receiving the Exporter of the Year Award from the Truro and District Chamber of Commerce.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

RESOLUTION NO. 1783

HON. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Simone Allaway of Upper Tantallon has always been a winner, as a teacher, as a businesswoman, and now as a runner; and

Whereas on May 23, 2010, Simone captured first place in her age category at the Bluenose 5K Marathon in a time of 28 minutes, 8 seconds; and

Whereas Simone's ultimate running goal is to qualify for the Boston Marathon;

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Simone Allaway on her accomplishments as a runner, with best wishes in her future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[Page 2741]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Richmond.

RESOLUTION NO. 1784

HON. MICHEL SAMSON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Petit-de-Grat resident Barry Marchand has been a player, coach and volunteer with the Richmond Amateur Baseball Association since his youth; and

Whereas Barry has taken responsibility for maintaining and upgrading the Petit-de-Grat ballfield for many years, a facility which is considered one of the best in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas on Sunday, July 4th, I joined Warden John Boudreau, Richmond Amateur Baseball Association President Gerry Bourque, organizer Olive Martell and Richmond Minor Baseball representatives, along with former players and coaches, to recognize Barry for his tireless efforts to maintain the Petit-de-Grat ballfield and promote baseball in our county;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly recognize Barry Marchand for his many years of maintaining the Petit-de-Grat ballfield, along with his outstanding career as a player and coach with the Petit-de-Grat Red Caps and Richmond Amateur Baseball Association.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 2742]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1785

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on September 12, 2010, a special mass was held to celebrate the history of service of the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame and to commemorate the closing of the convent after 110 years; and

Whereas the convent was established in 1900 along with Notre Dame School, beginning the academic and community tradition of excellence which became the hallmarks of the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame; and

Whereas when the Catholic school system in the Town of Sydney Mines ceased to exist, the sisters continued to serve the community in a multitude of ways and our community owes a great deal to the many talented women who have resided in Notre Dame Convent;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in recognizing the dedication of the Sisters of the Congregation of Notre Dame and the valued services they still provide in the Town of Sydney Mines.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Community Services.

RESOLUTION NO. 1786

[Page 2743]

HON. DENISE PETERSON-RAFUSE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas from April to September the made-for-television show Haven was filmed in communities along the South Shore and, in particular, my home community of Chester; and

Whereas Haven is based on the novel The Colorado Kid by renowned author Stephen King; and

Whereas this show has not only stimulated economic growth in the local communities, it has also proven that the arts and entertainment are alive and thriving in Nova Scotia;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly congratulates the producers, crew and actors of Haven on a successful season and wishes them well as they negotiate with the networks for a second season.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate..

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Clare.

RESOLUTION NO. 1787

HON. WAYNE GAUDET: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Jody Shelley Golf Fore Health Tournament took place this past July at the Clare Golf and Country Club in support of the Yarmouth Regional Hospital; and

Whereas this is the sixth annual event hosted by the NHL hockey player and $40,000 was raised for new equipment; and

[Page 2744]

Whereas 65 volunteers from Clare helped to host, for the first time, the Jody Shelley Golf Fore Health Tournament which was held in Clare;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly thank the Clare Golf and Country Club directors, staff and all the dedicated volunteers who assisted in hosting this special event.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Progressive Conservative Party;

RESOLUTION NO. 1788

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas November 1st to 9th marks Halifax Holocaust Education Week; and

Whereas Holocaust Education Week provides a unique opportunity for people from all backgrounds to learn the lessons and legacies of the Holocaust; and

Whereas Holocaust Education Week memorializes the victims of Nazi persecution, honours the survivors and helps us to teach future generations that injustice, genocide and hatred are never an acceptable option;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly urge Nova Scotians to take part in Holocaust Education Week events and to take a moment this week to reflect on the survivors and victims of this terrible part of our history.

[7:30 p.m.]

[Page 2745]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Fisheries and Aquaculture.

RESOLUTION NO. 1789

HON. STERLING BELLIVEAU: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the students of the Evelyn Richardson Memorial Elementary School in Shag Harbour captured their second consecutive WOW Reading Challenge for Shelburne County on May 26, 2010; and

Whereas the students at the school read a grand total of 13,036 books during the WOW Reading Challenge during the 2009-10 school year for an average of 77 books per student, and a total of 16,635 books during the 2008-09 academic year for an average of 100 books per student; and

Whereas the students are continuing to be involved in this program, which is a partnership between the RCMP and the Western Counties Regional Library.

Therefore be it resolved that House of Assembly congratulate the students at the Evelyn Richardson Memorial Elementary School in Shag Harbour for capturing their second consecutive WOW Reading Challenge for Shelburne County on May 26, 2010.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 2746]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 1790

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Roderick MacArthur became Assistant Clerk of the Nova Scotia Legislature in August 1975 and was appointed Chief Clerk of the House of Assembly in early 1986; and

Whereas Roderick MacArthur was a member of the Association of Clerks-at-the-Table in Canada, the professional organization of officers of parliament for the country and was recognized throughout Parliaments in Canada, Australia and New Zealand as a respected parliamentarian; and

Whereas Roderick MacArthur was recognized in Nova Scotia for his unwavering commitment to the non-partisan role of his job and the independence of the Legislature as key elements of the Westminster parliamentary tradition.

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate Roderick MacArthur on his many contributions to Nova Scotia through his work with the Legislative Assembly and wish him every success in his future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 1791

[Page 2747]

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Patterson's General Store in Scotsville celebrated its 35th Anniversary on July 29, 2010; and

Whereas Norman and Anita Patterson's entrepreneurial spirit ensured that the community of Scotsville would always have access to the essentials; and

Whereas the Pattersons' welcoming attitude encouraged many discussions among patrons on topics of the day, including politics;

Therefore be it be resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Patterson's General Store on 35 years of excellent service and wish them many more years of success.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Truro-Bible-Hill.

RESOLUTION NO. 1792

MS. LENORE ZANN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Truro Rotary Club is a community-based organization that was started in 1926; and

Whereas the Truro Rotary Club has been hosting annual auctions in Truro for the past 63 years as part of their fundraising strategy; and

Whereas this past year the Truro Rotary Club raised $45,000 of which 100 per cent of the proceeds go to assist charities such as the Colchester Community Workshop, youth programs, bursaries and international programs.

[Page 2748]

Therefore, be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature recognize the long-standing dedication and commitment of the Truro Rotary Club in raising funds for charities and thank them for their hard work and dedication.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford -Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 1793

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas The Canadian College of Family Physicians each year honours one family physician from each province for providing exceptional care to their patients; and

Whereas the recipients of the Family Physician of the Year Award must also make meaningful contributions to the health and well-being of their communities, dedicating themselves as researchers and educators of future generations of family doctors and exemplifying the principles of family medicine; and

Whereas Dr. David MacNeil of Bedford is this year's recipient of the award - an honour for which his patients think he is eminently suited, their frequent refrain being "I wouldn't change doctors if you paid me a million dollars";

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Dr. MacNeil on his award and thank him for his warm but firm bedside manner, his willingness to listen, his passion for leaving no stone unturned when working on a diagnosis, and wish him many more years of practice in Bedford.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 2749]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1794

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas a tutor helps students learn material in individual courses and helps them learn how to be successful in school by teaching study skills, time management and effective reading solutions; and

Whereas Margie Spencer, a resident of Summerville, Hants County, was recently named the recipient of the Patricia Helliwell Volunteer Tutor Award for consistently approaching each lesson with patience, dedication and passion since she began tutoring students with the Hants Learning Network Association in 2004; and

Whereas tutors play an important role to many adult learners who choose to return to school to further their education and without the encouragement and one-on-one support from people such as Margie, may not find success;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Margie on receiving the Patricia Helliwell Volunteer Tutor Award while commending her for her commitment to helping others and thank her for her dedication to the cause of lifelong learning.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 2750]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Pictou East.

RESOLUTION NO. 1795

MR. CLARRIE MACKINNON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas members of the Third Party in Nova Scotia's Legislature talk about fiscal prudence whenever they are given the chance; and

Whereas these same MLAs have advocated for the building of two jails in our province at an extra cost to taxpayers of $5.5 million upfront and an additional $1.7 million annually; and

Whereas it is this Third Party that steered Nova Scotia on the path to a $1.4 billion annual deficit, proving that they know not of fiscal prudence or decision-making in the best interest of Nova Scotians;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly recognize that saving taxpayers money and making the right decisions for every region of the province is true fiscal prudence.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable Leader of the Official Opposition.

RESOLUTION NO. 1796

HON. STEPHEN MCNEIL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

[Page 2751]

Whereas on October 10, 2010, Anglicans and visitors from across Canada gathered at St. Luke's Church, the Parish of Annapolis where 300 years before, the first Anglican worship service in Canada took place; and

Whereas this original service on October 10, 1710, was offered at Thanksgiving when the British troops were victorious in capturing the fort grounds in Annapolis Royal; and

Whereas it was the sacrifices and strong enduring faith of past and present parishioners that enabled this parish to be sustained through 300 years of continuous worship;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Parish of Annapolis and wish them many more years of faithful service.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes.

RESOLUTION NO. 1797

MR. KEITH BAIN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas on October 18th, Victoria County Council chose their warden and deputy warden for the next two years; and

Whereas Councillor Bruce Morrison, a county councillor since 1997, was returned as warden; and

Whereas Councillor Fraser Patterson, elected District 5 councillor since 2003, was again returned as deputy warden;

[Page 2752]

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Warden Bruce Morrison and Deputy Warden Fraser Patterson on their reappointments and wish them both, and all Victoria County Council, the best in the upcoming year.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 1798

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the ongoing success of our community organizations, fire halls, and events is dependent on the fundraising efforts of residents; and

Whereas Ron Bowers, formerly of Cherry Hill in Lunenburg County in the constituency of Queens, was one of those very successful fundraisers; and

Whereas the United Communities Fire Department, the Cherry Hill Fun Run, and many more community activities have benefited from Ron riding his bike from one end of the area to the other selling raffle tickets and raising thousands of dollars;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly recognize and congratulate Ron Bowers on all of his years of fundraising for many community activities in the area of Cherry Hill, Lunenburg County.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

[Page 2753]

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

RESOLUTION NO. 1799

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas this weekend Halifax played host to the Hal-Con science fiction convention, where attendees discussed the legitimacy of sci-fi characters, played video and board games, and patronized vendors selling gothic and medieval fashions; and

Whereas this weekend Halifax also played host to the Progressive Conservative science fiction convention, where attendees discussed the legitimacy of their own fictional legacy of good government and fiscal responsibility; and

Whereas the real Progressive Conservative legacy was increased spending and fees, such as an increase in the gas tax from 13.5 cents a litre to 15.5 cents a litre and an increase in ambulance fees from $85 to $120, both under Jamie Baillie's term as chief of staff;

Therefore be it resolved that members of the House of Assembly congratulate the Progressive Conservative caucus and convention goers for their efforts to support the craft of fictional storytelling through their own efforts at this weekend's convention.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

I hear several Noes.

The notice is tabled.

The honourable member for Colchester North.

[Page 2754]

RESOLUTION NO. 1800

HON. KAREN CASEY: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Fodor's Travel is recognized as the foremost name in travel publishing; and

Whereas of Fodor's selection of the best hotels, restaurants, and attractions around the world, only 15 per cent are awarded Fodor's Choice; and

Whereas Sugar Moon Farm in Earltown, Colchester North is a 2010 Fodor's Choice recipient, and thus will receive special recognition in the current Fodor's guidebook to this region and on Fodors.com;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of the House of Assembly congratulate Sugar Moon Farm for bringing distinction to their business, to Colchester North, and to the Province of Nova Scotia.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

[7:45 p.m.]

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cole Harbour-Eastern Passage.

RESOLUTION NO. 1801

MS. BECKY KENT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas more than 125 volunteer members of the Friends of McNabs Island Society took part in the semi-annual garbage and recycling cleanup of the island in June 2010, where 450 bags were collected; and

[Page 2755]

Whereas since 1991 volunteers have collected 9,500 bags of garbage and recyclables from the shorelines of McNabs Island; and

Whereas a few of the interesting items found during the cleanups were a chip bag with a contest involving the Montreal Expos, a pair of stiletto heels, a backpack containing a passport and other identification, and a seven-year-old election sign;

Therefore be it resolved that this Nova Scotia House of Assembly commend the Friends of McNabs Island Society for their dedication to beautify and protect one of Nova Scotia's prized historical parks, McNabs Island.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Digby-Annapolis.

RESOLUTION NO. 1802

MR. HAROLD THERIAULT: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Annapolis Highland Vineyards, located in Bear River East, is Nova Scotia's youngest winery, having opened its doors in the Spring of 2009; and

Whereas at the prestigious All Canadian Wine Championships held in Windsor, Ontario, in May, the vineyard won a total of four medals - two gold, one silver, and one bronze; and

Whereas this is the first time a winery in this area of the province has brought a gold and silver medal home from the All Canadian;

[Page 2756]

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate Annapolis Highland Vineyards for these outstanding achievements, and wish them continued success in their future winemaking endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cape Breton North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1803

HON. CECIL CLARKE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Gary Nicholson of Sydney Mines, hearing of a child with autism and the family's efforts to keep him safe, collected donations to build a fence and surround the backyard for four-year-old Domonic Williams; and

Whereas Domonic was a flight risk and lives near a cliff, and his mother also has to care for a six-week-old baby girl; and

Whereas Gary's efforts took two weeks to fence in the backyard to provide a safe environment for young Domonic;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating retiree Gary Nicholson for his compassion and community service, as evidenced by his deed of kindness and goodwill.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

[Page 2757]

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Antigonish.

RESOLUTION NO. 1804

MR. MAURICE SMITH: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the NDP Government is committed to assisting community groups in developing and maintaining facilities that increase public participation in sport; and

Whereas the Highlander Curling Club in St. Andrews is dedicated to the promotion, development and coordination of the sport of curling in Antigonish County; and

Whereas the Highlander Curling Club has applied for and received funding from Health Promotion and Protection under the Recreation Facility Development Program in the amount of $10,000 toward replacement of the curling club's roof;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the Highlander Curling Club for receiving $10,000 from the Department of Health Promotion and Protection under the Recreation Facility Development Program, and thank them for their continued support of sport and recreation in Antigonish County.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1805

[Page 2758]

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas across Canada over 55,000 young people are involved with Cadets, making it one of the largest youth programs in the country; and

Whereas being named CIC Officer of the Year is one of the highest awards presented to a member of Cadet Instructor Cadre; and

Whereas Major Bob Johnson received the CIC Officer of the Year award in recognition of his hard work and commitment to the Cadet Program in Greenwood and area;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly congratulate Major Bob Johnson for receiving this honour and wish him continued success in future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Leader in the House of the Progressive Conservative Party.

RESOLUTION NO. 1806

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Monsieur le Président à une date ultérieure, je demanderai l'adoption de la résolution suivante:

Attendu que le Village Historique acadien de la Nouvelle Écosse était une idée ambitieuse qui a été formulée par la Société historique acadienne de Pubnico-Ouest dans 1989; et

Attendu que en été de 1999 le Village a ouvert les portes et accueilli plus de 5,000 visiteurs d'autour du monde; et

[Page 2759]

Attendu que au mois de mai le Village a ajouté une nouvelle exposition en ajoutant une forge opérationnelle et au mois d'août ils ont lancé un bateau en bois appeler La Tatane munie d'un moteur à un cylindre qui a été construit sur le site au Village qui était le premier style de bateau de homard;

Par conséquent, qu'il soit résolu les membres de l'Assemblée législative me joindre à féliciter le Village historique acadien de la Nouvelle Écosse pour amener leur vision de conserver la culture, les traditions et la langue de l'acadiens de la région.

Monsieur le Président, je demande l'adoption de cette résolution sans préavis et sans débat.

Mr. Speaker, if I may in English:

Whereas the Village Historique Acadien de la Nouvelle Écosse was an ambitious idea that was established by the Société historique acadienne de Pubnico-Ouest in 1989; and

Whereas in the summer of 1999 the village opened its doors and welcomed over 5,000 visitors from around the world; and

Whereas in May the village added a new exhibit by adding an operational forge and in August they launched a wooden boat that was the original style of lobster boat, called La Tatane, which was a transom stern boat that was constructed on site at the village;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly join me in congratulating the Village Historique Acadien de la Nouvelle Écosse for preserving the culture, traditions and language of the Acadians of the region.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Cumberland North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1807

[Page 2760]

MR. BRIAN SKABAR: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Ralph McKay served our country as a member of the Third Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment in the Korean War nearly 60 years ago; and

Whereas the Korean Government has extended an invitation to Ralph McKay to visit South Korea for a service on November 11th, commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the Korean War; and

Whereas Ralph McKay's service should never be forgotten by members of this House or citizens of this province or our country;

Therefore be it resolved that members of this House of Assembly sincerely thank Ralph McKay for his dedicated service in the Korean War and wish him well in his upcoming visit to South Korea.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Bedford-Birch Cove.

RESOLUTION NO. 1808

MS. KELLY REGAN: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Logan MacGillivray is an enterprising Grade 8 French Immersion student at Bedford Junior High; and

Whereas two years ago Logan set up a charity, Listen to the Children, after seeing the conditions in which children were living in Sierra Leone and has since sent two shipping containers filled with school, recreational and building supplies to rural northern Sierra Leone, to help rebuild and refurbish schools; and

[Page 2761]

Whereas Logan is being honoured by the Nova Scotia Red Cross as its youngest-ever winner of its Young Humanitarian Award this year at a ceremony and dinner on November 10th;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this House congratulate Logan on his latest of many awards, thank him for his vision and compassion, and wish him well with his latest project, raising money to build a children's multipurpose centre in Maygba, Sierra Leone.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Inverness.

RESOLUTION NO. 1809

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Danette MacNeil of Mabou has become owner of the Shining Waters Bakery & Eatery; and

Whereas Danette is showing the kind of entrepreneurial spirit we need here in Nova Scotia; and

Whereas the Shining Waters is popular and well-known for legendary Mabou cooking;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly congratulate Danette MacNeil on becoming a small business owner and wish her every future success.

[Page 2762]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Kings North.

RESOLUTION NO. 1810

MR. JIM MORTON: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Chrysalis House of Kentville is a non-profit organization that provides shelter, counselling, advocacy and outreach for abused women and their children; and

Whereas Chrysalis House, under the direction of Executive Director Rhonda Fraser, in partnership with transition houses throughout Nova Scotia, provides many programs to women at risk, including services for women who have been psychologically, emotionally, physically and/or sexually abused; and

Whereas staff and supporters gathered this summer at Chrysalis House in Kentville to celebrate its 25th Anniversary;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly recognize the important work carried out by Chrysalis House and congratulate Executive Director Rhonda Fraser, the board and staff of the house on 25 years of dedicated service to women, their families and the community.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

[Page 2763]

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Hants West.

RESOLUTION NO. 1811

MR. CHUCK PORTER: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Hands Across the Sea (HATS), Haiti is one of many humanitarian missions dedicated to enriching the lives of survivors of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated the country in the first few days of January this year; and

Whereas Cherie MacDonald from Windsor, who has been involved in various outreach projects, is travelling to Haiti this month to deliver donations of medical supplies, clothes, money and stuffed animals to assist the children living at a HATS compound based in Deschappelles, Haiti; and

Whereas the existence of organizations such as HATS and the dedication of people like Cherie MacDonald are imperative to the redevelopment and restructuring of disaster zone areas and the survival of those who call these areas home;

Therefore be it resolved that all members of this House of Assembly commend Cherie for her commitment to helping others and wish her all the best in her travels as she brings smiles to children's faces.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

RESOLUTION NO. 1812

[Page 2764]

MS. PAM BIRDSALL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the 2011 Canada Games torch program shines a spotlight on youth across Nova Scotia who demonstrate leadership in the community; and

Whereas 12-year-old Lilydale resident Laura Stoodley, who was born with a congenital heart problem that limits her athletic abilities, applied to be one of the torch bearers during the Games' opening ceremonies; and

Whereas Laura Stoodley was one of only 10 people invited to bear the flame during the 2010 Natal Day Parade held in Halifax on August 2nd, carrying the flame the last six blocks of a 4-kilometre journey, making her the final torch-bearer;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate Laura Stoodley on the honour of being the final Canada Games torch-bearer during the Natal Day Parade this year and recognize her accomplishment despite her medical issues.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodoboit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 1813

MR. GARY BURRILL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Valma Boudreau has taught at Brookfield Elementary School for 25 years and has become a much-loved teacher, challenging his students academically and doing so with a warm sense of humour; and

[Page 2765]

Whereas Val runs soccer and floor hockey intramurals all year round and regularly turns out on weekends and evenings at local sporting events to cheer on his students; and

Whereas last Spring Val was awarded an Excellence in Teaching Award by the Chignecto-Central Regional School Board in recognition of the fact that staff, students, and parents have come to regard him as a caring and constantly upbeat teacher who takes time to make connections;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislature congratulate Val Boudreau for leaving a very positive and lasting impression on both students and fellow teachers and for always following through on his academic and social commitments to his students.

[8:00 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

RESOLUTION NO. 1814

HON. WILLIAM ESTABROOKS: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Joanne Kirkpatrick became the principal of Brookside Junior High School on the Prospect Road in September 2010; and

Whereas Ms. Kirkpatrick's skills as an educational leader are welcomed at Brookside and in our community; and

Whereas Ms. Kirkpatrick will continue the fine traditions of Brookside Junior High;

[Page 2766]

Therefore be it resolved that the Nova Scotia Legislature congratulate Joanne Kirkpatrick on her appointment as the principal of Brookside Junior High School, with best wishes in her future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Queens.

RESOLUTION NO. 1815

MS. VICKI CONRAD: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Provincial Capital Assistance Program is administered under Service Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations; and

Whereas in May of this year the Region of Queens Municipality received $322,000 under this program; and

Whereas the funds will go toward the construction of a new septage facility, which is essential for every home and business that is reliant on a private septic system;

Therefore be it resolved that the House of Assembly recognize the Region of Queens Municipality for the importance they have placed on constructing a new septage facility.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

[Page 2767]

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Lunenburg.

RESOLUTION NO. 1816

MS. PAM BIRDSALL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas in 1960 Reverend Henry Corbin and his wife, Barbara, started the St. James Church Boys League at St. James Parish in Mahone Bay to promote sportsmanship, community service, and leadership in the community; and

Whereas Mr. Tom Ernst joined the Church Boys League in 1960, not long after its formation, and has continued to be the group's leader and driving force for 50 years; and

Whereas the Church Boys League - considered to be one of the oldest groups of its kind still functioning in Canada - celebrated its 50th Anniversary in September of this year with a four-day program of events in Mahone Bay and surrounding area;

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly recognize the St. James Church Boys League on its 50th Anniversary and congratulate Mr. Tom Ernst for his enduring commitment to fostering leadership among youth in the community of Mahone Bay for 50 years.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

The honourable member for Colchester-Musquodobit Valley.

RESOLUTION NO. 1817

[Page 2768]

MR. GARY BURRILL: Mr. Speaker, I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas Truro Heights resident Todd Mills recently received an Emergency Health Services Exemplary Service Medal from Lieutenant Governor Mayann Francis; and

Whereas Todd trains others in field medicine and in 2000 helped launch the Bear Medic Program, which offers teddy bears to children in difficult circumstances; and

Whereas Todd has served as a 4-H and Beavers leader and is a volunteer with the Cobequid District Fire Brigade, having recently served as captain;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of the Nova Scotia House of Assembly congratulate Todd Mills for the many ways he has made life better for the people of the Cobequid district and the greater Truro area.

Mr. Speaker, I request waiver of notice and passage without debate.

MR. SPEAKER: There has been a request for waiver.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Before I go to the Government House Leader, I'm just going to mention the petition that was tabled earlier by the member for Halifax Chebucto. It's not an original, it's a photocopy and, as you know, in this House we do not allow a photocopy to be tabled. I brought this to the member's attention and, if he can produce the original, we'll allow that to be tabled as the petition, so I will be returning that to him.

ORDERS OF THE DAY

GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Public Bills for Second Reading.

[Page 2769]

PUBLIC BILLS FOR SECOND READING

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 74.

Bill No. 74 - Land Titles Clarification Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, it's my pleasure today to stand in support of Bill No. 74, amendments to the Land Titles Clarification Act.

The legislation will expedite the processes for those adversely affected with a certificate of title when a certificate of title is issued under the Lands Titles Clarification Act, and people seeking to clarify title to specific ungranted Crown lands occupied by others.

The Land Titles Clarification Act was enacted in 1964 because economic development was being adversely impacted by a lack of clarity in land titles. Presently, when a person makes an application claiming to own land in one of the designated land titles clarification areas, the Minister of Natural Resources may, after an investigation of ownership, issue a certificate of title naming the applicant the owner of the land. If someone other than the applicant feels that they have been adversely affected by the issuance of a certificate of title, the Act permits them to apply to the Governor in Council for compensation and requires the Governor in Council to investigate to determine whether or not the applicant has been adversely affected.

Needless to say, this is a cumbersome procedure. That means that Cabinet really has to issue the requirement for an investigator to go out, do an investigation to see whether or not this individual actually does have a stronger claim than what the minister may have applied by issuing a certificate of title and, through all that, if it's determined that this individual who feels they have been adversely affected - then they'll have to be compensated. This is a cumbersome procedure, not to mention an expensive procedure.

If found to be adversely affected, the Governor in Council must determine the amount of compensation to be paid. The bill indicates that the compensation must be fair, but in no case shall it exceed the value of the land at the time the certificate of title was filed. So what that means is if the minister issues a certificate of title and 20 years later someone recognizes or believes that they were adversely affected - they may not have been aware that the certificate of title was issued, so whenever that information comes to them then they feel that they have a greater title and that they were adversely affected by somebody else having a title issued to them, the compensation to that person cannot be greater than the value of the land at the time the certificate was issued.

[Page 2770]

So if a certificate was issued 20 years earlier, it's the value of the land 20 years earlier. They can't say oh, in 20 years that land has increased in value by X amount, therefore you owe me the inflation or the greater value in whatever time period and say that that land is worth far more to me, and if I had owned it for those 20 years, if I'd had title for 20 years, then this is how I would be fairly compensated.

Mr. Speaker, just to make it clear, the compensation cannot be greater than the value of the land at the time the certificate was issued. The fact they were 20 years finding out that happened or that they think they had a claim, the government doesn't take that to be additional time for the inflated value of the land.

Although applications for compensation made under Section 8 of the Land Titles Clarification Act are infrequent, our amendment will ensure a fair, simplified process for those who apply. That is really what we're trying to do - we're trying to simplify the process. We're trying to clarify it so that individuals who think they may have been adversely affected have fairly clear guidelines as to why they would have a reasonable case for a claim. We're also trying to reduce the cost, because there is approximately 250,000 acres of such land in the Province of Nova Scotia.

When I say that, I'm not kidding, there are 250,000 acres, but what I mean by that is that some of this would be land that the province could certainly claim title. Somebody may apply and we would deem that they don't have a claim. I think our view is that there's a fair bit of this land where people do have a legitimate claim. So if you were to put a price on every conflict, if you spend $4,000 or $5,000 on a parcel of 1,000 acres or whatever, or 500 acres, depending on the parcel size, you can see that if government spends that kind of money investigating these, this is a fair price tag.

If we can streamline this so - actually it's not our position that we claim it all. We think that people do have legitimate claims on this land and we'd be glad to just sign off. I think sometimes people tend to somehow confuse our role, actually. They look at the government and they don't really look at the people. The possibility of land actually belonging to the people means that we have a responsibility to ensure that we don't go signing it away, but that doesn't mean - if there's a legitimate case, that somebody has a stronger claim than the government, we're keen to look there.

The new process we are introducing would shift the responsibility for the investigation of claims from the Governor in Council to the Minister of Natural Resources through an independent reviewer. So, instead of it coming to the Governor in Council and the Cabinet initiating this process for investigation, et cetera, this could be done by the minister.

By doing this, the independent reviewer would determine that the person had been adversely impacted. The minister, using the criteria set out in the bill, would make a

[Page 2771]

recommendation to the Governor in Council regarding the level of compensation, if any, that should be paid to the applicant We're hoping that will speed this process and thereby make it cheaper.

These are really in cases where the government has issued a certificate of title and somebody feels they had a stronger claim and then makes a claim to the government that you have to compensate me - that's what this is about.

[8:15 p.m.]

The second amendment makes it easier for government to release its ownership claim on certain ungranted Crown lands that have been occupied and used for a number of years. There are approximately 250,000 acres.

The title review process presently is unnecessarily complex, time-consuming and costly and it can take many months to complete, leaving title uncertainty for those who have legitimate claims. The cost of clearing up title to these lands requires a significant investment of time and staff resources, which could be better used for other priorities, Mr. Speaker.

The second amendment will develop a process to limit the test for release of the provincial interests to evidence of current and historical use of the parcel or any other information the Crown determines necessary to be satisfied that the title has been extinguished.

With these amendments the province is continuing to deliver on our commitment to make life better for Nova Scotia families and, in this case, by reducing red tape, clearing up land title issues and reducing costs of government programs. With that I move second reading of Bill No. 74.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Kings West.

MR. LEO GLAVINE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm pleased to join the debate on Bill No. 74. The minister has explained why this has come about. We know that it's a lengthy, costly, cumbersome process now in many respects. The province introduced land title clarification through legislation introduced on October 29th.

The first amendment will speed up the process for people adversely affected when a certificate of title is issued under the Land Titles Clarification Act. An example of someone being adversely affected is a person seeking compensation for a land ownership claim where the province has issued a certificate title to someone else.

The second amendment will help people seeking to clarify title to specific ungranted Crown lands that they believe they have title or ownership to.

[Page 2772]

The first amendment will allow the Natural Resources Minister to appoint an independent reviewer to determine if a person was adversely affected by the granting of a certificate of title. Formerly the Governor in Council led such investigations. The proposed bill will let the minister recommend to the Governor in Council whether compensation should be paid to an applicant who has been adversely impacted and, of course, the amount. The second amendment makes it easier for government to release its ownership of certain ungranted Crown lands that have been occupied and used for a number of years.

This is an important piece of legislation as Clause 1 is significantly beneficial to the public. Our caucus has had a high volume of feedback on this issue. The land titles in Nova Scotia are confusing as the province is one of the oldest in Canada and settlements are some of the oldest in North America. Titles to land have been confusing for a number of people as some do not have the proper documentation, or do not know the correct process to file for land titles, or make a complaint if they believe their land title has been infringed upon.

This will be a good mechanism for Nova Scotians. Often people making claims are not heard and cannot afford the legal fees associated with this process. An independent investigation without government encumbrances is important and beneficial to these situations. Again, we have had many complaints from concerned Nova Scotians and allowing for an independent investigation is an important step. With that, Mr. Speaker, I'll take my place.

MR. SPEAKER: The honorable Leader in the House of the Progressive Conservative Party.

HON. CHRISTOPHER D'ENTREMONT: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I am very pleased to stand this evening for a few moments and talk about Bill No. 74. I did have short comments, I just might make them a little longer.

It is indeed an important issue to ensure that people clearly know what land they own or do not own. This is one of the basic rights of citizenship for citizens in democracy. It is equally important to eliminate unnecessary red tape. I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, that Bill No. 74 does meet both of those criteria, which is why I am pleased to announce that our caucus will be supporting this legislation through its process here in the House.

I know there have been a few incidents recently in which people have found that land they thought they owned, or their family owned, turned out to be property of the Crown or, indeed, the property of another citizen. These situations are very difficult to figure out because the key activity regarding them often took place many, many generations ago. I understand it can be quite a blow to a person or family to suddenly discover that land that they thought, or they or their ancestors had acquired years ago was actually granted by government to someone else. I can you, a lot of times I can ask my father before he ended up selling his property, where does the property line go? Well, it goes along from that rock to

[Page 2773]

that birch. Well, in 25 years that birch might not be there and that rock is all covered over or somebody has developed beyond it, and I can tell you, Mr. Speaker, that happened many, many times.

A great experience or example of this process can be looked at in Pubnico Point when the Pubnico Point wind farm was put in place - one of the most difficult parts was trying to figure out how to amalgamate all of those little strips of land that didn't necessarily have clear title and were passed down from generation to generation. If you look at a lot of the maps of years ago, you see these little tiny strips going from one end of a point to another end of a point. I know that happened in my community of the Pubnicos. I know probably down through Brier Island, in through Digby Neck, sort of the same thing where you had these little 100-foot strips going from one beach to the other beach and then getting split up as they were giving land to family members.

This legislation, Bill No. 74, amends the existing Land Titles Clarification Act to ensure speedy and just resolution of differences, disputes and confusion that occurs with situations through the appointment of an independent reviewer. We understand the independent reviewer will check into the situation and propose a fair solution, as we in our corner of the House understand Bill No. 74. The independent reviewer will move speedily on the files and report to the Minister of Natural Resources in a timely fashion so that the minister can immediately recommend a solution or, quite possibly, some form of a compensation to Cabinet. The negatively affected individual or family can then be quickly compensated, something that won't go on for years and years and I can say something that, beyond the compensation part, just takes the mess out of some of these discussions.

The second amendment contained in Bill No. 74 also comes under the category of common sense. It will clarify the ownership of land that has been occupied by families for generations under the apparently mistaken belief that they own them when, indeed, the Crown has never officially granted the land or, if it had granted it, somehow forgot to register the action with the Registry of Deeds. This new legislation simplifies the heretofore complicated process through which government can release its ownership of these ungranted lands.

Now again, this is pretty sensible stuff, it's in the spirit of red tape reduction, something that our Party strongly believes in and worked hard to bring about when we were on that side of the House.

In conclusion, we are very pleased to know that the current government is, in this regard at least, moving forward in our former government's red tape reduction initiative. So good stuff. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the honourable minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

[Page 2774]

HON. JOHN MACDONELL: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I want to thank the members opposite for their interventions - I do want to say for the member for Argyle, the Leader in the House of the Progressive Conservatives, the difference will be it will actually reduce the red tape.

With that, I move second reading of Bill No. 74.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 74. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, would you please call Bill No. 75.

Bill No. 75 - Merchandise Inspection Act.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Minister of Agriculture.

HON. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I'm pleased to stand in support of Bill No. 75, an Act to Repeal the Merchandise Inspection Act. Initially, this Act was created in 1762. It once served a purpose - to protect consumers and traders. Under this Act, municipalities were able to appoint people to inspect or measure food, lumber, fuel, and other merchandise. The Act also set size or grade standards for such goods, which are now obsolete. So the Merchandise Inspection Act no longer serves today's businesses as it once did. It is an outdated Act with functions that now fall under modern legislation and, in most cases, federal authority and national product standards.

This Act also fails to appoint a particular minister or department as being responsible for its administration. In fact, this Act is so obscure that no minister or department ever assumes they were connected to it. The subject matter covered in the Act primarily deals with goods and commodities now associated with either the Department of Natural Resources or Agriculture.

For these reasons, I'm proposing the Act should be repealed. This will eliminate any perceptions of duplication of barriers to trade and help ensure efficient regulatory practices. Further, by repealing this Act we will be doing our part to streamline and simplify the province's laws and help make life better for those in business.

[Page 2775]

With those few words of explanation and background, I move second reading of Bill No. 74.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Dartmouth East.

MR. ANDREW YOUNGER: Dartmouth isn't that small, Mr. Speaker. I'm pleased to stand on your behalf, actually, and speak on behalf of the Liberal caucus on this bill. Needless to say, we support the repeal of this bill, which was originally passed in 1762, as the minister noted. It's kind of amusing reading the bill because it actually makes me wonder how many more Statutes like this we have in the regulations that exist. I guess they're law, and I suppose they could be enforced if someone took them to court, but they're obviously not enforced.

For example, this bill regulates the size of bread for sale and says it can only be made for sale in loaves the size of 20, 24, 40, and 48 ounces. I'm quite sure that the member for Halifax Chebucto, when he's at the Farmers Market every Saturday morning, is there checking the loaves of bread to make sure that they all weigh within that measurement. Or for example, there is still a tariff of 10 English pounds on barrels of brown sugar being brought into the Port of Halifax. Actually, for anyone with any root vegetables, do you know what? You can only sell them by the pound. You can't sell them individually. So somebody better run up to Pete's Frootique before this gets proclaimed and let him know he has got to stop selling root vegetables individually in some cases.

In any case, Mr. Speaker, it might be interesting to go through all the Statutes we have and try to get rid of all the Acts like this. It might clean up some of our legislation. With that, we're obviously pleased to support this, and I don't know why we just don't pass this by unanimous consent to get it through and skip the Law Amendments Committee. If anybody comes to the Law Amendments Committee and says it's a bad idea to repeal this, I'm just not sure what I'm going to say at that point.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Inverness.

MR. ALLAN MACMASTER: Mr. Speaker, we are supportive of this movement to repeal this legislation as well, and like Bill No. 74, to repeal this legislation is very much in the spirit of the former government's Better Regulation Initiative. That was an essential plan to get rid of so many of the unnecessary hurdles that impact business in Nova Scotia. I understand the original Act that we're looking at today has been updated somewhat from the original legislation, but it's still obsolete. The fact is that the Merchandise Inspection Act is no longer useful and most of the laws are now covered by our federal government.

The original Act was good. It was progressive legislation for its time, and we must commend the foresight of the original MLAs planning for the development of the province when they enacted the legislation. We celebrated Democracy 250 not long ago where those first pioneers of democracy in North America were both practical and visionary leaders. They

[Page 2776]

set standards which all other democratic governments in North America and around the world have been following for two and a half centuries.

[8:30 p.m.]

The original Act gave municipalities in Nova Scotia inspection and measurement powers to protect consumers and set sizes and standards for basic essential products like food, lumber, fuel. While these standards are now obsolete, their repeal is a good thing and it is worthwhile to reflect briefly today on the extraordinary foresight of our early leaders.

With that, we believe that simplifying laws is good for business in Nova Scotia and that because modern legislation has replaced this Act, we are also in agreement that it should be repealed. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: If I recognize the minister it will be to close the debate.

The honourable Minister of Natural Resources.

HON. JOHN MACDONELL: Mr. Speaker, I'm standing to speak to this as the Minister of Agriculture; I think is where it falls. It kind of indicates there is lots of room for debate on which portfolio.

I want to thank the members opposite for their comments. I'm very pleased to know they're in agreement; I can't believe they wouldn't be. In our move to eliminate red tape, we're eliminating red tape before there ever was such a thing in the case of this bill. With that, I move second reading of Bill No. 75.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is for second reading of Bill No. 75. Would all those in favour of the motion please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

Ordered that this bill be referred to the Committee on Law Amendments.

The honourable Government House Leader.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, this is the first time I've had the privilege to appear before you sitting in the Chair, welcome.

Mr. Speaker, would you please call the order of business, Government Motions.

GOVERNMENT MOTIONS

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader.

[Page 2777]

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I move that the adjourned debate on the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne be now resumed.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island.

MR. LEONARD PREYRA: I too would like to welcome you to the Chair. I'm sure your former role in the classroom has prepared you well for your new position.

When we adjourned last week, I was talking about the great honour and privilege of being an MLA in this historic House of Assembly. We, as members of the Legislature, carry the hopes and dreams and aspirations of all the people in communities we represent. We will shape the opportunities and constraints presented to future Nova Scotians and Nova Scotian communities.

During the last campaign, and since the last campaign, my constituents have told me and Nova Scotians have told us that they would like us to make life better for Nova Scotians, both today and into the future. What they have told us is they would like us to live within our means, they would like better health care and sooner. They would like better and greener jobs. They would like a cleaner environment. I addressed those needs in my earlier remarks when I was talking about the last election and what we heard on the doorsteps and the campaign trail.

I spoke about the great history and heritage of my constituency and in particular the heritage of the Northwest Arm and the role of the Northwest Arm in the founding of the City of Halifax. I got involved in politics largely because of what was happening on the Northwest Arm. In fact, before that I was living a relatively quiet life at the university. I was appalled at the extent to which our shorelines were being slowly taken away, that infilled lands were being used to cut off public access to the shorelines - a right that Nova Scotians have enjoyed since time immemorial. People were building on infilled lands and building huge, monstrous homes that affected not just the quality of life on the shoreline and the habitat along the shoreline, but the view planes along the Northwest Arm.

After that fight a huge coalition of groups and individuals formed to say that we need to do something about infilling on the Northwest Arm. I can't say that I was in the forefront of that struggle because that had begun long ago, but I was happy to join it and was happy to be a part of that coalition that eventually got the Halifax Regional Municipality to pass a bylaw that prohibited the building of large homes on infilled land. I would like to believe that that bylaw will become a model for other communities and later on, perhaps, we could come up with some more effective legislation protecting our shorelines, ensuring that those shorelines are available to future generations.

I spoke about our universities as centres of learning and excellence in research and teaching, as engines for economic growth and development and our universities, colleges and

[Page 2778]

towns as dependent on those centres of excellence and those engines. I talked about access to post-secondary education as critical to our personal and social development.

I spoke about my constituency and the Capital District as being at the heart of Nova Scotia and the Nova Scotian economy, the Maritime economy. I talked about the Port of Halifax and its cruise and container traffic, the Autoport, the trans-loading facilities. The extent of which the Port of Halifax generates economic growth not just in my constituency, but right across Nova Scotia and across the Maritimes.

I spoke about the growing financial clout of the Capital District, about the Farmers Market as being a great alliance of largely urban consumers and rural producers. I spoke about the vitality of economic life in my community, in particular the business organizations, the Spring Garden Area Merchants Association, the Downtown Halifax Business Commission. I'm convinced that we share in common this desire to see Nova Scotia grow and to see Nova Scotia grow economically in environmentally-sustainable ways.

I'd like to say a little bit more about the role of the creative economy in our economic growth and development, both here in Halifax and in Nova Scotia at large. We know about the film industry, the quality of production that takes place in Nova Scotia. In fact, one of our most famous citizens today, Ellen Page, is drawing new attention to Halifax and putting Halifax on the world stage. Our digital animation industry is growing and there are demands from all over the world for their skills. We are looking for ways to grow that economy and to bring people here in Nova Scotia, who will nurture that industry.

All of us here know about the great, vibrant theatre community in Halifax Citadel, particularly the Neptune, but there are dozens of theatres in my constituency. The honourable member for Halifax Needham will know as well that the theatre and cultural industries have breathed great life into our constituencies and are attracting great attention and great jobs and bringing great talent to Nova Scotia.

Our museums and the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia are giving us a great opportunity to know more about our history. They hold up a mirror to us and tell us who we are and where we're going. They also have a critical edge to them that draws attention to things that we should be doing and should be doing better.

And let me not forget the music industry. Our musicians are making names for themselves all across the world and I dare say, many of them are making names for themselves in other parts of the world before they're even being heard here. Next week the Rankin Family is going to be here. I'm not going to claim the Rankin Family because I know the member for Inverness will take issue with that. I was in Mabou last year and I really enjoyed the life there in his great constituency. We have just as much talent in my constituency of Halifax Citadel-Sable Island and I'm sure there isn't an MLA here who isn't

[Page 2779]

proud of the music and art and cultural content and cultural work that's going on in their constituencies.

We shouldn't forget that the universities and colleges continue to play a great role in the development of those cultural industries. In particular the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design here in my constituency and across the harbour at the Nova Scotia Community College. In communities across Nova Scotia, those post-secondary institutions are playing a great role in developing, not just as centres of excellence in teaching and learning but they're also supporting these vibrant new industries that are developing.

I would be remiss in not saying more about some of the people who have made this happen, not just those who produce it, but also those activists who have kind of held our feet to the fire in terms of support for the cultural industries. We may not agree in the timing and the pace and the process, but we do share a commitment to developing the creative economy and developing our cultural industries and supporting our artists. In particular, I'd like to pay tribute to Peggy Walt who has just been a tireless advocate for the arts and a great supporter of young artists coming in and her partner Shimon Walt. Chris Mika and his partner Sheila Hunt and Gay Hauser and Robin Metcalfe, a great variety of people who have reminded us of our obligations to the arts community and to the great work that the arts are doing in Halifax Citadel-Sable island.

The arts, as you know, are also an important part of our tourism and cultural heritage. Thousands of people come to Nova Scotia and come to Halifax in large part because of the beauty of our lakes and, I'll call them mountains and hills, but also because of the quality of entertainment, the quality of music and art and our libraries.

I want to say something about health care. My constituency is also the centre of our health care facilities in Nova Scotia. I'm really proud of that fact and I know that it's a great burden too that we share in meeting all the health care needs of Nova Scotians and, I dare say, of Atlantic Canada. People come from all over Atlantic Canada to use our health care facilities, which are in Halifax Citadel-Sable Island largely and for the quality of our research in those areas, the Queen Elizabeth II, the Infirmary and the Victoria General, the Veteran's Memorial Hospital, Camp Hill, Abbie J. Lane.

Anyone who has had children will know, what a great asset the IWK Health Centre is to Canada and to Atlantic Canada and to our community. There are complaints about wait times, there are complaints about a great number of things, but no one complains about the service that they get at our hospitals and from our health care professionals. The IWK is in the forefront of providing that great service to our children and to our families.

I would like to remind people - and it's easy to forget - I recall during the H1N1 crisis, we were very concerned about whether or not we had the health care facilities. We were very concerned about whether or not we had the health care professionals and the

[Page 2780]

vaccines and things like that to be able to combat that. But under the leadership of the Minister of Health and with the support of our nurses and health care professionals who set aside many of their immediate concerns and said, this is a crisis and we all have to pull together. I was very proud of what we accomplished during the H1N1 and it augurs well for our ability to address some of the challenges we face in the health care field. I would like to pay tribute to those doctors, nurses, health care professionals, to those researchers at the university and all of those volunteers who make our health care system function as well as it does.

[8:45 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, I would be remiss if I didn't say something about my constituency as a commons, as something that we have inherited from past generations and that we have a duty to pass on to future generations intact. I'd like to begin by saying something about Sable Island, that remote part of my constituency that carries such a huge presence in the hearts and minds of Nova Scotians.

I know when the idea of creating Sable Island National Park was first mentioned there was a great outcry from people who thought we were going to do something that would harm it. You might recall that there were groups that started up, Hands Off Sable Island. I got letters from all over the world from people saying, what are you people doing up there? What are you going to do to the horses and what are you going to do to this great island that holds such an important place in their imaginations?

I'm happy to say, Mr. Speaker - and I'd like to pay tribute here to the federal government, to our federal partners who have worked with our Minister of Natural Resources; with the Minister of Environment; with the Minister of Energy; the Minister of Tourism, Culture and Heritage, and all of them in a very constructive way, to listen to what Nova Scotians and others have been saying about the importance of preserving Sable Island, of making sure that there is a human presence on the island, that the research we do there is on secure grounds. It has been a real honour and privilege to be the member of the Legislature for Sable Island and to be involved in that process of protecting and preserving Sable Island for future generations.

I've gotten so many letters from people saying, I would really love to visit Sable Island, it has been my lifelong dream and they've said - but I understand why (Interruption) It's my dream too, yes. We all share that dream and members of the other side might laugh but many of them have come to me and said, can I get in the line-up to get to Sable Island. If I had control, I would put them in that line-up.

Mr. Speaker, seriously, a number of people have said, I would love to visit Sable Island but I understand why we can't allow unlimited access to it. I want to pay tribute to the

[Page 2781]

two levels of government that have really pushed this project ahead and made it close to being a reality.

I also want to say that Zoe Lucas, David Richardson, Mark Butler and all those other people involved in the Green Horse Society have worked very hard over the years to make sure that we respect our obligations to Sable, long before it became popular, long before it became a public issue, they were there talking about our obligations as custodians and reminding us of our stewardship to that island.

I also want to say a little bit on this theme of the global commons. A great visionary project in my constituency is the Halifax Urban Greenway. Years ago, Mr. Speaker, a group of people decided that we should have an all-purpose hiking, biking, walking trail that would follow along the shoreline, that would become part of the Trans Canada Trail and Canadians from coast to coast to coast would be able to walk this great country. I'm happy to say that in my constituency the Halifax Urban Greenway has taken shape under the leadership of the Urban Greenway Association and, in particular, Mark Poirier. Again it is a project that began a long time ago but I'm very happy to support it and I'm delighted to see that the three levels of government have committed a significant amount of money and resources to making that project happen.

Mr. Speaker, I'd like to say something about the Halifax Common, an area that was given to us, bequeathed to the people of Halifax centuries ago. It's an area I share with the member for Halifax Chebucto and the member for Halifax Needham. We all lay claim to it because we're so proud of that area. I'm delighted to see the kinds of activity that goes on in that constituency, in that region, in that wonderful green space. I'm looking forward to crossing the boundary to the constituency of the MLA for Halifax Needham, to enjoy the Canada Games this coming winter.

The Halifax Common is a space that many Haligonians and many Nova Scotians are proud of and I'm glad to see that it is still devoted to public use and the public is very careful to make sure that we remember it is still a common area.

Some of the other places are more familiar to us, Mr. Speaker - the Public Gardens and Point Pleasant Park. Even though it is largely an urban constituency, my constituency does have a lot of green space, it does have a lot of common space and along with the shorelines, we have to make sure that those are preserved and expanded and passed on future generations, in better shape.

I want to say something about civil society in my constituency. I have probably the most active groups of citizens anywhere in Nova Scotia. In fact, when I first got elected I was surprised at how many groups there were centered in my constituency and how passionate people are. I had always thought that people were in politics for selfish reasons and they were all promoting their own selfish needs, but I think it is quite extraordinary the numbers of

[Page 2782]

people we have who are so active in our constituency who have no particular axe to grind, other than that they are interested in promoting the greater good.

Mr. Speaker, how much time have I left? Two minutes?

MR. SPEAKER: Just a little over a minute, member.

MR. PREYRA: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wanted to say something about the activists in my community. I know that people have talked about the next election and whether or not we're going to get re-elected, they are threatening to do that. One thing that I really use as a measure is when I look at what I do and what we do in the House I say to myself, what would Sister Theresa Chu say about what we're doing here? What would Muriel Duckworth say about what we're doing here? What would those activists who fought for social democracy and who fought for political change say?

I'm delighted to be able to go to those people and say, we heard you, we're listening to you, we're going to live within our means, we're going to provide better health care, a cleaner and greener environment and we're going to provide better jobs. I hope that over the next few years we will all be able to say that we fought for the greater good of Nova Scotia and Nova Scotians and we left this province in much better shape than we got it. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. (Applause)

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable member for Cape Breton Nova.

MR. GORDON GOSSE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It's an honour and a privilege that I rise on my feet tonight and stand in my place. I wouldn't be able to stand in my place today if it wasn't for a very good orthopaedic surgeon by the name of Dr. Faith Dodd who recently reattached my Achilles tendon, which I severed on August 11th. I must say it was quite an experience. I must tell the Minister of Health I have a new respect for her department. I also have a great respect for the orthopaedic clinic at the Cape Breton Regional Hospital and I must thank Mr. Ernie Ewer and Sandy Michalik and Sandra Rigby for cutting off five casts and putting them back on again in different positions, to help the healing of my leg.

It's an awful thing, Mr. Speaker, when you realize - you take for granted in middle age that you're going to be healthy and you step on a garden hose (Interruptions) this is the prime of your life and to have such a thing happen like that. I have a new respect for our health care, and I must say they were very kind to me.(Applause) It's going to be a long haul, apparently I guess, to look after getting the tendon stretched and learning how to walk again. I'm in physiotherapy at this time and it's coming along. I didn't have a very good week last week, but it's getting better as time goes by. (Interruption) No, I'll have to speak to the Minister of Health Promotion and Protection over that one, I guess.

Again, I'd like to thank the people of Cape Breton Nova for giving me the opportunity to stand here in my place. I must thank my wife, Jennifer Susan King, my son

[Page 2783]

Gordie, and my son Daniel, for standing by me. I have respect for everybody in this historic Chamber who puts their name forward for public life, because it's not an easy thing. It's not an easy job; you're constantly 24/7, contrary to what the media and everybody else portrays an MLA. An MLA works hard - we all work hard and we all do the best we can for the constituents we represent in this Chamber. We wouldn't be here doing this job if we didn't care about the people we represent, on all sides of the House.

I would like to thank my campaign manager, Nelina McGuigan. I would dearly love to thank her for running a good campaign. I'd also like to thank the people who ran against me. For the Liberals I had Mr. Donnie Morrison, a long-time Olands Brewery rep, a great guy. Donnie ran a good campaign, a well-respected man. The Progressive Conservative Party, they actually had a very young man, just out of university. They brought him back to Cape Breton to run against me. His name is Cory Hann. He was a good young man, and I still love his flyer - I keep it in my office every day to remind me - that quote. He did it on his flyer and he did it in the beautiful NDP orange.

It said Darrell Dexter says Gordie Gosse must go. That's what it said on the flyer. So I spoke to the young man during the campaign and I asked, why would you put out literature like that? He said, Gordie, they were trying to get a reaction out of you. I said to him, young man, I've been in this Legislature for seven years and longer, and I've never reacted to something like that and I will continue not to react like that, and I will not stand in my place and say something about another member of this Legislature or anybody else.

Mr. [Deputy] Speaker, you know now, congratulations on being named the Deputy Speaker. I too know what that position is like and your job is to protect all the members of the Legislative Assembly, as my job is to protect the health and well-being of the constituents of Cape Breton Nova - that's why I'm elected to be here.

I'd first like to talk about the beautiful riding of Cape Breton Nova. I can talk about the area of South Bar, which borders on the harbour with the beautiful Polar Bear Beach. You know why they call it Polar Bear Beach? The water; it's the temperature of the water. The water is beautiful. On a hot day, you can guarantee to cool yourself off on Polar Bear Beach. You can also watch the ferry pull out and go to Newfoundland and Labrador, and catch those waves off that ferry when it goes by - the wake is absolutely beautiful. South Bar is a beautiful little community; it overlooks the harbour. They have a beautiful little fire department there with a captain by the name of Mark Muldoon who looks after that. Actually, our government gave them some money to get themselves some new uniforms so they can fight fires and protect the people of Cape Breton Nova.

South Bar is such a beautiful place to live; it's just gorgeous down there. Actually, you can take a bike - as a kid, I used to bike all the way down to Polar Bear Beach for a swim and bike back. When I was playing ball in my younger years, I would bike down every day and try to lose a few pounds.

[Page 2784]

There's asphalt that runs from Whitney Pier right down to Polar Bear Beach. You can pedal down there, everybody walks there. You see more people walking down there than anywhere else. They have a little fishing wharf down there, probably with a little less than 20 boats - mostly the Quinn family, Bernie Quinn and his crew and the Fraser family. They've been there for many years and it's probably the third or fourth generation of fishermen in those families. It's a beautiful little spot. They love it down there. Anybody who lives there loves that little spot.

[9:00 p.m.]

Mr. Speaker, we move up from South Bar into the very ethnically diverse community of Whitney Pier. In Whitney Pier alone, when you come over the overpass - you know, growing up as a kid you would come along the overpass and you would always wake up because there was that smell - that smell of the coke ovens when they were baking the coke, when they were making the coal into coke so they could have the coke for the blast furnace. If you were away somewhere, you always knew that smell when you hit the overpass when they were quenching the coke. You knew you were home and you always had that smile on your face.

Now, today we're spending over $400 million - the federal and the provincial governments - to clean up 100 years of toxic waste by steelmaking in that community. When you drive over that overpass now - and I just drove over there recently with the Premier and the Deputy Premier. I think the Deputy Premier was in the back seat - and we looked at that community and you would not believe the green grass when you come over that overpass. I'm telling you, that hydro seed, when you come over there, it just looks beautiful, and the new set of lights in there - we have access.

Whitney Pier always had one road into the community when I was younger. It was a subway and in 1967, I think, or in 1968 - maybe the former mayor and my colleague, the member for Cape Breton South, could tell me - when they built the overpass in 1967, I remember they had the Queen of the Overpass. I remember that. I think her name was Sandra Best. I remember the runner-up - she was gorgeous too. (Laughter) Her name was - oh, here we go. She was the daughter of Florence and Clarence Bona of Brown Street and her name was Lillian Bona. She now lives in Alberta, but I remember her being the runner-up. I was 12 years old. You can imagine the excitement, having a Queen of the Overpass. It was a great day. Then we progressed onto that. Now we have a spare road. The spare road is the Sydney Port Access Road, so we now have another road into the community.

Since that has all happened, we actually had gotten money, I must say, from the federal government in the Façade Program. I must say that that minister, Mr. MacKay, and the federal government came in and decided to extend that Façade Program to the beautiful area of Whitney Pier. Now the storefronts are all redone.

[Page 2785]

You have to realize, that was a community that lost 4,000 jobs when the government closed Sydney Steel - generations and generations, which I'm a member of, a third generation steelworker. My grandfather had 49 years, my father had 43 years, and I had almost 20 years in that steel industry. When that happened we all worried about all the resource-based industries in Cape Breton - the steel, the coal mining, the forestry, the fisheries; all those resource-based industries that we and our fathers and our grandfathers lived on no longer exist. The fisheries industry is way down. The forest industry is down. Steelmaking and coal mining are gone - they're gone - a way of life.

I mean, I could go into - we are an island, that we are, but we, the people of Cape Breton Nova, are very proud. We decided that we were going to do something. What we're going to do is make our place a better place to live and the community is doing that. We have probably one of the best youth centres in the Province of Nova Scotia. (Applause) The Whitney Pier Youth Club was established in March 1994 . . .

AN HON. MEMBER: Who started that?

MR. GOSSE: Well, Mr. Speaker, it's difficult to say who started that. (Interruption) It was myself who started that program, actually. . .

AN. HON. MEMBER: That wasn't difficult.

MR. GOSSE: That's probably one of the reasons I'm standing in this House today. At that time I got quite ticked off at the government of the day for not giving enough money to youth programming in the Province of Nova Scotia. So I decided that I was going to join a Party and run for a seat in the Legislature myself.

Ironically, here I am today - four elections later - 2010 I'm standing in my place, but that youth centre and the gentleman who took over that youth centre, by the name of Chester Borden - I was just recently there with the Minister of Justice. We announced a Lighthouse Program for that youth centre - that's two years, $12,000 each year - for funding to keep youth off the streets. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, if you look at that youth centre and you think about the funding that goes in there, 99 per cent of the funding that goes into that youth centre is from the Province of Nova Scotia. The federal government is talking tough on crime, but I talk tough on getting money to prevent the crime before it happens. (Applause) The money that we spend now on crime prevention with these young people - I've seen it, those kids when I started that youth centre in 1994 are now in their 20s and 30s. Some are police officers, some are in the Armed Forces, some have gone to Afghanistan and represented their country.

[Page 2786]

These were kids in that community that believed in going to that youth centre. I'll give an example, the federal government, what did they give to that youth centre? They gave $5,000, two summer students. Two summer students that they gave to the youth centre. That's what that federal government gives. They talk about giving money for crime and putting more people behind bars. Spend the money on crime prevention with young people so we do not have to deal with those issues later on in life. (Applause)

Let us not fill the jails of Nova Scotia, let us fill the boys and girls clubs, let us fill the Whitney Pier Youth Club. Let us fill those clubs full of young people so they can go and learn right from wrong. You're not going to save every child that walks through the door, every youth that goes through there, there's no way you're going to do that. Those ones you are going to help, they will remember the things you did for them when nobody else would do anything for them. They'll always remember that.

I went to a wedding there this summer at the youth centre. A young couple that met at the youth centre got married there in the gazebo there this summer. They actually got married in the gazebo. I was so proud, I was so emotional, I thought they were my kids that were getting married there. You know what? I realized they were my kids at that time in my life. I spent all those days and nights with those young people.

Not only that, some of the other kids that met there that are now married and stationed in Petawawa - Colleen and Justin Burton - they're married and have a child now, they're in the Armed Forces. Jason Tubrett and Candice, they're married now and they're stationed in Gagetown. These are young people I've met there. Dwayne, Bubby and Val are now expecting. She just had her second child. They now have moved back to Whitney Pier and bought a home. He's working, she's off now on parental leave after just having a child. Then you have Earl and Jen, they met there and now live on the corner of Fisher and Henry Street. They met at the youth centre. Those are kids, and they all work.

Those are kids that could have gone down the other fork in the road. But with a little bit of guidance, I had that thought, youth don't care what you know until they know that you care. That's the big thing. We have to realize we have to show those kids and those young people that we care. That is the big thing, that we care.

The Whitney Pier Rink recently had a new roof put on it - $400,000 and a new chiller. That is probably one of the few rinks in the Province of Nova Scotia that's owned by the community, owned by the community of Whitney Pier. That's not owned by the municipality, it's owned by the community of Whitney Pier with a board. That rink is up and running with a new chiller, good for another 20 years. The young kids of the community of Ashby, Grand Lake Road, Whitney Pier can use that facility on a daily basis.

I'd like to thank the honourable Minister of Health Promotion and Protection for coming to the aid of the community of Whitney Pier. Not only that, we go back to talking

[Page 2787]

about young people and I also have to give congratulations to the Minister of Health Promotion and Protection for the new Cape Breton Health Recreation Complex, a $10 million indoor facility next to Cape Breton University. I went there to watch the young kids play for the first time, I was amazed to watch kids play indoor soccer and my son play indoor football on turf grass. I couldn't believe it.

I said, I can't believe it - this is the first time, no matter what the weather was like outside, these kids were inside. They had a golf driving range where the kids were playing soccer, but you have to be careful going through the door because your ears pop because of the air in there holding up the facility and it's very hard to hear. But I'll tell you it's the most beautiful facility. But then again, here we are with the honourable minister putting money into youth programming and helping youth get off the street. I take my hat off to the minister for being involved and getting those things done. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, I hear the honourable member for Halifax - is it Sable Island? - talking about Caper soccer. Caper soccer is doing fine, we did all right this weekend and we'll see Saint Mary's in the finals shortly.

Mr. Speaker, the most important thing is that when you are in government and you are spending money and targeting young people, you're getting your dollars' worth. The Office of Health Promotion and Protection is involved in helping get this $10 million facility up and running for young people - it's 15 minutes out on the highway, next to the university. This is amazing - not only is there an indoor soccer and football field, but alongside that there is a world-class track and field, the first time ever in Cape Breton, along with an artificial turf. By the way, the honourable member should know that the Cape Breton Capers play on that artificial turf now, it is absolutely gorgeous. Also, I was surprised when I was out there to see that they have a javelin throw, discus, hammer throw pit. The thing I noticed the most was that they have two beach volleyball courts up in back, with sand.

That place is absolutely beautiful. I cut the ribbon on that facility, I had the honour to cut the ribbon to open that facility, along with Andrew Link, and it is absolutely gorgeous to see that, Mr. Speaker. You ought to come down sometime, take a trip and go out to the university - but young people. I watched those people play soccer in there and football. My son played football in there, it was amazing, I just thought it was absolutely amazing.

Now I am going to go back to the community of Whitney Pier where I also have to take my hat off again to the Minister of Health Promotion and Protection, Mr. Speaker. I know I am giving her a lot of credit here tonight. Last week we broke ground on the Whitney Pier Historical Trail. Now I am going to give you an idea of what the Whitney Pier Historical Trail is. The community of Whitney Pier was actually settled by immigrants. They came from all over the world to work at Sydney Steel. In there we have a trail that is going to start from the overpass, run down Railroad Street - the nickname for that street is Scab Avenue and we call it Scab Avenue because during the strikes that is where the men would go into

[Page 2788]

the steel plant to go to work when the strike was on. It runs from there all the way through the whole part of Whitney Pier and eventually it tacks all the way down, over the Ferry Street Bridge into downtown Sydney.

Every so many feet on that trail there is going to be a kiosk. On that it is going to have either the Italian people came here to settle and the immigrants and what they did, the Ukranian people, the Polish people, the West Indian people, the Jewish community, the Hungarians. That is going to be all along that beautiful trail. That is part of the HPP Active Living campaign so that is going to be an absolutely beautiful place to walk, can you imagine, in the evening. As you are walking by, Mr. Speaker, you can look in at what they used to call Number Five Gate, where the men went to work through a tunnel into the gate and either broke off to the open hearth or the blast furnace or went left to the stripper or the blooming mill, up in that area, or the brick department. (Interruptions) The stripper is where the ingots would come from the open hearth and the crane would come down and take off the ingots, so the red-hot ingots could go into the blooming mill pit. The word for that was the stripper, so I'm just telling you.

In that area there we now have a beautiful, brand-new soccer field, track, lighted basketball court and a lighted tennis court. Again, it is absolutely beautiful. I think I was there with the member for Cape Breton West just recently, two weeks ago, to open up that facility and I cut the ribbon on that facility. The Sydney Academy soccer teams are there, girls and boys soccer teams. It was nice to see them there. It was pouring down rain and you know what? The event was absolutely great. I didn't laugh when the water filled up in the tent and you know how the water fills up on a tent in a big pool, and the water let go and went over the member for Cape Breton West. Now I didn't find that funny, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, I'm just going to say that it's a beautiful facility but who can imagine, when I was a young man carrying my lunch can, going to the open hearth through the scrap yard where my Uncle Cecil worked, that the kids would be playing soccer there today. I could not believe that, down there playing high school soccer in that facility.

[9:15 p.m.]

So the community of Whiney Pier, Ashby, the north end of Sydney - for the clean up of the Tar Ponds, this money also came from some of what that they call the Tar Ponds legacy fund, and some of that fund money is through the Department from the honourable Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal.

I must give him congratulations also, while I am up on my feet. I thought that he worked out a deal just recently with Cape Breton Rail, including the new subsidy, and keeping the rail line open to Cape Breton. If I remember, it was last week and I think he negotiated the deal. He wasn't like the minister from Economic and Rural Development. He did it in an open way, he was not having tea and crumpets in a secret meeting. He negotiated

[Page 2789]

that deal. He did that deal, open and transparently, and that's the way the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal works.

In that deal we'll not only keep the rail line open, but also we've worked to get the leases down, we've worked to get those leases down. You know, we got the leases down to $300 and the people can buy that land for fair market value. I went to all those meetings along with the member for Victoria-The Lakes, we went to those community meetings and we did go to those meetings to see if we could get a better deal for those people and thanks to the Minister of Economic and Rural Development and the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal, the people of Cape Breton are better off today with that deal in place to keep our rail line open, to keep that rail line open. Mr. Speaker, $3.5 million for the Cape Breton rail line agreement, that's what it cost to keep that rail line open.

I will tell you about one citizen whom I admire. The gentleman's name is Mr. Carl "Campy" Crawford. Now, there's a gentleman. If anybody ever wanted to know, this gentleman was the first black police officer east of Montreal, in all of Atlantic Canada, and I stand here in my place today and have the honor and the privilege to actually play on the same ball team with Campy Crawford and he can play. He can play second base and turn a double-play better than anybody and I did get to play with his son Carl as time went by too, and he also played hockey for Saint Mary's. Carl was a great ball player but his dad was a mentor.

Long before there was community policing, there was Campy Crawford. If you were in trouble with the law and Mr. Crawford was on, you would actually ask him - people have said this - please take me to jail, don't take me home to my father, because they don't want Campy knocking on the door and saying, Mr. Gosse, your son has been acting up. That was not the way it happened, you would ask Campy to take you to jail. Although that never happened in my time. (Laughter)

There was one of the finest gentlemen the Lord has ever put on this earth. But you know, there's a Campy Crawford award each and every year that's given out and I had the honour and privilege - even when I opened the youth center, Campy would come up in the car with the little dog.

Another one of my mentors, Joe Worrel, now there's another fine gentleman and one of the greatest ball players Whitney Pier has ever produced. I go now by his house - he has since had double amputation on his legs, from circulation and other stuff - and I went to see him recently. I go see him all the time when he's out on the step and I go to talk to him. He was the catcher on the 1969 Canada Games team. When that diamond up the road here was named in 1969, the Canada Games Diamond here in Halifax, Joe Worrel was on that team. Now there's a gentleman.

[Page 2790]

We sometimes sit in life and wonder how we got to where we are. Well, I played with Joe in the Nova Scotia Senior League in 1975, but they were called at that time, the Mill White Auto Datsuns, and then in 1976 we became the Glace Bay Alpines and Joe was my roommate for four years in the Nova Scotia Senior League and then we left there, went back with the Pier Aces and then I became the playing coach of the Cape Breton Pepsis in the hopes that the Nova Scotia Senior A Championships at Whitney Pier in 1985. It was the 200th anniversary of Sydney. We had - oh the crowds - a ball game in Whitney Pier back in the day would be 3,000 or 4,000 people to be in that ballpark. I have tapes home of the Olands Action Week Fastball Tournament and there was no fence and there was a human fence around the field. There were that many people who would come to that community to watch that Olands Action Week Fastball Tournament - it later became the Coca-Cola Classic Tournament - in the day.

Mr. Speaker, back to Joe Worrell; we used to play floor hockey in Glace Bay at the Caledonia Club when we first started back in '75 and we moved that to the John Bernard Croak School auditorium on Wednesday nights. We had a line called the Sydney line, which was Cliff Surette, Ralph Matheson, John Lewis, myself and Joe Worrell. The other line was Jackie Ferguson, Jimmy Hoffman, Clary Warner, Kevin Murray - now there was a guy who could run - and we played floor hockey there on Wednesday nights in our off seasons.

Those guys, Mr. Worrell, Mr. Campy Crawford, they shaped me as the person I am today. To have been able to be on those types of teams with those guys and realize the things that they went through in their lives but they never complained, there was never a sad word. I've never heard either one of those men ever say anything bad about anybody. That's one thing that they taught me in my life, if you haven't got anything good to say about somebody, don't say anything at all. Those two guys were absolutely phenomenal. It was an honour and a privilege to play ball with them, I think of those guys all along.

Also, they always talk about teachers in school and I think about my history teacher. I came to work today and the library had sent me over a book called The Gothic Line: Canada's Month of Hell in World War II in Italy. I heard all those stories growing up - most of the men in my community were in the Cape Breton Highlanders. The honourable member for Cape Breton South would know most of those guys because there are members in his Legion, in the Ashby Legion Branch 138 in Ashby. I've got this book now and I love reading war books - D-Day to Carpiquet, I think Mr. Estabrooks had given me a signed copy of that; that was about the North Shore Regiment in which his dad was a member, but also to look at the history books.

I thought back over the years and I thought of my history teacher, Mr. Redmond O'Keefe. I'll tell you how smart he was, or maybe it was just me, but I would get what he taught me on the bus on the way home from school because that's the kind of guy he was, he made you think, as an educator, he made you think. He had the same tone of voice day in, day out, he never changed his voice, he never raised his voice and he showed us respect.

[Page 2791]

The biggest thing for him was that he hooked me on history. You know, here I am today, through all those years, I'm hooked on history, he hooked me on that history.

There's not a book out there that I haven't read, no matter if it's No Retreating Footsteps about the North Novies by William R. Bird, all of those books that I read now, I think of my history teacher. You know that old saying about you always think about a teacher, well, that would be one teacher that I thought about a lot as I got older. My wife hollers at me for having the history channel on 24/7. There must be something else on that TV that I could watch. But I'm so ingrained this time of year about thinking about all of the veterans that I worked with in the steel plant, all the veterans that I knew as a young kid growing up across from the Whitney Pier Legion.

Across the street from that was the former member of the Legislature who served from 1956 to 1970, who was actually a prisoner of war. He served in this Legislature, Percy "Pinky" Gaum. He was another great man to put his name in for public office. I think he became a minister in 1967 under G.I. Smith. He became the Minister of Mines and Energy and he was a great man. I always think about Mr. Gaum because when I was a kid I grew up just around the corner from him. You always saw him in people's homes. I think that he gave out more money out of his pocket than he ever made and drew as a salary here as an MLA in this Legislature. He always made sure that people, in their homes, he always brought them groceries, I saw it as a kid. Percy "Pinky" Gaum gave out more of his own pocket than he ever drew of a salary here in the Nova Scotia Legislature and I know that for a fact because I grew up around the corner from him. I had breakfast at the Legion on Sunday, his home is still there. He was a good man and he represented the people of Cape Breton Nova for 14 years in this Legislature.

Then after him came the honourable Speaker of the Nova Scotia Legislature, Mr. Paul MacEwan. He represented the constituents of Cape Breton Nova for 32 years in this Legislature. Can anybody sitting in here today realize, sitting in your place in this Legislature for 32 years? Think about it, 32 years, nine consecutive elections. Well, I'd be well over 100, I think, if I stayed for that length of time. If you want to talk about a constituency MLA, a constituency MLA, that's what Mr. Gaum was, that's what Mr. MacEwan was, and that's what I am, is a constituency MLA. I do my constituency work. (Applause)

I inherited this riding from those two men, Mr. Speaker, who are probably two of the best constituency MLAs in their time in the Province of Nova Scotia. I realized when I first got into this job that if I did not do my job in the constituency, I would no longer be standing in my place in this Legislature, which means the constituency of Cape Breton Nova has many needs and many wants.

How many other MLAs can sit in here and say they do Board of Referees down at the unemployment office? How many MLAs can say that they do Umpire down at the unemployment office? How many MLAs do Canada Pension disabilities? How many MLAs

[Page 2792]

do DVA? How many MLAs have represented people in the tax court? How many people can honestly say that, sitting in here? But that was the type of riding that those two men made in Cape Breton Nova. If somebody walks through that door - I don't care if their problem is municipal, provincial or federal - that you have to help those people out who walk through that door. (Applause)

Do you know what, Mr. Speaker? Those of us who do those things will continue to get re-elected in all Parties in the Legislature. You do your job as an MLA and the people of your riding will reward you each and every time because the people of Cape Breton Nova know when somebody works. You look at the federal riding, the Sydney-Victoria riding which encompasses the riding of Cape Breton Nova, the MP who represents that area wins by 10,000 votes and when he comes to that overpass, it's like the lights come on - Whitney Pier - he loses all the polls.

Now, I can't figure that out, Mr. Speaker, and I know the former Speaker came into my office and had a copy of the polls, he said, now, this guy wins by 10,000 or 12,000 votes, but when he gets to Whitney Pier, what happens? He doesn't win a poll and why would that be? Because the people of Cape Breton Nova want you to represent them on all the issues whether it's provincial, federal, municipal. They want you to be there to represent them and bring their issues forward. So you can go have a look at those polls to realize that the people of Cape Breton Nova want somebody who's going to be there for them at all times.

Mr. Speaker, there are a few other issues that I would like to talk about. I actually had the honour, with the honourable member for Victoria-The Lakes, in unveiling the Alexander Graham Bell Way. The MLA for Victoria-The Lakes was there with me as we unveiled that sign and I saw it up for the first time afterwards. It's a beautiful sign and a great tribute to a family that's well-known all across this world - Alexander and Mabel Bell. They deserve that tribute on the highway. Also, the Lighthouse Program, the Whitney Pier Youth Club, that youth centre will be open for a long time. The kids in that area love that centre. After school you can't budge in there, there are that many, do you know what I'm saying, but I must also say recently we just had a new addition.

I talked about the churches of Whitney Pier. I talked about the Ukranian Church. I talked about the Polish Church. I talked about the Italian Church. I talked about the Jewish Synagogue that was in there. I talked about all of those different churches: the United Church, Trinity Church, St Alban's Church, the Holy Redeemer Church. Well, I'm going to tell the people in this province right now here today we now have a Muslim Mosque in Whitney Pier. (Applause) What better place for the mosque to be located than in the former Holy Redeemer Church gym. The Holy Redeemer Church gym was recently purchased by the community, Mr. Speaker, so they can pray in their religion.

Now what better place, if you think about it, what better place for somebody - the people of Nova Scotia and the people of Atlantic Canada should realize, if you want to have

[Page 2793]

a look at multiculturalism, if you want to have a look at that, come to Whitney Pier. Come to Whitney Pier and see the community that was built on multiculturalism. Come there and see the generations there, Mr. Speaker. (Applause) What safer and more beautiful place to have a mosque than in Whitney Pier?

Mr. Speaker, I'm just so proud of that. We have all the different types of religions that I know of in the community of Whitney Pier. An example to the world, to show how people can live with different religions and how people can get along with different races and different cultures in the small community of Whitney Pier. They should stand up and take notice. When you talk about multiculturalism, talk about that.

You wonder why there are so many people from Whitney Pier in the RCMP? Why? We have families in there that have three sons - unheard of. The Smith brothers, Danny, Charlie, and Billy - RCMP. The Sheppard brothers, Allan, Kevin, and Shawn - RCMP. The Laughlin boys, Joey - well, Hoss - and Allan. I hate saying a guy's nickname, you know what I mean?

[9:30 p.m.]

The point is that we have all of these RCMP officers. I think about Jonathan Skeete, Mr. Speaker. We have the Jonathan Skeete Run there every Action Week. Jonathan Skeete was a Black RCMP officer from Whitney Pier. For 20 years we have been holding an annual run in honor of Jonathan Skeete. Now there was another community guy who devoted his life to the young people in the community, with floor hockey teams, football teams, air cadets - There's another guy. You talk about that (Interruption) Well, his father, Lemuel, is in the Nova Scotia Sport Hall of Fame for fastball. Lemuel also ran the United Mission Youth Centre for many years. Lemuel was honoured for many of his accomplishments. He's a great guy. Lem Skeete has done a lot for the community of Whitney Pier. Mr. Skeete still runs the Whitney Pier Day Care.

By the way, I think the Minister of Community Services had given money to that daycare. Am I correct in saying that you had given money to that daycare to make life better for today's families in Whitney Pier? Didn't I just recently say that? Oh no, she did give money. I remember exactly, she did. How could I forget that beautiful minister giving money to that daycare in Whitney Pier? Really though, now that I think about it, because I did call Linda Talbot, who works for Lemuel Skeete as the executive director. They were quite pleased to receive that money for the children of Whitney Pier, and I thank you, minister.

I'm having a little sip of water, Mr. Speaker. As I think about it, you want to talk about a community like that. I think about Ashpy, the beautiful community of Ashpy, which I would say is mostly an industrial part - a lot of car dealerships - but on the other end of Ashpy, Ashpy Road, where my Uncle Redmond and his wife, my Aunt Paulette, live. I think about that area. I was very fortunate this year, thanks to the stimulus funding. The stimulus

[Page 2794]

funding is a three-way deal with funding from the municipality, funding from the province, and funding from the federal government. The municipality - I think is the way it works - they dictate what roads and what sewer and water they would like to get replaced.

On that deal, we replaced the sewer and water and the new paving, from Ashpy Road right up to Cherry Street, and I think down the other end of Ashpy from Disco Street down to the overpass - new sewer and water and new asphalt. That is all through the stimulus funding.

Now, the community of Whitney Pier benefited from the stimulus package also. When I think of Church Street, sewer and water, sidewalk; Henry Street, sewer and water is in right now, the pavement is coming; East Broadway, the stimulus money; Whitney Pier from Jamieson Street right to Broadway. These are all available because of working with the stimulus funding between all three levels of government, so that was a good thing this year.

The community in Ashpy and Whitney Pier continues to grow. People in my age group are retiring and coming back home and buying property. I recently had an e-mail from a friend of mine who I played hockey with, who just bought a house on Muggah Street. He couldn't believe he bought the house at a relatively good price. He is coming back home, getting ready to retire, moving back into the community. That's the kind of thing we need: the people in my generation who have worked away for many years to come back, retire to their roots, get involved in their community to make it a better place to live.

Mr. Speaker, I also think of - I joke with people and I say, you know what, in the House of Assembly the Province of Nova Scotia cannot shut down unless somebody from Whitney Pier walks in through that door to shut this Assembly down and finish our business. People look at me - what? I said no, you can't shut the House down unless somebody from Whitney Pier comes in. That would be Her Honour, Mayann Francis, but if she's not available, the Supreme Court Justice, Mike MacDonald. There you go, again, the community of Whitney Pier, Her Honour, coming in to shut it down.

I knew Her Honour's father, I remember him when I was younger. I went to school with the Lieutenant Governor's twin sisters Donna and Debbie and younger brother Howard. So I'm fortunate to know all of those people in my community and realize and know the history of that community growing up. To see that heritage trail going up and to see all those kiosks along that trail, talking about all the multicultural - but if you drove down to Whitney Pier right now, just past the fire station, you will see this great big metal pot. In that metal pot there are 32 flags under that pot. That's calling the melting pot.

Every flag of every nationality that settled in Whitney Pier, 32 flags, all the nationalities that settled there. I'm thankful to the honourable member for Halifax Citadel-Sable Island as being a member of the Democracy 250 committee that actually got me the

[Page 2795]

money for that monument to the immigrants that survived and lived in Whitney Pier. I'd like to thank the honourable member and someday maybe I'll get to go to Sable Island with him.

I'm just trying to say - the thing is (Interruption) there you go, you think about the little community of Whitney Pier. If you realize the Heartland Tour, that's a tour where the honourable member for Argyle, the former Health Minister, and the honourable Minister of Justice took part in that Heartland Tour. That Heartland Tour was devised and started by who? Nicky Giacomantonio, Whitney Pier, Mr. Speaker. I think he has a brother named Carman who is a doctor here in Halifax, I think he has a brother named Michael who's a cancer care doctor, an older brother Michael, at the IWK.

So, three brothers in this little community that are doctors here in this beautiful city. Think about it, that little community, how did they turn out all those people? How did they turn out all those people in this province - Lieutenant Governor, Supreme Court justice, doctors, lawyers, police officers. Why? (Interruptions) MLAs? Well, I understand that. Why? That's right. That's right, Mr. Speaker, the steelworkers. I think of all the steelworkers in that generation that's gone by. My father is gone and all those men. The honourable member for Cape Breton South, his father worked there.

I remember when I got elected, the former Premier of the Province of Nova Scotia, I had this discussion out here on Granville Street and he said, you know, you broke my record. I said what record would that be, sir? That's the Honourable John Buchanan. What record did I break? A former steelworker getting elected to the Legislature of Nova Scotia. He was the first. The Honourable John Buchanan. Imagine, I tied a record with John Buchanan. I couldn't believe it, gee, Senator John? When I was a kid I got to see him when I was younger, but he wouldn't remember me because those were the days when they used to have Krszwda's cottage out there on Ironville and I used to have to go out and mow the lawn on Sundays. The reason that would be is because Mrs. Krszwda would allow the honourable Percy "Pinky" Gaum to have that cottage for the month of July because Percy was a prisoner of war with her son, Jokie Krszwda, cause Jokie was shot in the stomach at the raid on Dieppe and was captured.

They were such close friends after spending two and one-half years in a prisoner of war camp, the families were pretty tight. So, Percy "Pinky" Gaum would be at the cottage out there in Ironville, and I was a young guy and I used to have to go out with Jokie who was the oldest grandson and we'd have to cut the lawn. That was the first time I got to see John Buchanan, Pinky Gaum and Bob Muir - Senator Bob Muir. I got to see those guys and that was my first taste of politics. They couldn't influence me that badly, Mr. Speaker, as you can see. But I do remember that as a kid, mowing the lawn, seeing those guys there at that cottage in Ironville. It was absolutely beautiful.

The first taste of politics I ever got was from Fred Tomie's. I don't know if anybody in this Legislature remembers Fred Tomie's Club in Whitney Pier. We called it the Whitney

[Page 2796]

Pier Athletic Club. That's where Sam Moon and Matt Minglewood used to play. It was Moon, Minglewood And TheUniversal Power. They played in that club. That was my first taste of politics, because later on I became the president of the Whitney Pier Athletic Club.

We used to go through the phone book. In those days, in order to get a liquor licence - it was a private club - you needed 50 names. I'd sit down with Freddy and we'd write down 50 names and the addresses and the phone numbers and we'd get enough to send the liquor licence in. Then Freddy would say, okay, here are the envelopes. He'd address the envelopes and he'd have the Nova Scotia New Democratic Party, the Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative Party, and the Liberal Party. I'd say to Freddy, Freddy, what are you doing? He said, I don't know who is going to be in power but I need my liquor licence, this is a private club. That was my first taste of politics. I said, really? That's how it's done, he said. I don't know who is going to be the government. I'll tell you, there were some good nights rocking down at Freddy's.

As a matter of fact, if you guys want to check it out, I think John Campbelljohn wrote a song called "Friday Night at Freddy's." That is a song, "Friday Night at Freddy's." I mean, the club only had 106 seats. If you didn't get your tickets after you got paid on the steel plant on Wednesday, if you didn't buy your tickets by Thursday, you weren't getting in Freddy's on Friday because he was sold out. You couldn't get in Freddy's. She was jammed. That was a strange name, though - the Whitney Pier Athletic Club. I've never seen anybody doing push-ups or sit-ups in that club.

I'll go out to Grand Lake Road and talk about the beautiful development along Grand Lake Road, about the Grand Lake Fire Hall, the Grand Lake Economic Development Association and the beautiful new facility that they put in there. It's absolutely gorgeous, centrally located. They do all the calls on Highway No. 125, Adrian Langlois and Mike and Dave, Allan Hanratty, Dougal Macaulay and all those guys. The service that they do in that community is just outstanding. We have an office in there - the NDP Outreach Office is in there - and I do get to see the boys often. It's a beautiful spot.

We move out farther on Grand Lake Road and we have the Cape Breton University. It's funny - I was driving in the car and heard President John Harker today talking about his trip with the Premier. Now, did you realize that Cape Breton University actually has a campus in the United Arab Emirates? They have a campus in the United Arab Emirates. That's unheard of. I heard him talking about, I think that the university has looked at this and said, we've got to grab the bull by the horns here.

Now, there's a new facility going in there now. I think it's the Centre for Sustainability in Energy and the Environment. That's under construction right now; it's absolutely gorgeous. It's going to be up and running. There was a little bit of a labour dispute out there just recently, but the radio said today the dispute is over. That's a good thing. I went to visit those guys on the picket line - I go to support those guys on the picket line. It was

[Page 2797]

pouring down rain and I went there to see them and I went there to offer my support. I know what it's like to be on strike because I've been on strike before. I worked at Sydney Steel. I was there when the union got the bill for the honourable Premier's car one day. I'll never forget that one. It was a Rent-A-Car. They sent the bill to the union hall, asking for the damage on that when he opened the wing at the new City Hospital. I had nothing to do with that one.

Cape Breton University has gone out and recruited students at a rate better than any other university in this province. They come to Cape Breton because they diversified their programs to understand that there are changes coming in education. President Harker and his staff went out there and realized that this Centre for Sustainability in Energy and the Environment, these are going to be good things for CBU. I was there with the Deputy Premier when he opened Harris Hall, a brand new residence, and he cut the ribbon on that one. (Interruption) They did, they trusted him with scissors. He did okay. He didn't hurt himself. That is a beautiful facility. Do you know that that uses the geothermal energy from the ground to heat and cool the facility? Can you believe that? Mr. Speaker, it takes the cold air out of the ground and cools the building in the summer and then again it heats the air in the wintertime, to keep the building heated. That's what they use out there.

Now, Mr. Speaker, I also have to give kudos to the Minister of Education because the Minister of Education came, and I do know that she had given money to the Marconi Campus to the NSCC. They're out there doing renovations to the community campus, making that a good place for our people of Cape Breton to get an education to better themselves and make life better for their families. So, minister, I would like to thank you for investing in the people of Cape Breton Island. Thank you. (Applause) Again, minister, you'll have well-educated people coming out of Cape Breton Island to run this province in the future. Thank you.

[9:45 p.m.]

Also I'd like to say, Mr. Speaker, as time is winding down, there's one thing I want to touch on. I want to talk about the announcement, that I had the honour to emcee in May with my colleague, the honourable Deputy Premier of Nova Scotia, to make the announcement of $15.2 million by the provincial government for the dredging of Sydney Harbour. Now if that does not say that the Premier, the Deputy Premier and this government is committed to the people of Cape Breton Island - they are not second-class citizens, they are first-class citizens and this government stepped up to the plate and did that. So I would say to the new Leader, when he steps into his place, to get on the phone and call his cousins in Ottawa and ask them for their share. (Applause)

Mr. Speaker, the first thing that the new Leader - I know the member for Cape Breton North traveled to Ottawa because I was with him. I was with him when he travelled to Ottawa and I was at the meeting with the Deputy Premier and the member for Cape Breton North, but you know what? That member is going on to bigger and better things, he has put

[Page 2798]

his name forward to run federally in the next federal election. Good luck to the honourable member for Cape Breton North. When the new Leader of the Progressive Conservative Party sets foot in this Legislature, the first thing is he should do is stand in his place and say, I called the Prime Minister of Canada and we're going to deliver the funding for the dredging of Sydney Harbour. (Applause) We are going to deliver that funding, that he, too, will think that the citizens of Cape Breton are first-class citizens. That's what he should do, Mr. Speaker.

We went in there, $15.2 million, 40 per cent of that project's cost covered by this government. So the municipality coughed up their money, the Province of Nova Scotia coughed up their money - where is the money from the federal government? When this new Leader steps into his place, the first thing he should do is show his commitment to the people of Cape Breton Island and say that he's made the call and he's going to come with the Prime Minister to Cape Breton and deliver that so we can go on.

You know what, Mr. Speaker? This is not about Party lines. The people of Cape Breton have spoken here. The people of Cape Breton Island have said that this project is the number one project that they want done on that island. Not too often in Cape Breton Island do you get a whole bunch of Cape Bretoners to agree on something. (Laughter) This is one thing that Cape Breton Island and the people of Cape Breton have agreed on, is the dredging of Sydney Harbour to move our economy forward. I say to the new Leader when he steps into his place, make the call, get the deal done so we can move forward to build the economy of Cape Breton Island, so we can sustain.

Mr. Speaker, the honourable member for Cape Breton North went to Ottawa. All I hear in Cape Breton is, he is coming? Who is coming? He's never been to Cape Breton, who are you talking about? The Prime Minister, he's never been to Cape Breton, he has never set foot on Cape Breton Island. So he can come down there, Mr. Speaker.

I'm just telling you, Mr. Speaker, I've been in public office for seven and a half years. They came to power four years ago - never publicly come to Cape Breton Island. Listen, once you come there, he'll realize how friendly the people are, he'll realize that we're good people. Come down, announce the dredging project so we on Cape Breton Island can go ahead for the future generations of Cape Breton Island, to build our economy to the once proud, historic community that we were.

You know that, Mr. Speaker, we produced one-third of the metal for World War II. The convoys that left from Sydney Harbour with the supplies to keep the army going, to keep the people of England going, that was once the beautiful Cape Breton Island that we know of - the beautiful Cape Breton Island that's still there today. Those people in that government up in Ottawa have to come down and announce that project so we can go forward with the project to make sure that we, the people of Cape Breton Island - we are always a very proud

[Page 2799]

people - stand in our place and are able to develop our own economy so we, and the next generation, my son who's 15, can stay at home.

Mr. Speaker, the thing that we do the most in Cape Breton Island is we export our expertise and our youth to other parts of this country. I have five nephews in Alberta - five nephews in Alberta. Two own their own business, one is a lawyer (Interruptions) well, you know, he has a condo here in Halifax, but he still lives out there. He graduated as the number-one student in Dalhousie Law School in 2007, and where is he? He's out making his money in Alberta. Where's his brother Darren? Out making his money in Alberta. Where's his brother Ryan, an electrician, and his brother, Darren, a diesel mechanic? Jay and Scott, you know, running their own business.

Mr. Speaker, I just think the people of Cape Breton Nova have made a good choice by electing this member to represent them in this Legislature to look after their health and safety, and this government and the Leader, Darrell Dexter, to bring this government back, to bring this place to be a better place for our families to live, to make life better for today's families. That's why the people of Nova Scotia, on June 9th, chose this government to be here. And do you know what? Sometimes we make tough decisions, but we make good decisions for the future of this province.

Mr. Speaker, I would now like to adjourn debate.

MR. SPEAKER: The honourable Government House Leader for tomorrow's business.

HON. FRANK CORBETT: Mr. Speaker, I'm not that smart, but I know when to quit.

The hours for the House tomorrow will be from 2:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. After the daily routine, we will be calling Bill No. 76, Bill No. 78, and Bill No. 79 and, time permitting, we will continue with the Address in Reply to the Speech from the Throne.

I move that we do now rise.

MR. SPEAKER: The motion is that the House do now rise to meet tomorrow at 2:00 p.m.

Is it agreed?

It is agreed.

Would all those in favour please say Aye. Contrary minded, Nay.

The motion is carried.

[Page 2800]

The House stands adjourned until tomorrow at 2:00 p.m.

[The House rose at 9:53 p.m.]

[Page 2801]

NOTICES OF MOTION UNDER RULE 32(3)

RESOLUTION NO. 1818

By: Ms. Kelly Regan (Bedford-Birch Cove)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas October marked Learning Disabilities Awareness Month in Canada; and

Whereas during this time, the Learning Disabilities Association of Nova Scotia, together with other LDAs across the country, hosted events and raised awareness about learning disabilities; and

Whereas LDANS offered a series of free workshops geared toward parents and professionals, including a workshop which discussed the best methods for helping children succeed within the school system and another which explained assistive technology;

Therefore be it resolved that the members of this Legislative Assembly recognize Learning Disabilities Awareness Month and the ongoing programs and services offered by the Learning Disabilities Association of Nova Scotia, which engage members and stakeholders and empower them with information about learning disabilities.

RESOLUTION NO. 1819

By: Hon. Sterling Belliveau (Fisheries and Aquaculture)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Island and Barrington Passage Fire Department Vehicle Extrication Team placed second overall at the Atlantic Regional Vehicle Extrication Competition on August 21, 2010; and

Whereas the Vehicle Extrication Team, including incident commander Walter Scott, medic Teresa Atkinson, and toolmen Dwayne Hunt, Morris Nickerson, Tyler Snow and Jordan Nickerson captured four awards for their performance, including best incident commander, the top safety award, second in unlimited pit, and second overall; and

Whereas the Island and Barrington Passage Fire Department's volunteer members continue to hone their firefighting and vehicle extrication skills through participating in various courses and competitions;

[Page 2802]

Therefore be it resolved that this House of Assembly congratulate the Island and Barrington Passage Fire Department Vehicle Extrication Team for placing second overall at the Atlantic Regional Vehicle Extrication Competition on August 21, 2010.

RESOLUTION NO. 1820

By: Mr. Brian Skabar (Cumberland North)

I hereby give notice that on a future day I shall move the adoption of the following resolution:

Whereas the Movember movement challenges men across the world to change their appearance and the face of men's health by growing a moustache for the entire month of November; and

Whereas the movement raises funds for Prostate Cancer Canada, enabling them to fund vital research that will lead to better screening tests and treatment options and to run support services for men surviving prostate cancer; and

Whereas the success of Movember can be directly attributed to more than 627,000 people who have supported the cause since 2003 with their different variations of moustaches;

Therefore be it resolved that I challenge Steve Ferguson, Rob LeBlanc, Darrell Cole, and members of the House of Assembly to join me in participating in Movember, an important and valuable international campaign for prostate cancer occurring throughout the month of November.